Green Oil: An Environmentally Friendly Chain Lube? - Review

Oct 9, 2017 at 9:24
by Paul Aston  
Green Oil Products



Green Oil is from the UK and does exactly what it says on the tin, it is 'green oil.' Where most lubricants and cleaners are petroleum based and use many different man-made chemicals for varying applications, Green Oil products are 100% plant-based and PTFE free. All the products are made in the UK, use recycled bottles, and are 100% biodegradable. There's lots of interesting information on www.green-oil.net

Green Oil Range
• Bike-specific range of cleaners and lubricants
• Recycled containers
• PTFE free
• Petrochemical free
• 100% biodegradable
• Made in the UK
• Price: £2.39–£9.99 / $3–$12.80 USD (approx.)






Green Oil Review
Green Oil Review
Green Oil is not quite good enough to drink, but it's not far off.



Is it really Green, or just a marketing exercise?

In this modern world (that we have done a good job of messing up so far) there are more and more brands who claim to be 'green,' 'natural,' 'eco,' or 'biodegradable,' often-times as a marketing exercise. After conversing with Simon Nash, the brand's creator, reading all of his website and watching his great videos, it seems that Green Oil do care and try to counter every negative possible outcome:

• All bottles are made from 100% recycled plastic - 'recycled' is the key word as it means the bottles are made from recycled material, recyclable only means it can be recycled, when in reality most of it ends up in the landfill.

• Green Oil refunds customers 20 pence in cash for every bottle returned for re-use. In some countries, this is standard practice for many glass and plastic bottles, but in Europe, there are few programs of this type.

• Supplying retailers with 5L trade packs (stored in a recycled crate made from pallets) to refill customers bottles and offer a 20p discount to re-fillers.

• Zero use of any petroleum or chemical products.

• Full recycling information is printed on every product

• All products are 100% biodegradable.*


* But, most of the other products I buy say "biodegradable" on the packet, what's the difference?

I'm not saying that all other products are not 100% biodegradable, but the following video from Green Oil shows a good example of how products only need to be 60% biodegradable to use the logo and wording:




Products and Performance

Green Oil were kind enough to send me a range of products including Wet Chain Lube and Dry Chain Wax, Ecogrease, GreenClean Bike Cleaner, Clean Chain Degreaser Jelly and an Eco Rag.


Green Oil - Review



The Clean Chain Degreaser Jelly is designed to be super sticky, like jelly, where many degreasers are a thin liquid that mostly runs off the product that needs cleaning. The Jelly does a good job of removing grime, can be diluted with one litre of water to become general bike cleaner and has a lovely, orangey scent. £4.99


Green Oil - Review



The Wet Chain Lube worked well for up to 50-70km of mountain biking in medium wet/dry conditions. The packaging suggests it should last up to 200km, but I think this would only be possible during a smooth road ride, not for the rigours of off-road riding. £6.99


Green Oil - Review
Green Oil On Tour is a 20ml bottle of wet-lube that can be re-filled to take on your rides.


Green Oil - Review



The Dry Chain Wax didn't seem to last a very long period on my downhill or eMTB, but would survive 20-30kms in dry conditions before needing a top up, it attracted virtually zero dirt and left the drivetrain clean ready for the next application. £7.99


Green Oil - Review


Probably Pinkbike's most boring product photo of all time. The Eco Rag is, well, it's made from chopped up jumpers that aren't deemed saleable from charity clothing collections. Performance is similar to any other rag or old t-shirt (my standard rag is an old towel) and can be washed. A greener option than throwaway paper towels. £4.99



Then I visited my Local Shop...

So the Green Oil website is firing all this propaganda at me about other brands being toxic, and I'm here thinking "it can't be that bad?" So I headed to the local bike shop, armed with my phone and grabbed some candid- shots of the products in the shop. Every single product had a warning label. This is not a name-and-shame exercise, simply an observation of other products and the warnings adhered to their products by law. Here's a selection of what I found:


Green Oil - Review
Green Oil - Review

Green Oil - Review
Green Oil - Review

The four products above all seem to suggest they are going contribute to one or more of the following: burning down your garage and melting your carbon frame into an unusable blob, make your lungs explode, and/or in the words of a famous Ozzy YouTube blogger, "Send your local fish to destination f***ed," as the winter wetness washes away your lube and works its way into your local fisheries. Hold on, don't some people want to eat those fish? Errr...

Green Oil - Review
Green Oil - Review

The product on the left contains PTFE, which is arguably a carcinogen. To use a bike spray involves spraying it onto your bike, and inevitably into the air, likely inside your garage or by a bike mechanic in an enclosed workshop. Some mechanics might use this kind of product every day. Make sure you are not planning on breathing at the same time, though, as you may die. "Arrggh, you bloody eco-warriors are always worried about dying, it's not that bad, I've died loads of times – ohhhh, you mean fatal death, err yeah that IS bad."


Green Oil - Review
Green Oil - Review
More death and fire...

Green Oil - Review
Green Oil - Review
Itchy skin, more burning and dead fish, it's almost a one-stop Piri-Piri BBQ in an aerosol can.


Every time you wash your bike or ride it in wet conditions, whatever you sprayed or applied to it is going to work its way into the planet. Some people don't care about sustainability in mountain biking, but for anybody who enjoys nature, it should be a consideration before there is nothing left to enjoy. If you don't care about the environment, you might consider caring about yourself.

After using the Green Oil products for months, it just makes me think "Why does the other stuff even exist?"




Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe performance of Green Oil products may not be any better compared to the wide range of bike-related fluids on the market, but, the peace of mind that everything you are inhaling, absorbing, or dripping into the environment is clean and chemical free, to me, outweighs any disadvantages. Paul Aston







138 Comments

  • 281 5
 People always talk about innovation in the bike industry in the form of evolving bikes and components, but I think this is real innovation and deserves to be a standard for mountain bikes. Long live the earth and good trails-
  • 92 1
 Mountain biking wouldn't be what it is without the beauty of nature, should all do our part to maintain it (and this is aimed at all the people who litter on trail as well)
  • 4 2
 @toad321:
I concur. +2
  • 9 2
 I think I've been using this stuff (the chain lubricant) for well over a decade. Even CRC used to sell it back then, for some reason they don't do that anymore. Unfortunately I haven't found an lbs in my country that refills the bottle for me. So that means that the PE bottle may be recycled but unfortunately (as GreenOil states) the PP lid and cap can't. I recommended to sell the lubricant in small bags that I can empty in the bottle (and the bags could be recycled). They're looking into it, maybe someday.
  • 8 1
 How we keep the ocean fill carbon scrap lubricated if you guys recycle all these bottles?
  • 4 4
 Fake Innovation/news:

WPL (Whistler Performance Lube)

wploils.com

They've been doing this for years now.
  • 1 0
 Also, for environmentally friendly tubeless sealant, the Velowurks guys have also been in the game for a while now. velowurks.com
  • 2 0
 @Hyakian: This product has also been out for years. Pinkbike has just gotten around to reviewing it.
  • 3 0
 @TucsonDon: PB is way too busy focusing on the stuff they don't like. Yes there have been e-bikes on Eurobike. There has also been the Portus Cycles Krowd Karl ED (krowdkarl.de) steel hardtail with fun angles (and the USD Intend forks) and a Pinion gearbox right when their Kickstarter crowdfunding was on. No mention. Even Olly Wilkins has been riding the Focus Vice which seems to be the ticket for anyone on a budget looking for a fun mid travel full susser. No mention. Dirt magazine is still my main source for the good stuff.
  • 3 14
flag otto99 (Oct 14, 2017 at 10:37) (Below Threshold)
 Gay
  • 4 5
 @vinay: you need to calm down.
  • 46 0
 I am an avid mountain biker and an engineering professor. My senior design group this semester is developing "Dr. J's Magic Green Tire Sealant." The goals are to use all green materials, perform better than Stan's, and cost less than Stan's (that one shouldn't be hard!!). If all goes well, it will be available in the Spring.
  • 1 0
 I like the sound of this!
  • 10 0
 If your students are successful I would love to see Pinkbike do an article on this! What better way to support meaningful innovation than to support the next generation of well-meaning bike-loving engineers?
  • 1 0
 Awesome! Can you tell us anything about what's in it?

I've been using a homebrewed sealant mix for a couple months now, it's pretty interesting what different blends people cook up, but a lot of them seem to work.
  • 2 0
 @bkm303: All you need to do is mix water, propylene glycol, ammonia, and latex together and you have Stans. You may need to mess around a bit with the ratios, but thats really it. Xanthan gum works too. All this stuff is pretty safe, just don't huff the ammonia.
  • 2 0
 @SlodownU: yeah I use 2:1:1 latex caulk, RV antifreeze, and slime (mainly for the little gritty bits in the slime), then mix well with a drill.

Works great for me. Just curious what "greener" substitutions might be made, really.
  • 25 1
 Hmmm. The main problem with judging if a product is really ecological - in my experience - is to take into account where and how it is produced, how far ingredients are shipped etc.

All of the chain lubes that I have used that claimed to be "green" needed to be reapplied much more frequently (and usually in larger quantities) than the not so eco- friendly stuff. So, a lot will depend on the production and transportation, to decide which product will be really be better for the environment in the long run.

That said, every effort to make our sport greener is a good thing.
  • 7 1
 You're guessing a global eco assessment, which is important indeed. And I'm not saying your reasoning and perspective is wrong. But in terms of toxicology, if you use sun-flower oil (just a stupid example) in 50x larger volumes than PTFE the impact of PTFE is certainly worse as it can't be metabolized and will accumulate organisms until the worse happen. And until we eat it.
  • 15 1
 @EnduroManiac: I am far from saying that it isn't a good idea to replace a PTFE based lube with green lube.

But, to use your "stupid" example, if some acres of rain forest are burned to the ground, in order to make room to plant more sunflowers, the overall effect of using sunflower oil might not be that good anymore.
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL: That would be biofuel then!
  • 4 0
 @FuzzyL: Once again, I'm not saying seeing the global picture is wrong - I even 100% agree. But in the article it mainly refers to direct harmfullness of the used product, which is something easier to assess. Finding out whether using a drop of made in europe PTFE is more harmfull than 2 drops of organic sun-flower from Australia for a Europe based user is a pretty tricky thing.
  • 10 2
 @EnduroManiac: You people all really need to get your facts straight, and stop believing the marketing hype. Shame on these companies for taking advantage of your/our good intentions by trying to shame us into buying their shit. PTFE is chemically inert. You don't have to wait for it to build up in organisms, because its otherwise known as Teflon, and you're cookware is coated with it. Half the machinery on this planet incorporates it, and by the way, if you wear it when you ride or ski. Goretex is is PTFE. Polytetrafluoroethylene.
  • 8 2
 @FuzzyL: Why would you want to replace PTFE? Its chemically inert, and isn't harmful. Its a solid, all the lubes that incorporate it have it in a suspension, the solvent then evaporates once you apply it. Nothing is "dripping" into the environment.
  • 2 0
 @SlodownU: yeah idk why you'd want to replace PTFE, although I do have a bottle of Pedro's Go Lube (some sort of vegetable oil I think) that's worked well for me. Then again, I'm not sure what liquid the PTFE beads are suspended in - usually seems like some kind of wax with a solvent.

But more to the point... notice anything in common between the terrible/dangerous products shown in this article? THEY'RE ALMOST ALL AEROSOL PRODUCTS - even if they don't use GHGs as propellants (NO2 has like 300x the GWP of CO2), I have to imagine it's much more energy/material intensive to produce those.

Not saying it's not cool that these guys are producing "green" cleaning products. I'm sure it's more benign than a lot of other stuff out there - but then again if you're really using aerosol degreasers and shit like that, you could easily go buy a couple reusable spray bottles and a gallon denatured alcohol. Works great as a cleaner/degreaser. That, a few nylon brushes, some rags, and a bucket of water have worked perfectly well for me.
  • 3 0
 @SlodownU: yeah, PTFE isn't the issue. PFOA used in the production of PTFE is, or at least is likely to be. While it isn't present in significant quantities in finished products it does persist in the environment, accumulates, and lasts a long time in the body. Massive amounts have been dumped in the environment and we all likely have low levels of it in our bodies. Increased presence of PFOA in people and the environment had been linked to an increased risk of cancer in a number of studies. So if you are going the PTFE route for lubricant it might be best to go with one that doesn't use PFOA in it's production, if you can figure that out. This shit is complicated and it would be nice to have some way of measuring the ham of using a product that doesn't take hours or more of research.
  • 4 0
 @pcmxa: The population does have low levels of PFOA in the blood, but not from dumping in the environment, more from the fact that Teflon has been in use since the 40's. Its being extensively studied because of this persistence. The link between PFOA and cancer is tenuous, and needs to be explored further. Most of the studies have focused on folks in plants, where exposure is higher. They use lower levels of it these days because the manufacturing process and chemistry has been improved. I'd say if you want to clean up the trails, how about we start by not leaving empty gel packs and energy bar wrappers all over the place? It would be nice to go on a ride and not have to pick up everyone else's shit.
  • 1 0
 @SlodownU: Most of the article deals with bio- degradability. In that context PTFE doesn't rank to well.
  • 2 0
 @FuzzyL: Yes, true, but everything is relative. We're talking about a miniscule amount of a harmless solid deposited on a chain, with even less ultimately leaving the chain. In a niche sport where most people neglect their chains. Not a very big impact, vs. say a Jeep going off-road and ripping the oil pan on a rock.
  • 2 0
 This problem with bike lube is quite similar to ski waxes. Most of them contain loads of fluorine, and all the snow melts down and we end up drinking it. This might even be a larger scale problem.
  • 4 0
 @SlowdownU: I know what PTFE is, I studied chemistry long enough for that. Sure I'm not concerned by a block of plastic. But it's not what we're talking about here, otherwise nothing would get out of your bottle except the solvent. We're talking about small particles that can't be metabolized (eg oxidized or broken down to smaller pieces) and therefore will accumulate in organisms. It's not a first case. There's been the example of "amiante" fibers, material appreciated for its... stability. Accumulating in worker's lungs, it caused serious and lethal disorders.
So how different would it be for, say, fishes?
Oh, it's only a small amount ? That's quite a simple way to ease your concious dude! The problem is: this small amount will only keep growing as it does not degrade. Got it? Why would we wait when it's already too late to look for an alternative ?
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL The stuff I've used from Whistler Performance Lubes performs better than any other chainlube I've used. It last at least as long as anything else, does an amazing job of not attracting dirt, and as a consequence seems to increase the life of my chains. In some cases you do seem to be able to get better performance and better environmental standards.

Only downside is that they don't do the refill or big container option that Green Oil do.
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL: Depends if they get the plants sustainably or nor. Looks like Green Oil do get their plants sustainably - no rainforest burnt luckily!
  • 1 0
 @SlodownU: According to the Green Oil website, PTFE makes a carcinogen when it's made. It can potentially break down into a carcinogen, and traces of a carcinogen remain mixed in PTFE after it's produced.

If somethings not biodegradable, that can't be good in any case right?
  • 19 0
 Squirt already offers BIO lubes and degreasers. The lube is wax-based and is performing extremely well.
  • 13 1
 Squirt is without a doubt the best lube avalible. It took me a while to find it but once discovered, it has revolutionised my bike care and maintenance. Chains and cassettes are lasting noticably longer and cleaning is no effort. Takes a bit of prep to get the initial greese off new kit but after that, just reapply a small amount every few rides and voila. No greesy dirty drivetrains. Chains and cassettes that stay silver. Amazing stuff. Use it on both my road and mountain bikes as well as the kids bikes so they dont get oil all over their clothes.
  • 4 1
 @ilovedust: yep agreed, i've just bought my third bottle, it works very well
  • 3 0
 hard to beat Squirt - but I suppose I'd try this stuff...
  • 2 0
 @ilovedust: Squirt is really good!
  • 10 1
 Cool! This should offset the flights and drives we take to dick around in the woods. Now I can sleep easy! ....let's face it, we are part of the problem, and I'm not talking about chain lube.
  • 11 2
 *Puts a few drops of eco-friendly lube on chain*

*Drives car to trailhead*

*facepalm*
  • 7 2
 It's a start.
  • 2 1
 Hope your joking. If your car is in good shape it shouldn't be dripping shit on the ground. Or do you leak oil and drive on the bike trails? It's definitely small scale but a lot of the places I ride are little oasis of nature where 100's of riders/trail users a day over the course of year dripping lubes or throwing gum wrappers would f*ck shit up.
  • 7 0
 @drunknride: I don't see many drops of oil on the trail from lube, but air pollution kills 5,000,000+ people per year worldwide, auto accidents kill 33,000 Americans every year, and locally almost every single wildfire in my area (and most others) have been started by cars. Point is, driving a car is pretty much the most environmentally destructive thing any of us do and by far, so it's just really ironic for someone to put eco-friendly lube on their chain and then put the ol' MTB on the back of a car. The way most people carry out their mountain bike habits is *extremely* destructive to the environment and chain lube isn't even close to the biggest reason for that.

I don't like trash any more than other people, but fact is that most trash is limited to the trail corridor which is a very small % of nature, and mostly just matters to the people using the trail rather than the local environment as a whole. Air pollution and fires is a much bigger deal as far as the whole of nature is concerned.
  • 2 0
 @north-shore-bike-shop: This comment sums it up perfectly, we're all focusing on the negative aspects rather than the positives. Yes we all make a much bigger impact with transportation etc. but then so does every other product. Every journey begins with the first step, this to me seems like a good one to take.
  • 5 0
 Love this! We already have a brand doing this in Canada. It's called WPL and we have been using and recommending their products almost exclusively for two years now. It would be great to see the entire bike industry (including OEM greases and oils) go this way as a new standard.
  • 7 3
 I work in chemicals Those are EU labelling, law labelling Whitout hazardus ingredients... the product simply don't work You cannot put olive oil in a engine... so you cannot put body cream on a chain... This green labelling like bio.. vegan... is just another big business... Put green oil on a chain chinese producted that travel on a big ship for 100000km aroud the globe...
  • 6 0
 I put body cream in ...places and works gracefully!! I guess - because of profession - you support Vaseline.
  • 5 1
 Hey Pinkbike.

As a Canadian website can you support a Canadian company who's been manufacturing environmently friendly lubricants for at least a couple of years before featuring a foreign product?

Whistler Performance Lubricants.
wploils.com

Give the local boys some love!
  • 1 0
 Good stuff, the Fork Boost product is awesome BTW.
  • 2 0
 @Hyakian: I've been using the Fork Boost, Chain Boost, and the Shock Boost for the past year with no problems. The chain lube is thick and your der pulleys way get gunked, but its easy to clean off.
  • 5 0
 I use Ecover washing up liquid to clean my bike already. Might just start using a knob of butter on my chain and jobs a good'un!
  • 8 0
 I use water to clean my bike
  • 2 0
 @emptybox: me too, I need the eco cleaner for me.
  • 6 0
 I use riding to clean my bike
  • 1 0
 @VtVolk: this is the best response ever!
  • 1 0
 I'm just picturing Kramer with the tukery body... "Hey, Buddy.."
  • 3 0
 Been using two different grades of Lanolin instead of oil on my bike for over a year now. Lasts well, has good penetrating properties yet can be polished to not attract dirt. I use it for all the bearings, hubs, fork and moving parts of my water jump bike. It's great for your skin too. Does smell like a sheep truck on first application.
  • 3 0
 it kind of cynical to state this eco stuff is BS since it is transportated fom far away, or we still drive to the riding spots, or this or that. The difference is that when this lubes fall off your chain, either riding or washing it, they won't poison with petroleum derivates and TPFE the soil or the streams they will finish at.
  • 1 0
 same applies to ski wax, we have safer stuff than fluorides now.
  • 2 0
 its beyond cynical, it's stupid. welp, the product gets trucked across country, I'll just use waste motor oil instead!
  • 3 0
 Bio lubes are nice but if you want performance and proper long lasting lubrication then go further, there is nothing to do here... Also if lube is biodegradable, then it starts to degrade as soon as you put it on your chain or elsewhere, and much faster what explains fast wear.
  • 3 0
 I've never seen or used a green product that came close to comparing to a high quality synthetic product as far as performance and durability go. Using a more durable less green product means I won't replace my drive train as much and I will therefore be helping not only my wallet but the environment as the drive train parts also have a high carbon foot print via the manufacturing process. The new drive trains with 11 and 12 speed cassettes are super sensitive to wear if not properly maintained. Best oil I've used for durability in this regard is the MOTOREX City lube. I can literally make my 11 ans 12 speed chain last twice as long vs using most other big brands.
  • 5 0
 I have to laugh when people say something is "chemical free." Water is a chemical and it's impossible to make a lube that's chemical free.
  • 6 0
 There is literally nothing green about mountain biking. Let's just stop kidding ourselves.
  • 2 0
 I´ve been using Green Oil products in my workshop since I´ve discovered them 3 years ago. I have complaints about the Eco Grease and I´m not using that any more, but thumbs up for the rest! Chain lubes work great, of course they have to be used for recomended conditions. Degreasers and cleaners are suprisingly capable to remove even synthetic lubes from components.
  • 2 0
 I use water to rinse off the big stuff. When I do a proper cleaning, I use simple green. Works great. I'd be interested in their lubes though. And I have to say, the pricing is fantastic. I expected it to be $50 an ounce or something ridiculous.
  • 5 0
 I use saliva on my chain cus it seems to work well for my other favorite hobby
  • 2 1
 Ok ive used some of these products in the uk. The green oil is ok but doesn't last that well. The bike cleaner is shocking. Its really good as a degreaser but it faded the anodizing of some of my bike parts. This was annoying but the worst bit is that they weren't interested at all when i tried to raise the issue with them. Bearing in mind i wasn't even out for a refund just trying to stop it causing any damage to peoples pride and joy!
  • 5 0
 I also have been using green oil in northern UK conditions for 5 or 6 years now. The wet lube works good and is no more expensive than the competition. If you do a wet ride you'll need to reapply after the ride just like every other lube. Through the summer I use the dry wax lube on my commuter road bike, also use on the MTB but a dry MTB ride seems to be a rare thing. It works well and my last road cassette out lasted 4 chains using the dry lube. I have just got some degreaser but haven't used it yet, however many degreasers warn against leaving it in contact with anodised surfaces for long as they can affect the finish. It has happened to me with other brands. On the whole I think it's great stuff and applaud what they are trying to do a new the stand they are taking.
  • 1 0
 I was trying to figure a new lube to try at my LBS that is better for the environment. Several products indicated "Natural" on the main label, but with no other details on the product. I really like using the food grade silicone grease from Magura on my old Thor fork, and stick to Shimano/Magura brakes to avoid DOT fluid. For a sport based around mountains and nature, I feel that we can do much better to protect our planet.
  • 2 0
 how about vegtable oil?
i have never tried it but thats green.
Hell get organic vegtable oil.
i use my used fork oil.
gives that used oil a second life.

You want to be nice to our planet?
Park your car and ride your bike.
  • 1 0
 Is the production and manufacturing process of our bikes and components "green" though? This is a step in the right direction but what about the MTB industry as a whole. I would like to see a brand manufacturing new frames and parts out of recycled materials. Or some kind of trade in program where you get credit toward your new bike by sending in your old one to be stripped down to raw materials to be constructed in to a new bike with the latest upgraded geometry and features.
  • 1 0
 I waxed my chains with a combination of canning wax and bees wax for almost two season. Justed melted it in crockpot. Slightly more involved than just regular lube, but my drive train was super clean, and it worked wonderfully
  • 1 0
 one topic that is not discussed here is “using your bare hands to do work on your bike”. when working on your bike at home; you can wash your hands before putting them back onto your grips, before eating your sandwich for lunch or before touching anything that should not be contaminated by potentially carcinogen containing products. but out on the trail (specifically fixing a broken chain) the majority of riders just go about the rest of their day with contaminated hands. I've worked in the food industry for a long time, so it's a no brainer for me, (that is why I always pack a few pairs of disposable rubber gloves in my pack, if I have to do drivetrain maintenance), but most people could literally give a f*ck less about the transfer of potentially carcinogenic products to everything they touch after a repair. i'm gonna give these products a plus one, at least for this fact.
  • 1 0
 Wow I had no clue there were so many warning labels on mountain biking products. I like to know the products I use are eco-friendly, but to hear that they only need to be 60% to qualify to use the term leaves me feeling betrayed. All of these advertising terms, slangs and slogans lead people to believing they are helping the environment but in reality were killing everything slowly Eek Frown
  • 1 0
 We have been part of the bicycle industry for decades, and since then, I have NEVER met anyone with more integrity to the environment, with a more honest ecological mission, and enthusiasm to an biodegradable, high performing lube and cleaner, than GREEN OIL. You may see other ones, but read the labels, talk to the owners, and most of them just don't care. It's all marketing. GREEN OIL uses recycled paper, recycled shipping boxes, reclaimed wood displays, and they ride a bike to the bike exhibitions unlike other brands. They have won leadership awards, environmental awards, performance awards, and eco standard awards. So before you judge, this stuff is pretty much at the top level of what we can do and what performs well. Hopefully we can fill up our jugs in the shop soon, but in the world of Amazon etc, who will do that yet. We give thumbs up to Green Oil and you can buy this at biketiresdirect.com, amazon.com or bicycle-boutique.com to name a few. happy riding. we love Green Oil.
  • 2 0
 Good to see more Bio options for out maintenance areas. I have been loving Pedro's bio stuff and will need to look at this the next time I need a reorder for the garage
  • 5 2
 If you can prove my current chain line hurts the environment in real life I'll eat my hat
  • 1 5
flag Sp4xXx (Oct 13, 2017 at 5:40) (Below Threshold)
 I'll prove it to you, if you prove to me that your chainline does NOT hurt the environment.
  • 4 1
 logic:
how many chain lube have you used in your life? now multiply that for the riding population of the States. So far we should have thousands of gallons.
Now tell me where all that lube has ended up. It hasn't been colected for proper treatment like engine lubes or other nasty stuff.
You just wash it off your bike and bye bye. It goes straight into the land.
Of course is not the Exxon Valdez, but hey...
  • 4 0
 @ismasan: ok yes it goes in the land. But there are no examples of its ill-effect to the environment. I've never seen any I'll effects and no one talks like it's a problem until the 'green' stuff comes out. It solves a problem that never existed, and they charge more for it.
  • 3 4
 @ibishreddin: let me guess: you're the kind of guy who denies global warming is human induced since there's no evidence of it, right?
Let's do this, once a week you put a drop of chain lube in your cereal, ain't gonna harm you.
  • 4 0
 @ibishreddin: Let's drop some bottles of fluorine-based lube in your local water tower. What's the worse that can happen ? No one has proved it was harmful.

Seriously, the problem with these chemicals is that it takes years for it to accumulate and then to show symptoms. A bit like asbestos, fertilizers, nitrogen oxides
  • 1 0
 This guy in the Green Oil video explains some of it here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=CP43vgGmKLA&list=PLpVVmFs68wEqZ51Pe7b2j-g3YW0osqzba
  • 3 0
 If anyone cares, PTFE = teflon, the thing that is used to cover the pans where you prepare your food.
  • 2 1
 yeah, that doesn't make it any better. Teflon degrades a high temperatures and contamine food, also it's acumulative, since the dody doesn't naturally eliminate it. As soon as a pan gets scratched, throw it away. Ceramic is the best.
  • 4 0
 @ismasan: I disagree. Cast iron.
  • 2 0
 @ismasan: the point is teflon is inert except at very high temps, and generally considered food safe as long as you're not getting the pan blazing hot / throwing it in the broiler / etc... In any case, it's not like these high temps are likely to occur on the trail, so I don't really see the environmental issues with its use as chain lube.... it's very stable.

FWIW I generally use cast iron/carbon steel for cooking, but a good nonstick pan can make some preparations easier, and works fine with more acidic foods that might ruin the seasoning layer on cast iron (and make the food taste like metal).
  • 1 1
 During two separate trips mineral oil/lube wasn't easily found so in a pinch I used olive oil on my chain(made stuff a bit gunky but kept it from rusting in the wet conditions), then the other time in my brake lines(performed pretty damn well actually). Bonus, it's earth friendly and I saved space on the travels by also having my cooking oil on hand! Smile
  • 2 0
 Did you jerk off with it as well?
  • 1 0
 WPL OILS folks!!, this stuff rocks, all their products perform awesomely, no need to worry about exposure, or environmental damage, as all their products are 100% biodegradable, petroleum free, and non toxic.
  • 1 1
 I don't care. The whole concept of enviro chainlube and tire sealant is ridiculous. Its not like you are dumping enough quantity on the ground or in water to have any effect. If you had enough riders on any trail in numbers needed to have an effect on the soil quality or water quality you would not want to be there anyway. This is virtue signaling marketing nonsense and all the huggers who downvote this know it, which is why they will attack me ruthlessly. Use your brains people and common sense. It's not like we are washing our bikes down with gasoline and soaking them in oil. My god what rubbish.
  • 1 0
 This conversation is laughable. Just ride your bike, if you think chain lube is a serious environmental problem, pull your head out of your ass.look around and read a newspaper.
  • 3 0
 Great!
Thank you!

Peaty's tubeless sealant is 100% biodegradable, too!
  • 3 0
 This is good to know, because as far as quantities spilled goes... id say on average, tubeless is the one thing that people either spill when attempting their first conversion, or rinse STRAIGHT down the drain when they take off an old tyre... @paulaston has any of the team got the Peatys stuff on long-term for a review? Smile
  • 3 0
 Biodegradable is also a nice tag on the label. It would be nicer to know within which time span the biodegradation of a certain amount (one tire fill) will happen. Because most things are biodegradable, but for some it will just take very, very long. I don't know if there is any rule about this, defining what can bear this tag or not.
  • 1 0
 @EnduroManiac: so is it better to rinse sealant down the drain or dump it in the Forrest?
  • 1 0
 @ibishreddin don’t poke the dragon haha. We all know neither is the answer... but il be damn honest. When I used to work in the bike shop, in the early days of tubless conversions vs. Baggy, cheap Schwalbe/Conti tyres, if it ain’t sealing, you are guaranteed to be losing a good 60/70ml of sealant pissing out on to floor after 10 minutes with a compressor running flat out in a bid to seal her up.

Maybe these days rim/tyre manufactures are working to better margins of tolerance? As I have barely lost a drop in the past few conversions..

All I know is, I used to dread the clean down of such a messy op. when it went wrong... and if it was done outside, the hosepipe would have to come out.

Fortunately, such a messy operation means you learn to adapt quickly.. but you could never win with a baggy schwalbe.. ever. Haha
  • 1 0
 Please sell your shit on Chile. I know others brands with real biodegradable products that don't sell here neither. My eco-friendly conscience is kicking me in the balls.
  • 1 0
 Are the degreasers bearing friendly, got told muck off degreaser takes the grease out of the bearings and im now looking for a good alternative
  • 2 1
 Now we just need "bio" brake oil. Would be cool if you could just use something as innocuous as olive oil.
  • 2 0
 You could. You could even use water. The only issue is the boiling point. I used to use cooking oil in my Magura HD33’s back in the day.
  • 5 4
 Mineral oil is far better than DOT in this regards...
  • 1 1
 I found some bio suspension oil. Total makes some biodegradable lub oil too but only for special clients.
  • 1 0
 @ilovedust: boiling point of most food oils is plenty high for bike brakes. it goes rancid or decomposes eventually though
  • 1 0
 @jkalis: with cereals or in your tea?
  • 3 1
 The real question is, which one can I use with the gf?
  • 9 2
 The real questions is why she needs it?
  • 2 2
 @passwordpinkbike: Please tell me you have been with at least on "kinky chick".
  • 3 0
 @passwordpinkbike: I take the down-vote as a "no". You are missing out.
  • 1 0
 The real news- an article mentions an e-bike and nobody has flipped out yet!
  • 1 0
 Would have ordered, if the shopping experience was not so horrible. I will pick up some if an LBS happens to have in stock.
  • 1 0
 Also available now a GT85 replacement that is very good

www.green-oil.net/products.html
  • 2 1
 Thingking something about LUBE... Hmm...
  • 2 0
 I'll buy this next time
  • 1 0
 Did they say how sustainable they are?
  • 1 0
 stopped reading at "e-bike"
  • 1 0
 I presume this is the only product Pole endorse for use on their bikes.
  • 1 0
 You know petroleum is created by nature.
  • 1 0
 Sorry, I wouldn't buy anything that has stalin on it
  • 1 0
 I use old fork oil as a weed killer around the edge of my lawn.
  • 1 0
 dam do they use nuclear waste in that stuff? (the other companies)
  • 1 0
 green oil to wash your carbon bike of china?
  • 1 0
 In the shop, "biodegradable" usually means it doesn't work very well.
  • 1 1
 The problem for many people is price not an ecology..unfortunately.
  • 2 2
 Just ordered online. Good ad guys.
  • 1 1
 BTW, I am at Mizzou, where we have mountain bike trails right on campus!
  • 1 0
 Just ordered some
  • 1 0
 MOOOAAR Death and Fire
  • 1 0
 Oil oil!
  • 1 0
 Tuna can oil for the win

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