peleton7

Former Expert (XC) and Cat 2 road racer. I like to ride technical trails all summer and backcountry ski all winter.

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peleton7 mikelevy's article
Dec 5, 2018 at 9:55
Dec 5, 2018
Field Test: Specialized S-Works Stumpjumper 29
@samimerilohi: I don't object to the geometry (I get on well with shorter reach bikes)-I object to mediocre climbing and descending. A well designed bike with a shorter TT can still do the things well.
peleton7 mikelevy's article
Dec 4, 2018 at 15:50
Dec 4, 2018
Field Test: Specialized S-Works Stumpjumper 29
It climbs.....okay. It descends....okay. That's not a glowing endorsement for a $4000 bike let alone a $10k top-shelf ride. When the same cash gets a better climbing and descending bike, why buy this?!
peleton7 mikekazimer's article
Dec 1, 2018 at 14:11
Dec 1, 2018
Pinkbike Poll: How Much Does a Bike's Climbing Performance Matter to You?
@bart882: Those Marin County guys were Cat 2 and 1 road racers who pedaled up for their downs (and pushed if they had to) more often than they got a ride to the top. Enduro as a discipline hews much more closely to the original Mt. Tam ethic than straight downhill. DH is fun and a great way to build skills, but a complete skillset also includes the ability to ride up hard stuff too. The cool thing is that a modern $3-4k bike (Giant Trance, Stumpjumper etc.) will handle anything short of the gnarliest black DH trails and still climb well enough for a beer league XC race. Riders used to have to choose a bike that rode up well or descended well, but that isn't a problem on most new trail bikes. Even if you run a shuttle, being able to ride up AND down on gnarly trails allows for more interesting and challenging riding.
peleton7 mikekazimer's article
Nov 30, 2018 at 14:49
Nov 30, 2018
Pinkbike Poll: How Much Does a Bike's Climbing Performance Matter to You?
Mountain biking (in its truest form) is riding up and down hills. Sure, 8" of coil-sprung squish is a good time at the park, but everywhere else a bike should be good at everything. We're at a time now when a bike that doesn't go up and down well is half-baked and a half-assed effort from the manufacturer. The best trails have both challenging climbing and rowdy, consequential descending. Even the best shuttle runs (Ribbons to Lunch Loops trailhead via Gunny or Mag 7 to Portal come to mind) have enough technical climbing to keep you honest and descents hard enough to keep you humble. A good bike handles both tasks with aplomb.
peleton7 mikekazimer's article
Nov 30, 2018 at 14:31
Nov 30, 2018
peleton7 RichardCunningham's article
Nov 30, 2018 at 8:44
Nov 30, 2018
Tested: 5 Ways to Hold a Tube on Your Frame
I like the carry of the RF strap, but it's got an earned rep for falling off. I just put a Voile strap around mine to carry more than a tube and have some security (and the utility of having a Voile strap). Combined with an Outvi tool roll all my tools are off my back.
peleton7 pinkbikeaudience's article
Nov 6, 2018 at 15:05
Nov 6, 2018
Ask Pinkbike: Shock Tuning, Flat Pedals, Ride Tracking & More
My background is mainly road-I raced road (and a little track) for a decade as well as XC off-road, always clipped in. Switched over this spring to flats......and it's amazing!! Grippy shoes (I just deal with quick wear and rock 5.10s) and well shaped pedals (started on Chesters, wore out the bearings & cracked the bodies and got some Scarabs) are vital. You'll likely need to move feet forward a bit, and I went to an oval ring to get a little more grunt on techy up-moves. If feet are coming off, try to lower your hips and shoulders; you might just be sitting too high on the bike. Flats allow for more aggressive and/or creative lines in the chunder but body position is more important. Stick with it and you'll be railing the chunk like a boss!!!!!
peleton7 enduromtbtrainer's article
Nov 3, 2018 at 6:53
Nov 3, 2018
5 Performance Strategies to Try This Offseason
How to stay fit in the off season. Option 1: Keep riding your bike. If the weather really makes that difficult... Option 2: Do something else that you enjoy to stay active. I backcountry ski, but running, swimming, or Nordic skiing also work to keep the motor tuned. Everything else is details.
peleton7 Starlingcycles's article
Oct 29, 2018 at 16:32
Oct 29, 2018
Video: The Starling Cycles Sturn is a Single-Speed DH Bike
I agree that some flex can and should be designed into a frame. I also agree that full suspension bikes don't track as well without some lateral compliance built into the rear end. I still stand by my statement though-1 speed takes more than it gives in terms of performance (see Commencal high pivot designs for how to make a geared bike without compromising suspension action). It's not like the weight of a geared drivetrain matters that much on lifts. And....building a steel mainframe stiff enough not to laterally load a rear shock is inefficient, heavy and (when using higher grade, heat treated steel alloys) pretty expensive. I get the compliance of steel in an unsuspended frame-I grew up on steel hardtails (and road bikes), and they rode notably better than the aluminum frames I had. Sure, big companies tout various metrics to hype their products, but they also have the biggest R&D budgets, engineers and lowest recall/warranty rates. And their bikes ride really well.
peleton7 Starlingcycles's article
Oct 29, 2018 at 11:27
Oct 29, 2018
Video: The Starling Cycles Sturn is a Single-Speed DH Bike
Flexy steel frame. Thanks autocorrect.
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