Formula's New 35 - First Look

May 3, 2016 at 12:49
by Paul Aston  
Formula 35 fork 2017


Among mountain bikers, Formula are well known for their brakes, but less so for their suspension. The 35 has been around for three years, but has remained a rare beast with little public exposure. Why would a brake manufacturer start making a fork? Well, the brand has been building motocross and moto trial suspension for years, so why not take that technology and experience and shrink the package into something suitable for modern day enduro racers? The brand has re-invented both the 35 and its image for 2016, and added some new employees and products. A quick ride at the Riva Del Garda Bike Festival showed that they're on the right track.


Details:
• Intended use: Enduro performance
• Travel: 29" 100-140mm / 150-160mm
27.5" 100-160mm / 170-180mm
• 35mm Stanchions
• Integrated Locking System
• Compression Tuning System
• Offset: 44mm or 51mm
• Axle: 15QR axle with Integrated Locking System
• Colors: matte black, matte white, Ultraviolet
• Weight: 1790 -1860 grams (claimed)
• Price: €988 - €1040 ($1120 - $1280 USD)
• Contact: Formula
Formula 35 fork 2017


Chassis

Formula have chosen a 35mm stanchion for their forks, the same as a RockShox Pike and nestled in between Fox's 34 and 36 forks. 27.5" and 29" options are available with a standard 15mm x 100mm hub, though a boost version will be an option later this year. There is a choice of two offsets, 44mm and 51mm for either wheelsize. Weight wise, the claimed 1790 grams suggest it is one of, if not the lightest enduro racing capable fork on the market. Breaking tradition, Formula will offer its premier enduro fork in a number of colours: "ultraviolet," matte black, and white - with a range of decal options in matching tones.

Formula 35 fork 2017
Formula's beautifully machined low-speed damping controls.
Formula 35 fork 2017
Two offsets are available: 44 or 51mm, and axles are 15mm.

Formula 35 fork 2017
A small amount of flex is built into the chassis for handling reasons.
Formula 35 fork 2017
Tire clearance is allready ample, and a Boost version is in the works.

The 35's designers focused on not making the fork overly stiff, as they believe that some flex is needed for traction. A taper in the right stanchion locks the axle there and the disc brake side is fixed with a threaded, 4mm Allen key or Formula's ILS lever. To avoid internal friction due to chassis flex, Formula devised a unique cartridge design. More about that later.

Formula's 'Integrated Locking System' lever is simply a means to tighten an internal 4mm Allen hex. The lever assembly can be removed, or left in place when riding and it can also be used as an emergency Allen wrench elsewhere on the bike. Watch the following video for a detailed description:

Views: 11,624    Faves: 4    Comments: 1


Internals

The 35's internals see a complete redesign for 2017, with a wide range of external adjustments. The air cartridge uses a coil-spring bottom out bumper, and instead of using plastic tokens to reduce air volume, Formula adjusts the oil level with a range between 5cc and 30cc. Compared to a Fox Float 36, for example, that works out to four tokens. The advantage of using oil for this purpose is that the range is not indexed by the size of token so finer adjustments can be made. Weight is the same, as plastic is basically oil in a different form.

Formula 35 fork 2017
The 35's air-spring piston (top) is moderated by a dual-rate coil spring to keep the fork supple in its initial stroke. The damper cartridge is below it.

Compression Tuning System: To ensure that customers can attain the perfect tune, the 35 features three pre-valved compression modules called the 'Compression Tuning System.' These small valve heads can be switched within a few minutes with an Allen key. Blue flexible prongs prevent over-tightening by bending before the ham-fisted among us can cause any real damage. The three valve heads change the compression rate from soft to firm (grey - blue - red).

On top of this, low-speed compression can be changed using the gold lever on the right fork crown, which has 13 clicks of adjustment, from open to completely locked out. An optional remote lever can be had (€62), which allows the rider to choose any of the 13 indexed compression settings on the fly. It does this by rotating the entire hose, which operates the compression dial like a vintage speedometer cable. Formula’s lever allows fine tuning of ride height damping when needed, while most handlebar remote levers only provide two or three adjustment options.

Formula 35 fork 2017
Three pre-tuned high-speed compression modules can be switched out in minutes without bleeding the cartridge.

To keep the fork compliant during lateral loading, Formula created 'Internal Floating Technology.' On the spring side, this means the air cartridge is structurally merged with the lowers and uses a ball joint head on top of the bottom out springs. On the damping side, the cartridge is designed to move smoothly even when bent under load, Formula say "this, more than stanchion coatings decreases the overall friction of the fork allowing for more travel usage and greater tuning for better trail control.'

Formula 35 fork 2017
The air-spring piston and the cartridge's glide rings swivel on their mounts so they will not bind as the fork flexes.


Impressions

I managed a quick ride on the fork in Riva Del Garda, certainly not long enough to give a solid impression but two things did stand out: With their standard, out of the box settings, the 35 offers more support than its competition combined with a suppleness and sensitivity I've yet to find elsewhere - at least without some heavy tweaking. Formula's asking price isn't extortionate, considering its performance and build quality, but I would like to see the CTS kit included for $1280 USD, rather than having to buy the kit separately. That goes for all manufacturers too: if you have tuning options I want to find them in the box when I open it.

There is a Formula 35 in the post coming for long-term testing and I can't wait to see what the fork has in store when settings are dialed into my liking. But, for now, here's a video edit of the new 35 in action:

Views: 13,846    Faves: 20    Comments: 2






211 Comments

  • + 154
 Looks really good. More options to choose from is always good. Now what we want is a fork shoot out, formula 35, dvo diamond, pike, 36, deville
  • + 81
 You would have to include the MRP Stage. It always has good reviews. I would be interested in how they all stack up for sure though!
  • - 58
flag Jimmy0 (May 4, 2016 at 23:08) (Below Threshold)
 the hell is a deville?
  • + 20
 @Jimmy0: bos
  • + 87
 Öhlins, Durolux and X-Fusion.
  • + 83
 ...and a manitou mattoc
  • + 1
 And the Durolux
  • + 15
 And a lyrik!
  • + 15
 and a Pike with AWK, MST Tuning and Racing Bros ZeroFriction , would love to see a highly tuned Pike compare to other stock options...
  • + 18
 @bascopeach: Don't forget an Avalanched Pike.
  • + 17
 Its difficult to keep track of all the awesome new forks that are now available.Its hard to make a bad choice now! Thats awsome.

I guess 95% of the time, the real world answer to the question 'what fork?' will still be Pike.
  • + 52
 And my axe!
  • + 5
 Laufer
  • + 6
 THIS!, and dont forget the Mattoc and the 350 too !
  • + 37
 "Weight is the same, as plastic is basically oil in a different form.".. my head exploded
  • + 8
 @panaphonic: @bascopeach: Don't forget any fork with a CRConception All-in-one cartridge
  • + 7
 You have my sword.
  • + 25
 Pinkpike
  • - 1
 And you have my bow.
  • + 12
 One doesnot simply walk into Mordor, whoopie doo, can I mention Lefty now?
  • + 13
 @bascopeach: No one is going to test tuned versions of forks in a comparo. Put down the crack pipes fellas!
  • + 7
 ...And Revel and Lefty! Inverted shocks matter!
  • + 1
 @hamncheez: have you got a leftist revelation?
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Yes. after all our conversations on pinkbike you have converted me to the left! So when do we overthrow the establishment two-sided forks?
  • + 1
 @hamncheez: first we need to deal with Republicans and their stinky coils!
  • + 8
 @WAKIdesigns: Good luck, my RC3 EVO TI is goin nowhere! Coils forever!
  • + 8
 Formula 35, DVO diamond, Pike, 36, Deville, Öhlins, Durolux and X-Fusion, Manitou, Lyric, Marz 350.

Full list for testing purposes. As attributed by pinkbike members above.
  • + 3
 @Davschall: i like your style, got evo's on 3 of my bikes.
  • + 2
 I hace CCDB Coil CS on my new bike. We are bigots, let us take off our trousers and kiss.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Only in secret though!
  • + 1
 @Lagr1980: yeah loved that line
  • + 3
 @iamamodel: This, this gets all the likes.
  • + 44
 Quote: "A small amount of flex is built into the chassis for handling reasons"

Sounds like this discussion:

Design engineer - 'Oh crap it's a bit flexier that anticipated'
Marketing guy - 'No wait, that's a feature!! Let's advertise it'
  • + 19
 motorcycle racing chassis builders do something similar. when the bike is leaned over far enough there's a point where the suspension is not able to do its job effectively. certain amounts of flex are designed into the chassis to account for that. "stiff as shit" is not always the best way.
  • + 4
 @Sweatypants: it's never the best way. But we are still traumatized by carbon fibre marketing hitting us since 2009, where we got brainwashed with stiffness to weight ratio. 36 is already too stiff for my likes while 40 is absolutely horrible.
  • + 3
 @Sweatypants: yeah I mean the big problem isn't really flex IMO, it's that flex usually causes the fork to bind up. If the design allows it to stay smooth while flexing a bit I think any decent rider will adjust to it pretty quickly.
  • + 11
 The difference is with motorcycles, that flex is designed into the chassis (frame) of the bike instead of the suspension components. Tuned flex has been around in motorcycle road racing for decades because they lean over so far that the vertically compliant suspension is ineffective when the bump forces are arriving at 60 degree angles to the bike. This level of engineering probably wont become mainstream in the mountain bike world because there are simply too many variables to try to account for. I do agree that some flex is needed but the cold hard truth is that most riders cannot ride their equipment at the level where this flex is detectable, let alone that they would know what type of flex and how much of it would make them faster. Frankly I am kind of disappointed that most fork manufacturers are still on the bushing bandwagon and haven't transitioned to needle bearings a-la Lefty. Bushing bind is a much bigger issue than torsional or lateral flex is. I found that out on my first ride on a Lefty.
  • + 3
 @Saiyan66: the whole thing woyld be better if forks looked inside like Reverb. Sliding surface in the outers. One bushing on the outer leg, one onthe inner. In this way bushing overlap increases with travel
  • + 1
 Yep...that is correct !
  • + 0
 @Saiyan66: You aren't the only one wondering about this... another example of manufacturers approaching the same problem with different versions of the "accepted" technology rather than actually solving it. Forks, in their current form, are poor engineering. The oil circuit components take up the least amount of space inside the tubes, with the springs taking up the most- but springs (whether air or coil) can be made to the same compression qualities at different diameters, with the stroke being the important factor. So using bushings is a choice, not a necessity. Try putting the slightest bit of flex in a toilet paper holder (the springy tube) and see if it will slide... basically a miniature version of the inherent flaw in current fork design. And we are paying big $$ to be forced to use it. The lefty is brilliant as far as limiting stiction while flexing- this "ball-joint" piston is simply admitting the problem and putting a Band-Aid on it.
  • + 4
 @skidrumr: current forks look the way they look due to weigh to stiffness/durability ratio. It is the lightest design solution - period. Call it poor engineering but you won't sell anything else to people who judge the bike by the number on the scale, and they are in vast majority and steer the industry. I just built a sweet bike and I am meant to be ambassadeur to the brand.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/13457153

I am extremely sceptical of posting weight under the article from the build. 14.1kg for Enduro bike where frame costs 3000€. I assure you people will whine on the weight. "6k bike over 30lbs?!", "weight, not impressive" will fly from all directions. Key weight addition include Coil shock, Spec GRID tyres instead of svelte Control versions and XT cassette (because it is 300$ cheaper than XX1 + XD driver. Can you imagine that I did not put carbon crankset on? I bought Hope, even though it costed as much as RF SiXC. No carbon rims either, by choice, not by wallet, because I fkng hate how stiff they are and how much they cost, offering no durability increase. Am I nuts?! Post a pic of DH bike weighing 12,5kg on your FB feed and almost no one will notice Rocket Rons.

Sorry mate, for majority of people, the kitchen scale is more relevant quality and performance measuring tool than the clock. The one and only single component that got excuse from that is dropper post. I don't agree with it, but I am not going to stop the rain from falling.
  • + 2
 @skidrumr: gotta agree with Waki on this one. The Lefty is a great piece of engineering, but it's only weight competitive because of its one-sided design, and that comes with some legitimate tradeoffs in cost, simplicity, and serviceability (keyways, bearings, special hub, etc). Add to that the perception of single leg and cantilevered hub looking weird aesthetically and the standard mtb fork with bushings becomes the optimal solution for most people (and mfrs).

Not sure what point you're making about the stanchion diameters. Yeah, you could package the air spring and oil circuit into much smaller spaces with same performance, but you still need to make the assembly stiff to make it ride well. It's not like the lefty is using much smaller stanchion diameters than other forks.
  • + 1
 @bkm303: Just saying if the stanchion were, say, a smaller diameter with a thicker wall, you would have room for linear bearings in the fork lowers rather than bushings. And friction would be reduced much better than any coating... wouldn't it be nice to service a set of linear bearings every few years instead of rebuilding your forks every few rides? It's funny there is so much emphasis on links & brackets to keep a much-shorter shock perfectly aligned so it can do it's job, but 8" of what is basically an unguided strut up front, where there are extra twisting forces introduced as well- and that is the norm. There is so much consternation about weight that makes no sense, are we all on the clock? My "way too heavy" wheels have run true forever no matter what I do to them, shaking my head as I roll by the taco'd weight weenie wheels being carried down the hill. I'll take consistent over faster any day.
  • + 1
 @skidrumr: haha amen. the first custom wheelset i had built when i got more serious with MTB were light. alloy nipples broke a bunch, rims were like wet noodles, CK hubs were all finicky. that was all it took for me to never chase weight there again. EX471 or DH rims on anything else, brass nipples, Hope hubs... never a single problem or wheel truing since on any of the wheelsets i've had built. my latest trade up from a HT ti 29er to a Meta AM 29er and a Pike saw my trail bike build go from 24.5lbs. to 31lbs., and its definitely noticeable going up hill... but at the end of the day, the Meta probably isn't going to crack its seat stays off at the welds and then take 2.5 months to warranty it. i'll make the sacrifice.
  • + 1
 @skidrumr: I get what you're saying now. The roller bearings could be done, but I still think it would add a lot of cost compared to what people are used to seeing. You'd need flats on the stanchions for the rollers to roll on, which becomes another assembly tolerance because the flats will need to be oriented properly. I think lefty is really the best way to make rollers work.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I think the thing that really gets to me is that we have been barking up the same design philosophy tree for decades now with mountain bikes. If the industry (or even just a little bit of it) had accepted the square tube/needle bearing approach as superior to the round tube/bushing design years ago, then who knows where we could be now. With enough time and R&D $$$ thrown into the process I know for a fact that the packaging (weight, cost, etc.) would improve dramatically. It seems as if we creep along in our "improvements" and ignore the major leaps in ideas because they are unusual. The same thing happened in the motorcycle world. Erik Buell had tons of awesome ideas early on and people looked at them like some kind of circus side show. Now most of the industry has adopted his design philosophies in some way or another. The MTB world needs to leapfrog on ideas like that and not just revamp the status quo for a 2% improvement in performance.
  • + 1
 @Saiyan66: you can't be serious, std fork is a very minimalist approach, round tubes and bushings weigh less than rails in Lefty, everything else is the same. By using Lefty rails and rollers you are inevitably adding weight. Kitchen scale is the exact reason why USD forks haven't took off until now, that is when market is so saturated that wacky ideas come out, like Fatbikes and plus tyres. Function over weight and efficiency. A chance for gearbox development, DH bikes first. USD forks must compensate in steerer-crown-stanchion department to cover up for the lack of bracing in form of the arch. UST did not pick up in recent years because of functionality of the original system, it picked up because ZTR offered rims that weighed less than full on USTs, were cheaper, and then tyre makers developed Tubeless Ready tyres which were up to 200g lighter (per tyre) than their proprietary UST versions. Otherwise UST would still be a domain of "weirdos" on expensive Mavics with weird colors.

Your argument makes perfect sense, but only if accounting were no object. It's a game of lighter, stiffer, better rolling, confidence inspiring.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I'm just saying that if we had (as an industry) adopted these designs as mainstream years ago, who knows where we could be today. By the way, your idea of making a fork like the dropper post has been done. Dan Hanebrink designed and manufactured forks like that back in the early 90's. They weren't ideal, but they were unique to be sure.
  • + 1
 @Saiyan66: Needles bearings can be used inside the Lefty because it's an USD dual crown fork. You need that to fit the length of the system (you need at least 12" of length for 6" of travel, as the bearings need space to roll).
Actually, for single crown forks, actual designs aren't that bad.
Like @WAKIdesigns said, a doable improvement woould be two bushings on separate parts, like a shiver SC, a dropper,... But the cast lowers would be really hard to make
Inverted forks are only an improvement for dual crown forks, as there is room for needles bearings, or big bushing overlap.
  • + 1
 By the time of release date all the bugs transform to features-)
  • + 48
 Floating air piston head is genius!
  • + 6
 Don't some of x-fusions forks have the same head on there air springs? pretty sure the metric has it, not sure about others.
  • + 4
 @orangenut: Metric has it along with foam ring under the pistons seal!
  • + 1
 @brigand: Issue with the 36 solved! Cool work guys.
  • + 1
 Floating air pistons are super common, and the only way to be. The Pike, and Diamond also have their own variation of these "floating" pistons. The smooth forks always take chassis deflection in to account.
  • + 45
 I could totally see myself crashing and breaking that little switch and raging on the side of the trail.
  • + 13
 That was my first thought. It seems too exposed. There's a reason most suspension knobs are flat and flush. Nonetheless, a new fork is always a good thing.
  • - 31
flag viatch (May 4, 2016 at 22:11) (Below Threshold)
 so its marzocchi crown, rockshox stanctions and blackout scheme and a fox lowers. They really did do their research
  • + 4
 Does it look good? Yes.
Would I buy one? No.
  • + 1
 Cool feature....another stuff to maintain
  • + 16
 they forgot to design the brake mount proprietary to their brakes only
  • + 39
 I've crashed plenty on mine, no worries in 18 months so far.
  • + 33
 When was the last time you damaged your top caps or crowns on a crash?
  • + 1
 Yoiu read my mind
  • + 2
 @bigburd: A few months ago, busted the pedal setting knob and the mechanism its attached to on my pike. Raged hard, but then realised I never use it on the fork anyway
  • + 1
 @chyu: Its okay, they remembered to make proprietary interfaces so you have to buy custom tools when you need to disassemble the legs and replace the seals instead.
  • + 5
 @viatch: technically marzocchi was using the black coating way way way before rockshox bud
  • + 32
 "Weight is the same, as plastic is basically oil in a different form." MIND. BLOWN.
  • + 0
 Sarcasm, FTW!
  • + 6
 Well it's complete bollocks. The Fox 36 uses hollow plastic volume spacers which are far lighter than an eqivalent volume of oil. That quote is great marketing BS but total rubbish.
  • + 31
 Did I just watch a Kickstarter video?
  • + 6
 "With your funding we can begin the tooling process to start the machining of many complex parts. Forks should start shipping by late 2016...."
  • + 5
 @chezotron: 2018: With all the feature creep there were many delays. We finally just bought AutoCAD and are ready to go into pre-pre -production!
  • + 4
 @Davschall: late 2018: We are hoping to find some new students as our full time jobs are taking away our resources. Applicants welcome so that we can get the design process started. BIG thank you to our supporters for being so patient. (not that any of us have dealt with this before)
  • + 29
 Why don't you look at me Jake?! Do you not find me attractive anymore?
  • + 19
 It would be nice to see a 20mm axle if they are offering it in 180mm travel, otherwise i like it a lot
  • + 14
 "Formula have chosen 35mm stanchions, nestled between Fox's 34 and 36 forks"
Thanks for that. :-)
  • + 10
 I enjoy new suspension technology as anyone else, but I have my doubts. It may just be where I am located but its never fun telling a customer I cant get a replacement part or it may be six months before I get it. This is one reason why certain brands dominate the market.
  • + 22
 The 35 is the most reliable fork I have ever bolted onto the front of a bicycle.
  • + 10
 @mattwragg: Damn, that's a bold ass statement! Thanks for the input!
  • + 17
 @therealtylerdurden I ran mine from November '14 to Feb '16 with zero maintenance, and I ride a lot.
  • + 4
 If liteville specs them, they should be ok ...
  • + 2
 @mattwragg: But how similar is this new redesign from the one you've been riding?
  • + 1
 @therealtylerdurden: what he said
  • + 10
 "...but I would like to see the CTS kit included for $1280 USD, rather than having to buy the kit separately. That goes for all manufacturers too: if you have tuning options I want to find them in the box when I open it. "

Well put, but are the suspension companies going to listen?
  • + 8
 I like Formula, I know a lot of people dont care for their brakes but i loved mine. Its nice to see them pushing the industry. Even if none of us buy this fork its only going to force the forks from the companies we like to get better.
  • + 11
 Them's some smart folks over at Formula..
  • + 6
 Good for Formula! Now, let's Pinkbike and NSMB.com review for function. In anycase, love to see the competitive capitalism market improve suspension for our beloved mountain bikes and trails. May the best win! Hard work to succeed over Fox and Rockshox, but go get em!
  • + 11
 The magic of Competitive market is that it shines so bright that you can't see it favors monopolists Wink
  • + 9
 Spent 35,000 hours on the fork design. Spent 35 minutes on the sticker design.
  • + 3
 You found out their secret Formula.....
  • + 7
 Hey it's better than SRAM and FOX who do exactly the opposite.
  • + 8
 35mm, black stanchions and made in italy ? Looks like a old good marzocchi ! Big Grin
  • + 8
 They didn't fix the most important part: THE PRICE
  • + 28
 Yeah, only suitable for medical practitioners, lawyers, people who own expensive things and other rich people I'm an apprentice, I've already replaced my rear shock with a bottle of Mountain Dew
  • - 37
flag scary1 (May 4, 2016 at 22:17) (Below Threshold)
 @Waldon83: maybe find a new sport,crybaby. This one requires money..and less bitching.
  • + 15
 @scary1: when you've got the bug there's no going back... You can sell your organs for spares but once you've run out of those what can you do... Waldon here has the right idea, replace shock with mountain dew and fill your fork inners with twinkies and you've saved yourself $1000.
  • + 1
 @Ozziefish: whats a Twinkie?
  • + 48
 @browner: I believe its an American sponge cake thing... Similar in texture to a Victoria sponge but with a more linear spring rate.
  • + 14
 Midstroke support is a fucking joke, though. I'm gonna try a croissant later this season when I have the money.
  • + 6
 @scary1: hahahaha, mate, you're a massive tosser.
  • + 4
 @therealtylerdurden: I found that fruit cake has the best over all support especially for jumping. Also since nobody likes it. It can be found really cheap if not free sometimes.
  • + 3
 My Twinkies didn't offer enough support, so I sent them out for tuning. They came back deep fried and dipped in chocolate, and with an insulin pump. Now they're perfect.
  • - 7
flag scary1 (May 5, 2016 at 12:17) (Below Threshold)
 @Waldon83: so glad im outta this sport. Its just a buncha f*cking socialist, stoner, bitches
  • + 3
 @scary1: No it ain't, you've got a vetetan in this thread, in addition to at least one gun owner. Seems to me that, politically, there's a more rounded mix of us than there are in other cycling disciplines, which tend to lean much more to the left as a whole. While I agree that there needs to be less bitching and more discipline in society in general, telling mountain bikers to man up and accept expensive bikes and parts will just never, ever go well.
  • + 3
 Well this went south quick. lol @scary1 interesting you say you are outta this sport. Yet make a comment like you did above. Seems you may not be as outta of this sport as you say. Also please if you are going to accusations about our political views, social behavior and general attitude. At least do it with some class... lol No where did I leave my liberal tears gun oil....
  • + 5
 @scary1: you don't even ride, you can't spell, and you're on a website made for something you don't enjoy because of other people.
Crawl back up your own ass mate, you're looking like a tool in front of everyone
  • - 2
 @USMC: i just check in on the new tech,which i find interesting, and watch the dh races. Ive been at this sport since 1995 and am just winding out of it. I do get tired of the spoiled "gimme " crap thats constant in this sport. Its never changed since ive been doing it,yet company after company put their asses on the line to bring innovation and huge leaps in products in the hopes of making domething of value to a bunch of ungrateful, critical,know nothings.
Its nice to look at it from the outside now, and see what looks like.
Im glad to run a company that dosent have to put up with this kinda shit.
I havent used "class" up to this point. I probably wont start,now
  • + 3
 @scary1: Been in this sport a hair longer than you. Surprises me that you can say the sport is full of people with a gimme attitude based a simple comment of the price of this fork. Its a fair argument considering other fork MFG's even ones with less pull that FOX and RS can list so lower. Even a Diamond comes in at a lower price point than this. Its funny you say ungrateful, critical , and know nothings without knowing the actual person or people you make these comments about. I will admit I have meet my share of know nothings, If I am paying top dollar for anything you can bet I am going to be critical of it. Never really meet anyone ungrateful so not sure how to argue that. Being critical of a product is how innovation happens. Feed back from ungrateful mtb'ers is how companies react and make changes. If they didn't we would all still be rockin' v brakes or juicy 7's. Being critical is what makes our sport our sport. Being critical is what moved us form Elastomer shocks into shocks and forks that actually do something. While I will always love the old days for what they had been
. I am glad critical comments changed the industry to a point it is now.
  • + 4
 @Scary1: "I do get tired of the spoiled "gimme " crap thats constant in this sport."

That is in no way, shape or form exclusive to this sport. That mindset is encompassing the majority of the latest generation, and it's thanks in large part to the politically correct participation trophys and the obscene 'everyone's a special butterfly, and everyone's a winner' mentality.

It's society you hate, not the mountain bike scene.
  • - 2
 @therealtylerdurden: you may be right. But this is/was my little corner of it. Dosent make much sense for me to blow a gasket at Quiltedpotholders.com. does it?
  • - 3
 @therealtylerdurden: ...and i do hate the mtn bike scene ...at least the "extreme" end of it. Probably because i have zero interest in getting high or drunk.
  • + 3
 Fuck quiltedpotholders.com. Lol. Seems to me that your problem is solved quite simply- don't hang out with people who like to get fucked up. I've met plenty of cool riders that don't feel the need to imbibe. I don't really understand what all this anger is about, I don't think any of us get it. You outta go camping, solo, this weekend, and get some solitude to foster some introspection, and ask yourself what you're ACTUALLY mad about. It's not because a few mountain bikers wanna party. The anger that's festering in you is hella unhealthy, man. Fix that shit before you have an infarction!
  • - 1
 @therealtylerdurden: I was pretty descriptive about what the anger is about. And, I don't have time for solo camping to try and find my deeper self. I got shit to get done.
We can call this topic closed, I think
  • + 1
 We pretty well broke those reasons with logic though; they're mere generalizations from the actions of a few. I agree that this conversation is going nowhere, but in defense of taking some time for introspection, I'll leave you with this:

Success is not the key to happiness. Happiness is the key to success.
~Albert Schweitzer

All I gotta say is, angry, bitter, and not taking time for your own happiness is no way to go through life. Take care.
  • + 1
 And I don't smoke weed, and I have enough money to buy this fork, 52 times over. But I'm not going to live in a house built of forks. Call me a cry baby all you like, but I'm not shelling out any money for this fork, nor any fork as my pike works great. Good luck with life scary1, you've certainly got 99 problems, and these comments ain't one
  • + 5
 It looks very high quality, and the rider in the video absolutely rips on it (also the fork action looks great in the footage).
  • + 3
 Sure, it's always good to have options that you can choose from. The big question is when it comes to reliability and service; and to be honest that's mainly the reason that I have moved on to RS. Also, yes that knob is a bit exposed and that NS looks awesome!
  • + 3
 The 35 is the most reliable fork I have ever bolted onto the front of a bicycle.
  • + 1
 @mattwragg: thanks for that.
  • - 10
flag endurocat (May 5, 2016 at 7:30) (Below Threshold)
 @mattwragg: No offense Matt, but you can call a fork reliable after you have rode it at least 3 years. And "Summers only" doesn't really count.
  • + 7
 Damn, actually looks pretty good
  • + 7
 Whoever put that "35" sticker on needs to get their eyes checked!
  • + 5
 It's really sunny here and the weekend is looking good, I'm going to ride my bike.
  • + 5
 Could we please get it with a 20mm axle? I like my noodles to be al dente at least. Smile
  • + 5
 Looks good, but I already have my own floating ball technology.
  • + 3
 I couldn't concentrate on anything he was saying or the sick riding because of those rediculously long cables flopping around the bike.
  • + 1
 Things I don't like - complex gizmo on the crown that looks like dirt and or a crash will destroy it - and on an enduro bike, another handlebar control? Don't know about you guys, but when I am riding down a trail, the last thing I have time to do is flip some switch. Oh Crap! I left the fork locked out! now I'm flying down some rocky trail and I can't get the stupid fork to move.
  • + 2
 Classic subterfuge pricing: sell them aftermarket at a ridiculous price so when a customer sees one on a bike on the shop floor they think 'wow a pair of those on a $2,500 bike? Take my money!'
  • + 3
 The only thing we can be sure of by reading all this comments is that @mattwragg is very happy with his Formula 35 fork.

That's a good thing... right???

Beer
  • + 2
 You can buy a Push tuned Fox 34 or 36 for cheaper and their customer service is awesome. Why don't we see Push or Avalanche reviewed products? Especially considering they're the best of the best??
  • + 3
 Good products don't need advertissements.
  • + 1
 The bike they are using, the NS Snabb Enduro, is so far superior to all other frames, its like cheating. That bike would make ANY fork look good, hence not really the best comparison. But i still believe that this is a really nice fork! Id like to try one.
  • + 1
 I've tested one. was stiff enough. Pretty light and looks OK.
It was supple, almost too supple with no progression at all.
The closing mechanism of the axle was broken (although it was almost new).
it gave a hissing sound every time it compressed which got on my nerves
  • + 9
 It sounds like you didn't set yours up properly - you need to add oil to the air spring and it ramps up really nicely. And there is no closing mechanism on the axle, so I'm not sure what fork you were using.
  • + 1
 @mattwragg: well, since the demo fork came from Formula directly, I couldn't set it up s perfectly. Yes it was this fork I tested and the integrated Locking System of the 15QR axle was broken
  • + 6
 @mattwragg: You must have skipped the part where they showed the video of the "closing mechanism" on the axle in the article above. Wink
  • + 3
 There is no closing mechanism in the axle - it just threads into the fork, that's it, it's not like a Maxle where the axle expands on closure. The lever is essentially a fancy allen key. If it is compromised you can just pop it off and tighten the axle with an allen key (and save some weight if you want).
  • + 3
 @mattwragg: Yes, I see that... but clearly that's what he was referencing as the part which was broken, which was my point. Thanks for the explanation though, I appreciate it.
  • + 1
 I guess the old adage still applies: "Light, Strong, Cheap... pick two!" And you can add "Works as intended" as well as "Doesn't need to be serviced every 10 minutes", then decide where your needs are and pare down your choices.

I will spend more if it means the item works well and lasts, weight is down the list below cost. What good is counting grams if you can't afford the service it needs after every ride or can't even get the parts? The smart guys want to fix the problems without concern for making a buck, and the mainstream manufacturers just want on the next bandwagon full of cash no matter how short-lived or unnecessary. Buell was a good example, Ferrucio Lamborghini is another- tired of having to fix his Ferrari, he made a better car with his own tractor parts. Too bad the big boys swoop in and buy up the rights to the good stuff so they can squirrel it away to never be seen again. #Suspensionconspiracy
  • + 1
 "Intended Use: Enduro Performance"

NOT endure racing, or practice though, nor all mountain of any sort.

I am starting to get so mad when I look at new bike products, the bike industry is trying so hard to push people into small genres now. Why can't they just make a fork that has 150mm of travel and say "here, go use this fork to ride your bike."
  • + 4
 This seems like the elevensix of forks..
  • + 2
 Imagine the 2 paired together
  • + 2
 Insulting to PUSH, heheheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
  • + 3
 The engineers seem to be a solid job, while the graphic designers and marketers are doing a fucking terrible job.
  • + 2
 Nice. The air piston looks similar to ones I've seen in Xfusion forks. I do favor metal over plastic though, but that's just me.
  • + 4
 Formula should have bought Marzocchi, Formula Marzocchi
  • + 1
 Formarz? Marzoula?
  • + 1
 That DVO Diamond has been slaying it for me on rough trails. I'm all about smaller companies giving riders more options than just Fox and Rockshox.
  • + 1
 not sure why I would want to remove the QR handle....Just something else to forget at home, by the road or rattle off on the trail.
  • + 3
 I am very interested in this fork. Looks way promising.
  • + 2
 Geez, the guys gave his entire speech and no-one told him he was talking into the wrong camera. Great ideas though
  • + 2
 32mm forks... "Nah, mate, too flexy"
35mm forks... "Yeah, nah, mate, these are too stiff, mate"
Here come the 33.5mm forks!
  • + 1
 This thing looks pretty impressive and if the listed weights are correct this could be among the lightest forks on the market. But for the price this thing better be amazing.
  • + 2
 I had the previous version. Stiff enough, changing out the compression heads was great. Super supple.
  • + 2
 They see the market has room to make money so whamo 1200-1400 must make sense haha
  • + 1
 guys the violet version of this on the lilac roubion, sickest colour combo ever, and little pieces of purple hope parts.
  • + 1
 You're an exception, would have been more accurste to say that there's no point investing in a declining market base.
  • + 1
 FYI: The ILS (Integrated Locking System) has a 5mm allen key not 4mm as stated above.
  • + 1
 Are these available in the US market? I haven't seen them for sale anywhere.
  • + 1
 "Formula are well known for their brakes" because is the first thing you sell if they come in a stock bike Smile
  • + 1
 Good to see the Italian Suspension Craftsman have found a solid Company to apply there skills, Viva Italia !
  • + 1
 I'd buy it just because of the how it's made music used in the product release video
  • + 1
 price is still a huge consideration for a lot of riders looking for a great fork....
  • + 3
 Delicious
  • + 2
 So this fork has been reformulated?
  • + 3
 no 20mm yet?
  • + 1
 @pinkbikeaudience two L's for ample
  • + 0
 "Why would a brake manufacturer start making forks " ? .... the question on everyone's lips ...
  • + 1
 thank god there's a boost version coming. -said nobody ever
  • - 2
 The knobs are too exposed, parts will be horrifically expensive and they won't be reliable. All founded on years of experience with Formula brakes. Amazing when they work, expensive to fix and frustrating when they don't.
  • + 1
 Interesting, long term ? a decent test will bring out any gremlins...
  • + 1
 The new 35 looks like the old 35 from 2014 with different graphics.
  • + 1
 Wow, 180mm, almost FR-call
  • + 2
 Why won't he look at me?
  • + 1
 I guess they forgot to make 26?
  • + 1
 Where is the 26" brigade?
  • + 2
 Over in the next room commiserating with the 20mm brigade.
  • + 3
 I was riding my bike all day in the desert.
  • + 1
 Rough trail,crazy riding,beautiful fork!
  • + 0
 RX Brakes are wank, can the eyeties be trusted with forks??
  • + 0
 formula brakes ? never again! Big Grin
  • - 2
 As said in the beginning of the video, the product gives everything riders are looking for. EXCEPT the price. I'll buy when this will cost less than 500bucks
  • + 5
 Show me a top fork under 500€
  • + 0
 @bellamyk: the new one costs only 1100€
  • - 2
 @WAKIdesigns: i cant show you that. I was speaking the futur form. One day i hope all these top components will be more affordable
  • + 3
 @RedBurn: I hope not, there's little chance it mayhappen so I don't give it much thought. People own too much stupid sht already, stuff that is way too cheap. There's nothing universally meaningful in mountain biking. Stupid overcomplicated hobby, it should be expensive
  • + 3
 @RedBurn: give it five years and stuff this good will be 500 euro. We'll still want the stuff that costs 1200 and moan it's too expensive
  • - 1
 I thought formula was part of Marzocchi.
  • + 0
 Fox Van 36...ftw....
  • + 1
 Why doesn't anyone talk about coil forks especially when you're talking about friction reduction?

Problem: we are seeing a resurgence of coil shocks and absolutely no talk of coil forks. How can an air spring ever match the performance of a coil? Air suspension should be regulated to XC and endurance bikes.
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.068502
Mobile Version of Website