Pinkbike Poll: What's Next?

Jan 6, 2016 at 0:20
by Paul Aston  
The Pinkbike Awards are in full flow and the latest nominations to hit the front page were for 'Innovation of the Year.' 2015 saw a whole bunch of new(ish) things hitting the market to many peoples' dismay: voluminous tires, wider hubs, electronics, cageless water bottles, and there was probably a press fit bottom bracket standard or two hidden somewhere.

There's only a finite amount of things designers and engineers can progress when it comes to a bicycle, it's a fairly simple contraption constructed from a few tubes, suspension bits and bobs and some rubber contact patches. When it comes to keeping things rolling over and fresh for the new year's products, making something 7.5358mm wider might be the only option after changing the colour.

Trek Remedy 29 Review
The introduction of Boost 148 was a commenter's dream - Step 1: check if the latest PR mentions Boost anywhere. Step 2: get in the comments and moan.

Will we see 12-speed cassettes, more hub widths or wheels and tire sizes? Do you think standard swapping will stop only to see actual refinement, perhaps with the addition of more electronic aid and integration? Will modish materials continue to cut weights or will genius geometry and svelte suspension hit the headlines? Maybe gearboxes will wedge their foot into a door or finally get one open? Finally, god-help-us if another discipline arrives now that the 'enduro specific' drum skin has worn through.





497 Comments

  • 757 4
 Buzz words I would like to hear in 2016:
Reliable.
Affordable.
Fun.

Any manufacturer that can use these words to describe their product has my business.
  • 192 3
 + Compatible.
  • 202 6
 Pick 2...
  • 28 1
 + Available
  • 6 6
 + Simple that's all I need
  • 15 31
flag NoSkidMarks (Jan 8, 2016 at 2:33) (Below Threshold)
 Zeroed cover all those bases.
  • 66 59
 That manufacturer is YT.
  • 18 9
 But do they enduro?
  • 9 9
 OzMike they're working on it. Should be out this year.
  • 39 2
 The new enduro is welding your own frame with built in cooler for IPA
  • 71 14
 Ha love how people are neg propping the YT comments when actually they are pretty much on the ball in terms of 'fun' and 'affordability', they are still not 100% on the reliability front but they are getting there. You guys ask for reliable/cheap/fun and when it is there you still winge about it
  • 28 12
 as long as it looks like a session
  • 56 7
 Still waiting for some company to come up with an endurospecific, 28" downhill fat e-bike with electronic suspension, two shocks, a triple crown fork, a 1x24 drivetrain and a signal horn shaped like a turtle. I would also be pleased with less e-bikes and new standards thougj
  • 23 2
 Just wait till 2017 when they change all the shock sizes back to imperial.
  • 10 1
 It's going to be more electronics.
Gearbox means a wholesale manufacture change.
You can retrofit electronic suspension/gears/brakes to any manufacturers existing design.
Electronic shock tuning is also a good shortcut too suspension system shortfalls.
That's my prediction for what it's worth.
  • 56 4
 There could be a review of a water bottle on here and somebody would still talk about how good YT is. I like what YT is doing but their not the only company doing it and their just cutting out the middle man, basic economics really. Its like drug dealing. You want a better price? Go straight to the source like Tony Montana. Are their bikes really that good? I dunno I can't test ride one at a shop or demo one and I think a lot of people talking about them (not all) have never even been on one.
  • 34 14
 I think 2016 should be the year people stop obsessing over wheel size. If you like a 26", then that's great... keep shredding.

But that doesn't mean you need to bash the other wheel sizes. I think some people just do it because they have sour grapes over not being able to afford a new bike...
  • 7 4
 comment of the year @OzMike if the only the industry would listen. As much as I love the sport I still cant justify the cost of the high end goodies.
  • 7 0
 They aren't cheap over on this side of the pond bud!!!
  • 6 2
 @gooutsidetoday New industry standard 29.5+ front 24.5 rear. Only because we need more wheel sizes and eww you ride a fat bike lol
  • 7 0
 my guess is e-duro competitions
  • 22 3
 This year feels like a good year to change steerer tube sizes. It's been a few years since a new standard was introduced....
  • 28 6
 @danieljohnkelley

I had an order for a AL1 capra that was 6 months out for $3700 (shipped, if i remember right). Six months later I hadn't heard anything and found out in the PB comments that the shipment was delayed. They ultimately were delayed 3 months more. I don't have the patience to wait 9 months to get a bike.

Went to my LBS. Lo and behold, sat a briefly demo'd nomad c x1 build for $4k (negotiated 4k OTD, with tax)

Didn't care the wheels were crap, because the wheels on the YT were crap and I had a decent set of wheels to throw on either bike.

Bought the nomad, rode it for 3 months and then finally received an email from YT that my bike was available.

Just got my bike back from the LBS because my reverb needed to be warrantied. Happened to be in there buying tubes for my fatbike and mentioned it was pogoing in passing. No questions asked, they just told me to take a picture of the serial number on my post and they'd let me know when the new one came in. They threw it on for free for the "inconvenience"

I can't say the same would have happened with a YT.

For $300 more I got a carbon frame and a warranty that i have used.

I like YT, i pedaled one around a lot because someone that had one let me tool it around for a min but other than that I've never been able to ride one. I like cam zink, I like the idea of high performance for the masses, but I don't see it with YT.
  • 15 6
 Still not a peep about onyx hubs. That is next! That is the future of hubs! Forget your noisy Hope pro hubs, let's go silent and have even more engagement than Hope. Those hubs are some of the best ever and they fly under the radar everyday.
  • 3 1
 @properp haha, I need to update my profile.. I ride a SB5C, a Marin Pine Mountain 1 (27.5+), and a Trek Superfly SS (29er), and a Transition Klunker.. I'm open to any new wheel size Smile .... I sold the fatbike tho!
  • 13 2
 Think yt have been a victim of their own success. They are pretty much sold out before they have arrived. I think they have the pricing down just not the after sales. Yt against Santa Cruz in the Europe is a no brainier from a price point of view. A carbon nomad cost practically twice as much as a yt. If they can sort out their distribution and warranty I think the debate would be a different one
  • 5 0
 UtahBikeMike
As anyexcusetoride mentioned YT are not quite there on reliability for some of their products (and customer support) but the price and quality of the components they use help compensate that. I’ve owned a Tues for nearly 3 years and it’s an awesome bike nothing has gone wrong with the frame and I paid half of an equivalent (new) Demo, V10, Session etc.
  • 1 0
 I'll be keen to see what they come up with
  • 3 0
 @treekilla - Onyx hubs are really nice. I come from the BMX world where there are everywhere. Only thing I don't like is the cutouts on the front BMX hubs. But the MTB don't have those so that is ok anyway!
  • 2 3
 @danieljohnkelley

Your situation with YT is much different than it is in the states.

Santa cruz is much more expensive there, versus what it is there. It's a no-brainer to buy a Tues living in the EU.

Here the Tues is actually available as well, versus the unobtanium Capra.
  • 4 2
 Our new product helps you RELIABLY enduro, AFFORDABLY gravel grind, and Boosts™ your plus-size FUN.
  • 1 1
 UtahBikeMike
I can't the YT business model working in the US if there isn't a considerable cost saving. In the UK as we pay too much for our bikes/ components so even though YT/ Canyon have long waiting lists and poor customer service we put up with it.. the customer service has improved though.
  • 1 0
 The new discipline will be... e-fatbike racing the apocalypse of biking
  • 5 1
 No YT for me. They don't offer an XL. That automatically rules them out as an option, due to my large stature.
  • 5 12
flag WAKIdesigns (Jan 8, 2016 at 9:14) (Below Threshold)
 If you want apocalypse of MTB, it would be the UCI making a rule where electric engines would be compulsory on DH bikes on World Cup. I'd like to see that.
  • 2 0
 @anyexcusetoride you said it yourself dude "they are still not 100% on the reliability front..." Hence the neg props. They're also known for poor CS and I hope you don't mind waiting for your bikes. PB has set the brief, let's see if anyone can deliver in 2016.
  • 4 0
 @treekilla silence by the masses is a buyers friend. Jim Gerhardt is the best guy to buy from and his exchange deal is beyond anyone else's in the industry. Oh did I mention the reliability, near zero resistance and infinity engagement. Onyx hubs are amazing!
  • 1 0
 What @NoahColorado said. Ha!
  • 5 0
 articles that rely less heavily on comments for hits. Most of the time I only ready half the article and realize it's complete shit, then get to the comments only to realize I just wasted 4 minutes of my life reading basically nothing. Thanks for the hard work pinkbike!
  • 3 0
 @makripper ^^ but you still commented anyway! ha!!! I think we are all suckers at one time or another.
  • 3 0
 It's a nice feeling that a guy in the U.S. is getting ripped off for a product that is cheap here for a change - as it's been the other way around for the last 50 years.
  • 9 8
 Makripper - Boost was made to boost the time people spend whining on new standards on the internet, thus increasing exposure to SRAM and Trek advertising. It was SRAMs revenge to Shimano/ Foxx cooperation that led to 15mm axles. If Campagnolo made MTB products and did such thing it would be called the Italian job.
  • 9 11
 @OzMike that is all you want out of 2016 is reliable, affordable and fun? Hasn't that already existed for quite some time? Lets just stop progressing and become third world grey coat zombies. Give me, huge tires(tyres), battery driven components, computer controlled suspension and w/e else some brilliant engineer can come up with to help me get on a bike that someday makes me feel like tron. I have a 1993 diamondback response with V brakes and a marzocchi fork that still works. Its fun, reliable and affordable. I think I bought it as old stock in 1994 for 50% off. You kids are freakin Emo sheep. Its like you ask for Enduro and then you shit on it. You ask for better bikes and then you thumbs up the guy that says you dont. The FB generation has a lot of people who just want to fit in or complain about their privilege while sitting in their parents luxury home shopping online for their next platinum plated Iphone. Stop trying to fit in
  • 2 0
 Sorry Waki, hit the wrong button.
  • 1 0
 Buzz saying: Looks like a M16/V10
  • 4 0
 +1 for onyx.... They.Are.The. Shit.
  • 1 0
 ...and waki- 15mm is fox/shimano's fault. Campy would have paired with marz to create 20mm boost if anything...it's quite possible that sram is the LEAST responsible for mucking up standards.
  • 1 0
 I think YT is a great company, just like I think Radon, Commencal and Canyon are great, but YT does not offer a bike that suits my riding style. When they decide to make a 120-130 mm full sus like the Meta TR or an awesome hardtail AM I will for sure consider them Smile
  • 4 0
 I don't like YT's tattic of cutting out the middle man, what Banshee started (bike shop direct) is much better in my opinion but they are too small to make an impact yet. As long as the LBS is involved I am happy... They are a big part of any local riding scene and if you don't have one nearby or if they aren't a good shop than I feel sorry for you because having a trustworthy and fun shop makes bleeding out that money much more enjoyable. You might even save a few bucks in the long run....
  • 3 5
 I saw a video of this new radical technology breakthru. It had this naked chick with semi decent tits riding a dildo pedal powered bike naked. After seeing this inspiring design one can only imagine how many pinksters will be rocking one of these dilduros next season...?????!!!!!!!
  • 1 1
 +Free
  • 2 1
 Words I would like to hear this year... Free, PinkBike & Giveaway
  • 1 2
 If it free, respect you don't... on ebay it lands, cash you get, cash you spend on anodized poop, match components you want, rest on snacks you spend, more to carry on uphill you must. The centrifugal FORCE gets strong in you
  • 91 11
 GEARBOX GEARBOX GEARBOX
  • 7 2
 Only if they halve the price
  • 24 3
 We want them! Even though current drivetrains have gotten somewhat reliable, a 10 or 11 speed cassette and a derailleur make no sense at all in a MTB with all that unsprung mass and rocks, roots, etc... WE WANT THEM!
  • 5 4
 Zero des are pretty damn cheap if you want a DH sled.
  • 58 1
 for the love of God, gearboxes!

The rear suspension would be much more supple - no chain, no rear derailleur, no cassette
Can spread the spokes wider and get a stronger wheel
no chain slap and silent belt drive
All the maintenance/reliability benefits of having a properly lubricated, clean sealed off gearbox
- change oil once every 10,000 km.

Just need to lighten them up a bit. I'd happily live with 8 gears if it made it lighter Frown
  • 18 1
 I would have picked that if it said what do you WANT, but it said what do you think will make headlines. So I picked something else.
  • 6 1
 @noskidmarks Since when is 3500 for a frame cheap?
  • 6 0
 Completely agree, I feel like most manufacturers are using wheel sizes as 'The Next Big Thing' to encourage people to buy a new bike . . . . but if those manufacturer could bring a gearboxed DH/Enduro bike to market at a competitively weight man they wouldn't be able to make them fast enough!
  • 2 1
 How would you make belt drive work when 90% of suspension designes has chain growth?
  • 6 0
 A tensioner could solve the issue...
  • 4 0
 I too want some serious dedication to gearboxes by Shimano. Pinion seems to be the way to go, but it's $$ and I'm wary of buying a bike that costs a tonne but will be an issue for my mechanic and my wallet if it breaks.
  • 10 0
 they don't have a good marketing but I'm sure we will hear more and mode about them in the few month/year

www.effigear.com
  • 4 9
flag Narro2 (Jan 8, 2016 at 7:35) (Below Threshold)
 it seems that those Gearboxes will never take off, look at the effigear designs, function following form, look at that Pinion design, it is necessary to have pulleys below the bottom bracket, so I wouldn't only be adding weight to the bike I would also be putting a set of pulleys in a high impact area, higher impact area to where the current rear derailleur currently is. On a separate note imagine doing Dirt Jumps or DH, people fall in those disciplines a lot, I don't want to fall down from a bike that has a 4 to 5 kgs transmission, that could easily break a bone or make an ankle or knee explode.
  • 8 0
 dh cassettes don't have many gears, so the gearbox could be smaller perhaps?
  • 5 0
 Gearboxes that will work with a trigger shifter rather than a double cable, push/pull, grip/ twist shift system.
  • 10 9
 Am I the only one who doesn't like gearboxes at all?
  • 2 1
 Amoodles You get much more than a frame. You get 80% of your drivetrain too. and one that'll last at least three times longer.
www.crankin.net.au/?product=zerode-g2-5-charcoal-27-5
That's $2400 Australian, 70US cents to one Aussie dollar. So under $2000US at a guess. Pretty darn cheap.
amrskipro Zerode run Sram X9 Trigger shifter(or Shimanno Alfine, or twit shifter).
  • 2 1
 Although that's a good deal, going off a sale price that's 35% off with only small and medium available isn't really indicative of good value, and even then good value=/=cheap.
  • 5 0
 @sunki
Why on earth wouldn't you like gearboxes?
Seriously, whats not to like?

They are hands down better than derailleurs for any gravity disciplin, and tbh they have serious advantages in any discipline except maybe road racing...
  • 2 3
 I am surprised that, to my limited knowledge", no custom frame maker has ever made a Honda R01 style bike where a regular cassette and regular rear mech sits in the front triangle, all connected using 2 chains and 2 chainring equipped crank arms.
  • 15 0
 Hmmm
Shift any time, multiple gears at once.
Chain and sprockets last several times longer(or run a belt).
No expensive parts that are very perishable or fragile in a prone to damage position.
Less unsprung weight for rear suspension.
Centralized low weight.
About 5% of the maintenance needed.
Always good to go.
Won't go out of tune by laying it down.
  • 1 0
 Yeah that was an odd move from honda. I suppose they were after the teeny-tiny efficiency gains derailleurs have over gearboxes, and couldnt care less about cost/reliability/servicing/maintenance as they were a full factory team.
  • 3 0
 The biggest problem about the Gearbox is just "how to insert the gearbox on the frame" .. I know that Nicolaï made a special frame for the pinion box, and here for Effigear, you have Cavalerie Bikes which are made specially for the box. But is it really possible to imagine a Demo, Session, Operator or Gambler and other with this ? How ? Impose a standard for every frame ? And so, every passionate engineer could work on a better box ?
  • 4 0
 Zerode are very close to releasing there trail bike, by what I have herd it'll be running the lighter pinion gear box that has less gears, after riding a one of there downhill bikes I was blown away at how good it was and if I ever went back to downhilling I'd drop my cash on a Zerode without a second thought. I don't see major manufacturers going towards gear boxes anytime soon as they have spent to much money building there overly complicated designs to combat the shortfalls of the standard bicycle drivetrains
  • 1 2
 I didn't speak about Zerode. I'm sure those bike are good but I don't get used to the look :p
  • 1 1
 Would need some kind of prop shaft inside the chainstay to work or all pivots to be around the BB
  • 5 1
 Scented air for my +size tires
Dehydrated water for epic rides
"instant Semenuk" Powder shakes
Anything That makes the weak minds feel outdated
Rear hub with a volume control
Tires with integrated suspension
A Mountain bike specific five prong power bar to plug all those wall warts battery charger, one for the lights, one for the rear shox, one for the forks, one for the shifter, one for the dropper post, one for the pedal assistance ebike crap
Battery using universal energy
shapeshfter threaded tires (neess a battery too)
A new definition for the Word "standard"....
  • 3 1
 @wizido The same argument could be made for bottom brackets, handlebar diameter, hubs, forks brakes, everything has to be standardised at some point. No reason they cant come up with one for a gearbox housing that all the gearbox manufacturers can be compatible with.
  • 3 2
 There is no way in the whole wide world you could standardize the gearbox housing. This is no bar clamp diameter
  • 3 0
 You forget Waki, this is no bar clamp diameter, but this IS mountainbiking.

We'll just have 14 different standards tup
  • 3 0
 With that attitude @WAKIdesigns, nothing would ever get done!
  • 1 0
 He's kinda right though. You'd be super limited if you had to design all bikes around one gearbox standard. That thing would get in the way of the pivots, shock, etc. on a lot of current designs.
  • 6 0
 I can see a good argument for having the position of the main drive output movable. Other than that tho, I think a reasonably standard gearbox mount could be homed in on after a couple of years trying wildly different standards, then a couple of years of refining the best. It'd take a while, but in the end I dont see why a gearbox would be any more restrictive than current chainring/chain device/rear mech setups are now.

I know people complain about change, but this is a period of change I could get on board with. There is an actual real advantage that makes it worthwhile, rather than a hub that is 2mm wider and requires me to buy a new frame to run it.
  • 2 4
 Totaly @Arnoodles. No one in the whole world knows what is the best way to make a gearbox, or rather centrally located gearing. Which one can aspire to be the best? R01 style, Pinion, that big old gearbox from Evil, Zerode style Alfine/Rohloff? Why do you want to limit the design opprtunities in it's wake, hinder the goods that come with evolution by limiting the technological diversity? How do you know the size of cogs that Pinion is using is optimal and the next gearbox from them won't be bigger or smaller? You don't know. You can't even say what will be the width of the system. Nobody can. I'd say we may have all of those designs coming up on bikes in the future simultaneously. That may be one of the may reasons why gearboxes have never picked up. Also the whole concept of standardization is straight stupid because how would you execute it? Would you form some world league against destandarization of MTB technology within EU or Canada and US? Get real damn it... are you really into wellbeing of MTB or are you locked within some sort of ideology that everything that's new is bad? Lyriks 15mm is bad bladi bla, Marzocchi will raise from the ashes and bring us the best fork in the world, which most important features will be: 1, 1/8 straight steerer, 20x110 axle and 35 mm stanchions. I will put to you that even if such fantasy organization would come to life, we trolls would kill each other deciding what is the right set of standards to keep. Having said all that: BOOST is still stupid, so is 500$ rear mech, whether it has electronics or hemp fiber exo-skeleton bonded with resin made of food rests from Wallmart, or runs on The Awaken Force.
  • 2 0
 Derailleur in frame is probably patented. There's Honda who patented loads of stuff I think, and the Pete speed gearbox design now owned by Answer Maniou.
Pinion gearboxes are tiny, fit in your hand. About the height of an I phone 6.
Pinion etc offer mounts for frame manufacturers to weld or mould too. No buggy there for companies to use.
As for suspension designs, most could easily adapt around it.
Effigear offers a higher out put sprocket so a concentric pivot would have more rearward axle travel/bump compliance. But a tensioner is easy to use if theres chain growth. With belt or chain. Check out the Nicolais with Pinions. and the Zerode.
  • 4 0
 How about just design all frames without bottom brackets and just make a "standard" set of connections and spacing, with a bit of buffer for future designs. Then gearbox desigers can do whatever they want as long their mounts fit the basic standard? Doesn't seem that different than deciding upon a headtube or rear axel size. it would probably mean more involved partnerships with gearbox makers and frame designers, but not necessarily. If you commit to a gearboxed™ frame you may be limited in that you can't buy every single product out there, but that's been the reality for automotive/moto for a longtime (ever), no? And honestly, who likes running ten year old frames except roadies anyway?
  • 3 0
 It would be great if there was a standard but as pointed out above its going to take a while to develop. If say Pinion and Effigear have commin mounts the rest may follow. At one level i dont really care as long as the gearbox company remains in business.
  • 2 0
 @fartymarty I don't think that would be a huge leap. Multiple companies offer pinion friendly frames, it doesn't actually seem to be a huge proposition, just no demand. One of the big guys needs to step up and at least offer a gearbox option. Specialized and Trek came to market with radically different frame designs for their plus sized hardtails and no one had even ridden one yet. Maybe Sramano is payin' them all off to shut up, haha.
  • 2 0
 I'm sure there are many a deal done behind closed doors... I can't see any of the biggies releasing gearbox bikes anytime soon. I bet motorbike gear boxes aren't interchangable. You just get the one that fits and they all work as well as each other.
  • 2 5
 Breaking Standard News: latest Spec Enduro will be taking all 3 wheelsizes using different links, according to Dirt. 29" 275 and wait for it.... Yea I know you want it baby... Noooo it's 275+ !!!

I want a bike with a gearbox, but a normal looking one. I can't get my head around it... Standard for gearbox mount. How about we make a standard for stem length and head angle? I mean isn't it crazy with so many stems? Everyone wants 35mm stem and 62 head angle for XC and for DH - nuff said!
  • 1 0
 I watched that interview with Minnaar and Warner and Greg said the Honda 'gearbox' method had a lot of drag. I don't think we'll see gearboxes from the likes of Shimano or Sram unless the bike manufacturers jump first and they turn out to be big sellers.
  • 1 6
flag WAKIdesigns (Jan 9, 2016 at 12:19) (Below Threshold)
 yes and he said it was because it had two chains #zerodeisnotcool
  • 2 1
 Not the two chains. It's the chains in the gearbox that were the problem. The gears were linked with chains rather than meshing with each other.
  • 1 1
 Um, mechanical loss? It takes power to spin all those gears, bearings and seals.
  • 1 0
 I know but I'm saying it's not the two chains on the outside (which there weren't even. Just one long one.) but rather all the chains on the inside of the gearbox that cause the drag.
  • 2 0
 I think i read that the pinion doesn't suffer from the same problem as the old honda
  • 1 0
 @simooo i think @NoSkidMarks is your go to guy...

From what I understood (from the Minnaar interview and reading about the RN01) the rear wheel used a fixed hub which meant the gearbox was always working. I guess this leads to some energy losses. For average Joe this isnt going to make a big difference but when seconds count it could.
  • 1 0
 Hopefully GT will step up with a gearbox bike again. GT seems to keep its ideas alive and revisit them. and aren't scared to be different.
  • 5 1
 How about this for a scenario... Gwin signs to Nicolai and rides a Pinion bike and wins every round of the World Cup by st least 5 seconds and also wins his first World Champs. For 2017 every major bike maker is releasing gearbox bikes based on a standard universally accepeted mount. Everyone is happy and we all live happily ever after.
  • 1 0
 @noskidmarks out of the biggies i would say GT would be one of the first as theyve already done it. You could take my last post and swap Gwin for the Bulldog and Nicolai for GT and i would be happy
  • 3 0
 Chains should not really cause excessive drag, they are an extremely efficient way of transferring power. Now gears with meshing teeth, they cause quite a lot of drag. slighty bemused by the Honda being referred to as quite draggy, although as fartymarty says it is likely to do with the fact that the entire drivetrain had to spin if the rear wheel was spinning. didn't know that before.
  • 114 39
 How about we go back to 26" and forget this 650B thing never happened.
  • 21 11
 Realistically, it seems that 26" will soon be forgotten. And I'm saying that as someone who rides a 26" bike (and tried a 27.5" too).
  • 69 1
 I hope not. I don't mind 650B, it would be nice if 26/27.5/29 could all live in harmony with plenty of wheel/tire/frame options.
  • 12 1
 @extremmist 26" won't be forgotten as long as you can buy a new frame for them. When I snapped my old one if found that this is very diffuclt to find one i liked so I was forced to move to 27,5 Frown If frame of my choice was for 26" I woluld never change wheel size.
  • 31 34
 Have you tried a 27?? IMO is much better in a lot of aspects, now if I ride a 26 it reminds me when I was a kid... For me 27 is much better
  • 4 1
 @Rocco90rider I'll try in few weeks time and we'll see what's what. I was very happy with 26" and thats main reason why I'm not stoked on new size.
  • 34 8
 What I always told customer in the shop was that, based on my own opinion, The benefits are there in the physics of the wheel being bigger (rollover, momentum, grip etc.) but it doesn't actually FEEL much bigger than a 26", still fun, playful and not at all like the jump you get to 29er. That's my 2 Cents anyway.
  • 4 3
 @steviestokes Well said.
  • 10 1
 Agreed. When I bought my new bike I went to 27.5 for no other reason than I hadn't had a new bike for a while and decided it was worthwhile upgrading to the new standards (tapered, 142x12, 27.5" etc). At 6'2" on an extra large frame I really cant tell the difference other than the bike looks a little more in proportion compared to my old extra large 26" bike.
  • 26 0
 Everyone seems to forget the dirt jump and slopestyle guys. Won't they keep 26 alive?
  • 2 1
 Yes I'm sure they will stay 26" but trail bikes will phase out 26" I'm sure (except for perhaps some x small ladies sizes etc)
  • 6 0
 26 ain't dead until there are no manufactures producing them
  • 4 1
 @petehaddock Exactly! I saw quite a tall chap riding his 26" xl Specialized hardtail and it looked just, out of preportion. Yet with most of the small to medium (and large) 27.5's, they don't look that bad, and xl 29ers just look right for big riders in my eyes.
  • 2 0
 26+ will be a way for some manufacturers to compete against 27.5+. Then all the 26er fo life people can be all like "told ya so".
  • 5 2
 I bought two bikes this year, both 27.5, and I must say that they feel no different from my older 26 bikes wheelsize wise. I did get them in 27.5 because I believe that 26 will (unfortunately) be left to DJ and wal mart bikes...
I switched my 2012 Devinci Wilson for a 15 GT Fury, and a 201something Vitus Blitz for a Norco Range

The bikes are quite diffrent, but again wheelsize wise I couldn't feel a thing...
  • 8 1
 @yeti951SD: I am totally with you! 2016 will be the year or of the 'great 26'' wheelsize comeback!'.
Many people here - me included - are fed up with all this wheelsize chatter and marketing.
Seriously: to hell with 650B
@Extremmist: realistically you are talking bullshit, my fellow-czech friend Wink
[pozdrav s chomutova!]
  • 9 5
 27.5 should have actually been a size between 26 and 29 instead of being a hair of a 26 which didn't result in a huge change in performance and generally just pissed people off, least those pinkbikers with 26er bikes Smile
  • 4 3
 27.5 is one inch larger than 26
29 is 2 1/2 inch larger 26
So 27.5 should have been 1 1/4 inch larger?
  • 9 1
 long life 26 " Smile
  • 6 2
 @jon123rjk hey, I don't know why 27.5 ever appeared in the first place, but if a size had to be introduced it should have been right in the middle. If there's a claim of a noticeable improvement with 1 whole inch of diameter, then I'd say an extra quarter inch or so would make a little difference too.
  • 14 0
 In my opinion, 26 should be kept as a viable wheel size for a few reasons...

-Rolling weight, spool inertia, and centrifugal resistance are generally lower on a smaller rim diameter. (= more manageable dynamic properties)
-More tire options are available.
-A smaller wheel is generally a more laterally stiff wheel.
-You are probably going to want to keep a smaller wheel option for small/x-small riders. (not everyone is kelly McGarry)
-Suspension and tire-to-ass distance is more generous than 27/29" options, allowing you to drop your seat lower on descents.

I have to think and hope that the old faithful 559.0 will not fade away so easily.
  • 5 3
 @burnadette not being facetious here at all, just curious: have you spent much time on 27.5 bikes? Just so hard to believe that an inch is such a game changer. I've only spent significant time on 26 and 29 and while I like 29ers for hardtail trail bikes, I would probably want smaller wheels for anything that involved higher speed turns, popping off lots of stuff and squish out back.
  • 4 3
 #steviestokes, I agree with you. I’m 6'2" tall and when you see me on a 26" bike it looks like I’m on a child’s bike, but when on a 29er & 650B all of a sudden everything looks all in proportion. I also feel much more stable on a 650b & especially a 29er. I do still have my 26" bikes mind, though they are only hard tail and I will admit that one will probably be sold in the spring/summer this year, to make way for a 650B!!
  • 6 3
 Curious how many of the 26" fanatics have actually truly ridden on 27.5" of a similar frame geometry to their 26. I ask because there is such a tiny little difference it is almost impossible to really notice. After a few rides, you really don't notice any difference. Oh but wait you do...you roll over everything just that much better while still maintaining the same cornering and acceleration. If 27.5" sucked so bad, was so horrible, then I don't think just about every WC DH team/bike manufacture would have switched over. 29's are a different story, that just too damn big of a wheel. My 2 cents.
  • 7 1
 I have both 26ers and a 27.5. The 27.5 is the absolute sweet spot for me. There was no "how-the-heck-do-I-ride-this-thing" transition like I had on a couple of 29ers. I love my 26ers, but I have zero desire to get back on them.
  • 3 1
 Buy a 27.5 Conti TK 2.4 and you'll have a wheel size in between 26 and 29 Wink
  • 16 0
 It's almost impossible to really compare 26 and 27.5. If you're on 26, chances are your bike is a 2013 or older. When you ride a new bike you might think the 27.5 is an improvement, but how can you tell? The geometry, suspension, and in some cases material are also all different and play just as much of a part in how the bike rides. I think it's really hard to pinpoint where the gains are coming from in real world test riding.
  • 10 4
 its horses for courses.........big wheels suit big dudes and little wheels suit smaller dudes........its really that simple...
  • 8 0
 It's not the the difference in feeling I think people are concerned about. I don't have any issues with that, welcome the change if anything!
More the fact their current 26" frames, wheels etc might not be catered for in the future. That's my only concern, I spent a bunch of money on a 26" frame and don't want it be be obsolete before the end of it's life, and seemingly railroaded into the other sizes, thats what winds me up.
More than happy to get big wheels, but not until my current bike is dead.
Bikes should NOT be treated like disposable/throwaway products, they need parts!
  • 5 6
 Y'all complaining about the death of 26 vs 27.5 wheel size and I'm over here in Utah still loving my 29. Then again I am 6'4, little guys seem to be the ones bagging on the bigger wheels. Smile
  • 1 0
 fair comment @bigbear

I'm sure 26 will be supported by fork, tyre and wheel rim guys......that's all you need right?
  • 3 4
 How to be a mountain biker step 3: pick your favorite wheel size and be a dick about it.
  • 3 0
 I've had lots of time on both with very similar geo and am very tall, not that I'm a "26 fanatic". But most 650b bikes are sub 30lb and don't feel anything like a DH bike. Luckily the process 167 was built to descend and didn't compromise anything so it could climb better , so I bought it. It has 26" wheels and I give zero f**ks because I have a DH bike that will get me to the top.
  • 1 1
 So many parents I know are looking for 26 inch wheel bikes for there 8-12 year olds. The market is there, and local bike stores are selling them. Just rebrand the wheel size as Grom heaven.
  • 4 0
 @TwoWheelPhrenzy Yes mate, I completely agree. I took the plunge on a Trance two years ago, now on a Reign 1 and god damn its a beast, and I never once think of the incremental size change as a bad thing, it just dominates, everywhere!
  • 5 3
 @JesseE, I have given it a shot. Maybe not logged enough hours on 27.5 to feel every specific difference, but enough to get an idea of how the wheel size affects the geo. I have demo'd a couple fullys from jamis and specialized and I am happy with how they ride relative to a 29er. (Still very smooth, lots of traction, but a bit more agile.)

However, if we are talking about having fun on the trail and catching some air off of roots/logs.. I have to say that i have more fun on my 26... It is just a smaller, more nimble, more controllable machine.

I dont think of wheel sizes as good or bad. I see them as a set of tools, almost like weapons in a video game...

- A 26" bike is like a shot-gun; Poor range, good power, lots of fun.
- A 29er is like a sniper rifle; Steady, Fast, purposeful.
- 27.5 is the assault rifle; Adaptable, fun, and confidence inspiring.

...sorry if the analogy is gun-centric, I thought it was a decent parallel to draw on.
  • 2 1
 @burnadette I wonder if a 27.5 is more like shot gun with buckshot, while a 26 is a shell with birdshot. 29er's a slug.
  • 2 1
 @flag yeti951SD What you call plenty of options I call too many standards. 27.5" bikes can be found everywhere from XC to Red Bull Rampage, there's no discipline where they wouldn't be used by professionals (I guess for a reason). And the fewer standards, the cheaper components.
Yeah, you can mention dirt jump or slopestyle but those are not true mountain biking disciplines (they don't ride in natural terrain) and many of them also use 24" wheels.
  • 1 0
 @Extremmist it's a fun sport, so I don't see valid options being a problem. Subtle changes that demand a whole new bike are annoying, but I see no reason to deny people bigger or smaller wheels if it's suits their riding just for the sake of efficiency. I ride a hardtail on generally flowy single track and don't get big air, so a 29" wheel works wonders to take the edge off the back while adding some additional traction when climbing up roots etc. I don't want to give that up. Sure, some people win XC races on 27.5, but who cares, I wanna wagon wheel for my trails.
  • 5 1
 @Extremmist: oh come on, slopestyle and dirt jumping are not true mtb disciplines? Are you kidding??? Both disciplines push the whole mtb sport and the bike technology forward because they go to extremes and because they are a test for materials and components. Compared to them the whole XC segment is a geronto-stagnation of the mtb sport.
  • 6 0
 i don't understand why anyone slightly over 6ft now considers themselves to have giant like proportions and now need a big wheeled bike. my 26er with 2.5 tyres is slightly bigger than a 650b with a 2.1 so you really saying that 26 feels like a kids bike. I'm 6'1" and when i see 6'2 guys riding a 26er i think there's another person out cycling. i don't think which poor child did he steal that bike from.
I guess you must all have like a 2000mm wide handlebars and carry 10gallon camelbacks. Must suck being so massive....sounds like you still have some growing up to do so sure keep your big wheels for that as im sure next year you will all likely be 8'4 just in time for the next wheel size increment. Man if you guys are so in awe of that tiny size difference you must be shitting bricks if your not suitably endowed with 1'5" schlongs...anything less and you couldn't go enduro.

in all seriousness though my only gripe with the 650b size is that it we all would have been fine with 26 and 29. if people like 27.5 then sure buy one. i know lots of people are sick of the wheel size debate but if so many of us were not forced to ditch 26" wheels when buying a new bike i wouldn't be so pissed.

if all things were equal in that i could go to a shop and buy any of the three sizes I wanted and find the spares i need if and when i needed them i would not care if they introduced a dozen more sizes. Im not against choice but anyone with any sense realized ages ago that the 650b would surely mean the demise of the 26 and i as a consumer said no thanks.....but eventually when i do need a new bike i wont have much say in it. i am not saying there's anything inherently wrong with the 650b wheel size just that now all the hype has passed are we really left with anything truly special. Did we really need such a similar size to the 26... I 100% agree with what Bigbear and DiveH have stated above.
  • 2 3
 @SlavIntruder Are you kidding? First of all, MTB = nature. That means riding natural terrain, not artificially crafted tracks.
Second - slopestyle and dirt jumping pushing bike technology forward? What did you drink/smoke yesterday? Big Grin Just by looking at the prices of those bikes you must realize you won't find anything revolutionary there, the only extreme you'll find there will be the weight of the components. Look at Marzocchi Dirt Jumper. 100mm fork that weighs 2.25 kg? Heavier than 180mm Rock Shox Lyrik? Seriously? And thats's the top model, the other ones are even heavier.
And calling XC a stagnation segment is an utter nonsense. Where did the carbon composite come from? 10 years ago you could only find it on pro racing XC bikes, today you'll see carbon rims at Red Bull Rampage or DH world cup (yet not a trace of carbon on SS and DJ bikes - so much for new materials...). Or modern 2x and 1x drivetrains, remote suspension adjustment and lockout, intelligent suspension, electric components, larger wheels, all this came from XC.
  • 1 0
 Pretty sure my Commencal Meta HT AM SX is produced in either 2014 or 2015 and it's a 26'er. But at the same time I understand what you're saying and I agree...
  • 2 0
 I don't race often, so smiles per mile is how I like to roll! Plus, since I'm heavier than most, having a stronger wheel really helps for longevity. I want to see a bike with 27.5+ up front and a regular 27.5 out the back. Would make for a good enduro race bike. Not for me, but for those who worry about the 1/10's of a second, it could help them go faster.
  • 5 0
 That comment was geared toward 26" wheels, my preferred choice. I think all the sizes should be made as each has its drawbacks. Ultimately the consumer should have the choice. If I'm paying 5k for a bike, I'm going to want it exactly how I want it. Every wheel size is viable and should be an option.
  • 2 0
 christopop my last purchased (new) bike was a 2013 supreme fr from commencal in mid 2014.....yep they were supporting 26 for a while longer than others but apart from the hip-hop I think all the others are now 650b :-(
awesome bikes aren't they.
  • 52 0
 Sramano will be releasing an electronic, 13 speed, gearbox, that will be lighter than current xtr, with proprietary new standard chain. Perfect for your lower, slacker, lefty equipped fattyish bike.
  • 4 1
 How about a 36ers fat ebike with electronic suspension and shifting.
  • 2 0
 I was about to google it, shame.
  • 4 0
 Don't tease.
  • 1 0
 gearboxes are probably a couple years away but 27.5+ and soon I bet 29+ will be the new thing
  • 1 0
 I'd rock the 36er fat ebike with electronic suspension and shifting.
  • 43 1
 I think we need some new ways to fit a bottom bracket that are totally different to any that have gone before. I also think the current diameter of bottom brackets is flawed, it does not promote an Efficient Concentric Power Curve (ECPC) and extra watts could be gained from a radical redesign and modification.

I am thinking semi-press fit with a BOOST interface, taking into account open seal" bearing technology to allow for ease of cleaning. Also its well known a 47.48mm diameter is the BEST for Comfortable Hip Efficiency (CFE), which has been proven in extensive lab and field trials to increase the Dynamic Rolling Resistance-Power Gain Curve (DRRPGC) and support ECPC.

Someone (probably SRAM) please make this so, I am concerned my current bike may have compatibility issues going forward and specifically my ability to buy a replacement part that fits, when in fact I should just be buying a new bike when the BB wears out
  • 22 0
 Pretty sure SRAM will be offering you a job after that post. Sounds like you have their business model down.
  • 17 1
 Semi pressfit sounds fantastic. You press the outer bearing assembly In with a Park Tool worth 500$, then you come to the threads and screw it in, using another expensive tool, which does not fit the one we used with the first HT2 bearings. Finaly we use two other tools, requring expensive machining to be made, to mount the other crank arm and preload the axle.
  • 15 0
 You forgot all the ©©©, ®®®, ™™™
  • 19 1
 Don't forget the price. Especially if SRAM produces it. It will be incompatible with your current wheelset, creaky as hell, and hit the market at $1200, dropping to $800 in six months, then $500 in a year. Then Shimano will release a $50 version that works perfectly, and is compatible with all your existing stuff ...5 years from now.
  • 8 0
 Obviously it needs to have a High Performance Dynamic Durability Function (HPDDF) with Falling On My Own Sword (FOMOS) technology for a reliable and suitably random trail side failure.

We see no benefit in any integration of tool types with existing products and will only provide a warranty if your BB is fitted by an approved dealer. Similarly our uniquely designed Boost Hammer Press Fit Screw Bar (BHPFSB) required to fit the BB will only be available to selected trade retailers upon payment of a £45 000 licensing fee

It goes without saying that we look forward to screwing you over, sorry working without your input or consideration throughout 2016 in new and inovative ways to make your £4000 2015 bike totally worthless redundant
  • 1 9
flag burnadette (Jan 8, 2016 at 7:10) (Below Threshold)
 Is it me or does the phrase, "open seal" sound a little bit paradoxical?

Additionally, I have been riding and working on bikes for a long time now and have never heard of 47.48 as the magical BB diameter. I think we have a joker here...
  • 7 0
 Is (elements) of the MTB industry not a bit of a joke anyways?

Like having 29347582992 different combinations of headset? Or press fit bottom brackets, solving problems that never existed in the first place. How about rear wheel spacing? 135, 142, 148 or 150mm?

Its easy to get labeled a troll or E-Hero for calling out the industry on some of the shit they produce, but how many benefits are there REALLY to a million "Standards"?
  • 2 0
 1 more monies for companies
  • 10 0
 Don't forget this needs to be made of a proprietary blend of aluminum (that equals 6061) with the acronym HAAA (Highly Advanced Aluminum Alloy). Another idea is to bond all the components together, so you can just replace the entire bike when something fails/wears out. Just a thought. We could call this SUCKERS (Single Use Component Kinematic Erosion Replacement System)
  • 4 2
 Kickstarter for Shimano, RS, Fox and SRAM - No more resizing for next 5 years. 4 million dollars to go
  • 2 0
 hahahaI I reckon you'd actually get some donations for that one.
  • 42 1
 Decent cup holders.
  • 1 0
 ^^^^^ This!!
  • 37 1
 Gear boxes.....if only.
  • 13 1
 Last piece of roadie gear on our bikes..
  • 2 0
 haha
  • 24 0
 How about reliable dropper posts?
  • 8 4
 Just buy KS Lev Smile
  • 18 3
 Your KS Lev must be a very different post from mine...
  • 3 1
 i think PB stated a few times the 9point9 post is the most reliable. it even won a award.
  • 2 0
 Nope, Gravity Dropper, hands down.
  • 5 1
 I wanted a reliable dropper too and then my seatpost clamp failed last week - there is no God
  • 22 0
 Maybe fix bugs on existing products??
  • 15 1
 I think it's electronic suspension. No more crazy links to make bikes not bob. Put that pivot wherever you want, make it lighter, and the shock makes it all ok! Would you want 8+ bearings and lots of stuff going on, so many moving parts, or just a shock and a sensor making it all pointless? What would Ibis and GT designers do with all the free time?
  • 7 2
 I think that's a big stretch. If anything mtb suspension gets trickle down tech from moto suspension, since they jump farther, land harder and have more finance backing their R&D. Expect just better forks and shocks, better linkage designs and all that jazz... thsee are road cars with electronic/magnetic ride control. It's let's go smash into shit offroad. Coil overs and air shocks, triple bypass and piggy backs. Rezzies baby. Electronics is for the roadies.
  • 6 1
 Are there any mx bikes that are not single pivot?
  • 4 1
 Nooope. All linkage driven single pivot, just different configurations, same with road bikes. Too much chain growth and flex to apply mtb linkages to motorbikes.
  • 1 0
 Pretty sure BMW used a horst link type design on one of their tourers. Dunno if they still use the design, but it was relatively sucessful in its day. Thats the only non-single pivot moto I know of...
  • 1 0
 All that stuff is going to add problems in the long run. Lots of suspension products are already a pain to service and repair, adding any more complications to the mix and we all just end up paying way more for something that wont necessarily perform much better.
  • 1 0
 Mert Lawhill did some stuff way back I think.
  • 3 0
 Mx suspension linkage and dampening are just slightly related to MTB. The difference in output power from rear wheel and weight/forces makes it all different to work with...
  • 1 1
 @TFreeman so with your rant on mx Ill through in the wheel size bs. How about the mixer by Foes and the big wheel up front and a smaller one in the rear. I think it is going to trickle down or already has. All mx bikes run a bigger front and smaller rear. Its only a matter of time till all bikes follow this.
New industry standard 29.5+ front 24.5 rear. Only because we need more wheel sizes.
  • 1 0
 @jaame - Yes, there are. Suzuki has been using the Full Floater design since what the 80's? This is very similar to Trek's ABP.
  • 4 1
 @dualsuspensiondave, the full floater is still a linkage driven single pivot, as the swing arm only pivots at one point, its still just a single chainstay attached to the frame. its called a full floater because the shock is compressed from both ends and not attached to the frame. ABP and Treks linkage is a completely different design.
  • 3 1
 Treks ABP is essentially a linkage driven single pivot. As is the Suzuki full floater.
  • 3 1
 But full floater is still a single pivot just like mono cross, uni trak and pro link. What I mean is, all mx bikes are the same configuration give or take. Push bikes are not.
  • 2 2
 ABP is a faux bar configuration that mimics what four bar does. This is different than a linkage driven single pivot. The drivetrain floats and seperates the forces. ABP actually was designed from the Suzuki Full Floater. Hence why Trek's suspension design is even called Full Floater.
  • 3 1
 Nope, the ABP is a linkage driven single pivot. The only actual functional difference between abp and any other linkage single pivot is that the brake is not mounted on the swingarm, which helps reduce brake feedback. The "floating" aspect actually does very little performance wise other than allow them another method of effecting the leverage rates.
  • 4 1
 to clarify "faux bar" is also a linkage driven single pivot. They only call it faux bar cos it looks like a 4 bar. Performance wise it is a single with linkage.
  • 4 1
 YOU DON'T PEDAL A MX BIKE!
  • 1 0
 Power still applied to rear wheel if you don't think that doesn't make a bike sag over the rear wheel you've never ridden one haha. I'm not saying the suspension will be the exact same. But similar for sure
  • 1 0
 Actually all that is already in prototype phase for a LONG time. Full integration with speed sensors, opening things up or increasing platform based on how rough it is and how fast you are going. I think it was right here on PB that Richard Cunningham wrote about riding the Fox prototype stuff. It will all integrate with Shimano electric shift stuff eventually, I'm sure. For those of us that aren't young whippersnappers, remember the old Proflex/Noleen "Smart Shock" stuff from 15 years ago??? Sure it sucked back then, but so did everything else.
  • 2 0
 I owned the K2 animal that took a 9v battery on the rear smart shock. The 9v battery lasted about 45 minutes then went dead. Everyone thought it was so cool. I had completely different thoughts about it. I think it was the in the late 90's. It also came with a warning sticker that said not for off road use.
  • 2 0
 Smart shocks sound like the dumbest syfy shit ever. It's going to make it hard to pop off a lip and also mow over a rock garden without changing settings. Unless it is an incredibly advanced brain, and if it is, it would cost an ass ton of money and be kinda large and still not work that well, or it'll be in the faaaar future.

But how are you going to program something so it can go "oh, this is the rider preloading before a lip" or "oh, this is compression due to cornering on a berm, better stiffen up enough so he doesn't wash out" vs "he's just taken a big drop, slow rebound time" and then "oh, fast quick hits, must be a rock garden" and the real question is how is it going to go into those situations with the proper settings. What if you take a heavy drop and then go right into a rock garden, for those first few milliseconds of the garden would it have really high compression and slow rebound and you'll get fuked up and pack your shock up?
  • 1 1
 TFreeman I don't think it'd need to be that advanced at all. Just a remote control car servo that turns low speed knob 1/4 way when pedaling. It'd act no different to most current bikes that firm up the suspension when pedaling. It'd just mean there's no pedal kickback like those bikes using anti squat. So bikes could be designed to be plusher for everything else.
The seal with a constantly rotating shaft would probably prove to be the a chilies heel, but it could all work internally to negate that issue.
Just as long as it's instantly on and off. Could work on the high/low speed elbow shims to make them blow off easier when a bump is hit. Could have a setting for brakes also to resist diving forks and squatting or jacking rears too.
My Zerode has a high pivot that negates Bobbing anyway and I hate the thought of electronics. Just saying I think it'd be a better advancement than electronic detailers.
  • 2 0
 This stuff doesn't need to cost any ass tonn (we talking metric?) Small computers are getting so cheap it doesn't even make sense. Just think about the thing in your pocket that is probably 1000x too powerful to waste on running a few sensors and a damper. Here's RC's opinion of a ride on last summer's fox mule:
www.pinkbike.com/news/exclusive-ride-report-fox-live-valve-active-suspension-system.html
  • 2 0
 Alright. Show me one off road racing vehicle that has electronic suspension. Oh, what? Even the guys in Dakar and Baja 1000 use just coilovers, bump stops, and huge multi bypass Uber cooling and piggies out the ass air shocks. And only shit ass slow moving vehicles like chevy's Z71, the range rover evoque, and the likes of semi offroad equipped vehicles use electronic suspension. Oh, and the suspension doesn't even work well, despite having all this funding. Geeeeeeez. Shock of shock. It looks like just better suspension is the way EVERY industry that deals with varying terrain goes.

Even in rock crawling and shit like the Jeep grand Cherokee or the range rover evoque or sport, it's only a few "settings" you choose from and it mainly adjusts the power delivery.

Face it, there is no room for electronics in suspension design.
  • 1 0
 The only real automotive industry that uses active ride adjusting suspension is luxury sport vehicles. That "magnetic ride adjust" when its settings are comfort, less comfortable, and awful, and top gear test track proven to not actually effect the speed or handling of the car.
  • 2 0
 No motorized vehicle has to worry about traction and energy loss like a bicycle does. Motorized transport want the same suspension either going up or down. In a way I could use your same argument and say no other industry uses the drivetrain to lock out the suspension and design the suspension with compromises to achieve that. So why not ditch the compromises and have electronics do the suspension adjustment.
I'm just playing devils advocate as I said. I'm happy with non electric bikes. But if made by a non greedy company a small generator(if not battery)could easily be used to power the electronics so there was no upkeep. But we know that aint gonna happen. The charge from passing magnets or something(any electrical engineers there)on the cranks could close a port on shock even.
Or it could be run from blue tooth from your phone or some shiz.
  • 2 0
 Not so much the powering as the programming and the activeNess of the shock. If all you want is lockout there can be a simple cable and switch for that, but if you truly want to make every bike single pivot and the only true greatness of the bike be the brain in the electronically controlled shock you're going to need a shock that can predict what is going to be needed of it. And that isn't possible, at least not within the next 10-15 years. You can make a reactive shock, but it won't work as well as the suspension we have now.
  • 1 0
 So you can't have a sensor activated by a moving crank that activates a port in a shock to close low speed damping somewhat.
  • 1 2
 Noskidmarks, LaPierre did that with their first bike equipped with "E-shock"

As to linkage driven singlepivots. Since linkage affects the way the shock is being compressed, you can't really put them into the same bag with classic single pivots. A problem with classic ones is while you simplify the suspension design alone, it gets harder to form the swingarm itself To limit flex, keep it strong and so it doesn't look like shit
  • 1 0
 How was that Lapierre?
Not sure of the single pivot linkage comments you made. I know having two stays or whatever creates triangulation and stiffer rear possibilities. Not sure of the relevance. Perhaps thats directed at someone else's comment, if so, ignore this. Or was it that the Lapierre was a non linkage driven single pivot? Sorry for lengthy confusing post.
  • 1 0
 A classic single pivot shouldn't really be any less stiff than a linkage one. In fact I would go as far as saying it should be stiffer for a given weight. The downside being that you massively reduce your options for affecting spring curves,
  • 2 1
 NoSkodmarks - I meant having a sensor reading whether cranks are rotating, telling the shock to stiffenup.

Gabriel - Classic singlepivots, like Heckler or Five, draw tubing all the way from a pivot located far in the front triangle while most multipivot design use bracing in form of bridges placed already behind the seat tube. In this way, tubing in single pivots has longer bending/twisting lengths. Hence most VPP systems are designs that are stiffest by nature. A monopiece swingarm is attached to the front triangle via short solid links.
  • 2 0
 Still lots of strange arguments comparing bicycles to high power off road stuff! Most of a bicycle's weight is the rider, who attempts to use things meant to run to turn a shaft. Remember now that there are a whole lot of bicycles out there that don't get hooked on a chair lift. I would guess most bicycles will never see a lift access resort or shuttle.
  • 1 0
 Waki - I see what you are getting at, but I see it differently. VPP systems may be stiffest on paper, and even possibly stiffest when brand new, however the stresses put on those short links are enormous. These stresses are what cause frame flex, and on a vpp they are focused on a very small area, leading to accelerated wear. For example, have you ever ridden an ali Mondraker Summum? Did it creak like a bastard? Thought so...

Yes most VPP's use a short swingarm, but this isn't inherent in the design. Look at a Marin Quake for example.

However I disagree with your suggestion that Orange swingarms are particularly long. The pivot near the bb and extend out to the rear wheel just like most sus designs. Where oranges do differ is that because they haven't wasted any weight on extra rockers/bearings/struts, they can make the swingarm huge. It really does dwarf the swingarms of pretty much any multi pivot design out there, and the stresses placed on it are spread over its entire length, not focused on one small area. This gives it a)massive stiffness, and b) very slow fatigue rates. Oranges are extremely stiff (ive ridden a few) and don't need their bearings replaced every six months like most vpp's.
  • 1 0
 The Orange swing arms are huge to counter lateral flex by not having 2 contact points to the main frame. How much a bearing has to rotate and it's size has a lot to do with how they wear as well as side loading.
  • 2 0
 thats the other flex advantage of single pivots. You can spec huge bearings, without the thing ending up weighing a ton. a few big bearings instead of lots of tiny ones. I serviced one of those Cube two 15 dh bikes once. Sooo many bearings. they were all very worn, and the small amount of play in each bearing added together to create quite a lot of play in the linkage.
  • 2 0
 Concentrating stress in limited nr of points on VPP and Classic single pivot being better at it? This argument is too long then, our minds obviously play tricks on us... Also Cube bikes are particularly shtty, don't compare them to Spec or Santa, If they or Mondraker made a singlepivot then it would be terrible compared to Five or Heckler. I have nothing against SPs, I am just naming their drawbacks. Everything is a compromise. You save on bearings but you spend on shock hardware due to... flex
  • 1 0
 that is true, bolting the shock directly to the swingarm rather than isolating it through a linkage can side load your shock more. I think the same would be true if not worse if you were to bolt a shock directly to the swingarm of a vpp, rather than to one of the links. I am not particularly biased towards single pivots, I just think their long term stiffness is one of their advantages, not their drawbacks. As you say, perhaps this has gone on a bit, haha.
  • 16 3
 180mm of suspension travel will be the new 160. 160mm used to be long, now it's standard. There's only one way to go from here...
  • 13 1
 I don't think so; as the wheels are getting bigger (whether due to bigger rims or fatter tires), the suspension is getting shorter again. and 130-150 mm seems to once again be enough for trail riding.
  • 7 1
 I see the 170mm the "new" enduro standard in the next pair of years.
  • 10 2
 In 2005 when you wanted a slacker geo, you were installing a bigger fork. Around 2010 trend hating online smartarseRs decided that geometry needs to be OPTIMIZED and said it ain't working cuz your BB bladi bla. In 2015 Jared Graves says he likes his 130 SB5 with 160 fork. In 2009 I rode a Nomad with 180 fork and it was an amazing ripper. But well, the progressive geometry nazis will always be there whining from behind their 35mm stems. Ride what you like.
  • 1 0
 ...And 60 degree head angles will be the new 63.
  • 16 2
 Buzz words i would like to hear in 2016:
Remarkaballs
Spectesticular
Unbellendable
Marphallus.
  • 13 0
 Boost the Boost. 0.148mm wider the the last thing imagine the gains!
  • 9 0
 Follow suit with Kona and Transition and bring out bikes with 26" options or Banshee/Production Privee where you can adapt. Why start to increase options for how wide your wheels can be and not carry on with options for how large ø they are too?
  • 8 0
 I want to see the results of all of these polls published for us to read. Then we can see how seriously manufacturers are taking the market or whether they are simply pushing new 'standards' and 'innovations' to keep the churn and turnover due to perceived obsolescence.
  • 21 0
 Think the pinkbike polls are a data mine to make money...
  • 15 4
 Except the industry has never taken this site, its polls, and especially its members opinions seriously. Because the site has a gravity dicipline orientation and those diciplines do not actually represent the majority of bike buyers.
  • 12 1
 BS...they're trolling for ideas.
  • 11 0
 Definitely. They aren't even that subtle. You can tell which are market research to offer added value for advertisers and which are audience research to help them sell more advertising, i.e 'x% of our visitors are hardcore shredders who ride 3 times a week or more and will buy more of your useless new shit'.
  • 4 0
 They ask what you think what you will see, not what you would like to see. Two different things.
  • 2 0
 @jamesbriancrilly

LOL I check them daily and send them round everyone in the office. Market research for the boys!
  • 9 5
 Industry does not cater to any collective demand, since by average people cannot demand something they don't see. Makers of stuff make something, then try to get as much exposure for it as possible, with an attached short story and visuals. Then individual people decide if they want it or not. Trend is nothing more but a pattern of desires and behaviors found among many individuals and it is a very blurry mechanism. Most sceptics assume that people "buy into" something due to complexes like, feeling Worse than others or trying to be one of the guys. That is rarely the case. People who buy a new bike every year are in minority since it takes quite a lot of money to be able to do it. If you buy a new bike then you simply get most pf the "trendy" stuff with it, so it is quite unfair to call them sheep. Some also assume that people outside of Pinkbike make rational, informed decisions when chosing a bike, and that is bullsht, since you make information based choice, nor experience based choice if you are not a great rider or his mechanic, balancing on the edge of what laws of physics allow to do on a bike. Vast majority of people working in the shops are poor riders so they can't do anything more than partot what someone told them, not mentioning the fact that every good salesman goes through the inventory of his store on Fridays to decide what he will try to push next week. Therefore even if 650B goes like warm buns, if he is left with too many 29ers, he'll adjust his pitch.
  • 2 2
 WAKI you need to write a book
  • 1 0
 Waki, it doesn't take a lot of money to get a new bike every year. It is new bike price minus old bike price. Plus if you stick with the same LBS year after year watch the discounts roll in, which makes the change over price even better. Been doing it for over a decade.
  • 1 0
 But what's the point of getting a new bike every year when they last for so many? Even with your lbs discount and selling your old bike it is a useless expensive joke. Plus you can get much better deals online and second hand.
  • 1 0
 @mattin, I do it because I can. I want the latest stuff, and I don't want second hand. This article is about what the next big thing will be, and if it is a new wheel size or drivetrain or whatever, I'll have it before most. And if it sucks, I only have to put up with it for a year. My LBS is happy, I'm happy, and people who buy my bikes are so happy they seek me out to buy whatever I'm getting rid of. I barely ever advertise. And it isn't a waste of money because it isn't as expensive as anyone thinks.
  • 2 1
 They're just jealous some of us choose to spend our money rather than trying to take it with us to the grave...
  • 13 1
 Active rear wheel steering for long, slack, long travel bikes
  • 1 1
 Genius! Give this man a Nobel Prize!!
  • 9 0
 I would bet money on more companies releasing trailbike specific coil shocks with lockout/propedal etc. Seems to be something people are asking for that only cane creek have responded to so far
  • 13 4
 29ers with decent AM geometry (Whyte, Spec, Evil) seem to be seeing the light of day......could be the surprise topic....especially if we get more big travel ones emulating the E29.
  • 5 3
 Check the Canfield Riot and EPOs
  • 3 12
flag pinnityafairy (Jan 8, 2016 at 6:28) (Below Threshold)
 29er EWWWWW YUK
  • 4 1
 I hope people hating other wheel sizes will be gone by this year!
  • 11 0
 1 1/8 Bottom Bracket would be a good change so I can use my fork to crank my gears and use my cranks to steer my bike.
  • 1 0
 Laughed way too hard at this
  • 1 0
 Bring back the 1" fork
  • 8 0
 If the industry continue to obsolete everything at the going rate I think I'll just give up and kayak full-time instead, then hopefully come back in 10 years time when popularity has faded from the sport and I can maintain a bike economically for years to come.
  • 8 0
 Here's a brilliant idea - BASHGUARDS !

Seriously, can anyone rationally explain why everyone ditched them?
With more people shifting to 1x drivetrains
1) front chainrings are more expensive to replace
2) no backup chainring if you bend it while riding

Have people stopped hitting rocks all of a sudden? Is it not enduro enough?
  • 2 0
 I always wanted to see a frame mounted replaceable plastic fin/bash plate mounted under the BB instead of off the cranks or ISCG mounts. If done right new frame slide tricks could be done, LOL.
  • 2 0
 "Always the top guide and pretty much always the bashguard. It's going to add 20 grams or whatever to your bike, so why wouldn't you run it? If it stops a rock flinging up and bending your chainring, that could be your race over. It's a damn light bike anyway - actually I never weigh the bikes anymore, I just set them up how they need to be set up and there is nothing you can do about the weight, it is what it is. " - Jared Graves. I've always wondered why they suddenly also disappeared, perhaps the smaller chainrings?
  • 10 0
 Increase flange width on those DH hubs with a 7sp cassette without actually increasing axle length.
  • 7 0
 Go see Hope's new hub
  • 2 0
 Atomlab
  • 1 0
 Allright, no breakthrough in 2016 then. Why all the upvotes Wink ?
  • 1 0
 hope trials hub. And you get better engagement only for demos though
  • 1 0
 Got one on my 4x. If they did a 150 version with proper flange spacing, that'd be sweet
  • 11 0
 Fat bike specific goggles.
  • 10 0
 How about;

- Future proof

- No planned obsolescence

- Ecological

- Ethical

- And internal gears already ffs!
  • 8 0
 truly the antithesis of the bike industry
  • 13 4
 More pointless expensive stuff we don't need, and maybe don't even want (looking at you, 650B) to make us spend more.
  • 9 14
flag Rocco90rider (Jan 8, 2016 at 6:06) (Below Threshold)
 I don't understand why there's so much hate into 27'5 wheels... they perform much better than 26 do...
  • 15 5
 It's because they don't, and I know; I own two......
  • 6 0
 I ticked gearboxes as a show of vote, but it's not what I expect to see as asked. I'd like to see Pinion and Effigear sell enough to lower their prices. I'd like to see a narrower Alfine to be used inboard. IF it's going to be electronics, stuff gears, I'd rather see a sensor on the cranks that tells the shock to add low speed damping. So there'd be no need for frames to compromise suspension performance by using anti squat from the chain. Gearbox Gearbox Gearbox. Although I have aZerode and Nicolai with Pinion, so I'm sorted.
  • 4 0
 I agree gearboxes need to start to be accepted by the larger companies. Derailleurs are already so refined that they cannot much more crisper, lighter or stronger. Gears on a mountain bike seems to be the least evaluated part on a bike. I guess there is electric shifting now but this to still uses the same concept of the derailleur. For 2016 we don't need the larger wheel sizes, electric shifting or "super suspension we need the gearbox!
  • 6 0
 Yeah they'll keep polishing that turd for as long as it shits out golden eggs. I'd like to see them make a wide range 8 or 9 speed cassette, with different cable leverage ratio so the button moved less than old 8 or 9 speed. So you'd have more durability and reliability. At least for DH.
  • 7 1
 Short term - dropper that drops without weight on it. Personally I'm happy with 125mm and could live with 2 positions. But it seems this makes me a minority. Long term - gears. Bottom bracket gear boxes. Makes way more sense than in the hub. Yes it's a new frame but so is sliding drop outs and belt drive compatibility. Range is far more important than number of gears. I use all my 11-42, but I'm often shifting 2-3 at a time.
  • 3 1
 Check out 9point8, a Canadian company for the milti position dropper, Cheers.
  • 3 1
 I agree on the dropper which goes down without having to put your weight on it. Can't understand how they did not do this in the first place with the electric droppers
  • 2 0
 Totally agree, that would be sweet.
  • 6 1
 What's wrong with a hydration system built into the tubes of the bicycle? That could be sleeved with a CO2 system surrounding the hydration tubes. The gas could then be compressed via the suspension action providing the ability of self powered refridgeration helping to keep the IPA of your choice nice and cold inside your bicycle frame. Now that's innovation!!
  • 1 0
 Another genius idea! Could be hard to clean, but I like it!
  • 6 0
 New mind blowing trails opening everywhere!

Santa Cruz is changing their colors (keeping the blue though).

stronger, lighter and yes...cheeper!

I won!
  • 6 0
 You should ask what we WANT to top the headlines in 2016. Rather than change the derailleur (clutch, 11 speed...), maybe we want to see a real improvement like the gearbox?
  • 1 0
 I agree that would have been a much better question
  • 1 0
 I was hoping there would be 2 polls and that would be the 2nd one.
  • 4 0
 I'd like to go back to one standard, quite like when 26'' was the only option. Please stop making new wheel sizes that obseletes others and make the happy medium out of 27.5, 29 and plus sizes. Set the standard to 28 1/4'' diameter wheels and 2.6875'' wide tires and keep it like this for a few decades!!
  • 2 0
 By setting a new average standard you're just creating even more new standard. With your plan you should rather force everyone to the middle ground 27.5", but that sounds like a terrible idea to me.
  • 1 0
 @Mattin your sarcasmometer isn't working properly.

You should get it calibrated before someone gets hurt.
  • 1 0
 I don't have one. Do you know where I could buy one?
  • 4 0
 Ultra lightweight gearboxes will remain my want, but its obviously going to be electronics and control system Ai. For the gearboxes I'd like to see them move away from large cnc'd heavy parts and work on smaller gearsets, using nano construction methods to allow much much stronger parts. Think mechanical clock gearing but produced with the diamondlike strengths we can get from nano tech. Its all just starting to hit factory level so I can see it happening in only a few years. Also get some nanotubes into the tyres, so we can kiss goodbye to flats and get astounding grip. But I guess with the way the bike industry is going that's like asking for the return of light bulbs that dont blow, money will make it not happen.
  • 7 0
 Air-less tyre system? A life without flats would be delightful...
  • 2 0
 I think they are still working on that one. I love where Bridgestone is going with it. Is it Bridgestone? The fins on the inside hold the tire on the outside. I guess weight would be an issue, though.
  • 1 0
 For road bikes there will be massive tyres coming onto the market. Strangly enough only 100g heavier than an average road tyre + tube and the rolling resistance was still in the normal range (below average, but some cheap road tyres were still slower). This might be something interesting to see if this product will keep on evolving more and how far it will get.
  • 1 9
flag panaphonic (Jan 8, 2016 at 2:55) (Below Threshold)
 How the hell do you get flats with todays tyres?
  • 6 0
 @panaphonic : depends on what type of trails you ride, how you ride them, and what tyres you choose.
  • 2 0
 Good idea that has had some thought put into it already. How about foam inner tube replacements? I saw these in the 90's in South Africa (where almost every plant has thorns) tried them and found them to be too hard and too heavy back then. With advances in technology surely we can do far better today?
  • 3 0
 @djm35: I think one day that will come aswell. Just needs time and research to find a correct composite of materials for the foam to work decently. But if 400g massive road bike tyres are already about to hit the market, it can't be that long. And these new massive tyres will just be the first version, give it 5-10 years of fine tuning and for all we know it could possibly compete against top-end tyres with air, or who know one day even become better.
  • 2 1
 Unlimited budget I would fill a tyre with this. could probably fine tune the resistance for optimum grip...

www.dezeen.com/2015/10/15/microlattice-metal-worlds-lightest-material-boeing-movie
  • 1 2
 Well if you get flats then you need to use a stronger/heavier tyre don't you.
  • 2 0
 A remote controlled bike So You Can go for a ride anytime in the confort of your living room without getting exausted ....were getting There...
  • 6 0
 150-200mm droppers !!
Are they so difficult to manufacture? Or not enough potential buyers?
Existing ones are too expensive
  • 3 1
 This is one point where I wouldn't mind if 150-200mm droppers would have a 35mm diameter. As long as all the frame manufacturers switch to 35mm. Since it is a seat post you can also work with shims for €3, so it's not a big deal if you replace your frame and have a smaller seatpost size. The extra travel would be worth it.

I would also like to see a dropper which automatically goes all the way down when you press the button, without having to put your weight on your seat first.
  • 2 0
 9point8 are doing 175mm dropper and maybe a 200mm....
  • 2 0
 Are they? I see 150mm but nothing more.
www.9point8.ca/index.php/products/sesatposts/product/69-fall-line-dropper-post

Vecnum has a 170mm and a 200mm, but 4 positions only.
RASE also has something in the 200mm range.

Also 400$ is quite expensive in my books
  • 6 0
 I feel like no one has made a new pedal size/thread standard yet. That would be a money maker.
  • 2 0
 You sir, are a geniusSmile
  • 1 0
 agree
  • 7 1
 A functioning 29er dh bike perhaps? ... I'll buy one if I have the cash ... just for the sake of having one.
  • 2 0
 Got to be worth a go!
  • 2 0
 Oxymoron.
  • 1 0
 That is some crazy sh*t......DH 29ers
  • 4 0
 what is the point of reliability anymore when two three years later it even becomes an interesting challenge to go tire shopping. (comment from an overthehill bmxer mtber of day one)
  • 4 0
 One thing's certain: manufacturers will continue to push those "innovations" that ensure you have to buy a whole new frame - and preferably a new bike. None of this retrofit mod bollocks...
  • 4 0
 Mountain tricycles. Rear hub spacing so damn wide you need two hubs and chainstays so short the rear axles are in line with the bottom bracket.
  • 3 1
 Gearboxes would be great. I think shimano and sram have already planed them, but the market is not ready yet. They can still make more money with expensive derailleurs and chainrings which need to be replaced once or twice a year than gearboxes which do not get bent or ripped of from rocks. But for 2016 there will be extra electronics
  • 6 0
 I wish it wouldn't be shimano / sram that bring (viable) gearboxes to market. They'd just bring out a first iteration of an under developed and heavy box, and drip feed feed us yearly reliability and weight updates for the next 10 years.
  • 2 0
 True Mojo. They'll just make them light to justify making them short lived. Would be good if either just bought out Pinion, they seem pretty proven. Although the Alfine 8 was a good box. They could just make it slightly narrower and slightly lighter to be used on AM frames Zerode style.
  • 2 0
 Think the weight vs longevity thing for gearboxes is going to be an interesting balance point. To my armchair engineering eyes, pinions look like they are over-built to take 1000w for years - a bit like they came from the w124 Schüle of singleminded and unnecessary overengineering. So they weigh a ton. Better (in my pov at least...) would be engineered to take 300w for 1 or 2 years, and easily user servicable, so to swap out worn gears, and be much lighter.
  • 2 0
 I guess they needed to as a new company. I'm happy with a few hundred gram penalty central and low at the BB for reliability. I did weigh a new 12speed Pinion Vs a mech cassette and chain guide the other day. I forgot what it was sorry. Under 500 grams but. Would be much the same for dual front rings and front mech, as that's what you'd need to match the range of the 12 speed Pinion. The centralized weight is good ballast for the suspension to work of and stabilize the bike IMO. and there's less unsprung weight make the suspension work better and the rear of the bike lighter to chuck about.
  • 1 0
 Agree with all points, though would compare to 1*11, which you'd be looking at a easy kg+ diff. Think a well optimised design could get well below 1.5kg
  • 2 0
 Good point. Still wouldn't be 1kg more I wouldn't imagine. and don't quote me. But I don't think 1/11 has the range of the 12 speed box. and if the Pinion was on a concentric swing arm(so no tensioner needed), the chain would never come off, so to match that reliability, you'd need to add a guide. You could say a 77Designz or Shovel guide is only sub 30grams I suppose. Not really back pedaling safe though, but with a Narrow Wide I guess it'd be as reliable.
Your also getting added chain and cable longevity, reliability and durability with a gearbox. and you can runs belt, but I'm not sure they're ready for MTB as yet. But I've not tried one.
  • 3 0
 The thing with gearboxes is that most of them need a frame to be designed around them. Now the engineers have taken the accountants out of the component spec process. Derailleurs allow the purchasing departments to negotiate with whomever because any brand will bolt up. Sure the engineers can spec components, but it's the corporate bean counters that make the final decisions.
  • 2 2
 No Man... It's all about physics. Gearboxes are good but they have only one problem that has no solution. You can put the best oil with PTFE into it, you can use the most progressive materials for its details but still it will "eat" the bigger part of the power you pushing on your pedals than the chain systems. I am working as an electrical engineer and I asked mechanical engineers at my work about this question and they told me this.
  • 3 0
 Fantastical mythological blah blah. In a lab compared to a new derailleur drive train, sure. But in the wild Vs a slightly bent 1 x running across the block to reach the extreme gears with a bit of grass stuck to the jockey wheel and shit evens out pretty quick. Then there's the fact you're in the right gear much more often with a gearbox as you can change several gears in one hit any time without pedaling. Something you don't think is that big a deal until you've ridden a gearbox bike and got used to it. Then your like, WTF is that primitive mech system still used for. So at the end of a ride you've actually saved a lot of energy just buy being able to get to the right gears instantly. Oh and the energy saved at your thumb by not having to muscle a mech up a block, LOL.
  • 2 0
 We all wanted gearboxes and they gave us boost and 650bplus. The manufacturers admit that the Plus bikes take more watts to get up a hill, so what is the big deal if a gearbox is 95% efficient compared to the 97% of chains. Also surely shimano and sram have got the funds to make a really efficient gearbox. Loosing the rear derailleur also increases the efficiency of a system so that must work in favor of a gearbox.
  • 1 1
 About "Fantastical mythological blah blah".... Man, if you riding XC then maybe you quite right... But speaking about enduro, allmountain and of course downhill I don't think so... But everything is changing. So maybe the newest gearboxes which I didn't try yet are really fantastic for any kind of riding!
  • 1 0
 On my Zerode I can change gears in a rock garden(not having to pedal amongst rocks), in corners ready for the exit,in the air ready for whatever is next. No three meters or whatever of soft pedaling to change gears. So energy might not be the big thing here, but time saved is. Or just dumping gears when you get off the chair lift, stop for a piss or whatever.
On my AM Nicolai with 18speed Pinion(get the 12 speed), I'm changing two or three gears every shift theres so many gears. If i come around a blind corner to find a hill, I can drop several gears and keep going easy with no loss in momentum or cadence. If your happy with your mech, just dont ride a gearbox bike for a day and get used to it and let your unconscious get used to it.
+ tires are just to help get electric bike sales. They may benefit less skilled riders to have fun by smashing through shit. But for performance at any higher level, there's no gains IMO.
  • 1 1
 I totally agree with you in two points: I hate switching many times to get the gear I really need And I think that 9, 10 and 11 speeds cassettes are useless. I have wrote this 15 hours ago somewhere upper in the comments to this theme. But I looked at Zerode bikes (sorry maybe I am newbie but I heard about them for the first time) and I was totally shocked about the construction with two chains. You see I ride my bike to work and back home every day in summer and also I can ride little harder at the weekend. And there is a thing that I hate most of all in maintaining bike - cleaning and oiling chain! And you got two of them... For me it is a disaster. Also, cheap chains like shimano ch-hg51 I need to change every month and something better like shimano ch-hg93 every 3 month. So on bike with two chains I would need to change them both? So I totally agree that the current system is not the best and that more speeds on the cassette are useless but I don't see the alternative in middle-price segment for now... But thanks for your opinion now I know Zerode bikes :-) Good luck Fellow!
  • 1 0
 The current Zerodes are DH bikes. There might be two chains, but they're running straight, and not being bent, twisted and rammed into other sprockets under load, so they actually last several times longer than a bike with mech. But yeah, DH bike, sounds like you need a non DH bike. Sorry if I'm wrong. If I am, the Zerode does pedal well for a DH bike as the high pivot naturally negates a lot of bobbing,
  • 2 1
 I thought for a while... Yes you are right I need some more all-purpose bike. And more cheap :-)
  • 2 0
 Whatever the buzzwords will be ,I dare say they will turn out to be expensive words.But then isn't that what keeps us excited and thinking whatever it is we will be buying will make us better,faster and fitter riders while also looking good.Or at least give us something to talk/moan about.
  • 6 0
 "New standard" 20x110mm front forks... That would be nice
  • 3 0
 Some new industry standard change,that will convince all the gullible people out there,that it will not only improve their bike,but also make them better riders.
  • 3 1
 More slack 100-120mm 29er trailbikes. Mixed wheelsize frames and sizing. Less internal routing. Enduro regrouping after the closure of several series. E-bike racing format debates.
  • 2 1
 I'm afraid that new standard sizes will happen.
I also think geometry will slowly change, but only year by year so people have reasons to replace their last years bike (same way Apple does it with their iPhones).

What I hope will happen is:
- simplicity: new updates / upgrades that require less maintenance, are more reliable, cheaper, lighter and more fun to ride. A good example of this from the recent past is the narrow-wide chain ring.
- tyres: not that they aren't good yet, but since they have such big impact on how the ride feels, they can always improve and it will have a good effect on the overall handling on the bike. Luckily I see the tyre companies are on their A-game with constantly improving their products.
- colors: no more ugly glow-in-the-dark parrot bikes please. The majority of the bikes have this nowadays and it looks so ugly. I would repaint that immediately if I would buy a bike like that.
  • 3 1
 I'd add price to that list. Why pay big money for some fancy Spesh or Trek if you can have a bike at is (at least) comparable in performance for half the price (like a YT or Commencal)? That cheap steel chainring from SRAM would be another example.
  • 6 0
 The simplicity part just will never happen. The manufacturers has no interest in making products that are reliable, and requires less maintenance. Cause these parameters does'nt make more money for them. Why should i buy a new derailleur if my old one is still in mint condition after 3 year abuse? Or an other example: My zocchi 66vf2s are still in better condition than my friend's 2 years old fox 36 float. I think you got what i mean...
  • 2 0
 Anytime I see someone complaining about the tires, I think about Aaron Gwin...
  • 3 0
 @Psyhostar - lots of trekkingbike companies focus on reliability and durability and still make a profit. Google Idworx or Rohloff for example.
  • 4 0
 Pretty sure after Leogan he complained about tyres too... Wink
  • 2 1
 How do you imagine a soft compound which is made for nothing else but for increasing grip to last? Just but Minions in 60a. The only exclusion from this is Kenda which manages to make hard compounds which wear out fast...
  • 1 0
 @bonkywonky : I mentioned cheaper in the simplicity part, but I agree it is indeed important as a whole and not just specifically for new types of parts like narrow-wide chain rings.
@ghostrider95: I wasn't complaining at all about current tyres. But since tyres are such an important part, I think a bigger difference can be made in effectiveness by further improving tyres, than by further improving suspension, general weight or stiffness.
@waki: I'm not a tyre developer myself so I don't know exactly how things can be improved. But to give some examples of improvements that worked well, you can look at high tpi tyres, triple compound tyres and aerothan tubes for example. I think the main part of improvements could be done by experimenting with new materials and composites, as a whole or just as an extra layer or a partial replacement. Aswell as the fact that tubes still contain air and can get flat. Imagine someone would be able to mix some type of sponge together that would work effectively instead of air, you could compensate the extra weight by taking out all the extra material and layers which are needed to prevent punctures and pinch flats. Just some examples.
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns : here's another recent thing that could possibly entirely change our tyres, the solid road bike tyres by Tannus. 430g per tyre, which is comparible to an average clincher road bike tyre with a tube inside: www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2809365/The-PUNCTURE-PROOF-bike-tyre-Solid-wheel-contains-no-air-ride-nails-shattered-glass.html

To be honest I don't believe this first generation version will be so good that it will totally change everything with our tyres, but the improvements seem to be coming close. Give it more years of developing and all we know, it could possibly become as effective as normal tyres with air, or who knows maybe even better? Only time will tell.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, I was speaking in general though, lot of people blame the tire for having no grip thus being slow etc., and these times times I just have a look at that run and smile. The ideas you have at improving tyres are pretty interesting.
  • 2 0
 Really hope this boost thing wont get a hold of since i just bought everything new (bike, wheelsets, fork etc) and its 142mm altogether Smile

I think 170mm is the new standard for enduro period
  • 2 0
 enduro period? jesus now EVERYTHING is enduro.
  • 2 0
 I really want to see an electronic gearbox, not fussed about having loads of gears, could happily live with 7 speed as long as it had a decent enough range of ratios and the weight penalty want too great.
  • 5 0
 "People ride their bikes and realize half of this stuff is bs"
  • 2 1
 Better tires please. So many advancements in wheel design, yet I still see what ever tires I run as the weak spot in my kit. They're just not that good compared to tires in other offroad sports. Other than than, a ban on press-fit bottom brackets would be nice.
  • 1 0
 "There's only a finite amount of things designers and engineers can progress when it comes to a bicycle, it's a fairly simple contraption constructed from a few tubes, suspension bits and bobs and some rubber contact patches. When it comes to keeping things rolling over and fresh for the new year's products, making something 7.5358mm wider might be the only option after changing the colour."

How many times has this or something like it been said? PB staffers are a little wiser than this, so I think it was just for the sake of the article. But come on, mountain bikes have years and years of evolution to go. How many years in a row have seen INSANE advances/changes? A few quiet ones would probably be a nice change.
  • 1 0
 One thing i really want to see since i first saw the new Boost Standard is the same thing for DH Bikes,it will be 152mm Rear spacing,it will cost your Balls and a Bone of your choice,oh...wait i forgot you will need new Wheels,so i guess your Balls are gone in Total,but trust me it will be Stiffer,Stronger,Lighter and faster....lots faster...no matter what your skills are
  • 2 0
 Im hoping they get the 27.5 geometry more dialed. A lot of 27.5 have the same wheel base as some 29'ers. BIKE INDUSTRY!!! WE STILL LIKE NIMBLE PLAYFUL BIKES THAT ARNT STUPID SLACK AND LONG. THERE IS SUCH THING AS TOO SLACK
  • 1 0
 The reason Im much more inclined to buy a transition or kona over a bigger brand is because they cut the s#it with stuff like this. Kona focuses on fun and affordability, for example that dylan sherrard precept promo video that came out a while ago, or transitions bad ass huck to flat mentality. THAT IS WHAT I IDENTIFY WITH, NOT WIDER HUBS.
  • 4 2
 Wireless brakes. I know it is a bit of a spanner into the water but imagine that... No cables, no outers, no internal routing... just USB cables.
  • 11 0
 Bluetooth....no cables
  • 6 0
 And no power x)
  • 9 1
 Hah, yeah, and with some tinkering, I can control my mate's brakes and easily overtake him. Mooohahahahaa. It would be like having the force!
  • 1 0
 it would be easy to keep the wireless secure. The tough part would be preventing any wireless jamming... but maybe i'm wrong and that would be economically feasible as well?
  • 1 0
 We should be making things more simple not more complicated. I don't want to take my bike to the local phone shop to get it fixed.
  • 3 0
 Soon your complicated bike maybe like goinf to a mechanic these days, they just plug their laptop into the frame, realise you are 20hrs overdue for your regular 10hr fox service, change oil, then put a sticker on your frame reminding you to return after your next 10hrs of riding.
  • 1 0
 wait for it
  • 1 0
 I can see it now, as you start a high speed section, your bluetooth module reads, "failed to connect" and you have to stop like fred flinstone.
  • 2 0
 Fair enough. Start with shifting and see how it goes. Can't say I'd be comfortable trying a wireless braking system myself.
  • 3 0
 expensive - whatever it is. dont buy it,be a thinking man,go out and ride and leave all that shìiiiiiiite behind
  • 4 0
 Surely only a matter of time before we see a 650+ dh rig
  • 4 0
 The availability of North American kit in the UK at the same price!
  • 1 1
 "When it comes to keeping things rolling over and fresh for the new year's products, making something 7.5358mm wider might be the only option after changing the colour."

Note to cycling industry: no it's not. Don't change things if it's not an improvement.
  • 7 2
 + size riders?
  • 1 0
 "Self Drive". Toss in blind spot sensors (handy for riding to the trail and those nasty merging bike park trails) and brake assist, and you've got a winner. Back-up camera extra.
  • 4 0
 buzzwords in 2016?

Back of 26" !!!!!!
  • 1 0
 What's next? How about another rear hub standard! Boost could be replaced soon according to this bikeradar article:

www.bikeradar.com/gear/article/trail-tech-five-technologies-to-look-for-in-2016-45948
  • 4 0
 Enduro specific downhill bikes.
  • 1 0
 That doesn't even make sense. It has to be downhill-specific Enduro bikes.
  • 3 0
 A bike with a sensor that preemptively stops me from riding something stupid.
  • 1 0
 Why focus on shortening the chain stay length when most non-competitive riders barely even use the pedals for more than foot support? Take that Enduro crowd... ssssslap!
:-p
  • 2 0
 Threaded headsets please, along with more threaded bottom brackets. Press-fit is for things that shouldn't need to be replaced.
  • 2 0
 strava mtb challenges with pictures - clear that gap, cross that camber, hop that rail, manual that ledge - leave the koms for the roadies Wink
  • 1 1
 As for me, I think that the real progress is something like sram 01 cassette 7 speeds but only with bigger difference between it's gear ratios. It is going with 10..24 and I need 10...32 and 36 on a crank. I don't like to switch switch switch switch and only then I have the speed that I need. In fact 7 speed is absolutely enough for almost every MTB style such as enduro, downhill, allmountain and XC. The only thing that is not enough in existing sram's transmission is (as mentioned above) it's gear ratios... 10...24 is too little and I don't want to have more than one gear on my crank. Also I think that oiling chain in dry weather must be in the past. The chains must have small hubs with dry PTFE bearings. Hope we will see them at the market very soon
  • 1 0
 I don't mind new standards when buying a complete but when You're trying to build a bicycle from a scratch to many standards can be the tricky part when it comes to availability :/
  • 2 1
 KS wireless dropper. Coil shocks with climb switches from fox, rockshox and dvo. New colours on the yt capra. Electronic xt and slx. Cheaper helmets. These are my wish list.
  • 1 0
 Coloured leds under the down tube and BB, matching the colours of your helmet so you can look cool. 150$ each and that's fine
  • 1 0
 Yes! Like the levitation lights kids were putting on their Hondas in the 1990s.
  • 3 0
 Can we just ride and not have more BS standards?
  • 3 1
 I want it to be gearboxes. SOOOOOOO much But it won't. It'll be bullshit new standards all year long..
  • 1 0
 I think We god to Ride all year long on what we have 2016 and let they joggle there one future for once. But I think it would be One suspension setup for all bikes!
  • 2 1
 New axle standards that require you to switch out your hubs, drivetrain, fork, etc for a whopping .0000000001 increase in performance.
  • 5 1
 kickstands
  • 1 1
 Some company should focus on affordability and reliability. Like my one up components chain guide. Its affordable and does its job very well. When the top guides is in need for replacement, those are also very affordable,
  • 2 0
 pleeeeease no E-bikes! If I wanted a motorcycle, I would've spoken to Yamaha
  • 3 1
 I am inventing a saddle that opens up in the middle so you can take an emergency shit right into the seat post.
  • 4 0
 Wouldn't it be simpler to just buy a Reverb?
  • 3 0
 Threaded headsets like a BB!!! Down with press fit nonsense.
  • 1 0
 An all mountain bike with a NEW PIVOT suspension system that will maintain the same wheelbase when the suspension is compressed!
  • 1 0
 Its a bit of a variable as the wheelbase length changes when forks dive. Get a high pivot bike.
  • 1 0
 Ride what you got, adapt to what you got, be happy and go ride! Don't buy new crap, go buy yourself a plus size riding vacation!
  • 6 4
 Hucking Spaghetti Monster
  • 13 1
 Are you taking our god in vain? Afterall he did boil for our sins...
  • 14 2
 yes he did, and now we are screwing him to the cross with 15x110 quick release.
  • 2 0
 I think 15mm is not stiff enough. They should boost the boost hub up to 20x110
  • 1 2
 If you think something is not stiff enough boy, maybe first you should get good at getting some mileage per each ride! Hallelujah!
  • 1 0
 You're a little too religious for my taste, Waki
  • 4 1
 more wireless seatposts
  • 3 1
 So more things can break and more expensive parts need to be replaced. Or... a cable which works just fine and costs like 10 bucks
  • 4 2
 Roost spraying charges mounted to the seat stays by GoPro
  • 2 0
 what for 2016 ? 26" tyre, 2x9 gears , and 2x180mm of travel Razz
  • 2 0
 I would like to see Millyard crazy tank suspension
  • 3 1
 more steel, and more longer travel hardtails.
  • 1 0
 Steel is Real, StarlingCylces!
  • 1 2
 I hope Lemmy will resuscitate and I will watch another Motorhead show!!! That's my expectation for 2016!!! And it would be very nice if the industry do not come up with another wheel size!!! That would be great too!!!
  • 2 0
 what's next? easy..just ride..Smile
  • 2 0
 What's next? Well... the 26'' bike again ^^
  • 4 1
 Chicken fingers!!!!
  • 2 0
 26.75 WHEELS - THE NEW HOTTEST THING TO MAKE YOU FASTER IN 2016
  • 4 1
 900mm bars.
  • 1 0
 A see your 900mm and raise you to nice round 1m wide????????
  • 1 1
 Imagine if they introduced a 26" wheel....that shit would be crazy !!


I'm sure that's already been said but I'm kit reading 300+ comments to find out !!
  • 2 0
 2015: The year mountain biking had a midlife crisis.
  • 1 0
 rims are getting stronger because of technology. I don't think the boost is the answer.
  • 1 0
 How come no spot for the AIM adjustable stem? www.3fstech.com/en/home
  • 1 0
 UCI introducing a mandatory fixie rule for Downhill racing. Now that would stop gwin winning
  • 1 0
 Also, in about two months, fox is unveiling their coil carbon fork. It's the first one ever made
  • 3 0
 Front and side airbags
  • 1 0
 Electronic horseshit that only people that miss the forest for the trees are interested in.
  • 2 0
 am i the only one who read this and then thought... um, who cares?
  • 1 0
 with all the recent innovation I suspect the year will be more one of refinement... and price increases
  • 2 0
 The switch back to 26" wheels.
  • 1 0
 self-inflating tires using one hollow spoke to deliver air from a co2 cartridge in the hub
  • 1 0
 Bikes will go full circle and get back to being fully ridged 26ers with thumb shifters and u brakes......
  • 3 0
 The comeback of 26"!
  • 1 0
 Rumor has it, Scott is coming out with a 33" wheeled bike. 33er may indeed be the new 29er but we shall see
  • 1 0
 It's going to be the year of enduro trikes.......smooth butter trails.......and gwin on a new bike...
  • 2 0
 Enduro Series
  • 2 0
 For me? Another ride.
  • 1 0
 Multiple sponsor variant factory teams
  • 1 0
 carbon, Enduro, eccentric
  • 1 0
 The big buzz will be proto plus sized DH bikes... Actually maybe not.
  • 2 0
 #FREEFATDUROCROSS
  • 2 0
 ...and the bikes & trails created for this new discipline.
  • 2 0
 Less gears.
  • 2 0
 BOOST 150
  • 1 0
 Not sure if you're joking or if you read this article: Sounds like 150 boost will replace 148 but of course our old 150 hubs won't work.

www.bikeradar.com/gear/article/trail-tech-five-technologies-to-look-for-in-2016-45948
  • 3 1
 27.5+ with banana seats
  • 1 0
 Also the CO2 could inflate your flats!!
  • 1 1
 More electrics unfortunately. Electric droppers from the big dogs. Also carbon for lowers.
  • 1 0
 A bike geometry that fits all 3 major sizes, be it 26, 27.5 or 29er.
  • 2 0
 It's already here really, go get a trek stache 9, fits 29+, 29,27.5 &26 with its insanely short adjustable chainstay. A bit pricy thou for a hardtail...
  • 2 0
 Heated seats and grips
  • 1 0
 29+ downhill e-fatbike competitions !!!!!!!!!!!!
  • 1 0
 LMFAO I tried a fattie on a downhill and still have the scar to prove it.......
  • 1 0
 XT Di2, New SLX, New Saint and Zee!
  • 2 4
 Boost 148...how DUM. I mean come on...most mountain bikes still roll around on the trails with wheels held on by quick releases and the BEAT the SNOT out of the WANNABEES on their fancy updated GARBAGE.
  • 2 2
 COMPLAINING! It's going to be another epic year of bitching about new technology, old technology and everything in between.
  • 1 0
 “Connected” for sure.
  • 2 0
 Retro 135
  • 2 0
 I think it'll be renamed as Boost 135 or 142
  • 1 0
 whatever the kids will eat up, ie "enduro"
  • 1 0
 Why do we not have di2 brakes yet? I need electric brakes!
  • 1 0
 Two wheels in back are whats next, the tribikle.
  • 3 1
 Steep Loam
  • 1 0
 "fat love". oops, I meant to type "plus size"
  • 1 0
 What air should be in your tires? O2, CO2, Nitrogen?
  • 1 0
 Ditch the energygels, pack some chicken wings and burgers!
  • 1 0
 More fanny packs! How bout breast packs for accessibility?
  • 2 0
 Sensors.
  • 1 0
 short travel 29er AM bikes and plus sizes.
  • 1 0
 Wireless electronic effing shifting. Cables and cassettes are archaic.
  • 1 0
 ... Remote tilt adjustable seatpost?
  • 1 0
 Buzzword? You not going to say everything and everyone is LEGEND.
  • 1 0
 New seat tube dia. standard for stronger n longer droppers.
  • 2 0
 Minus sized wheels
  • 1 0
 Frame Stiffener Spray© in a Fluorocarbon-free spray can, of course
  • 1 0
 It's all one dicks opinion against another
  • 1 0
 Urbanduro... definitely Urbanduro.
  • 2 1
 So stoked for 2016!
  • 2 1
 sacred geometry
  • 2 1
 'shmooblydong' for 2016
  • 1 0
 Super Boost 3000 +
  • 2 1
 Last year of Rampage.
  • 1 0
 12 speed
  • 1 0
 Inconceivable!
  • 2 2
 Mark my words, the next thing to come out is a frameless bike. Just watch
  • 1 2
 The talk around town is that they are going to do away with handlebars entirely and replace with steering wheels.
  • 1 1
 Who seriously down voted this??
  • 2 0
 probably someone whom gets annoyed by thread clogging unrelated chitta chatta.
  • 2 0
 sorry to mess up you all's commenting flow!
  • 2 1
 Higher prices.
  • 1 0
 More unnecessary stuff
  • 2 3
 Aaron Gwin
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