Pinkbike Poll: Does Bike Weight Matter?

Jan 19, 2018 at 9:34
by Paul Aston  
We have a Skype meeting every day with the Pinkbike tech editors from around the globe. It normally starts off amicably, then descends into a battle about geometry, bike weight, gearboxes, and who would win racing scenarios even though we are all past it– basically arguing who would be the fastest loser over a lame course.

A recent weight battle during one of our meetings got me thinking about how important weight really is. Mountain bikers, and especially PB readers and commenters are very performance focused, but unfortunately, there are few things on a bike that can genuinely be proven to be better in one way or another, one of the few solid metrics we can fight over is weight. In fact, it is the only one: geometry, suspension setup, tire choice and all of the other variables are dependent upon opinion, riding style, trail choice, speed over fun or vice versa.

So, as I was being laughed at for riding a 36lb steel bike with downhill casing tires up road climbs, I realized that it seemed normal to me to ride a bike between 33-38lbs: downhill bikes or enduro/trail bikes built with droppers, big cassettes and my usual choice of DH rubber. Looking at my last few test bikes they have weighed in at 34.13lbs / 32.8lbs / 37.1lbs / 35.6lbs / 31.1lbs. The three bikes under 35.6lbs were not shod with downhill tires and would have gained a few more ounces if I changed their shoes.


The Nicolai of Jack Reading leady to go.
Jack Leading's downhill bike probably wasn't one of the lightest on the circuit, to begin with, and is easily the heaviest with the added lead ballast. Supposedly it's close to 50lbs, but Jack had his best season to date and finished 36th overall in the UCI World Cup.


XC riders are looking to save every gram, but Nino Schurter has won every major race over the last two years without the lightest bike on the circuit. Some downhill racers are even adding lead to their bikes to go faster, admittedly no race winners have been seen doing this, but these guys aren't doing it for attention.

After spending hours and hours riding eMTB's over the last year, I found it is like training in the gym, and it's free to boot; if you ride a 20lb hardtail as your only bike, it will feel normal on every ride. If you ride a 30lb full suspension bike for a few weeks, when you go back to your 20lb-er it will feel lighter and you will be able to move it around more easily. The same applies when going from a 50lb eMTB back to a coil sprung, heavy-tire shod, Pinion-driven, 37lb German tank, it feels light and 'flick-able,' and damn, I hate that F-word. The first time you ride the 50lb-er though, it feels horrible, after a few sessions strength increases and more importantly timing changes. I don't feel any discernible disadvantage riding the eMTB and can still endo around corners, ride technical sections and bunny hop - picking it up and over fences or fallen trees still sucks, though.

So to me, weight is never a deciding factor, unless it is when changing to something heavier and stronger. I also find that any time I have ever chosen a bike part to save weight, I usually break it, if somebody tells me how amazing their new lightweight component is, I will probably break it. Maybe I just need to ride better, or less, or on smoother trails. My safety limit for a bike seems to be over 33lbs.

Lastly, I ain't racing up any hills, or against any riders that haven't been stuffing croissants and espressos into their faces with me in a café pre-ride. My focus and enjoyment when riding comes from the feeling and performance riding technical and downhill trails.


What is the weight of your current bike?




What would your ideal bike weight be assuming strength and durability would stay the same?




466 Comments

  • + 700
 in kg please. Thanks
  • + 41
 * 0.45
  • - 124
flag chillrider199 (Jan 26, 2018 at 12:23) (Below Threshold)
 Just look up a conversion table...
  • + 144
 Unless they are only asking americans to answer the poll?
  • + 376
 Why would it be in kg? Don't you know that the entire world uses the Imperial system? Kilograms are un-American, and therefore not safe to use on the internet.
  • + 577
 @EnduroManiac: It's called the lowest common denominator. It is going to be the hardest for us to convert things to KG vs you converting to lbs. I mean, did you see who we elected prez? We are not so smart.
  • - 50
flag eugen-fried (Jan 26, 2018 at 12:36) (Below Threshold)
 @EnduroManiac: didn't you get it that Americans and Brits are the target audience for this site? I mean we all know that Europeans just bash their cheap completes to unrideable condition, then buy new one. But imperial guys, they want the brand new Mondraker or Yeti costing more than a decent (a bit used) car...
  • + 84
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: We will build a 1 parsec long wall, and we will make Canadians pay for it!
  • + 96
 Just look up a pounds to bitcoin converter
  • - 38
flag SnowshoeRider4Life (Jan 26, 2018 at 12:44) (Below Threshold)
 this is MERICA we don't use no stinkin metric around there here parts.
  • + 81
 My car gets four rods to the hogs head and thats how i likes it
  • + 179
 @SnowshoeRider4Life: Actually Pinkbike is Canadian and West Coast Canadian at that. Sorry buds, it's metric round these parts. Time to catch up with the rest of the educated world. But it's nice that PB was thinking about the smaller minds down south. Sharing is caring.
  • - 53
flag WasatchEnduro (Jan 26, 2018 at 13:04) (Below Threshold)
 1st - who the fk knows?
2nd - who the fk cares?
  • + 180
 @WasatchEnduro:
1st - literally everyone but you
2nd - literally everyone but you
  • + 66
 @RedBurn Why, it is easy! It is 14 lbs in a stone so just compare your bike to some random rocks. About as heavy as two stones? That's 28 lbs for you! Basta, poll done, off to the comment section Smile .
  • + 78
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs:
We only use kilos when selling drugs.
  • + 9
 @raditude: that's hilarious
  • + 14
 @Robbyc78: Frickin' dentists buying $30k coke bags...
  • + 35
 Kg never got anyone to the moon..... Just kidding cheers!
  • + 2
 @SnowshoeRider4Life: unless you’re in the US military...
  • + 26
 lbs -> kg: subtract 10% and halve it
kg -> lbs: double it and add 10%
  • + 5
 @eugen-fried: Most bits that are under 50 years have only ever used kg, only old people use imperial.
  • + 37
 @pushingbroom: I thought Canada was just the US state between WA and AK?! Razz
  • + 22
 Good to see PB focussing on Liberian and Myanmarian Mountain bikers as well..
  • + 15
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: Don't you know the world is an American province ?
  • + 2
 @raditude: yup your so very right ! We not so smart!
  • + 1
 @pushingbroom: hahahaha..owned..
  • + 20
 I never understood giving bike weights in pounds. We used to use stones back in the 80s, now use metric, and have never used pounds! Ask a British person how much they weigh in pounds and they won't be able to tell you. Why is a British writer doing it for bikes in 2018?
  • + 31
 I remember the time I had entered my weight on Strava as a 180kg instead of 180lb.... Said I burned over 2000 calories on every ride... I was the fastest rider around at that weight!
  • + 8
 @SnowshoeRider4Life: yup - That flag didn't get put on the moon using no stinkin metric units!
  • - 6
flag TheR (Jan 26, 2018 at 17:02) (Below Threshold)
 @millsr4: Look out! You're triggering all the kanucks here with little-brother inferiority complex.
  • + 1
 @eugen-fried: yeah exactly
  • + 2
 @Number21: what's a parsec?!!!!
  • + 18
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: kilograms are"Fake News"
  • + 6
 @jammf: lbs-> kg: more accurately, subtract 9.19% and halve it. If we're all going to be engineers o here, we got to look the part.
  • + 1
 @raditude: lol this is sadly so true.
  • + 13
 @TheR: Little brother?!?! Have you seen the SIZE of our COUNTRY!?!?!?!?
  • + 3
 @pushingbroom: hey buds. No it’s not. We like grams, pounds, and kilometres.
  • + 2
 Definitely this discussion made my day!
  • + 5
 @SnowshoeRider4Life: except for shocks. Because Innovation. Because Merica
  • - 9
flag TylerG96 (Jan 26, 2018 at 23:53) (Below Threshold)
 lbs is a weight while kg is a mass, and they asked for "weight".. technicalities, right?
  • + 243
 Didn't you get the memo:

Bike Weight = lbs
Rider Weight = kg
Rider Height = imperial
Tyre Size = nominal imperial
Bar Diameter = metric (but based on imperial)
Bar Width = metric
Steerer Dia = imperial
Steerer Length = metric
HT ID = metric
Fork Travel = metric
F Axle Size = metric
Reach = metric
Wheelbase = metric or imperial
Other Dims = generally metric
CS = Always metric
Shock Length = Imperial but metric
Shock Bush = imperial
Pedal Thread = imperial
Crack Length = metric
Crank Axle = 28.99mm because. 01mm matters
Chain pitch = imperial
BB = metric
Angles = degrees but maybe we change to radians just because
Speed = mph (because its faster for the same number)
Distance = miles (same reason as spedd)
Height = metres (because they are bigger)
  • + 3
 I thought that would have been the default for Aston...isn't he Euro side? Then 'Murica and the handful of Canucks that can't wrap their heads around metric could post instead of you.
  • + 1
 @raditude: I'm happy to see that you can recognise that.! :-)
  • + 4
 Ain't weight a sensitive question. Especially about something you ride about.
  • + 2
 Well you can feck that sky high mate.
  • + 1
 Just multiply by 2.2
  • + 5
 @twozerosix: No but the flag was put in desert film set, so what do you really know?
  • + 3
 My blurry eyes lose count of those tiny little mm every time. Inching along in blissful ignorance. I mean... There's 25.8 of those li'l f'kers in a single inch, right?! Wink
  • + 16
 Pink bike do a pole people care about: should pink bike use metric or steam age?
  • + 2
 @EnduroManiac: Just 3 of or 4 countries use the imperial system, and the questions are made in imperial.
  • + 6
 @scotterbrains: 25.40 but whose counting
  • + 1
 @twozerosix: Actually, it did.
  • + 1
 @raditude: give this dude a Nobel prize Big Grin
  • + 2
 Anything 'real' I do with metric, physics, construction, but man i'd be sad if we (the us) went 100% metric. Is really charming to have a colloquial system.

You pro metric people, its like you gave up your language for Esperanto and I think you're poorer for it. I especially feel bad for the Canadians and Brits because I can see they miss the old measures. Pounds, pints n quarts, and miles, is language of life.

Is not too late to change back!
  • + 3
 @TylerG96: Uh oh, back to school for extra homework!
  • + 1
 @captaingrumpy: I still work in imperial at work because 99% of the building I work on are built in imperial. I use metric as well and both have their place. We still use miles though which is good.
  • - 10
flag Beez177 (Jan 27, 2018 at 11:08) (Below Threshold)
 @Whipperman: How's France these with your flood of immigrants. I heard not too good.
  • - 1
 @scotterbrains: Because the unit corresponding to an inch is not mm, but a cm Wink
  • + 7
 Ackchually, weight would be in Newtons...
  • + 1
 @rc51rugz: I have a friend who says kilograms are not the same anymore...
  • + 1
 @jackwdean: looooool perfect response for all the yanks looking down their noses.
  • + 5
 i do not have the luxury.i have components based on budget. as long as i can pedal the damn thing im good.
  • + 2
 @captaingrumpy: Pounds and pints are essential part of my holidays in the UK!
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: this is the best reply i have seen in years Smile
  • + 2
 @fartymarty: really? I always measure my crack length in inches. always inches....
  • + 2
 @raditude: did you see who we didn't elect President tho!?!!
  • + 8
 @fartymarty: Didja ever notice that a stem is imperial on one end (1 1/8") and metric on the other (31.8mm)?
  • + 1
 @raditude: snowflake dismissed
  • + 1
 @theslowdown: I believe 31.8mm is like, an inch and a quarter, or something. 35mm, that's metric.
  • + 1
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: typical think you think it’s the be all and end all.#swelledheads????
  • + 4
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: Have you seen the value of your currency? Wink
  • + 1
 @jaame: We always used lbs!
I sold bikes for five years in the 90s and the weights were always in lbs
  • + 1
 @alexm71: yeah sorry me too. My post was ambiguous but I meant we have never used pounds for weights of humans. I felt we were using pounds for bike weights because in those days we were importing this sport from America and they used pounds. In general British life in my lifetime, we have never used pounds for anything that I can think of... except as you say bikes in the 90s. Still, I didn't know what it meant really because I had no point of reference. Two stones would have had more value than 28lbs.
  • + 1
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: Please, define "entire world" and "America", please.
  • + 2
 As a first year student in The Netherlands we just had to work in both the imperial and metric system. No one is going like "this is the best and the rest has to adapt". It is not going to get you anywhere. Just accept that there are different systems and actually learn to work with it. It isn't too hard. All right, bike metrics are different

Orange Four: five inch travel
Orange Five: six inch travel
Marzocchi 66: seven inch travel

And we can deal with that perfectly fine, can't we? The only confusing thing for people to understand that in most cases, an 8" brake rotor is actually 8" in diameter, not 200mm.
  • + 2
 @vinay: I believe some are 200mm and some are 203!
  • + 1
 @jaame: and I have a Hope that is 205mm. That's a whole 2.5% more braking power than a 200 and .98% more than a 203. Or it means I can pack on a few more pound and still stop!!!
  • + 1
 International system of units please!!!
  • + 1
 It should be in stones. Or ounces. Or teaspoons of salt.
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: Yeah, I know. I had those in the back of my mind but the overall majority is probably still 203, especially from the big OEM players.
  • + 1
 @raditude: Straight Gold!!
  • + 3
 @pushingbroom: Oh the irony, whining about having to do simple math while stereotyping a complete country!! Winner in my books, haha.
  • + 1
 @jackwdean: Nasa works in metric...
  • + 2
 @jackwdean: hahaha you seriously believe anyone got on the moon ?? good joke !!! lol lol
  • + 5
 @millsr4: No. Canada is referred to as America Jr.
  • + 1
 @Robbyc78: People say Americans would have a hard time converting to metric, but if tweaker meth heads can figure it out...
  • + 1
 @georgy291: Actually they use both... I've seen their prints and models with my own eyes!

'requires use of the International System of Units for measurement in U.S. Government programs, "except where impractical." '

www.nasa.gov/offices/oce/functions/standards/isu.html
  • + 0
 @georgy291: Of course the NACA/NASA works in metric. Both the US and Russia recruited loads of nazi aerospace scientists after the WOII. It wouldn't be quite effective to have those work in the imperial system.
  • + 4
 @vinay: I was being flip with my original remark. The real answers are more interesting - from a reddit board:

First, though the scientific community may rely on metric, in US engineering, Imperial is still big (though certainly no longer universal). Even internationally, aviation is done in units of feet and nautical miles (while Airbus certainly doesn't design their planes to English units, air traffic is controlled to flight levels defined in feet and speeds defined in knots). US spaceflight was an offshoot of the aviation industry, so many of the preferences and practices used in aviation carried over into the space program.

The Apollo Guidance Computer was programmed in SI, but displayed and accepted data in English units. Mission reports, which documented the results of the mission from an engineer and scientific standpoint, used a mix of units, with the notable trend being engineering data (orbits, launch and landing reconstructions, performance of the various systems) being in English.

Shuttle used predominantly English units; SLS/Orion will be NASA's first human spaceflight program designed in metric. Outside of space, there's generally a mix of units, depending on the pedigree of the program. A lot of the aeronautics program collect and analyze data in English, but publish in metric. Newer programs skew towards metric.
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: You forgot the 2 most important MTB related measurements!

Beer = imperial
Wheel size = who f***ing cares
  • + 2
 @Nicksp894: as long as you use British pints and not those silly little American ones.
  • - 1
 @fartymarty: speaking of silly , boaty mcboat face , brexit , and Prince Charles the world's most uptight ass. Get off your high horse, people are people.
  • + 2
 @Beez177: how quaint!
  • + 3
 @Beez177: no need to be rude old chap...

PS it's just a bit of Trans Atlantic banter...
  • + 348
 I like to build my bikes to weigh 28.99 pounds. I don't have a good reason, but it should be the industry standard.
  • + 17
 HAHAHA You win !!
  • + 10
 So funny, I have had similar conversation in my head too. Current bike is 35 lbs and 28ish sounds so right. Biggest complaint right now is rider weight.
  • + 25
 28.99 pounds is the right balance between bearing size, durability, and weight.
  • + 0
 ...
2+8= 10
0.99= 1
------------
= 11

11:11 = SRAM Magic

Hahahahahahahahahahaha!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • + 3
 @RollinFoSho: Except 0.99 = 0.99, not 1
  • + 117
 Hmm, this is an interesting discussion and is bringing up some very relevant pointsWAIT YOU RODE AN EBIKE? GTFO OINOSUHVOUWNVIUUH(&@Y#%(&*@^
  • + 14
 Ya. That screws up your judgement right there. Might as well stop talking.
  • + 81
 What would my ideal bike weight be assuming strength and durability stay the same? Why wouldn't I want a 170mm enduro rig under 9lbs?
  • + 27
 because the weight of the bike helps with stability to some extent. My current ride is pretty heavy as far as enduro rigs go but the stability downhill is welcome.
  • + 4
 @adrennan: yeah what the guy above said, highly suggest taping a bit of lead to your bottom bracket and right by your headtube, you'll be astounded the strange effect it has on calming the ride and making the suspension more supple. I tried it and although I took it off eventually, being that my bike weighs 34 already, it was truly nice on the roughest descents.
  • + 2
 I don't weigh much! It's all relative haha
  • + 3
 @adrennan: if your riding involves some carrying on shoulder, then you'll want a lighter biker. Otherwise I agree with you
  • - 1
 Like a single use camera....
  • + 16
 I'm not buying this idea that a heavy bike is more stable. Yeah, it takes more energy to deflect from the path you intend. But it also takes more energy to put it back on that path after you get knocked about. It seems people are subconsciously trying to justify what they're used to or what they can afford. When lighter but just as durable bikes come about at a reasonable price, everyone on pinkbike will love them. They'll forget about ever having had this crazy notion that heavy bikes are good.
  • + 17
 @ryanandrewrogers:

Nonsense Mr. Rogers!!!!

I love it tho and can see it now! The next Enduro-trend!

160mm bike - check
Convertible fool face helmet - check
Knee pads - check
Integrated tools all over yer damn bike - check
Weights taped to yer frame to prove yer not a “casual all-mountain rider” but a genuine bad-ass endurobro/gal who’s so damn fast and so damn serious they have to prove they don’t give a fk about weight and it’s win or crash trying - double fkn check!
  • + 2
 @dfiler: IDK anything about subconscious justification, but I do know my wife weights 105 lbs and she feels much more stable on her DH bike compared to her trail bike. She doesn't get bucked around as much on her DH even though she is riding rougher trails.

Feel free to reply with innuendos.
  • + 14
 105 lbs is pretty light. She must be an unstable ride. ;-p

But seriously, If it were as simple as the heavier bike feeling better, you could simply strap weight onto her trail bike to make her happy.

It's the geometry, travel and everything else about the DH bike that makes it feel more stable. A light DH bike is even better. If you get knocked out of shape, you can actually pull the bike back under you. This is really obvious when watching kids ride. With a higher bike to body weight ratio, they can't recover well when shit gets out of hand. The bike is too heavy to muscle it around.
  • + 0
 @dfiler: i have ridden some very light bikes and this is just my opinion on the matter. I dont believe I would be as fast riding a 25-pound version of my bike.
  • + 0
 @adrennan: no it does not ...
  • + 2
 @adrennan: I was thinking, doesn't the mass moment of inertia of the wheels increase stability even more at speed? Obviously adding unsprung weight isn't good but we all need strong rims and tires so the added weight this comes with should be welcome. I think I use the gyroscopic effect a lot when steering at higher speeds (tilting the bike) and it also stabilizes the bike. But for low speed moves like riding up a steep switchback you have all your agility back. At least I don't think heavier wheels ever bothered me, though I asked the mikes what their take is on this. Personally I prefer my front wheel heavier than the rear. Would be nice my perception is right though. Just get heavy rims, tires and excess tire sealant and you solve all at once. Bigger wheels (29") have the edge here. The only downside would be the added unsprung weight.
  • + 4
 @duzzi: as i said just above your comment, this is just my opinion on the matter. i do not believe if somehow my canfield balance was 10 pounds lighter that it would feel as good at speed.
  • + 2
 @RichPune: is DH bike and trail bike a euphemism for something else?
  • + 2
 It blew my mind seeing that only a small percentage of people choose bikes under 19lbs.

There is no advantage in heavier bikes. Some people argue that they feel more stable, for example, in rockgardens, but you can achieve the same stability effect on a light bike simply bike entering the rockgarden faster. Here's the physics: p=m*v , p is linear momentum, m is mass, v is velocity.

Plus, on a light bike, you can manual, bunny-hop, endo, turn and corner easier. All of those allow you to go faster and/or smoother, so I dont understand why anyone wouldn't want the lightest bike possible.
  • + 3
 @XC-SCRUB: Same.. I mean, it says assuming strength and reliability remains the same!! Who wouldn't want a light bike!? I have been able to ride a xc bike at 7 kg.. amazing. I would love a 29er, 140mm travel under 10 kg..woohoo...
  • + 9
 This is worth a watch: www.youtube.com/watch?v=myFJTO8mdtw

Suspension allegedly performs better if there's a higher sprung to unsprung mass ratio (i.e. a heavier frame).
  • + 1
 /insert Pole joke/
  • + 10
 @XC-SCRUB: relevant user name
  • + 1
 @vinay: A heavy frame would increase stability. Heavy wheels require higher spring rates to allow them to react to terrain as quickly. Very heavy wheels would reduce the agility of the bike, both from inertia and gyroscopic effect.
  • + 2
 @rezrov: lighter wheels would improve that ratio also
  • + 2
 @ryanandrewrogers: I suspect your suspension is not setup right in the first place if this is the case.
  • + 1
 this man has an intuitive knowing @dfiler:
the best way of knowing
  • + 0
 @dfiler: The DH World Champ was reportedly adding weight for stability to his Demo when he moved to Specialized.
  • + 1
 @rezrov: Thanks for bringing this vid to our attention. This said, I don't totally agree with your conclusion. Their best rider did perform better with the lighter bike.

Also, from the beginning, they concluded that a surplus of 3 kg weight was negligible to adjust suspension spring rates, which I would tend to question considering the long WB and LR of the Pole for example.

In the end, the conclusion should be: "Except for Leon (by far, our best rider), this test proves that, with lighter bikes, we are riding with too much air pressure in our suspension (at least on a DH point of view)."
  • + 1
 @adrennan: A bike frame is like the housing of an engine, and there is no benefit adding weight to a housing. Call it a bike, a pair of shoes, the hull of a sailboat: the ideal weight is zero because the housing serves no other function other than delivering power to the medium (ground, or water).

Now, it is a different story if the housing center of mass somehow hinders performance. Then yes, adding mass somewhere might help. Obvious case is for displacement sailboats, where you must add ballast to avoid capsizing (but look at hydrofoils!). And less obviously so in a downhill bike, where ballast will change the center of mass and might make the bike work better because it feels more ... balanced ...

But otherwise weight of the housing (the bike) is always bad for the engine (you). There is no way out of it: it takes more power to move if you and your bike are heavier.
  • + 1
 @AbsolutX: I agree with you. You can't conclude shit if you have multiple variables when testing.
The proper way to test if bike weight matters, is if you adjust tire and suspension pressure in such a way that they would behave the same on the light and heavy bike. And the weights that are added to the bike must be placed at the center of mass of the weight-less bike (a bike definitelly doesn't ride the same if the weights are placed under the BB or above highest point of the top-tube).
  • + 1
 I own a 26" Stumpjumper Expert Evo which weighs in at 11.8 Kg with 2ply tires and 30mm rims.

When I received the bike it had 1,x Kg more. I replaced a lot of parts to make it really light, e.g. carbon bars, tubeless, pike, newman stem, 1x10 drivetrain.

The lighter the bike became during that process, the more mixed were my feelings about that bike. Accelaration and uphill qualities were becoming insane! But jumping became more and more of a suicide mission, as I did not feel the center of gravity of the bike anymore. The bike felt somehow undefined and had 0 self stability when I was taking off a kicker. So I ended up putting back tubes into the wheels to add some weight to it and get a defined and low center of gravity.

So to me there is absolutely no reason to build a super light bike as it absolutely ruins downhill and jump handling.
  • + 0
 @XC-SCRUB: I own a 26" Stumpjumper Expert Evo which weighs in at 11.8 Kg with 2ply tires and 30mm rims.

When I received the bike it had 1,x Kg more. I replaced a lot of parts to make it really light, e.g. carbon bars, tubeless, pike, newman stem, 1x10 drivetrain.

The lighter the bike became during that process, the more mixed were my feelings about that bike. Accelaration and uphill qualities were becoming insane! But jumping became more and more of a suicide mission, as I did not feel the center of gravity of the bike anymore. The bike felt somehow undefined and had 0 self stability when I was taking off a kicker. So I ended up putting back tubes into the wheels to add some weight to it and get a defined and low center of gravity.

So to me there is absolutely no reason to build a super light bike as it absolutely ruins downhill and jump handling.
  • + 3
 @RichPune: damn that's crazy!! It's almost like dh bikes are designed to handle rough stuff better than a trail bike!
  • + 0
 @nfontanella: "@RichPune: damn that's crazy!! It's almost like dh bikes are designed to handle rough stuff better than a trail bike!"
I though the exact same thing when I read that comment!
  • + 1
 @XC-SCRUB: wind is why I wouldn’t want it that light. Those few extra pounds help a lot
  • + 2
 @WasatchEnduro:
"Convertible fool face helmet - check"
Win!
  • + 1
 @Martron12: Thanks for pointing that out. I did not think about that.
  • + 1
 @alexdi: That's the interesting bit. Heavy wheels with a light frame would give more gyroscopic precession and more inertia. So when going straight you have more stability but when you tilt (bank/roll) the bike it will turn (yaw) in the proper direction more easily than if the frame would have been heavier. I don't know for sure but I do think I'm using precession a lot when cornering at speed. As an experiment, I might need to get one of those 2.5mm 700g Kenda DH tubes, dump it full of anti-leak slime and see how it goes Wink .
  • + 74
 I see the majority of us, so far, ride bikes between 31-32 pounds, but we want to ride bikes that weigh 27-28 pounds. That means we all bought $3000 - 3500 bikes with affordable parts, but we all wish we had the money to buy the full carbon $10,000 bling build.

Hmmm... seems about right.
  • + 1
 I like a 140/120 bike to be around 25 pounds. Pretty fun for up and down. I'd be fine with a 35 pound bike for lift-served, and I have ridden one in the past as my do it all bike.
  • + 7
 Um, my bike is a $10K carbon wonder bike and still just over 30 lbs. Once you put real tires and add CushCore along with truly durable wheels/cranks/bars/etc that is where you are going to be.

BTW I used to run what I "thought" was a solid 160 F/R setup that was 26.9 lbs. Then I put on some stronger bars. After that I went to more durable tires. That caused me to start cracking my carbon rims. Those needed more protection so had to add some more stuff. Etc, etc, etc.... End game 31 lbs and I am going faster than ever both up and down.
  • + 5
 You can stay at $1USD per gram for quite a while, and that's basically how it works up to $8k.
Past that, it's either bollocks, or the kind of diminishing returns nonsense that includes titanium hardware on a bike ridden by a fat out of shape oaf.
Of that last statement, I bring everything but the Ti goods.
  • + 3
 @kubikeman Nah, it means people currently ride a fully but decided a hardtail is actually good enough for what they ride.
  • + 1
 Nailed it!
  • + 8
 I ride a boutique bike and it is 32 lbs with 1,5 ply tyres. , 33 with 2 plies. Whenever I get asked about the weight people look at me as if I farted.
  • + 2
 Of course weight matters. If companies are going to keep banging us big $$$$ for carbon this and carbon that, it better damn well be light.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I ride a Jedi and I am always asked how much it ways .Typically I just push the bike towards them and tell them it weighs what it weighs. If they say it's to heavy I just laugh and tell them to man the F up.. It's a DH rig not a road bike.
  • + 2
 Except My full carbon 10,000 Bike weighs 33 lbs ????
  • + 0
 @SlodownU: sworks Enduro coil over any other mid/ long travel 29er. Anyday. And then I sell the carbon wheels, Spec paper tyres and buy dt 240/XM481 Minions DHF in DD and procore for the rear. That adds 2 pounds and she’s all better for it
  • + 0
 @salespunk: Just run Maxxis DD with real pressure and you dont need cush core.
  • + 0
 @poozank: nah, I went through SPec Grid (equal to DD) and Huck Norris... tyre slashed in two places, unrepairable. I'd say either DD + procore or Dual ply for anything involving speed.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: DD is so much better than grid. Corners better too thanks to the side all support.
  • + 0
 My MTB definitely didn't cost $10k and it weighs 28 lbs. Could easily bring it down below there with a few key upgrades but 28 works well for me.
  • + 1
 @poozank: i know there are slight differences but Grid, DD, SG are pretty much the same. I haven’t got issues with stability of Grid. Just punctures. DDs are not common in Europe. I’ve seen only DHR 2s and HR 2s in DD. And then they are pricey as fuk
  • + 58
 Bike weight matters at the airport
  • + 5
 this
  • + 55
 My wife weight is 21 stone and she rides gooood
  • + 143
 It's true, she does!
  • + 17
 @km79: Agreed Smile
  • + 8
 @km79: hahaha she loves a jock xxx
  • + 13
 @km79: I can second this. She does. Very, very well.
  • + 1
 @km79: lol....nice burn!
  • + 11
 Indeed, she is a bit of a legend.
  • + 8
 Just tried. Mmmyep, excellent!
  • + 11
 @BMXrad: Bloody predictive text changing it to jock.
  • + 16
 i am pleased to confirm it . breakfast was also nice
  • + 2
 @trauty: it certainly took a while till I got a go at er but everything you’ve read was true.
  • + 2
 @nyhc00: I found her “rear cassette” a tad dry and had to use some wet lube to get her into gear, but performed well after that.
  • + 1
 I just heard cousin eddie at the table in Christmas vacation when I read "goooood." That cat nip ain't too bad
  • + 0
 @trauty: yes breakfast's good but the ride was a bitte wobbly
8 stone would've given a better ride
  • + 45
 Need a category for don't know, don't care.
  • + 26
 however heavy needed to not break all the time is how i build my bikes
  • + 2
 I was thinking the same thing, there was no option for: I don't know the weight of my bike as I have never been bothered to weigh it as its pretty well irrelevant and somehow I can still have fun when I'm out riding.

5-10lbs is not the difference maker that will all of a sudden make people able to scrub every jump in the park, blow up every berm, eat up the nastiest root sections at full speed, or average 30 plus kms trail rides all of a sudden. It is however a good sales pitch for those who are easily manipulated into thinking that their equipment is whats holding back performance from being on par with the best of the best...
  • + 1
 @adrennan: spot on. When people ask, I’m like; “it weight (lifts up bike), errrrm, about that much”...
  • + 2
 @VPS13: if i need to drop 5 pounds off my bike, the rider is where the weight will come off easiest.
  • + 1
 This. I only guessed at my bikes weight so I could see the tally--bet that's what more people did than not.
  • + 19
 pedaling a heavier bike uphill will make YOU weigh less. personally that's what matters to me. mtb is fun, but it's a great workout that never gets boring. allows me to drink all the beer i want without gaining anything. if i didnt do that, i might actually lose weight.
  • + 6
 Pedaling a lighter bike harder will do that too.
  • - 1
 @nozes: If you do enough curls, 5lb dumbells will build muscle too, you'll just have to spend all day at it
  • + 2
 @VPS13: That's just a bad comparison.
On a bike you adjust the gears acordingly to how fast you're going. You're effort doesn't depend on bike weight.
At an x value of effort, you can either go at 20m/s on a 10kg bike, or go at 10m/s on a 20kg bike. (btw, It just an example, and the values aren't real)
  • + 1
 @XC-SCRUB: It was more a passive joke, who cares what your bike weighs if you enjoy riding it...
  • + 1
 @XC-SCRUB: Effort is independent of bike weight? Go pedal an XC whippet and a DH anvil, and then reevaluate that opinion..
  • + 1
 @mtbikeaddict: Yes, effort is independent of bike weight. It seems you didn't understand my explanation. I recommend you read my comment again. I'll try to explain better if you wish/request.
  • + 1
 @XC-SCRUB: Ah. You were saying effort depends on selected gear, while speed depends on weight? That's if the gears are different, which was beside the point. For effort to stay x in your example, different gears would be used on the different bikes. If they were congruent except for weight, effort would change. There's a limit to gears. The same gear ratio on two different bikes will still pedal differently. As I understand it, you said that even with a weight difference, effort can stay the same by switching gears. But we were saying that it takes more effort to move a heavier object faster...
  • + 18
 How is the Ideal bike weight number so high?

If strength, durability, etc are all the same I would ride a freaking 10lb bike if I could. I remember going from a 34lb beast to a 28lb bike and I would drop another 6-10lbs easy if I could and not have a bike that would be constantly broken.

Cheap, Light, Durable... Pick two.
  • + 8
 Higher weight=stability
Given how many pinkbike users are endurbros who tend to shuttle, heavy stability outweighs (pun intended) light and twitchy rides.
  • + 2
 I'm with you..
  • - 3
 Throw a balloon as far as you can. Now fill a balloon with water or sand and throw it. There is some low range where it’s too light to toss around. There is an upper range where it’s too heavy. That’s why 10lb bikes would suck. Harder to throw around. You need some substance.
  • + 1
 @speed10: exactly, it's a case of momentum. 29ers and slack geo only go so far!
  • + 1
 Stability is part of it, but notice that part of the poll mentioned nothing about price, performance, or maintenance. Less weight would be nice of course to a point, but not at the expense of performance or increased maintenance or costing a non-maintainable amount of money. Cause you know, shit always breaks anyways. A rule I have for components and such is don't buy it unless you can afford to buy two of them, or the extra bit money ensures it outlasts two or more of something else.
  • + 1
 @Metacomet: how about a 5kg bike, of which 4kgs are the wheels and tyres. You still get your stability, and also lose a ton of weight.
  • + 2
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: It's not absolute weight that matters, it's the ratio of sprung to unsprung weight. There's a practical limit to how light the wheels, swingarms, and relevant drivetrain components can be, so you have to manipulate the other side of the equation: frame weight. More frame weight means more stability and less agility. More wheel weight is just bad all around. If unsprung mass were negligible, there'd be no disadvantage to a similarly negligible frame weight.
  • + 2
 Funny to hear "a 34lb beast" nowadays lol, I remember when 50lbs was pretty much industry standard for gravity bikes, some of those old v10 builds were over 60. Shit the old super monsters forks were around 10lbs by themselves Smile
  • + 3
 @speed10: That's a poor analogy. That's the case for a balloon because an air filled balloon has very little momentum to counter air resistance. Not the same situation as a bike.
  • - 1
 @treesmoker: I remember watching an Ali C Vlog not too long ago. He essentially said what I’m saying. It might seem counterintuitive, and in flies against the industry “you need carbon everything,” but I feel, at experientially, that it is true. I don’t want to bunny hop a 45lb bike, but equally a 6lb nothing bike (assume strength is adequate) will likely bunny hop worse than a 24lb bike. This is my experience. Probably others too.
  • + 0
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: the weight of a bike has little to do with its "twitchyness" or other have said "stability". If you could, by magic, increase or decrease the weight of every single part of a bike by the same % you will discover that when it comes to "twitchyness" a 2 Kg bike would ride the same of a 16 kg one. And that is because their center of mass would remain constant, and the center of mass is the only thing that matters for a bike "stability".
  • + 0
 @speed10: The lighter the bike, the better it will bunnyhop.
Unless you can somehow jump higher holding a 24lbs weight than when holding a 6lbs weight XD
  • + 2
 I own a 26" Stumpjumper Expert Evo which weighs in at 11.8 Kg with 2ply tires and 30mm rims.

When I received the bike it had 1,x Kg more. I replaced a lot of parts to make it really light, e.g. carbon bars, tubeless, pike, newman stem, 1x10 drivetrain.

The lighter the bike became during that process, the more mixed were my feelings about that bike. Accelaration and uphill qualities were becoming insane! But jumping became more and more of a suicide mission, as I did not feel the center of gravity of the bike anymore. The bike felt somehow undefined and had 0 self stability when I was taking off a kicker. So I ended up putting back tubes into the wheels to add some weight to it and get a defined and low center of gravity.

So to me there is absolutely no reason to build a super light bike as it absolutely ruins downhill and jump handling.
  • + 1
 @XC-SCRUB: it’s not really apples to apples. Bunny hop is not the same as jumping holding weights. I can actually bunnyhop higher on a 25lb bike than I can static jump with a 10lb kettlebell. Figure that out.
  • - 1
 @speed10: "Bunny hop is not the same as jumping holding weights" ---I'm not sure about you, but I hold my bike when bunnyhopping XD

"I can actually bunnyhop higher on a 25lb bike than I can static jump with a 10lb kettlebell"
Here's the figuring out:
1: A static jump holding a kettlebell doesn't use the exact same muscles as bunnyhoping.
2: When bunnyhoping you preload the suspension first, which works like a boost in strenght (because you're essentially storing energy)(But rear suspension isn't beneficial).
3: On a bike you can get up an obstacle of height x, even when moving the center of mass less than x.
  • + 4
 @XC-SCRUB:
1. I think we agree. Bunny hop and static jump are not the same. Regardless of you tongue in cheek comment that the bike is technically a weight. Obviously the bike is also a lever and machine that offers advantages.
2. I bunny hop highest on rigid bmx bikes. Suspension doesn’t really help my bunnyhop, and all record hops have been on rigid bikes.
3. Wut?
4. I maintain that there is such a thing as too light a bike. You’re only arguement against me involves static jumps with weights.
5. In conclusion, you are a jackass.
  • + 1
 @speed10: Your right it seems as my rune is really heavy. I'd like something lighter for maneuverability
  • + 2
 @speed10: I like some junk in the trunk too
  • + 0
 @speed10:

"2. I bunny hop highest on rigid bmx bikes. Suspension doesn’t really help my bunnyhop, and all record hops have been on rigid bikes." --- You missed the part where I said "Rear suspension isn't beneficial". On a large bike, front suspension helps when it comes to picking up the front wheel.

"3. Wut?" ---- www.youtube.com/watch?v=mvfce4bEZpg&t=1s
Go straigth to the end of the video. As you can see he didn't bunnyhop hard enough to elevate himself 1,5m in the air, but he still managed to get over the 1,5 meter rock.
This effect is even more exaggerated on bikes with very low standover height, such as bmx's or trials bikes, because they allow you to pull the bike really close to your body (like he does in the video, since that's an essencial part of this technique).
  • + 3
 @XC-SCRUB:
3. Ok. I understand what you are saying, but how is this information pertinent to either of our claims?

If we are going to only discuss bunnyhops, then I’ll go on record saying that weight is not near as important as geo and the ground you’re taking off from. Try hopping a 18lb TT bike. Then a 25lb DJ bike. Then try hopping in the downslope in sand. The weight is not near as important as these other factors. Just like angles can be too steep or too slack. Just like tires can be too narrow or too fat. Just like everything on the bike (in the world) too much one way or another isnt ideal. Too light a bike is a thing.
  • + 1
 @speed10:
3. It is pertinent because you said "I can actually bunnyhop higher on a 25lb bike than I can static jump with a 10lb kettlebel."
Then I used several arguments to explain that phenomenon. One of of them was "On a bike you can get up an obstacle of height x, even when moving the center of mass less than x.".
When static jumping you can do the same because you can pull your legs up after trusting(not sure if that's the right word) your self up, enabling you to get up something that's is higher than the elevation that occured to your center of mass.
Then I showed you a video that proved this phenomenon is much greater on a bike than when static jumping, since you would not be able to get up that rock even when not holding any weights.
Thus explaining why you can jump higher on a 25lbs bike than holding 10lb kettlebells.

This debate isn't about how frame geometry or the physical properties of the ground affect bunnyhops. It is about how the weight of a bike affects it's handling.
One guy used bunnyhoping as an example for his argument and that's why we went on to discussing bunnyhops.
I'm pretty sure that makes sense. If someone is talking about weight, i'm not gonna be like "Ohhh! But the chainring size and hub standard... And also the geo and tire width... And the grip diameter and colorway... "

Comparing what we now know about angles and tire width doesn't prove that a light bike is worse than an heavy. False analogy fallacy is what that is called.
  • + 22
 I've no idea what any of my bikes weigh.
  • + 9
 Same. Can kinda guess but don't know for sure.
  • + 4
 Same here, just a wild guess. 13kg for my steel hardtail (130mm forks) seemed reasonable. Kind of silly poll not to ask what kind of bike people ride though. For an XC race bike this may seem heavy. For a DH bike it would be amazing. For an e-bike, I should probably do a better guess Wink .
  • + 5
 I used to weigh my bikes but found psychologically it didn't help because they were always heavier than I thought.
  • + 15
 I use water as a ballast. I put it in a bottle and mount it just forward of the bottom bracket in a convenient little holder. If I ever get tired on a climb I just drink some to lighten the load.
  • + 17
 If you don't mind, it doesn't matter.
  • + 2
 Or.. with no mind.it doesn't matter
  • + 2
 My problem is I'd rather the bike was strong, I broke a bike in half before, and it was NOT a pleasant experience. Also it's called "MOUNTAIN biking" which conjures up images of lumberjacks on bikes for me.
  • + 15
 It weight what it weighs... It cheaper to lose the 6 lb I packed on over Christmas from over endulging!!!
  • + 1
 i'm with you - still fighting that christmas stuff
  • + 1
 You're right, unless you start analyzing a trade off at time spent at work for some professions... There is always a breakout point where spending money and enjoying some beers is more palatable
  • + 4
 Weight off your bike makes a huge difference compared to weight off your body.
  • + 4
 @skelldify: going to the gym and getting stronger and losing weight makes your bike feel lighter.

I have built my bike so that its strong and reliable so there isn't a massive amount of weight I can get off it without spending dentist money (which I don't have).

If I switched to a Ti frame (29HT) I could save a few pounds but it's a lot easier to eat better to lose the same weight.
  • + 11
 It really depends on what the bike is for. And anyone that says it doesn't matter hasn't gone from a heavy bike to a light one.

Example. My old DS race bike was a hard tail and weighed in at 35lbs. My current bike build has 150/160 travel and will be plenty durable and should come in around 28-29lbs.

If it didn't matter Transition would have sold a LOT more Smugglers. That's been the best low travel bike around for a few years now and it doesn't sell as much as it should because it weighs 32-33 pounds. That bike should weigh more like 28. That is a big big difference and does matter.

Dedicated DH bikes or free ride bikes. Not as much. More important that it's trustworthy. Bas Van Steenbergen's Rampage Hyper was heavy as hell but when you're building a bike to huck off huge cliffs weight isn't your number 1 priority.
  • + 2
 Truth. When buying my DH rig I didn't care about weight. My XC bike is pretty darn light, and I'd like a full squish trail bike under 29-30lbs...
  • + 3
 The smuggler is a great bike. But really it's just another good looking bike with FSR suspension. I agree that it would have sold better at a lower weight.
  • + 2
 Bullshit, bollocks, rubbish and utter bullshit.
  • + 1
 Well Transition can't sell enough Sentinels and Smugglers, soooold out! I went from a high spec X01 level Large 2017 Smuggler (with piggyback)--maybe 31lbs to the same spec Sentinel that is 1.5lbs heavier. The Sentinel blows the doors off the Smug uphill. It's not always about the weight, but the position of YOUR weight.
  • + 1
 @ukr77: new sentinel has updated angles and linkage comparef to old smuggler... no?
  • + 2
 If you're not a pro racer, it doesn't matter.
  • + 14
 Props to the 4 committed monsters who would stick with a 40+ pound bike.
  • + 3
 Wouldn't these just be e-bikes? They probably don't easily go below 40 lbs.

Edit: Just learned from the comment section that at least one of these is a chromo tandem.
  • + 4
 My Norco shore tips the scale at over 50+ pounds and I put up with the beast
  • + 0
 44 lbs hardtail here. Not an e-bike, not a tandem. Steel frame and some old school components are all you need.

When building another bike, I would need to stick with 40+ lbs bike, considering I don't buy into these new unnecessary, unreliable, expensive new standards to save a few grams.
  • + 4
 @adam102: or few kilos
  • + 9
 I ride Moto,l so anything under 104kg (230lbs) feels light and is easy to move around.
My Genius LT comes in at 12.79KG (28.2lbs) and I love how it feels and my M9 is 18.5kg (40.8lbs) and I love how it feels as well.
Would I like my Genius to climb up a logging road like a 6KG cross bike? Yes, but I wouldn't like it snapping in half at speed sending me and its dead carcass into a tree causing irreparable damage to my ego and my wallet. Plus I would have to deal with my wife telling me to be more careful and stop riding bikes like i'm still 21.....and she doesn't forget anything so that's a conversation I will end up having for the next 50+ years or until I die doing something awesome
  • + 6
 I think rider weight plays into this... at 195cm (6'5) and 100kg (220lbs) I'm gonna notice a 33lb bike that wont break on me over a 30lb bike a lot less than a 75kg rider will... That's why I chose to go with a Knolly Delirium.. alloy battle tank with a bit more mass to it than most would be okay with but proportionally speaking I don't think I really notice it so much... then again I've never cared much for the uphill bits anyways!
  • + 5
 I'd add to the few people on here that say some weight in the bike helps with stability. I've ridden a few long travel, lightweight wonderbikes from a company that seems to place all of their emphasis on prioritizing lightweight, and they descended horribly. Didn't feel planted at all, felt skittish and pinballed all over the trail. Couldn't hold a line to save my life. Riding those same trails on my own bike, which was about 6lbs heavier felt light night and day. Stable, confidence inspiring, held whatever line I wanted.
  • + 4
 A Scott huh?
  • + 4
 I posted the weight of my 3 bikes:

Full Suss Trek Fuel XC 26er: 26lbs
Commuter/Adventure 700c/29er Rigid Steel Bike: 28lbs
Chromoly Rigid MTB Tandem 26er: 42lbs

They all feel pretty good for what they're designed for. None of them feel too heavy.
  • + 6
 What are these lbs you speak of ?
Whenever I hear Americans talk about weight I feel like I have been transported back to 1918.
  • + 3
 Steampunk!!!
  • + 3
 Get used to it, they're gonna be a yuuuge trading partner for you (or not) unless someone pulls the emergency brakexit. How many pounds is a lb of euros worth?
  • + 2
 @BenPea: bout 3 stone.
  • + 1
 Is it sad that I read "lbs" in the first line of this post as "local bike shop" and didn't really think it didn't make sense. Direct sales bikes are showing up everywhere on my local trails.
  • - 1
 @von-rumford...yeah, that's 'cause we're talking about WEIGHT. Kilos are a measurement of MASS.
  • + 4
 I filled this out for a DH bike, so 39lb actual weight, wish it was a 32lb. Gonna be way different from XC folks out there. Just wanted to say hello to the other 18 dudes with 40lb bikes that buy all the cheapest heaviest parts that lasts forever
  • + 5
 It's not my 32lb (14.5Kg) Process... it's my eating... I could be way faster climbing if I just lost 30lb (13.6Kg) my self.... or maybe the extra keep me grounded... gravity does suck.....
  • + 3
 does the weight of your bike matter? Of course it does. Depending on it's main purpose weight plays a crucial role no matter how good/experienced rider one may be.

An XC rider isn't going to win medals on a 30+lbs bike against other riders and a DH rider isn't going to make it down the mountain with a super light bike that won't be able to hold up to the harsher terrain.

It's all relative but overall weight will always matter when it comes to endurance & speed.
  • + 5
 We KNOW most of Pinkbike readers are from USA or Canada... but PLEAASSSE!!!! use Kilograms also... at least a close aproximation.!!!
  • + 3
 What about the Brits. They weigh in stone. Now that is one that most of the world need to look at conversion tables for ;-)
  • + 1
 @MMOF: we weigh ourselves in stone. Everything else is kind of interchangeable but don’t ask me to convert something in my head!
  • + 1
 @ThomDawson: Aagh, I have family over there and I still don't know it. How big is the stone is a common joke ;-)
  • + 5
 @MMOF: whoops sorry hit the wrong button man! Yeah the uk is an odd place, we do use metric but whether it’s inches, mm, lbs, kg nobody really cares all that much it seems. Everything comes in different measurements. Perhaps it’s a conspiracy to keep us all guessing while the man takes all our lbs?
  • - 1
 Printed tire size on MTB sidewall is in inches while the metric size is microscopic. Perhaps you would like a chart for that too? While we are at it, can we stop calling 29ers "29ers"? I'd like to refer to them by their metrically correct (or MC) dimension. But travel, shock sizes and everything else shall remain metric... as a form of compromise.

Above all, we need a safe space for those who get confused, offended, or triggered by non-MC Numbers and discussions. A place where everyone is included and coddled whether they are imperial, metric, or bi-numerical.
  • + 3
 @MMOF:
1 stone =14 lb or 6.36 kg
So a light Xc bike would be a good stone and a half ,
Enduro 2 stone , DH maybe 3 to 3 and a half stones !!
  • + 1
 @flyingfox49: Thanks flyingfox. Glad that the welsh have this off the top of their heads :-) I'd 100 x upvote you for this knowledge.
  • + 1
 FYI-Canada is officially metric, but our proximity to the States dictates some knowledge of pounds and US gallons. Just divide by 2.2 for lb's to kg's
As for converting a US price to Canadian? Just double itFrown
  • + 1
 @ThomDawson: Up until about 2000 I'd have agreed but Kg have become the norm now I'd say, I don't know what I weigh in stone anymore just Kg. Maybe due to my job I guess if you don't think Kg is now prevalent in the U.K., hospital drug doses etc all ml/Kg etc when ever patient weights discussed it's always Kg.
  • + 1
 @StevieJB: yeah you’re right, of course in many professions it’s all metric. And I know what I weigh more accurately in kg and generally my generation work easier with metric but until the oldies croak I think we’ll still have the odd mix. I don’t think miles are going away, nor is a lb of bananas for a £.
I guess it’s the same everywhere though (apart from Europe who seem to have metric pretty dialled?). Once my kids are my age now stone and ounces will have long gone.
  • - 3
 For crying out loud! Please... kilos are MASS, and pounds are WEIGHT! You can't really interchange the two... you don't weigh _ kg. Going to the Moon will decrease your weight (lbs), but it hasn't vaporized your bodily matter, so your mass (kg) doesn't change...
  • + 5
 @mtbikeaddict: lol yeah I forgot about those riding trips on the moon. In every day life it doesn’t matter AT ALL. Except for those who know better and must have the whole world and even those on the moon know it.
  • + 1
 @ThomDawson: Exactly. It doesn't matter at all. So why does everyone complain that it's not listed in kg, when lbs is more accurate and easier? The article poster can use lbs if they want, everyone else has the right to whatever they want to use. If it bothers you, convert it. Seriously. Oh wait, this is pinkbike... pointless complaining is to be expected... never mind.
  • + 1
 @ThomDawson: Oh, and by the way, my post must've come across wrong. I wasn't saying that people shouldn't use kg; I don't really care what someone uses, and most of the world uses kg. I was just pointing out all of the people complaining that someone dared to use lbs to measure weight. So what. As you said, "In everyday life it doesn't matter AT ALL." Sorry if I came off as a rude know-it-all. I guess I was pointlessly complaining about pointless complainers... wow. Big Grin
  • + 3
 I think it depends massively on where you ride your bike. If you live in a bike park you probably don't care at all what you bike weighs, you just want it to be plush and durable. If you ride more Trail/XC or actually race enduro then the weight matters a lot more. More watts per kilo is more speed up the climbs or putting in less energy to ride the same speed. Win either way.
  • + 1
 I think the point though is that you quickly adapt. If you live in the Himalayas for three months, then come back to sea level, for a while you're realizing the benefits of having adapted to the higher altitude, but then after time you lose it as your body adapts again to sea level. Ideally, you would only ride your light race bike on race day, so that you realize the performance gains of the lighter bike.
  • + 1
 @hangdogr: That depends on the discipline. Xc definitely want lighter. Down hill ..I prefer a little more weight.
  • + 3
 Surprised at the weights of bikes mentioned - especially the guys saying the have expensive carbon enduro bikes and mentioning weights like 33lbs, I'd be pissed if I spend big money on high end carbon for it to end up that weight. I just took my enduro bike on a plane so weighed it on a digital hanging scales so know exactly what it weighs and it's 14.8kg or 32.6lbs. Radon Swoop 170, only carbon it has are the bars, it's not standard spec but equally not high end. XT shifter & mech, Zee brakes 203/180 rotors, reverb stealth, Truvativ stem, Ragley Carbon bars, DT Swiss 350 XD hubs, GX cassette & cranks, wtb i25 rims, sapim race spokes, Rock Razor SG, Magic Mary snakeskin, tubeless, Lyrik, Monarch RTC3, DMR V12 Mg, brand X saddle.
  • + 3
 Dumb poll. If strength and durability were the same why would anyone choose anything other than the sub 19lbs option. Unless they assume that in reality this means a shit ton of $ or is impossible
  • + 2
 The "go out and have fun on whatever you've got" seems like the best comment so far. I got curious once to see what my bike weighed, so I wheeled my bike into the house with the brilliant idea to get on my wife's high dollar, super body metric measuring digital wonder scale she keeps hidden in her closet - dam if I'll ever do that again - totally screwed up the scale by maxing it out and discovered that that I was 20 lbs heavier with 8 percent more body fat than i had at the last physical. Total buzzkill. Worst part was the three sad faced heart emojis that came up on the screen before it turned off, which according the maker Tanita, meant I already had one foot in the grave. Suffice it to say I dramatically changed my diet and started working out a minimum of three days a week. Things are now about where they should be for a reasonably fit geezer that still loves the outdoors.
  • + 2
 How could anyone answer the second question with anything but the lightest possible weight? It lays out the assumption that strength and durability stay the same. The advantages of less weight may be tiny, but if the bike is as strong/durable as you need it there's zero reason not to go for the lightest possible.
  • + 2
 So, doesn't it matter how weight is distributed between sprung and unsprung weight, mass moment of inertia of the wheels vs total system weight. We're geeks here right? We're not just going to answer how much our bikes weight. It is not a nice thing to ask either


(and to be honest I don't even know).
  • + 2
 @Paul Aston

Ok, I dont understand why all the test bikes are so heavy anyway.

My currend 180mm Travel rig weighs in at 33,x pounds. Large frame with DH yyres, big brakes, dropper post, 1x12 drive train and 2.2 lbs per tyre, not taking into account the procore which adds around a pound for two wheels. There is only two carbon components on the bike and that is the handlebar and the cranks. Aluminum frame, aluminum wheels. open bath cartridge up front, capable shock in the rear.

Since your test bikes are rarely "budget builds" - I dont get how they tend to be so heavy.

You can easily get to a modest weight today, not by speccing flimsy parts but just shying away from the parts made from billets of lead. (I mean, I got to 33,x pounds even with 2 lead parts, in this case brakes and grips). I could have easily taken it down to 32 pounds.
  • + 2
 I'd rather see the poll let us answer "what do you think a bike of XC category should ideally weigh?" - 22lbs "what do you think a bike of AM/TR/EN category should ideally weigh?" - 26lbs "what do you think a bike of DH category should ideally weigh?" - 34lbs
  • + 2
 XC: don't know
Trail: 30~ give or take 3 lbs.
Endo: 32~ +-3lbs
DH: don't know I always took the long legged endures to the park.
Ebike: Don't care too much. I'll try my aunt's out for shits and giggles when she gets it. (She's the category everyone claims to be fine with: older, disabled foot, trying to lose weight but not ready for serious pedaling) She is a hair away from pulling the trigger on a haibike. I'm pretty excited for her. She taught me to skate half pipe, sold me my first mtb in the 90's, got me out of school to snowboard and ski. It was a bummer when she had to slow down so whenever someone tries to tell me ebikes should be banned I think they should just rim job a porcupine.

Sorry to get off topic.
  • + 2
 Years ago my (in my XC youth) my sponsor built a Fat chance Ti Eddy that came in at 19 lbs..
Bike was horrible to ride, really tweaky. bounced an skipped off every root an bump in the trail
For me an ideal weight of any non DH bike is sub 30.
Over 30 for DH
  • + 7
 I have changed bikes, going from 29 lb to 32-33 lb, with the same wheels/tires... Did not notice the weight 'cause the heavier bike had a very nice pedal position and platform. Geometry is more important than what people think..
  • + 3
 To be fair, everything sucked back then (I had an '87 Fisher Hoo Koo e Koo). I built up a 2015 Pivot LES hardtail 29er at sub-21 lbs. and that thing is amazing – fast and stable.
  • + 4
 I have a 20lb xc machine and the thing rips and I would want it lighter. The twitchiness comes from the short wheelbase. Use your legs as shock absorbers and your butt as a rudder to weight the bike properly at the right times and it wont bounce around so much.
  • + 2
 As a imperial weight user "American " Its strange I know almost every bike part I have in Grams , but only know my bikes weight in pounds. Similarly suspension, droppers and wheels are MM but I only really know frame measurements in inches. This could be primarily do to local journalism listing things in imperial units?
  • + 1
 The title asks if weight matters but there is no answering option that expresses that it doesn't matter. I don't know what my bike weighs. Weighed it once but I can't remember the number and replaced various parts since than anyway...

/edit: To be clear: I don't think that bike weight doesn't matter I just don't care about the number.
  • + 2
 my bronsonCC was 5 pounds lighter than my alloy '18 smuggler and I can notice. But they are both fun. I'd prefer my bike was lighter though. It makes a big difference on the ol' 1500ft climb every time I ride
  • + 3
 wheres the "weighs 27- 28 pound option with stock paper thin tires, 30+ once you put tires on that can survive an enduro race,
  • + 1
 Don't forget the durability factor. A ultralight / superlight / featherweight frame with similar components will not survive the eventual crashes of our sport. Even those race-dedicated machines, have problems surviving the whole season.

So,
technology may be able to offer us an antigravity-feel superlight bike, especially if money is not an issue, but remember:

You WILL crash!

Personally I do select parts that will live as long as possible. My list of priorities is:

-Performance (how well this part, does what is supposed to do)
-Reliability (is it going to perform the same as long as I service it?)
-Durability (it competes with the above. Is it going to stay alive after some brushing, knocking and crashing? )
-Servicability (do I need to send it back to NASA for service? I prefer not)
-Weight (of course!)
-Looks (sure. It matters we all know that)
  • + 1
 I'm 135lb and currently riding 29lb carbon Strive. It's just perfect for all-day rides and this bike feels like a mid-travel trail bike. But when it comes to taking a-lines, I felt much more confident while riding my (now past) Summum that was around 35-36lb. Im might sound crazy but as long as I want to have single bike I'm looking right now for something 30lb+, therefore new 170mm mini-DH righ with coil on the rear sound like a good choice. Nevertheless, not going above 35lb is very important for me for all-rounder bike and crucial – light wheels.

Disclaimer: I'm from EU so for me "all-rounder" means riding an average of a little bit harsher trails than is US, I believe.
  • + 1
 The average harshness of the trail.... pretty subjective there, m8. Also, you must be forgetting who invented off road cycling in the first place. You and your high horse can eat it. FreedomUnits Baby.
  • + 1
 The variety in Europe is awesome. I was just talking to a French dude about it last night at the bar. The question is, where are your trails? The eastern block doesn't look as interesting as the west to me for riding. Spain's trails are fairly gnarly, I have seen first hand, but Utah has some similar rough stuff once you get away from Park City and the tourist centers and out into the stuff the locals ride. But does Poland have any worse than the scree and granite of the US east coast?
I think I am going to have to do a riding tour of Europe to judge for myself.
  • + 2
 I don’t remember any time being at any of the bike parks in Canada and shooting the $h1t with the racers and riders and referring to bikes or parts weight in Kg... Just saying.
  • + 1
 I didn't read all the comments so probably this has been said before, but this poll is so flawed. Firstly, the first question does not include my answer. Which is 'Í don't know' . I own a kitchen scale but nothing I can use to weigh my bike with. And if the question is 'does it matter', then anyone who honestly would answer 'no' would not know what their bikes weigh because why would you weigh it if you don't think it matters.
Secondly, the second question totally misses the point. If strength and durability would not suffer of course you would like your bike to be lighter (unless you don't actually use your body strength to get it uphill). But something always suffers. It can be stiffness, strength or your wallet. Ideal bike weight is a compromise. If you take away the disadvantage there is nothing to compromise.
  • + 1
 I dont bother to think to much on frame weight. I would rather have a bike that lasts then being a weight wheenie. Better to have a light to average light wheels than anything. They are the most noticeable things when it comes to riding and bike performance.
  • + 1
 I'll take durability and comfort over weight (to a degree). When possible, money spent on wheels and tires is the best investment, IMHO, as it lowers your rotating mass. Personally, I'll go for the lightest,widest rim I can (the two are not always mutually exclusive, especially if you tend to ride gingerly), and pair it with a high volume tire. Air doesn't weigh much, and the volume allows you to run lower pressures for traction, especially tubeless. TCS is the best thing that's happened for my hardtail in a long time.
Seems like all my bikes, regardless of if they're full sus. or not, always end up back at around 31 lbs regardless of cost or farkles.
  • + 1
 Overall bike's weight hardly tells anything about it's performance on the trail. Light rims plus burly DH shock vs heavy rims and xc Shock may end up weighting the same. Yet on the trail I'd choose the first one to the other any day... I think 14 kg should be the limit for an all-mountain rig that aims at climbing as well as pinning down, though.
  • + 1
 115 lb female here...yep...bike weight matters...definitely going up...and to a lesser degree going down as well. 3 lbs is a HUGE difference when climbing steep technical stuff. I might be able to make 3-4 moves on the heavier bike, but then I am done and have to walk some, whereas I might be able to clear all 6 or 7 on the lighter bike. I can also go a lot longer and faster on the lighter bike. I can manage a heavy bike on wide open flattish terrain but it is scary on narrow trails with drop off or deep ruts because if I tip the bike just a little to the side the weight can topple me over. I calculate my 25 lb bike is like a 44 lb bike for a 200 lb rider...riding an ebike without the motor !
  • + 4
 I’m 275lbs. I need to lose a lot of my own weight before the weight of my bike matters all that much.
  • + 2
 im 246lb and know what you mean although before My last bulk up( im also a weight lifter) I was 217lb. And can't tell a ounce of difference on the climbs now I’m 30lbs heavier but that might be because I’ve doubled my squat weight in a year
  • + 1
 I think you guy's need to run a test ! One rider on three different trails with the same bike setup heavier , lighter and average bike weight. Could be both enduro and DH. Personally , I think lighter is faster. Lighter = faster acceleration , faster deceleration. Look at F1 , they don't make cars heavy to win races !
  • + 3
 F1 cars don't race downhill
  • + 1
 This poll is a bit "light" as the weight question is a twisted question, because you talk about total weight, meaning static global weight, but you don't talk about the most important overall: the masses in movement. This is where weight counts the most and makes sense. A 10 kg bike with shitty wheels rides bad, whereas a 15kg bike with well-balanced wheels including good hubs, right spoke tension and good tires at the right pressure can be really awesome. I've experienced that so many times. Weight problems mainly appears when you have to carry or push your bike on steep ascents.
  • + 1
 Wouldn't the weight of the bike have relevance in combination with rider weight? My Insurgent currently weighs 14.8kg wihtout the motherload strap with a tube which is quite heavy - I had to go for strong DH rims and bars as carbon wasn't for me. However, I only weigh 69kg which means that a lot of the mass I am carrying is the bike, making things harder. I notice that at 15kg, I am right at the limit on being able to push hard on the bike without being exhausted - but that is due to my lack of training. I have thought of running DH casings in the offseason just to get stronger and then swap back to normal tyres - the penalty being I am already quite hard on my gear, last thing I want is to get used to destroying even more tyres!
  • + 5
 Does bike weight matter ?

Yes

The end.
  • + 2
 Need to work on your second question. Of course if strength and durability stay the same I would want the bike under 19lbs. However, in the spirit of the question I selected 27-28lbs.
  • + 1
 I selected under 19lb
  • + 1
 The bike that gives me the biggest smile at the end of a ride.Nothing else matters for me.Today was a downhill shuttle day and such a lot of fun on a 36lb(or whatever he weighs) bike with great company and brilliant trails.Tomorrow I'll ride my trail bike and hopefully have the same happy face having ridden in a completely different way! I say hopefully but its actually guaranteed I'll have fun.
  • + 1
 Depends on the bike and it's intended use. Personally I'd be happy with anything under 30lbs/13.6kgs. My current old school Cannondale Prophet is at a guess 34 or 35lbs. (15.5 ish kgs) It will get lighter as I upgrade stuff and feel lighter when I get my fitness back. (Got very lazy after a wreck)
  • + 1
 What do I do with the fact that the difference between the most common weight range (31-32) and the most desired weight range ( 27-28 ) is 4 lbs, which is at least what I've put on in weight since sliding into sloth over this winter so far
  • + 2
 Honestly having a bike that weighs less is great for climbing but kinda sucks for descending. Reason is there's no rotational weight to keep you going and when the wind is a factor you're pretty much hooped.
  • + 1
 My local trails take a lot of pedaling, no hills longer than like maybe a mile - so it's up and down and flat and up and down. So I think if you don't have sustained descents, a lighter bike is nicer because you're pedaling it all the time. Not that my bike is super light (about 30lbs), but if I got drop any weight for free, I'd take it. I could certainly drop weight for a sum of cubic dollars, but it's not really worth it to me - that's the math everyone has to do.
  • + 1
 It does not have to be feather weight, climbing must be easy, and going down must be secure. Everything between 11-13 KG (24 - 30 lbs) is ok, of course assuming that a bigger travel most of times means more weight.

PS: not everybody use pounds!!!
  • + 1
 Bike weight definitely matters if you have to pedal yourself up a hill. When it comes to weight it's relevant to what/how the bike will used. For a 29r trail bike with 120-130mm of travel 26lbs is my limit on weight. For an AM style rig with the big wheels 27-28lbs is a solid setup weight. For XC full suspension 22lbs or less depending on your pocket book and riding weight. For a frame of reference I'm currently 230lbs before gear. There are light economical options available if you know what to look for. As always I highly recommend www.light-bicycle.com rims from personal experience and cost.
  • + 1
 for dh bikes there is a point where they can be to light and will get kicked around more by bumps and ect. there is this thing called the "trophy truck effect" which is they weigh so much because they have too. if you build a super light weight truck it will not track at 100+ mph through whoops like a heavy ones will.
  • + 3
 I want my bike to weigh negative 3 pounds....so I have to tether it down when my fat-ass isn't sitting on it. Helium injected.
  • + 2
 Try an ebike, it would at least be able to ride on its own.
  • + 1
 In a recently Dirt Max interview with Nico Vouilloz, he clearly says too light bike is not good at all for DH, even if stiff. He assumes some teams must hidde some wheight inside the bike to make it heavier...
  • + 1
 i never build light bikes my current k9 dh001 is a whopping 47lbs and it feels better than any bike ive ever owned it dont bounce all over the place and get deflected off every little thing!
  • + 1
 Sad that nationalism permeates every single aspect of life no matter how inconsequential. Can't discuss anything at all on the internet without the crazies coming out of the woodwork.
  • + 0
 Does the weight affects your riding? Yes of course. But not always as much of us think. Meaning it is not always a desirable thing to have the lightest bike. I guess it is a personal preference as everything in modern bikes.

Beer
  • + 1
 Sorry, but I HAVE NO IDEA how much my bike weights, rilly! So I cannot answer in this poll. It lacks the most important answer - "I give a sh*t as long as it is lighter than an e-bike".
  • + 1
 I have a m9 that weighs about 40.8 and it is so damn planted and has loads of grip. It's horrible for jumping off small lips but it's very stable at high speeds. I honestly didn't mind the weight that much
  • + 1
 Same as chicks- built for comfort. Or built for speed?

Ones built for speed need careful handling or you'll break something.

Ones built for comfort....go nuts! They suck that shit right up!
  • + 3
 It only matters if it's more than about 32 lbs. If your bike is there or under you're golden.
  • + 4
 I'm curious to hear some people weigh in on this...
  • + 1
 If you're fast, you're fast! If you're slow, you're 1st loser! This seems like an experiment of mechanical or mental advantage that didn't work! Get you some Richie Rude time!
  • + 1
 Assuming durability would stay the same? As in stay pretty terrible? Then ideally I’d like it to be lighter. But I’d happily take more strength and the weight that comes with that.
  • + 1
 what a load of fucking shite geomatrons must be if you need to add lead weights so it rides ok ,talk about fashion victim to the long reach possie ....hahahaaaaa........ flat bars sir....or maybe a bottle cage or two.....
  • + 1
 Weight matters to me.
Trek Session (26)- 17,2kg.
Giant Trance (27,5) - 13,3kg.
Cove Hummer Ti (26) - 10,8kg.
On One Inbred (rigid 29) - 10,7kg
Kona Four (FS 26) - 9,8kg
Scott CR1 (road) -6,9kg
  • + 1
 When it comes to bike park, hopping off of my 38lb dh bike and trying to ride my 26lb trail bike, I noticed that weight has its benefits as far as holding its line in the air, and maintaining traction in loose conditions.
  • + 2
 I want a bike that has adjustable, on the fly weight adjustment. It needs to be negative 180ish lbs on the climbs and positive 25ish lbs on the downhill... via a twist grip.
  • + 3
 When you are over weight and can loose 10 to 20 lbs, does it matter what your bike weighs??
  • + 2
 It matters. I went for a Process to a carbon Trance. The Process 111 is a great bike, but you get on a bike that's 3 pounds lighter and you feel it.
  • + 3
 Why would anyone not want the lightest bike option, assuming strength and durability are uncompromised? This is silly...
  • + 1
 I don’t care about weight even a 10th as much as I do about performance. But I don’t even understand how people have reliable sub 30 lb enduro Bikes. My carbon framed, carbon wheeled xx1 bike weighs 33+ lbs....
  • + 1
 My dh bike is 37, I think thats pretty light for a think I can straight line chunder on and slap turn like no tomorrow. For my trail bike that im looking to buying, Im hoping to keep it around 28-29 pounds.
  • + 2
 It matters that big bike manufacturers do not list bike weight, so why do they want to know when they are not intrested in tell us?
  • + 1
 I don't like a DH bike under 35lbs, as I don't like that flighty feel n the air.
My enduro weighs 34lbs+, and while it works fine on gravity runs, it tends to kick my ass a bit climbing with it
  • + 0
 It blew my mind seeing that only a small percentage of people choose bikes under 19lbs.

There is no advantage in heavier bikes. Some people argue that they feel more stable, for example, in rockgardens, but you can achieve the same stability effect on a light bike simply bike entering the rockgarden faster. Here's the physics: p=m*v , p is linear momentum, m is mass, v is velocity.

Plus, on a light bike, you can manual, bunny-hop, endo, turn and corner easier. All of those allow you to go faster and/or smoother, so I dont understand why anyone wouldn't want the lightest bike possible.
  • + 1
 So added weight to a bike improves stability. How about wheels? If a light wheel and heavy wheel are equally strong, which is more stable?
  • + 2
 Yes. If it weighs the same as a duck it must be made of wood... and therefore... It's a witch! Burn it!
  • + 2
 "Heavy is good. Heavy is reliable. If it doesn't work, you can always hit them with it." - Boris the Bullet Dodger
  • + 1
 You mean Boris the sneaky f*ckin Russian?
  • + 1
 The only weight that matters on a bike is my own weight. If Im not fit and healthy the weight of the bike does'nt make any difference.
  • + 1
 I can't really answer the second question. Ideal weight exists on a bell curve that takes into account the purpose of the bike and where it's primarily going to be ridden.
  • + 2
 I don't get it. How can you brits, yanks and canucks measure your bike weight in Local Bike Shops?
  • + 2
 Ok to compare, my bike is as havy as two and a halve average European house cats. How much is this in stupid lbs?
  • + 2
 Depends of the category of the bike ... My Trek Slash 9.7 2018 is just over 30lbs but it's good for a 29er monster truck!
  • + 1
 Right. I want my XC/TR 120mm bike to be as light as possible while maintaining reliability (and a dropper). I want my Enduro bike to weigh between 25-30lbs, depending on the amount of climbing necessary.
  • + 2
 Over 40lbs in both cases out of protest because there is no kg. Everybody: Follow my lead! Protesttrain! Choochoo...
  • + 1
 You should divide the answers HT vs. Fully. I actually like mine the same weight, but I use my HT like a cudgel & my FS like a. scalpel... ok, like a ... lighter cudgel.
  • + 1
 For a slope/ dj bike in particular, i always have mine built between 23-24lbs, my p slope is currently 24lbs ish and rides perfect for what i ride.
  • + 1
 People fighting here about metric vs imperial... but it's Pinkbike's fault. They know they have an international audience but were too lazy to provide with the conversion.
  • - 1
 Lets brake this down.
Carbon fybre is pritty expensive, no?
Correct.
So take a typical carbon fybre handel bar and compare it to a typical aluminum handel bar.
You see?
Now, lets dig deeper.
Some people buy carbon seatposts. Why. Well, good question.
Now, lets dig deeper.
Many buy carbon because they feel they have too. Why. f*ck the industy. good point. a cheers.
Well, at the end of day, you do bit of this and bit that and you've got a bike that weighs a little bit more or maybe less than that one.
Who cares anywho. Not me.
so at the end of the day, ride what you got and just ride.
be seeing you, on the, trails.
  • + 1
 Good to see I'm not the only one feeling a little "tired".
  • + 1
 Weight only matters if you have the money to buy a lighter weight frame or components. If you don't have the cash you ride what you've got and have a great time regardless
  • + 2
 I wish it didn't matter so I could get a 50 lb Brooklyn with an Avalanche fork.
  • + 2
 For me. Ideal bike weights vary depending on bike type. DH bike i 34-36lbs. Enduro bike is 28-30lbs.
  • + 1
 Why? What are the advantages over a 19lbs bike?
  • + 2
 If it mattered i wouldnt ride a 24 pornking DH with marz monster T forks up front lol so hellz no it dont matter ????????
  • + 1
 I use to own (but still have the frame) a 2001 Brodie 8 Ball which weighed in a approx 56lbs and let me tell you... that bike threw me around on the trail.
  • + 3
 This sounds suspiciously analogous to “does Willy size matter”
  • + 3
 Everything else being equal the ideal weight is clearly zero.
  • + 1
 I would like to ride a bike lighter than around 14kg, in rough stuff, the weight helps to keep it flowing, while light bikes goes crazy. Also a question of reliability
  • + 1
 doesnt matter at all. i couldn't tell you the weight of a single component on my bike and it will never matter to me. durability is far more important than weight.
  • + 2
 Metric makes way more sense than sae... wish we would adopt it. Everything is in tenths, hard to screw that up ????
  • + 1
 I climb and haven't ever had a shuttle up a mountain to ride down it, so I like lighter bikes. They are more playful and easier to climb.
  • + 1
 I think I need to start riding my '03 Big Hit w/ Monster T, and 3" Gazzis.

55+ pounds is the future!
  • + 1
 Just half it, for conversion. DH rigs shouldnt be designed considering weight XC and enduro should
  • + 2
 How much does it weigh? Dont care, only cost me $400 to build!
  • + 1
 Poll 1 needs an "I don't know" option. Similarly, poll 2 needs "I don't care"
  • + 1
 I stopped reading after the word "ebike", went straight to the comments section and took a shower for feeling dirty.
  • + 2
 Where's the don't know / don't care options?
  • + 2
 If ride n muddy conditions add 5lbs
  • + 2
 Metric system. Dinosaur's
  • + 2
 This means nothing, makes no sense, too objective.
  • + 1
 Exactly. Stupid question. Weight of which kind of bike?
  • + 1
 I have a DH bike that weighs 32lbs, trail bike that weighs 29lbs and bmx bike that weighs 17lbs.
  • + 1
 I weigh 277lbs (126kg). I'm faster than anybody here, but only riding downhill a straight line. :-) :-)
  • + 1
 "The first time you ride the 50lb-er though, it feels horrible," because it is and always will be.
  • + 1
 I really did not believe that bike weight mattered all that much, until I road my first lightweight carbon bike Wink
  • + 2
 Just get fit and loose 10lbs
  • + 2
 Less than 10kg is a good weight to start.
  • + 1
 if strength and durability stay the same, why would anyone want something heavier than 19 lbs??
  • + 2
 honestly i dont care about weight is just about fun
  • + 1
 WTF is this question. Ideal weight of which kind of bike? The data you'll get back from this wont mean anything.
  • + 2
 Can't calculate in LBS... We're in 2018, what's up with metric???
  • + 3
 FREEDOM UNITS!
  • + 4
 Freedom? Not sure in which states you live ;-).
  • + 1
 It does to a point, but when you start making stupid sacrifices it's a curse.
  • + 2
 Its easier to buy ti and carbon than eat less cake.
  • + 0
 On the poll you forgot the option of "I don't know how much my bike weighs because I'm not a weight weenie".

And if you think your bike is too heavy your just weak.
  • + 2
 The adage still applies: Strong, Light, Cheap. Pick Two.
  • + 0
 I have one thing to say to non pro weight weenies: I too seek ways of enriching my masturbatory experience. Lately pseudoephedrine.
  • + 1
 What is this "lb" and "lbs" you speak off?

My answer to both polls: I don't know.
  • + 0
 Anyone can lose 3-5lbs of riding weight by eating vegetables and visiting a bathroom pre-ride. No need for $$ and carbon, just soft toilet paper.
  • + 2
 Same problem again with these polls. Assuming only 1 current bike...
  • + 1
 should be a box for "i couldnt give less of a f*ck about the weight of my bike"
  • + 2
 What is this "lbs" you are talking of?
  • + 1
 Trump made us say lbs , it's easier to spell for us 'murikans. : )
  • + 2
 Does anyone even bother to weigh their bike? Just go out and have fun!
  • + 1
 Yup. I weigh all of mine.
  • + 1
 @meesterover: Weighed my XC rig, but never bothered on my enduro bike.
It seemed ok, so why bother?
  • + 1
 @IluvRIDING: one of the many benefits of OCD attributes
  • + 2
 No one here has only one bike, need more options
  • + 2
 My bike weighs 27.5 inches. And that’s just right!
  • + 2
 I have six bikes. Which one?
  • + 1
 I think the weight of my fat belly is one of the more hindering aspects of my riding.
  • + 1
 I have no idea how much any of my bikes weigh, and I own a park tool bike scale. It just doesn't seem that important
  • + 1
 No sense paying huge money for a heavy bike even with full suspension, unless you’re going for an e-bike!
  • + 2
 Air shock + lead weights ...
  • + 1
 Funny enough, that is legit. Who want all of that weight messing with your suspension travel.
  • + 1
 I would prefer to be able to pedal a 15kg bike, heavy bike feels good in air
  • + 1
 it really depends on the type of bike.. for dj and bmx 20- 25 is great and dh and xc stuff 24-29
  • + 1
 I'll take all the weight off from the wheels, tires and suspension. The rest of the bike can be as light as possible.
  • + 2
 Any weight as long as it's not an e-moped
  • + 2
 Once you ride a light bike its hard to go back to a heavy bike.
  • + 1
 I think where weight matters the most is actually street riding/park and dj's.
  • + 1
 Adding lead to... nicolai
  • + 1
 Weight debates will be the death of pinkbike and the MTB community lol
  • + 1
 Pounds are a more specific metric than kilos. Nobody wants decimals.
  • + 1
 I found it cheaper to lose 10lbs than pay to lighten my bike by 10lbs.
  • + 1
 Everybody's chasing the dragon, but we'll never catch it!
  • + 1
 Wow, hot topic I agree with you Paul. Buy what will last.
  • + 1
 My niner is about 30lbs while my dh bike is about 46... Lol
  • + 1
 I dont race, so weight doesn't matter.
  • + 0
 If Jack Leading used a Nicolai Ion 20 with gearbox, he wouldn't have to tape lead on it.
  • + 1
 Did anyone tell these guys to use pedals? You can’t win without pedals!
  • + 1
 LBS, KG doesn't matter... What matters is HOW light the bike should be !
  • + 1
 Expensive, heavy, stupid. Choose 2.
  • + 1
 That histogram is a thing of beauty.
  • + 2
 EDIT
  • + 1
 Use International System of Units for God's sake!
  • + 5
 I'd have figured God could do simple unit conversions. I could be wrong about that though...
  • + 1
 Go look at your tire and tell me what tire size is printed on it in big numbers. How on earth did you manage to get the size you wanted?? And your suspension settings... how do you function when the American companies like Fox, Rock Shox etc are using Psi and not Bar? Your struggle is most certainly real.
  • + 1
 Pinkbike poll: Does having a bike that fits you matter
  • + 1
 Drink beers, eat donuts, and fried chicken...10-20lbs easy!
  • + 1
 This is for DH rigs only I'd imagine....
  • + 2
 Imagination is the only place you would find a 20# DH rig.
  • + 1
 This doesn't even take into account the frame size.... stoopid poll!
  • + 1
 Where is the 30 to 31 lbs option?
  • + 1
 26.5lb full suspension bike, 150/140, and I absolutely love it.
  • - 1
 I am a big heavy guy, bike weight is pointless if the rider is over 200lbs. even an 18lb bike wont make me faster on the climbs.
  • + 1
 Depends on how pretty her face is and if see is nice or not.
  • + 1
 Rotational weight first, then bike weight.
  • + 1
 Only guys with a tiny penis down vote????
  • + 1
 Use a web based conversion app whiners.
  • + 1
 where I come from pounds is only a currency
  • + 0
 I just dont care unless its my xc race bike. My enduro bike weighs 35lbs and i climb a lot on it
  • + 1
 Where is the "I have no idea" button?
  • + 0
 Just as long as I can lift it over a gate, I don't care.. Now where's my gym pass?
  • + 1
 brakeless hardtail ftw
  • + 1
 Heavy maaan....
  • + 1
 Of course it does
  • + 1
 My bike is in KILOS
  • + 0
 Why so retard units? Are we still living in 18 centuries?
  • + 1
 That much.
  • + 1
 Imperial my (a)s(s)....
  • + 0
 20#, 7" Ebike FTW!!!!
  • - 3
 weiner size matters more
  • + 17
 What size weiners do you prefer ?
  • + 1
 Then you are sh! T out of luck

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