Pinkbike Poll: Weighty Issues

Jul 2, 2015 at 13:19
by Paul Aston  
There's an old adage - "light, cheap and strong - pick two." What do you prefer? Personally I'm always biased towards strength and/or performance, followed by price and then weight. I get many products to test and often the first question to be asked by peers is about the weight, and grams always a create a buzz in the comment section. I'm happy to slug a couple of extra pounds of weight up the hill if it means a more enjoyable, or reliable ride on the way down, instead I try to work on my own weaknesses or simply not worry about it on the way back up.

Examples that instantly struck up the weight debate include the Schwalbe Procore system and a gearbox bike I have had to test recently: "200 grams extra per wheel? that's a lot" - but there are many advantages on the way down like decreased rolling resistance, increased grip, more reliability. Hmm, that gearbox bike weighs 30.5lbs, X bike only weighs this much - benefits here include a better unsprung to sprung weight ratio and less chance of rocks destroying your pride and joy. Lightweight is sometimes proven to be faster, but I recently spoke to a team manager who had his rider test two different enduro bikes against the clock. The times proved him consistently faster on the heavier machine, but then he refused to race it because it was too heavy!

Fabric Cageless Bottle
Are you a weight weeny?

What do you look for in a product?




169 Comments

  • + 74
 Kitchen scale is the major force steering evolution of mountain biking, often pushing it into some really whacky places, destroying private economies, corrupting the most reasonable minds, making them compromise everything, handling, grip, own health, all for the sake of getting >10 likes under exponentially hashtagged picture on Facebook with descriptions like "new brakes", "ready for sunday", "under 30lbs". The vision of going to a office party and getting asked how much did your bike cost and how much it weighs, seems irresistible and will keep on fueling budgets of R&D departments of all bike companies in the world. Without it the German bicycle component manufacturing boom would never happen.

All hail kitchen scale.
  • + 36
 Hear hear. Sitting on a chair weighing components keeps me from crying while staring at the bathroom scale.
  • + 24
 some people cant ride, but they sure can weigh.
  • + 14
 I wouldn't be so hasty into putting equation mark between weight wheenieing and sucking on a bike, even though it is true in my case
  • + 6
 Passing by whilst writing a complaint to manufacturer about the product I received is 10 grams more than their published weight.
  • + 20
 I like certain parts to be light, others need some beef.

Handlebars and cranksets: I like em carbon (light) and strong.
My fork:Who cares about the weight as long as it rides good and is dependable. I may switch from x fusion 34 to RS 35, maybe.
Wheels: I want light and strong rims (which are never cheap), but just about any hub will do for me. I'm currently torn between L-B 38mm wide and Flow ex. Whichever will be stiffer for my 29. I'm staying away from all the $1000+ wheels
Tires: I WANT them to be light, but lets be reasonable. They need to grip well and be durable enough to occasionally ride across triangle shaped rocks. I go middle weight 700-900grams but try to draw the line at 1000grams. I may switch from my current Schwalbe to WTB trails vigilante after these wear out.
I recently broke a chain, but they all weigh about the same right?
I pay absolutely no attention to the weight of my cassette, derailleur, shifter, brakes, rotors and grips. I usually run what was stock on my bike and never replace them unless something breaks.

I ramble so long to prove a point-
There were only four choices in the poll, but it's not always so black and white.
  • - 1
 To be honest, low sprung weight just makes the bike less stable down rockgarders or root gardens. My eyes are shaking in my head so bad which is forcing me to brake and I suffer from brake-anxiety. Fully 160mm 12kg bike.

@ChampionP I would wait till LB releases their new asymmetrical 34/28mm rim, would be perfect for a 29er. 3mm edges is what matters for strength.
  • + 9
 Carbon rims make sense for rich owners of 29ers, and for XC racing, other than that, they are an unnecessary luxury
  • + 8
 Weight weenie-ism is a plague that has infested mountain biking. It's infectious, so if your friends have it, get new ones. Don't go down with the ship.
  • + 28
 I always take a shit before I ride. One time I weighed it and it was about 1.67 pounds. Depending on what I eat, it can range from 1 pound to 2 pounds of unsprung weight lost from my body when fully kitted up.
  • + 2
 My perfect answer would have been:
Most strength possible for a decent amount of weight, not too heavy, but not sacrificing strength for weight. Price is not very vital (lucky me).
No black and white here either...
  • + 0
 And?
  • + 3
 Isn't that sprung weight?
  • + 1
 i really try to guage the component purchase relative to how much my skills currently suck or doesnt suck. my bikes aren't fat. they're "healthy".
  • + 4
 What do you guys use to trigger the poop if it doesn't just want to come out whike sitting on the toilet. I use Swedish snus tobacco 10 mins prior to the ride but it ain't always working
  • + 8
 that's easy, waki. gas station sushi or a neglected roach coach burrito
  • + 10
 LOL....I have a frankensteined 2008 SOCOM with a single crown fork that weights in at pultry 45lbs.......and I ride it 3 to 4 times a week up 2200 feet of mountain and then down again......the boys make fun of me but not for long as the girls love the results of lugging a heavy bike around!!!!!!! and when I get on my M9 DH 38lbs it pedals like a monster.....run what you brung never beleive the hype
  • + 0
 tell 'em @Bird-Man. pddddddd.....
  • + 2
 For me it's really fun to build a bike as light, strong and cheap as possible. I built a new X01 SC Bronson carbon piece-by-piece for $4,200 all-in. It weighed just under 28lbs with pedals (which I think is plenty light for a trail beast). Be patient, completely ignore brand loyalty, peruse pb/ebay/craigslist and other online sites. So many people obsess about certain parts that you can often find smokin' deals on new take-offs.

And to those that are fine pushing 35lb bikes up a mountain I'm happy for you. Just don't assume I overpaid for shaving grams.
  • + 2
 Extreme weight savings are stupid in a way that many shave kilos on tyres, ending up with Rocket Rons on a bloody 150 bike or single ply tyres on DH bike. I spent around 3,5k on almost top of the line, 28lbs bike, with knobby tyres and dropper buying a lot of stuff second hand but almost brand new.
  • + 3
 @shreddiemercury how'd you measure it down to the second decimal? That's quite impressive.
  • + 1
 as light as i can afford it
  • + 1
 Looking at the results of the poll shows MTB is now a total wank fest for the majority. 'Performance is more important to me than strength or weight' Really?
There is a positive side though - 'I just ride my bike' scored well.
  • + 55
 Listen, I like my bikes like I like my women: too heavy for me and too f*cking expensive. Wait don't walk off. *falls off barstool*
  • + 4
 Hahahaha
  • + 37
 I like my women like my bicycles, cheap, dirty and made in Asia.
  • + 11
 And a few extra inches in the front and rear.
  • + 7
 Like my bike, I prefer to finish my rides on a nice rack.
  • + 11
 Wait... i thought women were easier to pick up the heavier they got?
  • + 47
 You really have to weigh out the pros and cons.
  • + 35
 Yes, such decisions can't be taken lightly.
  • + 25
 It's not that big of a deal in the scale of things...
  • + 11
 Yes, a heavy decision to make
  • - 1
 On a scale of 1 to 10, component weight is right down there.
  • + 3
 Weight Weenies are a little light in the loafers
  • - 3
 and make sure you´re not too light headed when purchase something new...
  • + 15
 on a kitchen scale from 1 to 10, what's your favorite color of the alphabet?
  • - 3
 One can spend thousands on lightweight components, but weight weenies are better served with smaller buns.
  • + 4
 This article was worth the weight
  • + 2
 Choosing bike products by weight alone may appeal to the mass of people, but quality should be the true measure of a component when making a decision with this much gravity.
  • + 1
 I'm glad someone has brought some light to this subject. It has been weighing heavily on my mind...
  • + 8
 It's going to cause mass confusion.
  • + 28
 That's gonna be 270$. Oh what a great price - I just saved 20 grams
  • + 20
 Where is the "I'm a cheap bastard, I don't care about weight, strength or performance" option?
  • + 23
 Just putting it out there ..... 26'er wheels will always be lighter than the equivalent whatever wheel size is the latest thing Razz
  • + 4
 And 24" even lighter...
  • + 7
 And stronger.
  • + 4
 Why stop there?? www.google.com/search?q=lantu+20&tbm=isch Dat stand over height
  • + 5
 My kids 20" bike is lighter than many carbon FS bikes. Next big thing in XC?
  • + 17
 bikes are always getting lighter AND stronger. in 1985 32lbs for a fully rigid bike with narrow tyres was normal & it still suffered plenty of failures, as did all my friends bikes. in 2015 a 28lb 150mm full suspension rig with 2.4 tyres & dropper seatpost that will cope with considerably more abuse is considered the norm & failures are considerably rarer
  • + 13
 And you try and tell the young people of today that ..... they won't believe you.
  • + 68
 When I was 15 my bike had no rear wheel and my father would come late from work, hit me with a broom and make me ride it in a lake.
  • + 1
 you arent comparing apples to apples.
  • + 10
 WAKI have you been watching too much Monty Python?
  • + 4
 I love you WAKI!
  • + 6
 Hah, I had a rear wheel and no bike, just the rear wheel. My father turned into a seat-less unicycle, and made me ride it every evening he came home from work. Didn't half burn my undercarriage though...
  • + 10
 Luxury! i had no tyre on my rim and only 13 spokes, one crankarm and only one Di2 shifter, then my mom would kill me every tuesday
  • + 1
 Probably cheaper too.

You just broke the lighter/stronger/cheaper rule by introducing the fourth dimension. Well done!
  • + 1
 You're right! My father has an old Specialyzed Rockhopper, which is a rigid bike, and it's clearly heavier than my Commençal Meta SX 650b 2015, which is a 160mm full suspension bike with a dropper post...
  • + 18
 After Aaron Gwin win MTB World Cup with no chain i remove the weakest links from my bike and therefore gain on strengt and save weight.

Its Gwin/win situation!
  • + 1
 Touché
  • + 12
 It might be the fat drizzled sugar smack cereal talking, but as a Clydesdale, strength is everything to me. I have a 40 lb blue pig (how appropriate, eh?) and I love it. It gets up hills like a aerobics instructor being chased by wolves, and it bombs down like...like... a fat guy on a really heavy bike. I just get nervous when I lower my lardness down on willowy components.
  • + 3
 I'm with you. I can't convince myself to use carbon anything because it feels like egg shells
  • + 7
 I think this question could be answered many ways based on what kind of riding you do? and how aggressive you ride.
DH I don't care about weight within reason, coming from a Motocross background MTB bikes are really light.
Enduro with a lot of climbing I want something fairly light but yet strong enough not to break.
XC the lighter the better, I don't want to slug a heavy bike up big climbs.
Just my two cents worth.
  • + 7
 I've just moved from a 27lbs carbon Tallboy to a 30lbs alu Stumpjumper - amazed I held weight so high up in my hierarchy of bike needs. Steve Jones from Dirt says a lighter bike means a longer day out in the woods, but I ride for fun and as long as you have a bike that can deliver fun and smiles, you certainly won't be thinking of how heavy it is. Even on the ups the added weight of my Stumpy never bothers me because I know when the downhill comes I'll have more fun than I would on a lighter bike.
  • + 1
 Yep, my Fuel is ~28lbs and my Mega is ~33 but I don't even really notice the difference all that much. I can climb and throw the mega around just as well. The thing that makes a difference in speed for me is the rolling resistance of the tires so I try to keep something semi-light and fast on the back.
  • + 2
 a mates done a frame swop from a SC 5010 carbon carbon to a banshee spitfire but has added carbon rims to the mix (added weight as a whole), i've gone from a commencal meta am to a spitfire as well (removed a lot of weight), 30lbs seems to be the magic number as we are both quicker than before
  • + 4
 The thing that makes for a longer ride in the woods is either strength training or electric engine on the bike, under 35lbs, all this weight shaving and adding X-es and Rs to the drivetrain is inneffective to say the least. I put 700g EX729 rims on my HT after riding 500g XTs and I barely see the difference on the whole. Sure, it gets a bit sluggish on steep climbs but then you just ride it like a 29er, that you try to keep it rolling. Then Yesterday, I rode my other bike on alu rims (Ex 471 - the Gwin's bane) for the first time since a year, as I hade wide carbon LBs and huh, alu rims may be 50g heavier but they surely leave you less beaten up.
  • + 1
 Going from carbon to aluminium has made me even re-think carbon as the numero uno choice for everything. Cesar Rojo of Mondraker fame recently said that he always found alu plenty stiff for frames and wheels - I agree, although on the 29er wheels come in for criticism more so, but my alu roval wheels have a 29mm internal width and are proving to be super sturdy, compliant and stiff. I'll take comfort over the clock any day.
  • + 5
 Its all about the sweet spot.
sometimes REALLY hard to find, but there are products out there wich are light, not expensive and able to take real beating.
i dont care about "bling", trends and mainstream-opinions. I just ride what works, is fun and durable. a lightweight bike is more fun to ride, but in the moment you need to start thinking if your wheelset will collapse on the next sketchy landing the fun is kinda limited...
  • + 5
 Does it really matter if your bike is 27lbs vs 30lbs when you are 15 too 20 lbs overweight and out of shape?

Two main reasons I ride are for fun and exercise. So I factor in reliability/performance first, it's is not fun when sh&t breaks on you in the middle of your ride, does not last or performs like crap. Little extra weight (within reason) means that I just get a little better workout.

1) Reliability
2) Performance
3) Cost
4) Weight
  • + 5
 I'm small. Lighter bikes are easier to get in the air and throw shapes. That said I don't have ti bolts or anything crazy. I just know where I can handle some extra weight and strength and where I can't. I wouldn't pay through the nose for a lighter part.
  • + 4
 Most important is that it is reliable and it won't injure my by suddenly snapping in half. Even though I like my bikes light, I never sacrifice any strength for weight. Never pay any high ammounts for top-end parts either. If you choose he right average-priced parts your bike can be just as strong and as light as when you build it with CK and Thomson parts.
  • + 4
 If you weigh all your parts before assembling your bike you can later scale how fat and dirty it is at any given moment. Makes it a bit more alive with personality: you put on a bit of lard there around those bearings darling.. or seems you need a good scrub behind the seat tube you little scoundrel.
  • + 5
 I'm a weight weenie with a serious case of carbon addiction. That way I don't need to think about losing weight off my fat ass. Costs way too much to drop weight there... no way I'm giving up post-ride pizza and beer. Smile
  • + 3
 Agreed, why bother so much when you have all the cash to spend.
  • - 8
flag tobiusmaximum (Jul 10, 2015 at 2:26) (Below Threshold)
 Because... Lard-arse on an amazing bike!? I really hope this is a joke..
  • - 8
flag tobiusmaximum (Jul 10, 2015 at 5:09) (Below Threshold)
 Obviously it's a joke I missed. Because if it's a PC attack because I dared to suggest that a fat person who rides bikes is doing something massively wrong, then people need to be less sensitive. Seriously, get a grip. Then get a diet. Go on, flex your neg muscle again...
  • + 9
 Never skip neg day!
  • + 5
 Hi tobius, I'm a fat guy. I ride my bike often. You're welcome to hop the pond and convince me to stop.
  • - 3
 who said I was gonna convince anyone to stop? Not sure where you've got that from. My question is simply, why are you still fat? My next question would be why do you wear it with such pride? Like it's your ethnicity or heritage or something.
  • + 3
 Neither pride nor shame. I'm fat because I looooooove tacos.
  • + 4
 Over the years I've added a little weight to the "engine" and i'll admit it's more than a bike can compensate for, so before I worry about a few grams on my bikes I have a few kilo's to lose. Unless your body fat is under 10% it's pretty laughable to talk openly about shaving off a few grams. The best is listening to some fat cat roadie who clearly has more money then sensibility talk about saving a few grams and how insanely light his race ready bike is as he sits pretty in the coffee shop after having squeezed his plus sized belly into that form fitting logo riddled racing suit LMAO. Better to get off your butt and talk about what you did and how much fun you had. Stop losing your focus and yammering on about grams and go have some fun riding your bike on the road or down a hill but go do it!
  • + 5
 I put some carbon crap on my Wilson and I swear the f'ing thing got heavier! The only time I give a crap is when I am trying to push it up the hill!
  • + 4
 cheap is such a relative term... you can have cheap, light, strong if you are reading this on the deck of your new super yacht.
  • + 2
 I like my bike to be light because I ride up and down on said bike. So having a light bike without sacraficing strength is great for imo. But yes, the cost is high but in the end of the day, I'm not exactly complaining because I'm enjoying my bike for what it has become and for what I want it to be. Yes we can argue that all i need is fitness and that a heavier bike would simply do but the thing is, not everyone can ride and train and for me, i can ride like twice on weekdays and once on a weekend... for like two hours max each session. Priorities you know, so yes, a light bike helps in this regard. having freinds in taiwan who owns bike shops with factory connections is gold too haha
  • + 6
 I poop before a ride, saves pounds, who cares about grams.
  • + 2
 pooping is where its at, no one wins races constipated. I cant even ride with out pooping!
  • + 9
 "Saves pounds"

-WTF do you eat dude? I've been weighing my poop and I can't seem to get over 200 grams! Plus it's really pissing my room mates off having a shit covered kitchen scale!
  • + 2
 WTF you weigh your poop?
  • + 2
 I have a 2008/2009 transition bottlerocket weighing in at just sub 17,7kg of which 6,5kg are only the wheels taken off the bike as they are and put on a kitchen scale. I just ride my bike. I would always have wanted a lighter bike but cannot affort lighter or newer components. If I'd have more money I would definitely try to bring it down at least to 14,5kg! A lighter ride is sooo tempting when your bike is so heavy and you get to pedal a lot!!
  • + 3
 By the way 17.7kg are 39.02lbs and 6.5kg are 14.33lbs. And that was before I had to change my rear hub to a slightly heavier one Frown
  • + 3
 In that case the cheaper way would be simply to buy a new bike Smile
  • + 1
 I know. Until I can save enough money I will just rock this bike until every single part is broken ahahaha
  • + 5
 there is a secret option to get all three:

'can have cheap, light and strong only if buying used'
  • + 1
 Exactly! Or you can have 3 bikes for not even the price of 1.
  • + 1
 I have built up a 24 pound 150-140mm trail bike(26"), with used frame, forks, and wheelset for under $2500. There are lots of ways of putting a bike on a diet, things like rotors, seatpost and tires can make a huge dirrerence!
  • + 1
 Built my '12 Genius 10 (FS 150mm) for $2500 two years ago and it comes in under 25 pounds.
  • + 1
 I don't really like the way the poll was conducted. There is no option for people like me and I believe I'm not the only one trying to find a good balance between weight and strength.

One example - hubs and rotors. I've chosen DT 240s hub with centerlock disc mount. Centerlock hubs are lighter, always, but the rotors are average. But the Shimano RT-99 rotors are hands down the best rotors on the market. Their weight is on the trail side while their strength is on the tandem/DH side. Same stuff with my crankset, I've bought an XTR 9020 Trail with a OneUp 30T NW chainring. Am I a weight weenie because my crank is only 535 grams but still heavier than a carbon made Race Face Next SL Cinch? I don't think so, I went for strength over weight because the Shimano crank is alloy made ...

Am I a weight weenie? I don't know but if I can have a decent weight with a decent strength I'm more than happy to pay for it Smile
  • + 3
 They make the polls like that deliberately because it promotes discussion. Only once has there been a pole option that was a choice for me.
  • + 1
 Back in the early-mid-90s everybody was striving for that sub 22lb xc bike. Every part was scrutinized, measured, and validated by weight. MBA always seemed to have these ultra lightweight bikes featured. AMP research's full suspension bike is down to 23.4 lbs!!!! Rad!! How long will it last? Who cares!! I cut an inch off of each side of my handlebar to save those precious grams ferchrissake. Everything was fragile as shit and the whole exercise was stupid and I spent a lot of money.

I think we're actually closer to parity on the light/cheap/strong equation than ever before. Things may be more expensive, but they're also way lighter and way stronger than the stuff we used to buy.
  • + 1
 Go add a different perspective, I recently visited Las Vegas/bolder city and had to go on a weight saving exercise so my bike and bag (and some tools) could squeeze in the 23kg airline limit, but respect to Virgin air, it was free
  • + 1
 Always makes me laugh when someone walks up and picks up my bike, or any bike, by the seat and handlebars and pulls that face as if viewing a used car and says something like 'Nice' or 'Carbon?' As if just by determining the weight, like they can even remember the weight of the last bike they picked up as a comparison and then make a judgement on its overall quality. I just smile, but I want to say 'put it down you twat...and stop wasting everybodies time'
  • + 1
 My RM Slayer weighs around 14kg. I have to climb a pretty steep and long road to get to the local trailhead, so it would be great if I could get it well under 13kg with a SRAM XX1 drivetrain, carbon handlebars, a pair of XTR Trail brabes and a carbon wheelset, all light, strong and reliable components, but the cost is just outrageous, higher than the bike itself as it is now. So it stays as it is until I win some lottery prize or something.
  • + 3
 my HT is 34lbs and throws around really easily and climbs like a goat, so i don't really see the point in trying to get a bike as light as possible.
  • + 1
 it all comes to the first post up there....
  • + 3
 I weigh all my components purely for... fun. It's good to know how heavy is this thing but in the real world it isn't that important. For me, at least Smile
  • + 1
 I'm 6'4" and weigh 250lbs w/ a full pack. I ride a carbon AM bike with 800mm carbon bars, however the remainder of the bike is a beefy build (Read 36 Fork, coil shock) to handle the abuse of aggressive riding coupled with my weight and extra leverage. Put the lighter bits where you can get away with it, and build it to bomb. Works for me anyhow
  • + 1
 I don't care too much about overall weight but I do care about the front/rear weight balance. The case in point is I am looking at replacing my sektors with single crown domains but that will add about 400g to the front of my bike. I can't help thinking that will make be endo most of jumps - or will I get used to it?
  • + 1
 Just be smart with what you buy. I had some saint cranks on a second hand bike i didnt need. I spotted some XTR's for reasonably cheap so i went for them, sold the saints and ended up spending only about $50. For me that was worth it. Equally, getting rid of the 2.4 Kaisers i had and swapping them for Specialized tires front and rear. Sure there was cost involved, but so long as i can a) afford it b)save some weight c)improve or maintain performance, it is completely justified in my eyes.
  • + 1
 replaced my saints for next sl whcih i i got around $250.00 bnib. best upgrade for nigh the cost really. Be smart. have friends in taiwan Razz
  • + 1
 What exactly is so great about super expensive carbon cranks over quality alu ones other than saving a couple grams? Serious question, I've always used midrange shimano cranks and don't understand why they are so coveted.
  • + 1
 My currently equipped frame with bb/crankarms and headset is close under 3kgs. I don't care about weight, because i got this set on heavy sales but i'm scared every time if i land some jumps sideways etc and always checking for some cracks on these parts. Probably next time i'll buy some heavier parts just to be sure.
  • + 1
 I have a Large 26er FS that weighs 25lbs. I tested it back to back with a Large 650B FS bike that weighed 31 pounds. Even though I rode my bike second, I had a MUCH easier time with climbs and acceleration was effortless with my bike. I felt like it was night and day. (I'm 165 lbs geared up).
  • + 1
 On a more serious note you got to keep replacement costs in mind as well: had an off in a rock garden and everything seemed fine. Then i discovered two small but deep gouges on the sixc handlebar. 150€ deep. Made me seriously consider going back to alu bars but while i waited for the new sixces to arrive i rode some alus i had lying around and thought the carbons feel way better. when it happens next time though i am probably going back to alu.
  • + 1
 I never paid too much attention to weight because the bike I got was under 27 pounds and I could ride all weekend with my buddies and be near the front of the pack. Then I got new bike with some poorly chosen components that came in at 34 pounds and I could no longer keep up. So now I am a weight weenie, but within reason. I'll spend enough money to get the bike under 29 pounds and still extremely capable. For me, weight and performance is tied together. If you're too tired after pedaling uphill all day long, how can you charge hard back down?
  • + 3
 Light is good (for me) but it has to be balanced with durability and cost as well as effectiveness.
  • + 2
 Well, since I realised my bike was nearly 19 kgs I decided to go on a "weight hunt"... 2 tires, -1.1kg already. My goal, 16kgs!
  • + 3
 Is it OK if you buy lightweight stuff and don't weigh them?!

... Ti bolts just look cool ...
  • + 4
 Some products are strong and light but pricy this is my favorite.
  • + 2
 When super X use carbon then I will switch, until then if I want to lose some weight then I will skip my next burger. love carbon but it scares the shit out of me.
  • + 1
 did you see martyn ashtons bike party videos? it's given me much more faith in lighter components and carbon.
  • + 2
 Titanium rotor bolts and carbon headset spacers start are a bit pointless when you have a few kg of mud attached to your bike.
  • + 1
 I have carbon headset spacers, but bought it online and it cost me half of what alu headset spacers would have cost me at my lbs.

I'm not planning on paying €5 per Ti bolt though, so not paying €60 just to get Ti rotor bolts.
  • + 2
 Plastic headset spacers and aluminium rotor bolts are the "new" light.
  • + 3
 I live in Fort William. Bike industry, i dont care about weight. Give me a rim that will last a run
  • + 1
 I live in Sopot, Bulgaria www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRASl2-sfeU nothing lives forever here they said DH track's take's victims and need a sacrifices Smile there track is not recommended for no fit riders and carbon frames, rims Smile
  • + 2
 This pole does not support the hard truth shown by the constant ranting on pinkbike that "its too heavy". You people are lying to yourselves.
  • + 4
 I just take a dump before my ride. Allows me to save some 500g or so.
  • + 3
 Performance is key. A consideration of that is weight but it is not the be all and end all.
  • + 3
 I always figured it was cheaper to lose 10 lbs off my gut than pay to save 10lbs. on my bike.
  • + 3
 I just get stronger legs, its cheaper.
  • + 4
 i'm a heavy weenie
  • + 1
 I like carbon for its dampening attributes, weight savings is a bonus.
I'd like to see more parts made from magnesium like shimano/trek...until graphene can be used.
  • + 3
 Gotta love rare and expensive Ti/carbon parts... mmmm
  • + 1
 mah, the strategic placement of alloy and composite bolts is where it's at
  • + 1
 Well, even if i can afford to buy i carbon bits i will consider how important is my life/health and is there anyone to look after me....
I'm saying that because i know carbon for bikes always fail's, soon or later and it snaps suddenly so bad that if you bare in mind that, riding will not be the same. All that marketing game of weight is a play with the devil i've seen broken carbon rims while riding DH, i've seen bad landings due to failed carbon crank, i've seen seat if in the *** after not a big drip carbon seat exploded, I recently saw a carbon bar snapping after a average drop and broken collar bone after that, so, so far i really look more for strength and durability prior to light weight and plastic stuff..... Razz
  • + 1
 Yeah we do pretty crazy shit on these things, well many do. Save grams or save your neck, choose one.
  • + 1
 I would not consider carbon to be dangerous, rather uncomfortable and expensive
  • + 2
 Carbon handlebars are comfortable and expensive. Maybe the only place where carbon really makes sense besides a hardtail frame or fixed seat post.
  • + 1
 i got few blokes in carbon industry and they laugh when i speak about carbon parts and MTB bikes they opinion is
very very small range of applications there is marketing trick running around to get your cash and break your neck.
In MTB bikes there is much more torsional forces, flexibility ambient temperatures and so on as well, carbon tends to develop micro fractures quite easy due to weather changes, bad riding, bad settings crash failure or so be wise what choose, choose life, choose job, choose your f*** career but don't choose marketing tricks Smile
  • + 1
 i have a few dudes who are making world's best aerobatic and distance flight sailplanes (Swift Fox, Diana) and they say carbon cannot be used for bikes cuz it explodes when hit, so I would not treat them as a reliable source of information regarding application of carbon in bicycle industry...
  • + 1
 well there ware successfully made DH bikes 10 years ago and even then they claimed the are strong and reliable but not much companies ware able to jump on the boat and that idea was abandoned, now days when bike industry reached its limit they switched to carbon as well some strange and odd standards like 27,5 29, and fat bikes. I do agree diversity is needed but the carbon applications are nothing more than a trick to buy new products. Have you ever ridden very light DH bike and a normal weight 17-18 kg Dh bike on the steep slope with a high speed turns...? You deff want to stay on the track and too light couse a troubles and one bad high speed crash brakes bones and frames and big time after that . The other disadvantage is broken/cracked carbon cannot be welded. My sources are reliable my friend's do carbon parts from jullery to speed boat's and car details.... Wink
  • + 1
 I hate carbon for price and too much stiffness. But durability wise, at least with 2010-2012 frames, there is no problem. The issue came up when aluminium frames and rims went down in weight, thus carbon stuff needed to go on diet to justify the price. Sht started to crack but not in any dangerous way.
  • + 1
 not to mention my friend pro rider already devastated x2 S.Cruz swing arms, other lad destroyed his Davinci read end, i saw breaking down Rental Fatbar just too much leaning on a berm, one more friend was enjoying too much his new Specialized Toy, sadly i was joking with him it looks like a lego toy well it broke and he is still waiting for replacement, not to mention he broke carbon crank witch lead to a bad crash as well.... SO there is a problem and its obvious carbon tends to fail no matter what price, brad, quality. To prove im not anty-carbon freak i got some carbon spacer's Smile and i tested some carbon rims time ago ...
  • + 1
 The only weight I care about is the pound or two I drop in the biffy before each ride.
  • + 1
 Im not going to worry about saving a few grams on a component when I could do with shifting more than a few off my waist
  • + 1
 I don't care so much about weight, but at the same time I don't want a very heavy bike. Around 17Kg is ok.
  • + 1
 36lbs Santa Cruz. An absolute pain to pedal. But so worth it on the backside.
  • + 1
 If you want a lighter bike fill you tyres with helium works great for fat bikes
  • + 1
 I've always thought about that but I thought the properties would somehow make it not good.
  • + 2
 Leaks faster, loss in weight is less than .1% of total bike weight.
  • + 1
 GOT TO BE MORE THAN 1% on a fat bike?
  • + 2
 Wheres the option for light as possible without sacrificing strength?
  • + 1
 I plan to have liposuction to get from 75Kg down to a twig weight of 65kg. I have to if I ever want to make it pro.
  • + 1
 I miss the good old days when performance & strength was more important then saving weight on DH bikes.
  • + 1
 Durability and reliability. If those two come in a reasonable weight package, thats bonus.
  • + 2
 my rig is 45 pounds, i could care less
  • + 1
 I can relate, my 09 Norco Atomik is 46 lbs; and I still have 46 lbs worth of fun with it.
  • + 2
 Yeah i have 2004 six, that thing is a tank. I crashed and it dropped it down the trail on a rockgarden on fromme. Not even a scratch
  • + 3
 My bike is pretty much the heaviest in the group every ride , the only time I care how it weighs is when I pick it up to put it on the uplift trailer
  • + 0
 Wait? I dont wait for anyone, see you at the lift.
  • + 1
 "Strong. Light. Cheap. Pick two."

I buy the lightest and strongest stuff from 5 years ago; ends up being pretty cheap.
  • + 1
 this is not a new idea, my bike about 12 years ago from walmart had this.
  • + 1
 I bring my digital scale of truth. To the bike shop.
  • + 1
 We lost it when Park Tool came out with the digital scale....
  • + 1
 heavy things only you stronger which is a good thing Smile
  • + 1
 I'm a heavy weenie

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