Orbea Rallon 2016: First Look

Jul 21, 2015 at 4:43
by Paul Aston  



Orbea released the Rallon in 2014 and it was received with rave reviews across the industry, quickly becoming one of the enduro bikes of choice for people in the know. For 2016 the Rallon keeps its shape, but gains some size in all directions. Pinkbike took a First Look and a posted a comprehensive Review of the Rallon last year. Here we take a quick look at improvements after two years of racing, riding and customer feedback as Orbea strive to keep the Rallon on the cutting edge for 2016.


Orbea Rallon 2016

Orbea Rallon 2016
Orbea Rallon 2016

Orbea Rallon 2016




Geometry Updates


Orbea Rallon 2016


Orbea have stuck with the numbers that made the Rallon a success in the first place: long top tubes, short chainstays and a low bottom bracket. There are still three sizes to choose from and the generous sizing means that even tall guys should find a comfortable fit. The frame's reach has grown slightly by 5mm on all sizes to give even more breathing space. Head tubes have grown by 5mm on small frames and 10mm on larger sizes, Orbea noticed in general riders were hiking up the handlebar for attacking steeper terrains, so a longer head tube means less stem spacers and increased stiffness and surface area for welding.

The head angle slackens half a degree to 66 degrees in the high, and 65.5 in the low setting. Orbea found that nearly all Rallon users set the bike in the previous low setting with a HA of 66 degrees and rarely went higher. For 2016, this angle becomes the high setting and now riders can drop a further half a degree with the low setting . Switching to the low setting also means the bottom bracket height drops 7mm to a ground hugging 338mm.





Frame Updates

Orbea Rallon 2016

Rear hubs have been boosted up to 148mm x 12mm, compared to the previous 9mm x 135mm QR or 142mm x 12mm thru-axle options. This increases stiffness and has allowed the 'Concentric Boost' pivot/drop out system to be simplified. The wider Boost hub and chain line adjustment also allowed Orbea to gain more tire clearance which was an issue on the older Rallon, now 2.4" tires in the short 420mm chainstays are no problem.

The high D-Mount front derailleur has been changed to a removable, rather than a fixed mount. With 1X systems becoming the norm, and more affordable, Orbea decided to to clean up the lines of the frames and save a few grams, although the front derailleur option is still there if riders desire. The 'Cable Highway' on top of the down tube has been also been modified, neatening up the routing and allowing all cables to head down the same path before splitting off to their respective destinations.

Existing hydro-formed tubes have been tweaked slightly across the entire bike, not to reduce weight but to increase stiffness and give a slightly more refined look. The alloy frame still comes with Orbea's lifetime warranty.





Suspension Updates

Orbea Rallon 2016
  Orbea Rallon 2016

The Rallon's suspension has also been updated, working in conjunction with BOS and FOX to supply bikes with custom tuned dampers. Shock bushings have been replaced by bearings to increase sensitivity, and the suspension curve has become slightly more progressive at the end of the stroke for absorbing big impacts. Dependant upon model, you can choose from BOS Kirk V2 shocks and the updated BOS Deville FCV fork which now has updated 27.5" lowers. FOX equipped bikes have options between 34 and 36 chassis, and Float or Float X shocks with EVOL air cans.

Orbea Rallon 2016
  Orbea Rallon 2016





Specification Updates

Orbea Rallon 2016
Rallon X-Team $5,999 USD


There are three standard models to choose between, the X30, X10 and X-Team. Orbea also offer their MyO customization service where you can pick and choose any aspect of the bike. The frames are fabricated in Asia, but are painted in Spain, then bikes built to order. This means you can choose a base model then mix and match components or colours to suit your desires, and have the bike delivered to you within three weeks.
Orbea Rallon 2016
Rallon X10 $4,499 USD
Orbea Rallon 2016
Rallon X30 $3,249 USD

Find out more at Orbea.com

Orbea Rallon 2016



171 Comments

  • + 127
 they etch the torque settings onto the bolts. in a world where most manufacturers don't even put them in the manual or answer your email requests for them. winners in my opinion.
  • + 52
 As much as people may hate on Trek, my Slash has all the torque tolerances etched into the bolts as well. It is definitely very helpful, as the linkage bolts are something that you would't really want to over tighten / under tighten.
  • - 9
flag chrisingrassia (Jul 21, 2015 at 7:46) (Below Threshold)
 that's all gravy until you strip a bolt
  • + 8
 Canyon does it as well...
  • - 6
flag expat (Jul 21, 2015 at 9:13) (Below Threshold)
 @deeeight when you make a 150mm hum you have choice. Either you increase flanges spacing to obtain a stiff wheel, or you make a nearly symetrical hub that allow a higher tension in the drive side spokes, increasing durability.
As stiffness is "over rated", the second choice makes a lot of sense. For bigger 29 wheel, you may need more stiffness, but for smaller 26 or 27 ones,I'll take durability over stiffness.
  • - 3
 Looks like Lladegla
  • + 3
 Attn: Dave Weagle,
  • + 4
 @pinkbike why ghost edit on my comment...

YT has the torque specs too...
  • + 5
 2009 cannondale moto carbon has those too.
  • + 1
 My Norco has that as well.
  • + 11
 That Bos Deville looks great with Fox stickers on it.
  • + 3
 My banshee has that too. So yeah winners ha!
  • + 4
 Yeah Kona do that too, plus they print all the bearing sizes on the seat tube too, very handy.
  • + 1
 they do, but not on all the parts. i mean manufacturers in general, i notice that some Canyon bolts have the torque setting inside the bolt head, i like this.
  • + 1
 trying to figure out WTF happened with my comment above. uuumm, I didn't post that, nor did I copy and paste it from the guy who posted it originally. fookin weird.
  • - 1
 yeah, like they matter... is that the maximum torque for dry bolts or with lube? with or without thread locker? how many tightening/untightening cycles can they withstand for it to still be valid?
Torque specs are way overrated in the cycling world... what really matters is the bolt tension, and the error you get measuring it with a torque wrench is way too big to really care.
  • + 1
 seems there is some serious editing going on here... my whole post WAS there and then it was GONE. Nice.... its not possible to post empty posts... ????
  • + 1
 @ibeaver I think PB is going through some funky stuff because I've seen that circumstance a few times on the site in the last week.
  • + 42
 Sexy aluminum frame with great geo, Check.
Bos Suspension, Check.
Threaded Bottom Bracket, Check.
Boost 148, SON OF A @#$%^
  • + 6
 boost 148 is a nice thing if you're buying a new complete bike, it just poos the scrootch for all us who already have a good kit and are frame shopping.
  • + 25
 Be a lover orbea hater, it looks like boost is here to stay. Personally, I would like to use boost to wipe with after a night of feasting on ultra spicy burritos. Just my $0.02.
  • - 4
flag Balgaroth (Jul 21, 2015 at 6:27) (Below Threshold)
 Sure Boost is soooo much better than a 150x12, you know, those 2mm narrower must save at least 5g on the rear hub ! Using a 150x12 would have been so backwards (and would have allow compatibility, such a shame, yew !)
  • + 21
 Again STOP comparing 148x12 to 150x12... 150 was simply a 135 hub shell spaced out with extra length spacers to fit into a 150 frame. 148 is a totally different hub shell with wider flanges to increase wheel stiffness/strength. 150 was less than ideal even for 26 inch wheels, its even worse with 650B and 700C wheels. A 135 wheel hub, in the era of disc brakes and 8 or more speed freehubs had to shrink the hub flange spacing compared to when 135 hubs first came out when they didn't need to fit disc brake rotors or more than 7 speed cassettes/freewheels. This weakened the resulting wheel build. Making the spokes longer weakened things even more.
  • + 10
 Different to 150 or not, it's still pointless crap that we don't need!!!!
  • - 2
 Its pointless crap to someone stuck in the past on a 26er maybe, but to someone with a BIGGER wheel size its sound logic to restore the wheel stiffness/strength lost to needing longer spokes. As someone who actually builds wheels, I am fine with the solution that is 148x12. Almost any new full suspension frame I might buy today will have some sort of thru-axle rear end and none of my old rear wheels with QR only hubs will work, so I have no mental bullshit preventing me from going to a new rear hub built around an entirely new standard. I was done with riding/buying new 26ers SIX YEARS AGO other than my fat bike (which is only a 26 in nominal rim size standard, in practical tire diameters its a 29er).
  • + 7
 Well, I guess it's a good thing a large part of the industry is influenced by what people want and not necessarily need, I personally ride a long travel 26er but that's just my preference, that being said, there's always room for ingenuity...it's a good thing cars don't still ride on wooden wheels, Ya know!
  • + 24
 Haters .. I have 3 Boost hubs and I don't even own a bike , sigh
  • + 4
 Yah, the additional 12mm either side of the hub that 650b has makes a MASSIVE difference.........best redesign entire frames and wheels just after everyone has bought new ones following the last incremental increase.
  • + 1
 Just so you're aware, my comment is agreeing with your first one.
  • + 13
 Boost. Who cares? The only people who legitimately have reason to complain about it are guys that already own expensive wheels that won't fit this bike AND are in the market for a 2016 rig.
  • + 0
 Yeah I got that maninblue, it wasn't at you buddy
  • + 14
 Just a heads up, the 150mm hub is not a 135 hub spaced out. You look at any manufacturers 150 or 157 hub, and they are completely different. They use a completely different body and will not work with 135 or 142mm hubs.
  • - 7
flag deeeight Plus (Jul 21, 2015 at 8:02) (Below Threshold)
 dobbs... the distance of a 135/142/150/157 disc 8-11 speed rear hub, between the flanges is typically only about 50-57mm total. That's not a very wide base to the triangle that makes up the angles at which the spokes pull the rim. A wider base is better than a narrower one and 148 increases the room hub/wheel designers have to work with by 6mm. 150 and 157 hubs also require a wider BB shell (83mm) and longer BB axle. 148 hubs do NOT. They are a best of both worlds solution. Frames can still be designed around a 73mm width BB shell and axle length, and the wheel strength/stiffness is improved.
  • - 10
flag deeeight Plus (Jul 21, 2015 at 8:14) (Below Threshold)
 dustyduke...depends on specific manufacturers. a handful of 150/157 boutique brands actually used the extra spacing to increase the flange widths apart but most of the major players did not. Not enough to make a difference in any case with longer spokes. Of course you can try and argue why you think brand A's 150 rear hub is good enough but for the industry its already too late. They are en masse going to start moving to 148 in the rear, just as they en masse moved to 650B as the new "standard" wheel size for mountain bikes. A lot of models which were 135/142 or 150 are going to go to 148 instead just as a lot of models that were 26ers or 29ers are going to go to 650B instead. It may take a few years to sort it all out but eventually 650B is going to be the #1 wheel size for most all mountain bikers, and 110 front hubs and 148 rear hubs will be the dominant standards for dropout spacing.
  • + 14
 It's a small gain though deeeight, and (once again) it means even more redundancy for existing kit.
If we as consumers let the industry keep doing this, they'll take the piss forevermore. And this is from someone riding 650B!
  • + 5
 It's a small gain though deeeight, and (once again) it means even more redundancy for existing kit.
If we as consumers let the industry keep doing this, they'll take the piss forevermore. And this is from someone riding 650B!
  • - 11
flag deeeight Plus (Jul 21, 2015 at 9:17) (Below Threshold)
 The graphic scheme seems like it was heavily inspired by the year old nomad with the model on the top tube by the headset and the brand with corresponding inverse graphic beneath the downtube....
  • + 0
 Looks like Lladegla
  • - 16
flag deeeight Plus (Jul 21, 2015 at 9:22) (Below Threshold)
 i don't think the manufacturers should be able to post their free video ads here.
f*ck OFF bike manufacturers. go sell to someone else, especially your c*nts at scott w/ your adoption of the bullshit new 'standards'. f*ck. off.
  • + 1
 Seems like MGo works primarily with Samsung 4K TV's, ironic as Sony is a title sponsor of the movie, guess what TV I have...
  • + 7
 @deeeight when you make a 150mm hum you have choice. Either you increase flanges spacing to obtain a stiff wheel, or you make a nearly symetrical hub that allow a higher tension in the drive side spokes, increasing durability.
As stiffness is "over rated", the second choice makes a lot of sense. For bigger 29 wheel, you may need more stiffness, but for smaller 26 or 27 ones,I'll take durability over stiffness.
  • + 3
 @Boardlife69 sorry man, its just that people rag on so-called "enduro" all the time and how its "ruined the sport".

it becomes hard to distinguish between sarcasm and seriousness, esp on the internet.

also sarcasm is a skill, and i see a total lack of skill in your first comment

carry on
  • + 18
 can someone please tell me what the proven percentage of stiffness gained in the wheel is by moving the hub flanges out 3mm per side which will then require a longer spoke, because with my 37 years as a skilled engineer, my experience tells me it will be next to 0.f*ck all%,
I very much doubt any body less than a high ranked pro would even tell the difference between a boost and non boost bike
  • + 7
 I'm with mark3,
Make whhels bigger but, now they're heavy
Take some spoke out but, now they too floppy
Ok let's make hubs wider......
In 2-3 years 26+ will be a 'new' standard
Ya heard it here first
  • + 11
 Everyone sane knows that there is no improvement by 6mm widening of the hub flange for regular rims. There just isn't. It may eventually do something for plus sizes, as their rims are extra wide too. Everyone also knows that old 20x110 and 150x12 hubs were wasting spacing width, having lots of space between hub flange and the ends of the axle so we may as well have fixed that, at least for the front. But hey, they are here and they are not going anywhere, and there will be more resizing to follow in coming years - complaining on it is like complaining on the shape of the moon. Actually this discussion reminds me of moon landing conspiracy - there are some crazy people out there denying that man landed on the moon, but the real loonies are amateurs making their own research to prove that it did happen while NASA sits quiet for obvious reasons. I stopped moaning on 275, Boost, on E-bikes, yet deeeight is still here, going strong since at least 5 years, telling us that we are retarded 26 for life dinosaurs, while whole world out there buys every new toy, not caring what we say, and that he is on their side. Jesus fkng Christ...
  • + 6
 Oh my .... bikes were supposed to be fun fellas, who gives a flying f' about standards. Oh, and nobody cares about guys still on 26 (I'm one) we aren't buying anything... when we do we will buy what is available and quite honestly I'll take the standards as they come and deal with it, instead of crying like a little baby.
  • + 4
 i cant even voice my opinion, deeeight keeps hacking and changing my comments.
  • + 2
 I sooooo look forward to the year+ long bitch-fest that's going to go down as the above whining is applied to almost every new frame that comes out with that newfangled 148mm spacing /s
  • + 12
 I think deeeight must be employed by the bike industry to come on this forum and bullshit everyone into buying the latest trend, either that or he soaks up every bit of bike industry bullshit like a sponge and expects all others to be as gullible as he is
  • - 19
flag deeeight Plus (Jul 21, 2015 at 13:14) (Below Threshold)
 Then you must be a moron if that's what you actually think.
  • + 9
 Ever the charmer.
  • + 4
 no deeeight your the moron, just reading half your crap proves that, I mean ffs if you want a stiffer wheel use shorter spokes to make the hub-spoke- rim triangulation smaller but that would mean making 26" wheels, hey there's an idea
  • + 0
 The part that gets me about boost is that its happening after 650b, if it had came out the same time it right be a big deal. It shows that the 27.5 wheels were forced on us quickly, if boost really does stiffen things up then the research should of been done first
  • + 2
 26 for life...or at least till it's completely fazed out Frown
  • + 6
 For every speed increase up to 8 speed, we widened the rear dropouts. Why? to preserve wheel stiffness. However, that was because parts, especially hubs, were essentially all designed for 700c wheel sizes, & those couldn't tolerate much more decrease in flange spacing. 26" wheels, on the other hand, weren't so near the raged edge, since their spokes are shorter, so we were able to cram the flanges a lot closer together without problems. But we've started moving the rim diameters back out with 650b & 29er, & in the meantime, we added disc brake tabs, & are spacing cassettes closer & closer to the spokes.

for most of the existence of bikes, changing speeds meant a change in rear dropout spacing, which usually meant a new frame & wheelset, or at least bending the dropouts(on steel frames.) We've been spoilt by having the same spacing for the last 15+ years, & it's time for drop out spacing to catch up with all the changes we've made in the other parts of the wheel.
  • - 8
flag deeeight Plus (Jul 21, 2015 at 15:29) (Below Threshold)
 Again people ignoring facts I see... except for groghunter... he's on top of the facts on this point. But as to boost following 650B...Boost hubs were developed PRIMARILY for 700C wheeled bikes. That its being adopted by 650B bikes is because the same facts apply to those wheels also. You want to ignore facts and logic to deny improvents in technology and keep riding your old bikes and parts, fine, but don't expect the rest of us to cry for you also.
  • + 3
 If there's gonna be a change, I'd rather it be universal across wheel sizes, instead of having to buy special hubs for 29ers or 650b.

I don't mind change nearly as much as I mind making parts less & less standard, cause that's what really increases prices.
  • + 4
 Deeeight, here is your official theme song:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=WFcUJ1tDqDA
  • + 2
 Totally right, groghunter. I just wish we could skip to a hub design that was totally incompatible but really made the best possible use of the available real-estate back there, rather than a 3% gain every year that still rendered all the old stuff obsolete. This revolution-by-inches game just isn't worth it for the end user.
  • + 1
 I don't doubt that boost provides an improvement to bikes; It does after all provide scope to reduce rim weight, which even in small reductions provides large benefits to ride acceleration. That being said though, I don't know whether the boost hub provides optimal rear spacing; a balance between pedalling comfort, and wheel stiffness.

Its unfortunate, and with no disrespect to the pioneering fabricators and machinists making do with what they had, but mountain bikes have never really been engineered as an entire optimised system. Id say this is mostly because of the hundreds of companies looking to score our $$ by producing effectively the same thing (and hence the requirement for standards). Until the industry consolidates you can expect progression to continue via slight incremental improvements. Imagine if the big three each developed a frame and components completely optimised as a system without conforming to external standards. Inter-company standard changes could be limited to when there are significant advances in materials and/or technology and maybe then bikes would reduce in price and perform as best as they can with the current tech.
  • + 2
 Hey guys, just skimming through the comments here. To qualify my comments I have absolutely zero engineering experience. But, if boost gives engineers freedom to make chain stays shorter, isn't that a good thing? You know, because manuals.
  • + 0
 A - Boost allows for max 5-7mm shorter stay, compared to 135/142. Previous generation of bikes had stays longer than 440 so Cs lenght argument is a BS.
B - short stays are a FAB, expect really long stays on DH and Enduro bikes in tcoming 5 years. Minnaar and Gwin are already running stays longer than stock. As with every situation, overdriving a parameter has equal number of pros and cons.
C - Boost allows for a better spoke triangulation of a extra wide rim where optimal placement of spoke holes lies away from the center of the rim. Otherwise it offers microscopical gains for regular wheels and rims.
D - boost has been developed solely with plus sizes in mind, and it is economically wise to run it through all the range.
  • + 1
 @scottzg Boost probably is the best use of real estate, right now. just like 135 was, in the late 90s. We stopped widening stays at 135 because it was starting to be a problem for q factor, & keeping chainlines usable with a triple(though again, roadies tolerate a lot less in those numbers, us MTBers aren't as sensitive to that stuff.)

A big part of why they can get away with boost now is that they have more real estate out front with only having to worry about 1x & 2x chainlines. going any wider than 148 is going to introduce some serious problems that will compromise either chainline or q factor.

Or we'll all be riding fat bike cranks, q factor be damned.

Oh, & as someone pointed out in the past, the stiffness problems that SRAM talks about is probably more about lower spoke count wheels. widening the flanges a few mm is lighter than adding 4 spokes, or at least that's their spiel.
  • + 4
 This kind of BS is why I'm sticking with my 26 for a couple more years until the bike industry figures its shit out. Seems like ever season last years bikes are completely outdated due to "new standards"
  • + 0
 nismo - Universe is not slowing down, it is accelerating. Expect every company to run different stuff in 10 years. These days all companies still use same standards. Sticking to what you have is a good way of doing things though
  • + 1
 dont know what the speed of universe has to with company's changing standard every 5 min but that's cool haha I just think they should find a good design and stick with it for more than one season. You can't tell me there are huge performance gains being found this often.
  • + 0
 i meant that there will be more "standards" or rather "interfaces" coming. They are not changing much though
  • + 2
 @deeeight you have a point but you are a dick about it.
  • + 2
 hahaha @t-turi-mullet Are you new here? You must be new here.
  • + 0
 why not just build your rear wheel with a rim such as a Ryde Trace Enduro which offsets the spokes holes to the disc side in order to equal out spoke tensions by lengthening the drive side spoke lengths if you're worried about rear wheel strength? then use a 148mm hub cap conversion (if hub manufacturers are even making these?!!)

but then, i guess thats a lot of effort to go to so maybe just buy a new rear hub. as for the front, i really don't see the advantage of boost here. front wheels are not sufficiently weakened by having to accommodate disc mounts for us to be worried about their strength, unlike the massive dish that has to be applied to rear wheels to accommodate a cassette and the allowance for a disc mount thus making them inherently weaker than front wheels.

it seems buying a new rear wheel/hub is one thing but buying a new front wheel AND fork is a whole new kettle of fish in terms of price.

just some thoughts from a wheel builder...
  • + 1
 Ryde Trace Enduros are made of chocolate. I killed one in a couple of weeks. Completely FUBAR. The DT Swiss EX 471 which replaced it has been considerably better.
  • + 1
 You've missed my point. You're referring to the strength of the trace enduro rim material rather than my generic point about offset spoke hole rims, of which the trace enduro is one of a few examples, but nevermind.
  • + 1
 No I got it dude, I was just trying to warn people off of the Trace Enduros! They are rubbish!
  • + 0
 What sort of riding were you doing Tracers? Are they really that cheesy? I was wondering whether to buy them. I got Ex 471s but may want another wheelset. After riding DTs a few times l know I will never go back to carbon wheels unless i Start racing XC... which is unlikely.
  • + 1
 I'm certainly not riding anything I'd consider out of the comfort zone of a rim with the name "ENDURO" with 29mm internal width. The rims stated intention is pretty clear, and they're not up to it IMHO.
A few normal trail runs, and couple of blacks (no hucking though). Nothing my EX 471s haven't shrugged off.
I ran 35psi too, as I felt them bottom out a little with lower pressures on the smaller stuff.
  • - 1
 Bad rim designs happen people, Stan's Hugo's have been plagued with problems. Some have folded up just from riding pavement. I don't mean dents, I mean actual folding/buckling of the rim. The combination of spoke tension and rider weight were simply too much for them.
  • + 1
 Thanks for input. I wonder how WTB Koms hold up, they have insane weights as well
  • + 1
 I'm riding a pair of KOMs in 26 right now. I have a fairly large buddy who's riding them too, in 27.5. So far, they haven't been a problem, but they still make me nervous.

First, I had to warranty one of the two I ordered because a piece of the weld was broken off, & too large to escape out of a spoke hole.

Second, every single rim I've seen built & ridden has a crack in the gold logo, right over the weld (it looks like a decal under the clear coat to me, as opposed to paint, FYI.) It almost looks like what you would expect out of a cheaply pinned rim that had the two sides moving independently of each other.

But they haven't had a single problem in actual usage. Like I said, they just make me... nervous.
  • + 1
 I think you are fully entitled to feel worried. I heard stories of people who cracked their carbon rims, fixed it with epoxy and so far nothing bad is happening... but still, not a wheel set which you could take to Alps without worrying
  • + 6
 Dear Orbea, could you explain the price disparity between europe and the UK?
A Rallon Team in europe costs the equivalent of £3700, however in the UK one will set you back £4200. Where does that extra £500 go?
I know about exchange hedging, but why don't you just do what Nicolai do and publish prices in euros and state that purchase is according to exchange rates?
  • + 1
 import tariffs perhaps
  • + 3
 @parallaxid, all countries within the EU allow free travel of goods between borders without import tariffs, so it's not that. The usual explanation is because they reckon they can get away with it, much the same as a whole bunch of US brands simply putting a £ in front of the US list price instead of charging the equivalent + 20% Vat.
  • + 1
 Yep, common market so no additional taxes or duties.
The excuse is normally that they "hedge" the UK price against the euro but they always kick the arse out of it and the Brits get bent over.
  • + 0
 well maybe you brits should just get with the program and get on the euro Wink
  • + 12
 We've been watching that program, it's full of broke Greeks and Spaniards begging and some noisy Germans telling everyone else what to do, no thanks.
  • + 1
 interesting. i hope anyone from orbea could comment.
  • + 1
 Its no surprise that consumers are starting to take note of pricing disparity! Bikes are after all reaching the price bracket for new small cars, so consumers are shopping about, including abroad in our global economy. If its any consolation, similar things happen in Australia, especially from brands considered to be "boutique".

Things are going to get interesting in Aus because the AUD has weakened against the US drastically since this time last year, and US bikes here are becoming exorbitantly priced. Maybe the distributors will have to start cutting their margins to keep their products competitively priced? Either way, its a good time to be a Canadian brand and to a lesser extent an EU brand selling bikes in Australia. I have my eye on Orbea Smile
  • + 4
 Dear Dobbs59 Thank you for your appreciation!! The prices for the 2016 range will be the same in the UK and the rest of Europe. Regards Orbea
  • + 2
 Thank you Orbea, great to have a manfacturer response especially when fairness results.
  • + 1
 What do you mean by "prices will be the same" ? So 2000 EUR = 2000 GBP ?
  • + 2
 Well hopefully they mean a proper conversion, so 2000 Eur equates to £1400-ish, even if they add in some leeway and make it £1500 that would still equate to a hefty price cut for the UK. If that's what meant then I approve, thanks Orbea!
  • + 1
 I don't care if they just spot price them, as nicolai do.
  • + 1
 @orbea When will you do this price rationalisation?
  • + 4
 Same here. I bought a Trek 830 Antelope at a shop in 1991 for about $450 IIRC. Rode it a few years and decided to upgrade to a bike with suspension. In late 1994 I bought a '93 Stumpy S-Works that was quite similar to Ned's bike: Future Shock on a black cherry M2 frame. Take note, whippersnappers: I found the listing for the bike on a Usenet group. The seller MAILED me color photos - and I blindly mailed him a thousand dollars back. Talk about old school - no digital pics, no PayPal. The bike showed up without a hitch. M900 XTR cranks and hubs, Syncros post, World Class ti BB, X-Ray shifters, Flite Ti saddle, and those 737 pedals. That was a fun bike. I have a gallery of bikes I have owned on my profile page. You can find a pic of the S-Works there. I added the blue Rock Ring you see in the pic. And yeah, paint chipped easily off that frame as Ned says.
  • + 10
 Dude nice rant but this is an article about an orbea?
  • + 5
 PB was replacing your submitted text with someone elses random comment for a few minutes there. It was kind of fun. So that's probably why his comment makes no sense. Probably...
  • + 3
 maybe he misreplied here instead of here : www.pinkbike.com/news/ned-overend-1992-specialized-m2.html
  • + 4
 I have no idea where any of that s&+t came from hahaha never seen it before weird pink bike glitch
  • - 3
 its affecting many people, random threads
  • + 4
 Same here. Comment problems today Pinkbike? (Please don't release my Ashley Madison preferences!!)
  • + 4
 It's a small gain though deeeight, and (once again) it means even more redundancy for existing kit.
If we as consumers let the industry keep doing this, they'll take the piss forevermore. And this is from someone riding 650B!
  • + 2
 Well your copy and paste buttons work
  • + 1
 I didn't write that.. Comments went crazy earlier. The reasoning why nothing in this thread makes sense.
  • + 1
 Ok. Nvm then carry on
  • + 2
 I just want to point out that the Canfield Brothers managed to design a 140mm 29er Full Suspension frame with 412mm chainstays without the Boost spacing. They used a standard 142 hub with a standard 73mm BB. The bike still has loads of clearance with 2.8 tires on the WTB i45 Scrapers. Looks like you don't need a new standard to still design and execute sick bikes.
  • + 2
 Anyway, not interested in the slacker head and tiny bit longer. They've made it even more of a dh bike. I've just ordered a 2015 and quite glad. Stock wheels will be mince on the x30 and i would want to be able to rebuild my existing Pro2s with 650 rims. Is the industry really trying to wipe out 135/142? Kindly stop it, you're devaluing our used bikes and.winding everyone up!
  • + 2
 @Boardlife69 sorry man, its just that people rag on so-called "enduro" all the time and how its "ruined the sport".

it becomes hard to distinguish between sarcasm and seriousness, esp on the internet.

also sarcasm is a skill, and i see a total lack of skill in your first comment

carry on.


^^^ I typed and submitted "Just a test"
Too Funny. I'm probably messing with someone now at this point. I hope it isnt just me.
  • + 2
 You are not alone. :'(
  • + 1
 welp rewob (bower?), thats definitely my comment that was not going through earlier.

very strange.
  • + 3
 I love my 2015 Rallon, and I can't see myself changing bikes soon. The geometry is awesome and the spec is well balanced for the price... I'm glad they're getting good press and reviews around the industry...
  • + 5
 @paulaston, the three pictures in the "Specification Updates" sección are of THE SAME BIKE.
  • + 2
 Rallon has been in my wish list since it was first released. I was very close to getting a 2015 model. Looking at this article, I may hold off for a bit longer. When will 2016 models be available to the public?
  • + 3
 Hello, In a few weeks. We will communicate on our website and social media channels.
  • + 4
 This is the weirdest thread on the whole of pinkbike. pinkbike.. go home... you're tripping.
  • + 5
 Best bike I've had. Gorgeous and sick down a trail, love it.
  • + 5
 This turquoise colour is just ubiquitous right now.
  • + 13
 Image if Yeti had Specialized legal team...
  • + 0
 your totally!
  • + 2
 I'm not sure where my comment above came from either. I was asking if there was a link or anything where we could build our own rallon.
  • + 2
 And if you want to buy this in Canada, good luck. Dealer is Forazani Group, so good luck trying to buy this through your local Sport Check.
  • + 0
 @deeeight when you make a 150mm hum you have choice. Either you increase flanges spacing to obtain a stiff wheel, or you make a nearly symetrical hub that allow a higher tension in the drive side spokes, increasing durability.
As stiffness is "over rated", the second choice makes a lot of sense. For bigger 29 wheel, you may need more stiffness, but for smaller 26 or 27 ones,I'll take durability over stiffness.
  • + 1
 Looks like llandegla
  • + 2
 What I was trying to say before Pinkbike messed up my comments is, are you being ironic? You can literally buy these at Sport Check.
  • + 1
 Messed up your comments lol! I never said a word and got two replies!
  • + 1
 "Shock bushings have been replaced by bearings to increase sensitivity"

Is this true in general? I made myself the idea that in general bushings were better, but maybe it is just down to quality...

Anyone?
  • + 1
 Tolerances, same reason why Turner went from bushings to bearings.
  • + 3
 I guess YETI's copyright on that turquoise blue ran out last year then.
  • + 0
 i guess all bike companies want their bikes to look as sexy as Yeti's
  • + 1
 What happened to the spec of the x30? I was going to order one today but I'll hold off a bit now to see other manufacturers 2016 models.
  • + 1
 Word on the street is boost is needed for SRAMs domination of the bike industry they have 1x12 in the pipeline. Shimano wake the F up!
  • + 2
 I like the switching of components idea, personalizing a bike to price and aesthetics is awesome
  • + 3
 What's waky doing in the picture..?
  • + 1
 The Orbea is a beast, can't beat it for the money. Quit moaning about bike parts and go ride your damn bike, old age men getting angry over wheel sizes, boring.
  • + 2
 ¿Por qué no una Fox 36 en vez de la 34??
  • + 5
 Probably to hit a weight and price point that is more attractive to the average consumer.
  • + 4
 I suspect that you can specify 36 or 34. Orbea seems to allow quite a bit of choice when you order your bike.
  • + 2
 Dude give it a rest
  • + 2
 never
  • + 2
 Nice bikes
  • - 1
 Nice bikes
  • + 1
 well I did not write this I guess i am not allowed an opinion.
  • + 1
 Are we allowed to post again?? I had the same thing
  • + 3
 i refreshed and my posts are still the same...."nice bikes"
so no I am being censored and anyone else with negative opinions about this brand.
I was told to refresh and all would be ok. Not buying it.

Bring back the old days where we argued like dirtbags.
  • + 2
 It's just a glitch, relax. I posted positive things and my comment turned into a comment about which hub is stiffer or something
  • + 1
 BOS fork with FOX decalls, wtf?
  • + 2
 Nice bikes
  • - 2
 The graphic scheme seems like it was heavily inspired by the year old nomad with the model on the top tube by the headset and the brand with corresponding inverse graphic beneath the downtube.....
  • + 2
 I didn't type that, what I said was I like the colour, and it's cool that SportCheck is selling high end bikes now
  • + 0
 that is the exact sentence written 3 comments above by "glasgowdan
  • + 2
 looks good
  • + 2
 Deeeightard
  • + 2
 Love this bikes
  • + 1
 Anyone else notice head angle and seat angle don't match the numbers
  • + 2
 NEXT BUILD ... SOON
  • + 1
 Hope you can just buy the frame
  • + 1
 glad that guy ditched the ponytail
  • + 0
 I know it should not matter, but all these top tubes with humps near the headtube just look so foooking wrong!
  • + 0
 These humped top tubes look like sandals with socks, only even slightly worse.
  • + 1
 and very bad for when you... might crash... cause the brake levers scorch across it.... just ask me, I know.

and thats EXACTLY why Orbea raised the front, cause the stem mounted at the highest from last year, requires your brakes to be pointed almost flat frontward... I know, i have one. I would like the half degree slacker for sure ( and the cm more on top, so in case I crash, I won't get a second scorch on the top tube) :-)

still, its a very fun bike ( I know I have one :-D).
  • + 1
 I really like the geometry ... how about making a size XL please?
  • + 0
 paging skyway tuff wheels ....
  • + 0
 Ugliest bike I've seen grace the front page in a long time.
  • + 1
 Decent!
  • + 0
 Why I ride an Enduro... sickkkkk
  • - 3
 The graphic scheme seems like it was heavily inspired by the year old nomad with the model on the top tube by the headset and the brand with corresponding inverse graphic beneath the downtube.....
  • + 1
 I.didn't say this shoit!
  • + 2
 Don't fight it @glasgowdan ya did too and now you owe me a beer.
  • + 1
 "neatening".... Really?
  • - 1
 Looks the 2016 stump jumper but with out a place for a water bottle
  • + 0
 Looks like a session

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