Finished: Ask Me Anything - Reuben Krabbe, Photographer

May 2, 2017 at 11:18
by Pinkbike Staff  




Reuben Krabbe is a photographer that shouldn't need an introduction, but in the event that you're reading this and don't know about him, here goes: Rueben calls Squamish B.C. home, which is perfect with all of the time he spends up and down the Sea to Sky highway, shooting and playing in the backcountry that the area provides access to. Perhaps this has helped with his success shooting the style that he often does, which includes the full beauty of the scene, rather than the athlete doing a sick skid? Regardless, his eye and style have won him multiple competitions against his peers and he now works for the who's who of the action sports industry.

Reuben joins us today, live on Pinkbike to answer all of your questions about his career, his shooting style and what it takes to make it work in this industry.

Kenny Smith Deep Summer Whistler
Stephen Matthews rides through foggy mordor like trees on sumas

Reuben Krabbe

Wade Simmons riding with style and confidence on a greasy day on sumas
James McSkimming Whistler BC

Copyright Reuben Krabbe 2011


How ‘Ask Me Anything' Works:

Starting at 10:00 AM PDT/6:00 PM BST on Wednesday, May 3rd you can type your questions into the comment box following this article and the Reuben will have a crack at answering them. Sometimes your answer will pop up in a few seconds; others may take a while, Reuben will be busy responding to the flood of questions. Everyone who posts a question, large or small, will be taken seriously. To make the process as efficient as possible, try to follow these simple guidelines:

Keep your questions relevant.

Stay focused. Try to keep your questions on one topic if possible. You can always ask about another item later.

• Try to keep your questions to about 100 words.

Ask Us Anything is a service to PB readers who are seeking helpful information, not a forum to broadcast opinions or grievances. If you do have a negative issue that you want to ask about, no worries, just keep your complaints relevant and in the context of a question so that it can be addressed in a productive manner.

Use propping to acknowledge good—or not so good—questions. Bump them up or down to where they belong.


Mark your calendars—the conversation starts at 10:00 AM Pacific Time / 6:00 PM British Time on Wednesday, May 3rd.

Other time zones:
• 1:00 PM EST (New York)
• 6:00 PM BST (London)
• 7:00 PM CET (Paris)
• 8:00 PM SAST (Cape Town)
• 5:00 AM AEST (Sydney, Aus)


Reuben is sponsored by MEC, Yeti Cycles, F-stop camera bags, G3 skis, Dissent Labs and Oakley.

Follow Reuben on Instagram.


MENTIONS: @ReubenKrabbe




171 Comments

  • + 44
 How do you find time to shoot photos whilst squiring supermodels and being an international man of mystery?
  • + 2
 what got you into photography in the first place?
how is it as far as pay, if you don't mind me asking?
  • + 17
 What kind phone are you shooting with?
  • + 5
 @scary1: I went on a trip with only an iphone 6 a couple months ago. It wasn't a 'shoot' but it was so nice to travel light!
  • + 5
 @jmartinbiking:
Two friends of mine starting shooting on film SLR cameras when we were out mountain biking when I was 14. Before that we shot photos occasionally, but when the film cameras slowed us down and forced us to concentrate, it turned into a hobby. That became an expensive hobby by the end of highschool and I decided to chase the dream rather than buckling down into post secondary degree study.

Pay depends on the quality of your work, how you negotiate, and how valuable an image is for a brand. For example, the Eclipse ski project was the signature campaign piece for Salomon skis, the trip took 3 weeks, and the concept was original. So, for that kind of thing, it pays off. Many many other days I'll go out with a rider and shoot and play in the woods and come up with nothing.
I've been working in only photography for 6 years, some MTB photographers are homeowners with children, so it can pay!
  • + 23
 Reuben, long time fan, first time caller. Tips on the ultimate selfie? Obviously, I'm a handsome lad, but they never turn out quite the same. Mud splatter technique, pouty face? Plz help!!
  • + 4
 Mud splatter selfie came after I got back from the Whistler hospital. I crashed on the ladderbridge on lower ninja cougar beside A-line.

Recent favorite from last week: imgur.com/pvNCWmH North face of Sessle Mountain near Pemberton. Woke up at 3am and climbed the ridge with several TGR athletes. Requirements; morning coffee, ice axe and crampons, 2 weeks of not showering.
  • + 22
 Favorite food the Krabbe patty?
  • + 8
 That's literally my wifi network name. Best served at my Krabby Patty, french toast and espresso or sweet potato curry.
  • + 15
 Which nickname do you prefer... 1. Techno Viking 2. Seafood Sandwich 3. Reubix Cube
  • + 4
 Each for it's own occasion. @seafoodsandwhich is a genius name thought up by Feet Banks, while Techno Viking is just too good!
  • + 13
 What was your first breakthrough into professional photography and what's your advice on how someone can try and do the same?
  • + 4
 We like to think of 'breakthrough' as the biggest step in many people's careers, but I think of them more as milestones that come with constant effort, instead of singular summits or accidental moments of success.
The breakthrough/milestones that I think of: Skiing photography slideshow competition in 2011, that proceeded other bigger successes or competitions that came later.
But, even before that competition in Banff, it took years of effort and little successes of published photos and personal connections to allow opportunities that came later.
  • + 11
 @ReubenKrabbe just wanted to thank you again for giving me your time and advice all those years ago. Time is precious and so is knowledge. Thanks for sharing both here today. Mucho gracias, keep on killing it!
  • + 8
 Hi Reuben! I've been trying to get my name out there to become an action sports photographer, but nothing seems to be working. Truthfully, I feel that Instagram Isn't working, nor are most things that I'm trying. I've thought about going to bike shops and offering my services to take photos of their sponsored riders, but I'm afraid this might be too cocky since I haven't shot for money previously other than in a studio. Help! what did you find that kickstarted your career?
  • + 13
 Starting a photography career in action sports is a chicken and egg problem. You need the skill to shoot the good rider, the good rider to have good action to shoot... I remember the problem well.

I think the biggest thing I would emphasis is to
1: work with what you have. Don't wait on imaginary barriers that 'prevent' you from trying to do things. Just get shooting.
2: work hard and learn lots, try silly things, try ambitious things, imitate pro's photos, study.
3: grow you network. I rarely have a company say 'we cruised through instagram and liked your photo, so here's a campaign you can shoot' Instead, my work comes through the relationships I've developed by being part of skiing/biking community, etc.

Ex: I live down the street from oneup components, and we go for regular lunch rides. They also happen to hire me every once and a while!

Bike shops aren't likely to hire you for too much, very few buy photos (instead the brands they carry pay for the pictures and signage you see in the store). But, they will be really happy to connect you with their sponsored riders and get those riders producing more media. So, go track them down, and shoot a bunch, then if your imagery is good and seen as valuable you can sell it to those bike brands, to magazines, etc.
  • + 4
 @ReubenKrabbe: thank you so much for your advice!!! I've been able to take some pics of their riders and they seemed to like them, commenting on them and things like that. But I'm going to keep working hard and try to get some rad shots. Your advice definitely gets me stoked to keep going. Thank you!
  • + 8
 While playing the roll of Body in the hit 80's movie Point Break, what did you enjoy more ...the surfing or the skydiving? Also was the 100 year storm all it was cracked up to be ?
  • + 4
 Bodhi (Patrick Swayze) is actually being hired to act in an upcoming remake of the 2015 classic adventure film 'Eclipse' in which a bunch of hairless apes travel to the high arctic to worship the sun.

Which 100 year storm are ya talking about? Calgary's?
  • + 2
 @ReubenKrabbe: Bells Beach
  • + 9
 @squagles: No Bodhi knows the the troubles I've seen
  • + 1
 @ReubenKrabbe: theres no way bells is bigger than waimea, bro
  • + 1
 @cyclemobolympicpark: Any self respecting Point Break fan knows it was the 50 year storm. Go back to the Valley man! haha
  • + 6
 I'm looking to get into photography (outdoor, landscapes, action sports, etc) and I'm having a hard time deciding between a DSLR (Nikon D750) and a mirrorless (Sony A7II). Just wondering if you have any thoughts on the matter. Thanks!
  • + 1
 I'm gonna add onto this cuz im in a really similar situation right now. I have been using a Nikon D200 for the past few years but I will be getting a new camera for college graduation. I'm between one of the Nikons(d810, d750, or d500) and the Sony a7sii. Leaning towards nikon but my big dilemma now is whether to get the full frame 750 or 810 or get the crop sensor d500. Thanks!
  • + 4
 @njwiv: I''m not any kind of pro, but have been taking back-country photos (hiking, climbing, skiing) for over 25 years, first colour neg, then transparency and B&W, then crop sensor, now FF for the last 5 years. Medium format is more likely to be in my future than going back to crop.
Crop sensor can be a significant size & weight advantage, and _sensor_ image quality is great nowadays. However, most of the lenses designed for crop sensors (which are primarily responsible for the size & weight advantage) aren't that great - slow, not super sharp or contrasty. Once you step up to better glass, it's mostly designed for full frame, and you lose much of the size & weight advantage. The other advantage of crop sensor is magnification, but I find that I was often using a longer focal length for subject isolation (reduced DOF), which you effectively get with a lower focal length in FF (for the same aperture). There's no objective reason why you couldn't replicate the same look by using an equivalent focal length and aperture, except that fast wide zooms are uncommon, and few fast primes are designed for crop. Also, to get the same level of camera controls in a crop body generally takes you up to the bigger chunkier body anyway, where it's only an incremental difference getting the lower end FF body. If you like to shoot really wide, there's no real substitute for going FF. Better dynamic range (i.e. being able to recover shadow detail) is the other obvious benefit of FF, which can be particularly useful in high contrast scenes, e.g. around sunrise/sunset, mixed shadow/sunlight in forest etc. All that said, if you click on the linked photos you can see that Reuben has shot a mix of crop and FF Nikon, but the most recent ones I found are all using a D750 www.pinkbike.com/u/ReubenKrabbe/album

@cseachris: I'm a Canon shooter for the last 10 years, but have friends using Sony. For extended back country, they have found battery life to be a significant issue, to the extent of having to carry solar systems and or battery banks. As far as lenses, Sony have some great glass now, though there have been some questions about reliability. My suggestion would be to give both systems a good try out (borrow/hire/in-store demo) and decide based on handling. Back in 2007, I found I preferred Canon over Nikon, you may prefer Nikon over Sony. I've considered moving to Sony (A7RII) for the in-body stabilisation and sensor resolution, but really didn't like the ergonomics and don't like using an EVF, so I'm sitting out mirrorless for another 5 years (probably updating to Canon 6DII when that comes out). If you do decide on Sony, and you really plan to shoot action, you'll be wanting the new A9 of courseSmile
  • + 1
 @dsut4392: thanks so much! I have definitely been leaning towards FF but theres a big price jump!
  • + 2
 sorry I missed this. There's a couple things here I'd think about. Are you trying to become a professional in the long run? Then investing in full frame, and the lenses to match will be the most cost effective way, rather than buying 4/3rds and upgrading more later.
If you're not planning on it becoming a job, then either system can work, I still prefer shooting with a better camera design for motion and speed, compared to a bit of an annoying 4/3rds layout. However, it's also way nicer and easier to carry a small camera.

For the amateur, each camera's sensor will create images that will be great. It's more about the handling of the camera, that makes the decision for me
  • + 1
 @ReubenKrabbe: Thanks so much!
  • + 5
 What are your thoughts about giving trail builders credit in photos. I was thinking of climbing photos where sometimes credit is given to the route creator, history of the climb, etc. (I.e. Fred Becky route F.A 1967). I know often it would be impossible.
  • + 5
 I think that could exist, but it would take a larger effort overall to credit trailbuilders universally. If trail signs had the accompanying trail builder, or Trailforks had space for that information, I would be glad to start working to credit where possible. However, without good resources for that, it's hard to start. Maybe we should get that into Trailforks to start!

I think it works better in climbing because routes are put up, and then take little to no maintenance and also don't get changed or re-routed. It's a lot more permanent and a single person or pair are likely responsible. Where, in biking there's a larger community investment in many trails. (or, also trails built illegally where the builder wants no credit hah!)
  • + 1
 hey dave - I'm still a hack, but I'd be keen to take some shots of you and G on some of your trails sometime! lets do it! Cheers Kyle
  • + 5
 My question doesn't involve advice on how to be a photographer or anything. It involves being a consumer. I see so many amazing photos posted by the likes of yourself and other great photographers, Martin, Trumpmore,etc. but it seems impossible or very difficult to obtain a nice printed copy that you can frame and hang. The selection seems very limited. Why so? Thanks for your time.
  • + 8
 Thanks for asking this! Most photographers don't have web stores for photography because it's not a very lucrative thing for us to do. Having stock of prints is expensive, shipping is expensive, and you have to predict what sells. Also, most photographers enjoy photography more than business and deskwork, so we'd rather be out there shooting more. But, any photographer will still sell you a shot if you email them and ask. I probably printed 20 custom canvas and print images and had them shipped around the world last year. So, go for it!
  • + 4
 After a shoot how much guidance do you give to the client on which photos should be used in the final ad/article - do you submit a list of your favourites and then a load of B roll options or just let the client decide, even though that might mean, in your eyes, weaker shots being presented? Or do you pretty much only submit your strongest photos and limit the final number?
  • + 9
 This always depends. In a recent story for Bike Magazine on the Calgary Floods' effects on local trails (on the shelf this week), I hand in several hundred photos. Anthony, the photo editor gives me a 'selection' of, say, 40 images for me to deliver in high resolution (edited looking spiffy) and then maybe 20 make the final cut. Since Bike employs a person for that specific task, and Anthony is better at it than almost anyone in the industry, I am comfortable having almost no say.

I also am frequently frustrated that images I like won't get used. I'm glad that now I can at least publish to instagram, allowing me to show off the imagery I like as well!

However, other projects that you'll see on the pinkbike feed might be done with a company that wants to give me creative control. Allowing me to build a narrative the way I want it shown.
  • + 3
 How much does the travel photography lifestyle impact family/friends relationships? I feel like you don't see too many big name media guys and gals with real "normal" lives outside of their work, not that thats necessarily a bad thing
  • + 5
 It's hard in some ways, but also great in others. Much of the work i do is at the mercy of local weather patterns, making me answer 'maybe' on every facebook invite. However, I'm also learning after years that more and more things are more important to me than a day of shooting photos here or there. This AMA even got rescheduled 4 times this spring due to snow conditions in the Whistler backcountry (thanks Rachelle @pinkbike).

I think the age of photographers and filmers in action sports will, like athletes, stay low. We like working with our friends so it's simply a natural pairing that many lensmen are the same ages as athletes. Some will always persevere, like Sterling Lorence with kids and a family, however you will see that those kinds of shooters will also concentrate more and more on work that they can do locally.
  • + 3
 Just a shout out to you and your skill. I also enjoy the stories from athletes and people that you have pushed past their limits in order to get "the shot". You have a vision and the confidence to back it up. Watching the Eclipse film showed that well. In the end everyone sounds so grateful for you pushing them as the images are like nothing else.
I look back fondly to our Chilcotin by night shoot, but at the same time shake my head at the exposure and the lines we rode in the dark just the shot. Thank you for making our sport look so good!
  • + 1
 hahah such a funny and insane little trip! How good was the second night's descent?
Don't know if I'll ever have a more memorable chilcotin ride
  • + 3
 I've always been into art, even going as far as being an art major in college, briefly. However, I always shied away from photography, feeling that it wasn't really "art", am I wrong? The older I get the more I think I might be.
  • + 12
 I have a special love for the 'is it art' debate. Photography both is and isn't art, I look at it more as a medium (like a typewriter, paintbrush, or welding machine), all of those can be artistic, but all of them can be simply a device for creating something generic and mechanical. What matters is content and message. Are the photographs I create art? infrequently I'd say they are, but a lot of the time, I feel like it's more simply creative work.

So, can you use photography in art college? It is likely looked down upon because so much of it is easy and quick, but I think few people will deny that really amazing iconic photos are as important to history, culture, and human expression, as other mediums.
  • + 3
 A number of years ago you donated a photo to my daughter's preschool fundraiser. I ended up winning it (for a bit more than I had anticipated) and still love it as a prominent piece in our living room. I also look at it and reflect on how cool it was of you to donate it. Thank you. You capture and create some amazing things and I have always been a fan of your work.
  • + 2
 Wow, so cool to know where that print went! I'm glad that it has a home where it's appreciated!
  • + 4
 I ride alone 99% of the time and I want to show my friends what they are missing out on. Other than my phone, what is a decent portable camera I could carry in my hydration pack or small backpack that you would recommend.
  • + 1
 Sony's A7s is a pretty amazing camera for the person who wants a really really amazing camera in a smaller package. Friends were also recently telling me about Sony RX100 which would actually be the 'point and shoot' variety. Both are still pricy for the dirtbag rider, but those are the two smaller cameras I'd be looking at buying. (I shoot with mid/full size Nikon SLRs)

To get your friends into the whole thing, try inviting them more, and trying to share more experience!
  • + 6
 What is your preferred body, and lens setup?
  • + 12
 hour glass shape obviously
  • + 2
 @wheeled: 36, 24, 36. But only if she's 5'3"
  • + 2
 Depends on the day of shooting.
Backcountry skiing on big missions: D750, Sigma 11-24, nikon 70-200f4
MTB editorial: D750, 17-35mm 2.8, 70-200mm 2.8, 50mm 1.4 (it's dark in the forest)
Commercial work I some times use strobes, a d4 (more frames per second) etc
  • + 3
 Where is mountain bike photography heading? Are you being asked to shoot more video than stills? Seems like true storytelling is becoming more and more important in advertising. Do you think that's true?
  • + 10
 Yes, story telling is really important in advertising. Now, we don't really want to just see some superhero kind of athlete shown by a brand, we want to know more about people, more about their experiences and lives. The trophy shot will always exist, but story telling will always be at the centre of the way we relate to people and brands.

I think mini storytelling through photography will become a big thing this year. Instagram's sideways swiping little gallery sets will be used to show you a small story arc of a specific athlete after their world cup race.
as far as 'next big thing' it's hard to know. the 2010-2014 years (ish) were dominated by photographers using strobes, but I'm not sure you'll see something that 'big' any time soon. I think drone shooting will be a bit of a thing as well, several photographers are doing it already. But, it's really hard to do well
  • + 5
 How many years would you wait to correct someone on the pronunciation of your name?
  • + 18
 rupert crabbull has infinite patience
  • + 5
 How long does it take (on average) to find a location, set up and capture a shot that you are finally happy with?
  • + 4
 I've spent a month, or months, on making certain dream images. (Eclipse, Northern lights skiing, Big Lonely Doug, etc). If i'm shooting on general backyard Squamish trails, and have a day when the light is working, shots can happen as quickly as 2-3 minutes.
Back when I used to shoot with flashes a ton, I would frequently spend 30 minutes and 20 'takes' to get a shot.
  • + 2
 When you start photography?
What was your first camera?
Which type of action do you like to shoot? why?
What's your favourite lens and why?
Do you have a mentor ?
Who is/was your photographer model?
  • + 5
 Started with a point and shoot camera in 2004, photography school 2008, full time employment 2010.
Fuji A380, Nikon d80
I really love ski mountaineering photography, or big backcountry mountain bike rides. Mostly, because the experience of the shoot is such an adventure
Lenses to me are like a hammer or screwdriver. I'll use different ones for diffenent shoots and objectives. the nikon 70-200 is a favorite cause is saves a full pound in my camera bag. The Sigma 11-24 has been fun cause it's so surreal how wide it is
Photographers actually have a pretty great community and openness to conversations, assistance, etc. So, several shooters were influential and I still call up for advice. Blake Jorgenson, Sterling Lorence, Jordan Manley, Paul Morrison
I don't get the last question.. try again?
  • + 1
 @ReubenKrabbe: yes sorry ... the meaning is : sometimes when we were child we said " i would be him !!"
who was you idol ? (photo speaking)
  • + 4
 What are your go-to backcountry hair care products for multi-day adventures?
  • + 11
 SAE 5w-30, or if i'm traveling light, I simply let it go wild
  • + 3
 what's your opinion about postproduction?
how many times do you spend on it?
Postprodution style are impose by the client or are you free?
  • + 4
 95% of photographers use post production in their workflow. It's as much of the process as choosing an aperture to shoot a photo. I think that many photographers start by using a ton of photoshop (myself included) and most of us edge away from it a little bit as we work longer. If I shoot for a day of editorial I probably spend about 6 hours in post production.
I wouldn't say clients 'impose' much on photography style, so much as collaborate and envision.
  • + 2
 Do you ever host classes/seminars? I'm an avid (hack) photographer and love to ride. I'm looking for a way to boost my skills by learning from someone like you. I'd be interested in classes in BC if you offer them.
  • + 3
 I'm teaching photography at Momentum Camps, which is a ski camp on Blackcomb glacier in Whistler this summer. Ski photography skills transfer, so that could work! I'd love to see you there. Otherwise, I've done a half day photo clinic with my sponsor MEC in Vancouver. But, not much.

book: 'The photographer's eye', critique from an online community, imitate the pro's
  • + 1
 Do you have a favorite pack for storing your cameras when on the bike? Do you worry about shamshing them in a crash? I'm always nervous about putting mine in my pack when I go riding in case I crash and smash it. Thanks
  • + 3
 I use F-stop camera bags. They aren't designed to protect a camera in case of a backslap, but I have crashed several times and gotten lucky. Most of the time I'm riding with a camera bag I dial it back to 60% so I don't really think I'm going to crash too often.
I learned my lesson during the deep summer photo challenge in Whistler, I was having too much fun on A-line and got my handlebar stuck under the shoulder strap on a table. I fell out of the sky with my bike sideways underneath me and blew open my elbow and had to get stitches.
  • + 1
 Hi @ReubenKrabbe,

I'm really interested in Photography i do it all the time and i shoot mountain bikes constant but my question to you is this,

how do you get to where you are today?
  • + 1
 Jack, it's a combination of many things, but ultimately it's constant effort that makes it happen. In my years transitioning from amateur I had to have a constant work ethic, and an attitude that is sorta peculiar: I'm good and getting better, but I'm not good enough and have so much to learn. Both the confidence to know that I could succeed, paired with the understanding that you're never the best and there's so much more to learn.

So, learn more, shoot more, read more, get more critiques, move to a region where there is 'industry' in mountain biking (companies, sponsored riders), get to know athletes and people in marketing, try things, fail at things, try again.
  • + 3
 Very nice work! Just a stupid question...which costs more, your bike or your camera?
  • + 5
 I own more photography equipment than the value of my bike. But, on most days on the trail with a simple photo kit, my bike is more valuable than my camera bag, my bike is more valuable than my truck too!
  • + 2
 are you keen to host a photo clinic locally in Squam (or around Whistler in winter)? I'm sure you'd get a bunch of us signed up.
  • + 4
 I would love to! Who else wants to come?
  • + 2
 Just finished reading on the Alberta floods article, VGreat photos and a great read! thanks for showing the world a bit of Alberta!
  • + 3
 Thanks so much!
  • + 1
 What are your thoughts on shooting a 'quiet' trail while its still a bit secret, looking fast in stills while riding, and the oxford comma? #theburgerkingcrown
  • + 3
 I think shooting a secret, or lesser known trail is fine, if given permission by the trialbuilder and or landowner. And, captioning or not captioning the trail accordingly. Current trail of choice is 20 miles past zippermouth lake in the region of Zanskar.
Looking fast in stills while riding is a hilarious artform. If you've ever looked at the photos shot on Whistler's bike park, it turns out most of us aren't very photogenic while sportsing... even if we think we are. So, it's good that there's some show ponies who can help encapsulate the way that riding feels.
Oxford Comma: it's right, it's proper, and if you don't use it you're a chump.
#TheBugerKingCrown coming to your local septic system in a town near you
  • + 3
 How did you crash your spin bike?
  • + 2
 Wise is the man who patience eclipses his insistence.
  • + 1
 Do you have any favorite styles/angles when shooting? Do you look for something particular when you go out to shoot or do you let it come to you?
  • + 1
 Certain things frequently turn up good photos, but I avoid making 'rules' or sticking to a pattern, in an attempt to keep it fresh. But, airtime looks good from low angles with wide lenses, trail riding looks good when it's not 'an ass shot'. Much of the time I go out shooting with no plan, or maybe a plan for 1 photo. But while in pursuit of one photo, you'll likely find others along the way.
  • + 2
 Are you worried that Dylan at Shredhard Photography is going to eat into your market share?
  • + 3
 there isn't much that Dylan has tried, which he hasn't been successful at. So... I'm screwed
  • + 3
 I've got nipples Greg, Can you milk me??
  • + 1
 how do you protect your equipment out in the rain, mud, and snow? do you have any tricks to keeping your gear clean in messy situations?
  • + 4
 Many situations call for many tools to do it right. I don't have a go-to. F-stop camera bags are great at protecting against moisture in most circumstances. Some times I'll bring an umbrella. A towel to dry off excess water and lens cloths to get try and spiffy clean. Sensor wipes to remove dust every week or two.

Cold/snow: the devil is heat change. Going from hot to cold and back to hot moves moisture from the outside of a camera into the camera. Fog inside a lens is the devil, so I frequently toss lenses and cameras into bags of rice to fix the problem before it starts.
'Fog dot of death' is a common problem of getting a circle of fog underneath the outermost piece of glass in a lens on a cold day. There is a trick of pressing your warm hand against the front of the glass, which helps -temporarily- solve the fogging issue.
  • + 1
 would you ever take pictures of an unknown mountain biker ?
some one like me, forexample, some one who would leave everything behind to make this passion a living ?
  • + 2
 I take photos with friends who aren't 'known' in the way that they're not sponsored or famous. However, I frequently shoot with sponsored riders because their brands buy photos. If you're willing to leave everything behind to make your passion a living, the only thing that's holding you back is the fact that you haven't yet pulled the trigger.
  • + 1
 @ReubenKrabbe: haha hey, thanks for answering !
i do agree with the fact that i havnt yet pulled the "trigger", i dont like to go blindfolded into the future, as some one once told me, planing is everything, i am curently on my way to get local sponsors who would finance in any way my travel from race to race. but thanks for the advice Wink its a good one
  • + 2
 Can you tell us about the most difficult shoot/project you were on? How did it turn out?
  • + 4
 The Eclipse movie (above) will stand as the most difficult. The day before the eclipse I was so stressed, nervous, and convinced I would fail, that I swore off photography. But, we (I) got super lucky, the stars literally aligned, and it was a lifetime highlight. I really love doing those kinds of hard projects, where you feel like you can actually fail. Real failure isn't something we don't frequently get to face, we have safety nets everywhere (emotionally, physically, socially). And, I love finding places where I'm trying something difficult enough, where you're vulnerable to failure.
  • + 3
 What's the difference between a photographer and a large pizza?
  • + 13
 A large pizza feeds a family of 4. Bing Bing Bong
  • + 1
 I'm a psychotherapist and meditation teacher who loves to ride. Any ideas on how I might combine mindfulness, therapy and riding?
  • + 1
 Tough question. I think many sports are a short cut to concentration and flow states, however I don't think the sports by themselves transcend into people's everyday lives. I haven't yet met the mountain biker who reached enlightenment by the pedals alone. What biking does is it gives us a short cut, or window into how the practice of mindfullness and meditation can feel.
  • + 2
 How do you go about getting a shot? Does it come from a vision in your head? Or something "real" that inspires a photo?
  • + 4
 Photography can work as something that I'm inspired by, something that I see while riding that catches my eye, a creative idea transplanted from music or art I see. Or, it can be a client telling me to shoot a certain way, or a client telling me to 'go do my thing' which is both free-ing and terrifying.
  • + 2
 As an entry level/hobby type of action photography would you recommend a DSLR or a micro 4/3 system will do?
  • + 3
 Micro 4/5rds will do really well, for many photographers. I enjoy the larger physical camera, and some benefits of usability (focus, zoom) on larger cameras. 90% of the photos I shoot could be done in nearly equal quality if I wanted to shoot on the smaller camera.
Reasons I don't: usability of small cameras, client perception, and the fact I've already invested in dSLR
  • + 4
 roost or no roost?
  • + 5
 I think it's hilarious that 'roost/no roost' is a debate and the main classification system for pictures on pinkbike. I don't think that anyone can deny, roost looks amazing, exciting, and powerful. However, they also don't interest me too much, frequently the photography itself is quite bland in a roost shot.. close wide angle.

Anyways, I sorta reject the 'yes/no' approach to roost. Many times, the most stylish, fast, or creative riding might move dirt. However, I also don't think moving dirt is always that stylish.
So, when needed, or warranted, roost when roosting is what the bike tells you needs to happen. However, one also is to do it sparingly, and really damn well, or the trail gods will send cross-winds on your next Crabapple lap.
  • + 1
 @ReubenKrabbe: very cool insights, thank you for taking the time! very appreciated.
  • + 2
 What do you use to carry your gear with you? Backpack? Sling bag? Other? And which make and model fits your setup the best?
  • + 3
 I use F-stop camera bags, who are a sponsor. But, I'm also convinced that their product is the best available, and I'd be using one regardless of my relationship to the company. Ajna is the bag I use most for skiing and biking, since it's smaller and lighter (and I try to bring the least gear/photo gear possible). fstopgear.com/mountainseries?_ga=2.148480702.888870899.1493838714-1322659418.1493838714#.WQorf1PyuHo
They do have smaller bags, but since I'm tall, this one is the goldilocks bag
  • + 3
 If you could only have one lens what would it be?
  • + 4
 I shot a trip on a Leica this summer with only two mid-range prime lenses. And, it was infuriating being so restricted. I think it might be 70-200 since it can be used for so much... but... man it would suck
  • + 1
 What can the rider do to make the photogs job easier or result in better photos?
  • + 4
 Wear colours! Try to understand what the photographer is trying to do, so you can see the shot from their perspective. Ask for permission before using or sharing photos. Keep the vibe high (we're concentrating on cameras, so if you concentrate on stoked, it'll keep us all positive)
  • + 1
 What focal lengths do you think would be the most useful for someone starting out in mtb photography to consider picking up?
  • + 2
 I spend most of my time shooting using one wide and one telephoto lens. I don't shoot mid range (50) since it doesn't provide the compression, variety, and distortion I like to use when I shoot.
For MTB, we shoot most things close to the trail, so the first lens you need is a wide zoom, the second is telephoto.
  • + 2
 How do you feel about Fat Tony's post-ride?
  • + 2
 Similar to when leaving shoreline in a red canoe
  • + 2
 @ReubenKrabbe When will we finally get to do yoga together??
  • + 7
 depending on your perspective, we have always been doing yoga 'together'. Given the right location and direction of movement and velocity, a certain observer would see the time and place to be 'together'. More studying of the theory of general relativity studies are needed!
  • + 2
 Hi Reuben,
Are you planning on a shoot for this summers eclipse in Oregon?
  • + 3
 I'm planning a motorbike road trip with three friends to watch it, but planning on taking no photos!
  • + 2
 Is mirrorless the future?
  • + 2
 Maybe 4 years out, mirrorless cameras will have a good enough viewfinder and shoot fast enough that the mirror will be obsolete. (Mirror is heavy, breaks, takes space, delays the picture, causes the photog to lose view of the scene). However, for now, I can't shoot action sports well enough on a mirrorless camera (focus during consecutive shooting, viewfinder quality, lack of vision during shooting....)
  • + 1
 @ReubenKrabbe: Quite possibly less than 4 years. Sony A9 supposedly offers 20fps with full AF tracking and zero viewfinder blackout or lag. The catch is that it's using only the electronic shutter, and it isn't a global shutter (though the rolling shutter effect is claimed to be much reduced). Only 5fps when using the mechanical shutter I believe. Proof will be in the pudding over the next few months.
  • + 2
 Favorite trail/loop to ride in Squamish?
  • + 3
 I love the Alice lake area, cause I'm close to it. So I'm always hanging out on credit line, entrials boney elbows, and rupert.
  • + 1
 Do you find value in shooting with vintage gear? Maybe lenses more so than bodies?
  • + 2
 I don't use vintage gear, other photographers love the experience because you slow down, concentrate, and it creates a more enjoyable experience and great imagery. For me, I'm quite certain about what I want to create and don't have trouble slowing down, so it isn't too big for me. Other photogs like Bruno Long also shoot on some vintage gear for the way their unique distortion.
  • + 1
 Have you tried shooting DSLR video? If so, how the hell to you maintain focus? Personally, it's driving me nuts!
  • + 2
 Not much, I have shot on RED a bit and the larger viewfinder and dedicated motion design helps a ton. I am a big fan of using the right tool for the job, so SLR video isn't where I spend much time.
  • + 3
 Kebab or Falafel?
  • + 2
 If you could only use 1 camera for a year, what would it be?
  • + 2
 I shoot 80% of the time on a Nikon d750. It has an amazing sensor, is small, user friendly for a professional.
  • + 2
 Has anyone ever told you that you look like Jim Morrison?
  • + 1
 I see Bohdi from Point Break (1991) but, I do see Morrison too.


- If you want the ultimate, you've got to be willing to pay the ultimate price. It's not tragic to die doing what you love.
  • + 3
 Nope, but the portrait in that shot is also from a couple years back. There's a couple references, apparently the main singer of some swedish metal band as well. Farrah Fawcett too
  • + 1
 What was your first paying photography gig ever?

And your first paying gig while working out of Squamish?
  • + 2
 Hmm, hard to know exactly. I shot a couple family portraits when I was a teenager, a school play, then my first real income came from Architecture photography, where your portfolio can stand for itself, and get you work.
First work in squamish was a Freehub Magazine shoot last year. www.pinkbike.com/video/450626
(I lived in whistler for 5 years before moving to squamish)
  • + 1
 do you ever have your lens randomly come off your camera while shooting?
  • + 1
 haha never had this problem, do you? I think Dan Barham had a couple come off, but that had to do with dropping cameras out of moving vehicles.
  • + 1
 @ReubenKrabbe: ya man! I got a canon 6D or D6 something like that but sometimes ill be shooting and i'll fell the tele lens twisting off and its a few times too. It all started when I was video recording in a punk mosh pit with the L series kit lens that came with and you know, i was getting bump around just a little but nothing serious. dunno just kinda odd. thanks
  • + 1
 What are your thoughts on naked bike riding?
  • + 1
 it's lonely at the top
  • + 1
 When was the last time you went sh1tty fishing?
  • + 3
 S-hity f1shyng was a one time, and life altering experience
  • + 1
 What is one lens you never leave home without for MTB shooting?
  • + 2
 17-35 f2.8. Wide, fast, sharp. Mandatory for a nikon shooter (or, others shoot 14-24 but that thing is a boat anchor)
  • + 1
 What's the most challenging project you had been working on so far?
  • + 2
 The Eclipse movie (above) will stand as the most difficult. The day before the eclipse I was so stressed, nervous, and convinced I would fail, that I swore off photography. But, we (I) got super lucky, the stars literally aligned, and it was a lifetime highlight. I really love doing those kinds of hard projects, where you feel like you can actually fail. Real failure isn't something we don't frequently get to face, we have safety nets everywhere (emotionally, physically, socially). And, I love finding places where I'm trying something difficult enough, where you're vulnerable to failure.
  • + 2
 Who pays you to shoot?
  • + 4
 I've worked for: Bike, Decline, Freehub, many european magazines, Whistler Blackcomb, Sombrio, Chromag, Destination BC, Dissent, Evoc, Bern, Kona, Yeti.... it goes on
  • + 1
 What was your main breaking point that got you a career in what you do?
  • + 3
 We like to think of 'breakthrough' as the biggest step in many people's careers, but I think of them more as milestones that come with constant effort, instead of singular summits or accidental moments of success.
The breakthrough/milestones that I think of: Skiing photography slideshow competition in 2011, that proceeded other bigger successes or competitions that came later.
But, even before that competition in Banff, it took years of effort and little successes of published photos and personal connections to allow opportunities that came later.
  • + 1
 Slippery Salmon or Smegma?
  • + 2
 Slippery salmon has won several crankworx events for Semenuk.
  • + 1
 Do you miss your SLC friends??? Because we miss you!
  • + 4
 Does the pope wear a cool hat? Does a bear poop in the woods?
Come for some high performance mountain cycling up here with us snowmexicans!
  • + 1
 Away from mountain sports, what is your favourite subject to shoot?
  • + 3
 That's hard, cause it's almost everything I shoot, and it includes shooting landscapes and portraiture. I think I'd say portraiture though, I rarely do it, but it's such a massive and difficult challenge to capture humans!
  • + 1
 what lenses do you use most & least for each of MTB and Skiing?
  • + 2
 skiing: 11-24 sigma, 70-200 f4. (also at other times use 17-35, 24 tilt, 50mm, or 200-500)
MTB 17-35 2.8, 70-200 2.8 (when shooting in the woods and it's dark) also use the above lenses on rotation
  • + 1
 does anyone ever sit down when they are pedalling their bikes?
  • + 2
 haha i think so now, but it's simply not that dramatic or exciting in an image.
  • + 1
 How much pocket bacon do you carry while riding your bike?
  • + 2
 5-7 standard bacon units, however it's very dependent on length of day, and the army assembled.
  • + 1
 You have a gift son Smile
  • + 1
 RAW or JPEG?
  • + 4
 RAW. editing is part of photography, and a JPG doesn't have enough information to use.
  • + 1
 @ReubenKrabbe: Just testing ya Smile

Have you noticed a general lack of respect for photography in action sports in terms of what people are willing to pay for? Have your rates been reduced / budget tightened with the "digital / selfie revolution"?

Do you have to hustle harder now to make a decent living off your craft?
  • + 2
 @Dustfarter: I haven't been around the industry for long enough to comment on the prices and trends. I think that digital made photographers have to work harder on client education and rates than the effect of social-selfie revolution.

Large companies will never stop hiring professionals to create imagery and media. They understand that creation is work, and that people should be compensated for the work that helps a company succeed. You see more rights infringement, or rate negotiation with companies or people who are trying to make smaller budgets go further. So, both sides will always exist.
  • + 0
 Alex wants you to come to newfoundland.
  • + 3
 oh jeeze! I also wouldn't mind, I've never been Maritimed! all in good time!

Post a Comment



You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2017. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.108179
Mobile Version of Website