Pinkbike Awards - Best Gear or Accessory Nominees

Dec 21, 2015 at 21:48
by Pinkbike Staff  
new MTB awards logo 2015
Best Gear or Accessory: Nominees


Pinkbike's Best Gear or Accessory Award reaches beyond the bike to showcase some of the clothing, protection items, tools, and peripheral accessories that play equally important roles in the mountain biker's performance equation. Because this is a new category for the awards, we added a fourth nominee in an effort to showcase a wider range of products. Selections include a winter jacket that manages to keep its wearer warm and dry while powering uphill in a sub-zero storm, a helmet that can provide full-face protection and half-shell comfort, a carbon-friendly tool that should come with every bike priced over $5000, and our most unlikely nominee - an inner-tube destined to become a popular emergency back-up for tubeless riders.




Bell Super2

Bell Super 2R Helmet

A full-face helmet that does more than convert to a half-shell.

Enduro sprang into popularity without a dress code - which sparked a number of debates about proper protection, approved use of goggles and to what extent that a rider may be covered with Spandex. Helmet regulations vary between countries, with full-face lids mandatory for EWS events, while half shells are legal at many enduro venues. For most races that require a full-face, half-shells are approved for transfer stages. The Bell Super 2R Helmet can do it all.

Bell Sports did not invent the convertible full-face helmet, but they did make the first one that is safe to wear at downhill speeds, attractive looking in both half-shell and full-face modes and more importantly, its engineers crafted simple-to-operate latching mechanisms which allow the Super 2R's face protector to be installed or removed in seconds. The face protector stows flat on a hydration pack, so racers can easily carry one helmet that can fulfil both tasks - a full-face for timed stages and a lighter, cooler half-shell for climbing transfer stages - all for a reasonable MSRP of $200 USD.

Bell's Super 2R helmet's ramifications extend much further than the needs of enduro racers. Many riders probably need full-face protection for their most rowdy rides, but would not purchase one for comfort and expense concerns, and because a half-shell is the more appropriate choice for most of their trail rides. The Super 2R provides a gateway opportunity for trail or all-mountain riders to step up full-face protection without committing to a second, expensive full-face purchase - and if they did, it would probably be sitting on the shelf on the day when they need it. The Super 2R's face protector is handy enough to encourage riders to bring it along, just in case. Weight: 722g (complete), 322g (face protector), 400g (half-shell). MSRP: $200 USD.
Bell Super 2R

Bell Super 2R
One rear and two side-latches release the face protector from the half-shell helmet.






Park torque tool review test


Park ATD-1 Torque Driver

Convenient pro-quality tool to protect your expensive carbon parts.

Frame and component makers have engineered the size and weight of every part to the absolute minimum - which includes shrinking the size and depth of every threaded connection. It is no accident that a torque value is etched next to every threaded part on a bike. Those same engineers insist that you to use a torque wrench, because designing to the minimums requires that assemblers use science, not conjecture, to tighten each fastener to its optimum value - no more, no less.

Park Tool's ATD-1 is a double assurance that home and shop mechanics will properly torque key cockpit, brake and drivetrain items - because it is easy to operate, and it eliminates confusion by offering only the five torque values commonly used on a bike. ATD stands for "Adjustable Torque Driver" and it is an ergonomically comfortable T-handle wrench with a five-way adjustable torque function. The business end has a magnetic driver that fits all commercial 1/4 inch bits. Turning the metal dial on the T-handle selects either 4, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, or 6.0 Newton-meter values. Remove the cap on the opposite handle to find a 3mm, 4mm, 5mm and a Torx 25 bit - the bike's most common sizes.

Park tool designed the ATD-1 to last in a shop environment, with all metal internals and a unique over-riding clutch mechanism that breaks free when the selected torque value is achieved, so the mechanic cannot over-tighten the fastener. Park's adjustable driver costs around $70, and some may argue that you could buy three dedicated, single-value drivers for the same price, but in the real world, Park's ATD-1 is already in hand when you discover that you need a different bit or torque value, so you'll be more inclined to switch out the bit, choose the correct torque, and do the job right.
Park Tool review test

Park Tool review test
The ATD-1 accepts any 1/4" bits. There are four in its handle.






Tyler Horton static clothing shots

Endura MT500 Waterproof Jacket II

There is no such thing as bad weather - just bad gear.

The best way to discover how well cold weather gear performs is to go for a long, hard ride on a the worst winter day of the year - which is exactly how Endura's MT500 jacket earned a nomination for Pinkbike's year-end awards. Endura builds mega durable soft goods and hails from Scotland, where winters are long and harsh. We expected a lot from their best waterproof jacket and that's what we received. Every seam is sealed, its ventilation strategy operates beautifully, venting enough air to keep its occupant dry, without throwing open the doors for Old Man Winter. The jacket's three-layer-laminate Exoshell60 fabric is pretty much the state of the art for breathable, waterproof fabric, which furthers its comfort levels under sustained efforts, and drawstrings are located in key places to customize the jacket's fit at the hood, waist, and lower seam.

The MT500 is cycling friendly in all aspects, with a drop down rear and a just-right hood that fits over a helmet without overly restricting peripheral vision or mobility. The pockets are all in the right places, and adjustable sleeves with thumb-loops and internal cuffs prevent the sleeves from becoming ram air intake pipes. Topping it all off are tough nylon patches intended to ward of abrasion from a pack's shoulder straps. This is the standout jacket from Pinkbike's 2015 cold-weather gear review, which easily earned it a nomination for an award this year. Endura's MT500 Waterproof Jacket II retails for $299 USD. Colors: black or yellow. Sizes: small, medium, large, and extra-large.
Tyler Horton static clothing shots
Bring it on. The MT500's hood rolls up when not needed.






Schwalbe EVO Aerothan Inner-Tube


Schwalbe EVO Aerothan Inner-Tube

Only 72 grams, and so compact, you'll forget that it is in your pocket.

Before tubeless tires and Stan's latex sealant, riders could expect one or two flats during any fast-paced technical trail ride. Mountain bikers bought them like candy. The tubeless revolution, however, relegated the lowly rubber inner-tube from a staple product, to a rarely used emergency backup item that does little more than add 130 to 200 grams to your hydration pack or bike.

Schwalbe's EVO Aerothan inner-tube addresses that fundamental shift in importance with an engineered material trade-named "Aerothan" that weighs significantly less (one half to two thirds less than a quality butyl rubber tube) and packs so small that it can be carried in an i-pod pocket. Much of the EVO tube's weight savings is derived from the Aerothan material, which holds air as well or better than Butyl rubber, yet is much thinner and more pliable. A significant weight reduction, however is made possible by switching from the Butyl tube's metal valve (required because the valve must be molded to the rubber using intense heat), to a feather-light polycarbonate plastic valve stem. Both use standard Presta internals. Schwalbe's EVO Aerothan tube weighs only 72 grams in the 27.5 inch size, compared to 130 grams for a lightweight and over 190 grams for a conventional-weight tube in the same size.

It's no secret that fashion-forward enduro racers have inspired a massively popular trend to eschew hydration packs in favor of frame-mount bottles and an unencumbered jersey flapping in the wind. Of course, that means stuffing a lot of essentials into nooks and crannies on the bike frame and in your pockets - which is where the EVO Aerothan tube pays huge dividends. Three will fit in the space that one Butyl tube takes up, so stashing an EVO tube in your super-cargo power panties can make room for important items like a Co2 rig, a useful-sized folding tool, or two extra energy bars. Schwalbe's EVO Aerothan tube is not cheap, but nothing lightweight is, and if you are going to carry a tube with you every ride for the rest of your life, why not carry one that weighs only 72 grams and takes up so little room that you'll forget it exists? MSRP: $25 USD
Schwalbe EVO Aerothan Inner-Tube
Schwalbe EVO Aerothan next to a standard butyl tube - both 27.5"

Schwalbe EVO Aerothan Inner-Tube
Aerothan tubes use a polycarbonate plastic Presta valve stem.



Click here for information about the judging and selection criteria for Pinkbike's Year-End Awards.





131 Comments

  • 217 2
 You should have a "Best comment of the year" award, this is really the best part of Pinkbike :-P
  • 77 1
 And worst pun award.
  • 90 1
 Interested on "most down voted comment" hahaha
  • 12 3
 I think that for the post with the largest number of comments, Aaron Gwin broke the internet !
  • 7 23
flag fercho25 (Dec 30, 2015 at 19:22) (Below Threshold)
 Bacon

#comentoftheyear
  • 15 1
 I win most downvoted (257)
  • 2 0
 @ronworth impressive!
  • 6 0
 @Ronworth please show!
  • 1 0
 really lame nominees.....
  • 114 6
 U got a 26" one for me Schwalbe or are we no longer friends?
  • 154 2
 They do. You guys can still be friends.
  • 39 1
 I feel a little warm and fuzzy inside..lol
  • 15 21
flag unconvinced (Dec 30, 2015 at 10:54) (Below Threshold)
 They have a 26" one
  • 10 1
 Since procor has been on backorder at the LBS for 13 months now, I wont be getting any hopes up
  • 6 0
 Does it protect against flats any better than a rubber tube?
  • 2 0
 Is the tube already for sale? Thought they were only going to be released in 2016?
  • 90 2
 Inner tubes cost $25 now? No wonder Gwin's asking for a higher salary.
  • 34 0
 The words "inner tube" do not exist in Aaron Gwin's vocabulary.
  • 1 0
 hard core LOL's
  • 32 0
 Those tubes seem like a great idea. I figure a lot of us nowadays only carry a tube as an emergency for a major sidewall tear/puncture so why not carry a super light one around if you're only gonna use it once every couple months
  • 21 0
 Didn't even know that tube existed until now. Now I'm seriously considering one just to sit in my pack for that emergency.
  • 11 4
 Surely if you're using a tube as your 'get you home' emergency backup you want it to be as reliable as possible. I'm not sure I'd trust one of those as my last resort for the sake of at most 100g.
  • 1 0
 I didn't know they existed either. Sounds like they won't be out until early 2016 which is the most likely reason. And @bobochobo I carry all my supplies on a tiny running waist pack so reducing the weight/bulk from the tube in there would be great. Also, if I blow a sidewall or have a big puncture I usually just take it easy the rest of the ride and get myself home, so I figure the tube could hold up to 2-4 miles of non-aggressive riding
  • 17 1
 Except most of the tubes I use now go to riding companions that have flatted and hve no tube. dammed if I'm buying them a $25 tube/
  • 3 0
 I got some free at Eurobike this year, rode them over the RedBull Foxhunt and the 4 weeks prior. No punctures. That was 5 weeks of low pressure, on rough downhill trails, on a trail bike.
  • 1 0
 Put a high psi in it if you're worried
  • 27 1
 $300 for a jacket? one second, just checking if my money tree has grown at all yet...
  • 44 0
 You're name perfectly suits your comment! lol
  • 3 0
 Getting married soon, I got bought a money tree as a wedding present. Had £5 notes hanging from it and a mixture of chocolate and real coins.
  • 18 0
 "Best accessory of the year" ...you forgot to include this bad boy:

s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/99/b0/24/99b0242824bb7a3f2c16a7a50fae8a16.jpg
  • 11 0
 all i can think - SO MUCH FOAM
  • 1 0
 A bicycle that weighs as much as a Harley
  • 5 0
 It must be pretty easy to manual that bike
  • 4 0
 Haha, I actually know a brewer (Black Bar Brewery, check them out, tasty ales made by a mountainbiker who's girlfriend runs a bike shop and races 4x) who delivers a lot of his beers to local pubs on the back of a Surly cargo bike. I often wonder how it doesn't all get shaken up. Then I drink more and stop worrying Razz
  • 2 0
 That's actually the folks at New Belgium brewery and their Yuba Mondo cargo bike.
  • 2 0
 Black Bar Theory My favourite beer EVER
  • 1 1
 good choice Smile
  • 16 0
 I think the bottle cage from yesterdays list should have been on this list instead.
  • 11 0
 Why is this the first I'm hearing of the Schwalbe tube?!
  • 4 0
 Because it's not available yet. This is the 2016 gear award article from our time-travelling friends at Pinkbike.
  • 10 1
 Ooooh clear plastic valve stem wankwankwank
  • 6 1
 I have never heard of that tube before, but it does sound revolutionary. I have a Super 2R and while it is an extremely lightweight, and well ventilated unit for a full face, that detachable chin guard does not come in very useful. If you don't wear a hydration pack there is almost nowhere to put it and if you do, it is a pain to take it off, take off your pack and shove it somewhere, and then put it back on.
  • 6 0
 Watched a bunch of guys who when climbing just drop the chin bar around their neck with the back clasp done up. Seemed clever to me.
  • 1 0
 Saw the bell super 2r and came right to the comments. PB is deliberately taunting us.
  • 3 0
 It is two helmets for the price of one... Well if an inner tube is $25 and a jackets is$300 I guess you could say that.
  • 6 0
 ASTM F1952-15 certification would have been useful. It just seems scamish without it.
  • 6 0
 I agree with @gdnorm - implications that it is a full face substitute without any of the proven/ certified safety benefits of a full face is bordering on fraudulent and pinkbike (and others) have frequently implied that it is a substitute and conveniently miss that it does not have the requisite certifications. I can ignore pinkbike saying that certain components are reliable or reasonably priced but to imply through careful wording to the public that the bell helmet gives THE SAME protection or that you can forgo owning a proper full face is extremely remiss.
  • 4 2
 @bonfire - my chin guard doesn't stay clasped to anything, pack or bike, without full tension inside the helmet. The helmet is so well ventilated, you can raise your goggles and climb with it though.
@cinnamon140- as I understand it, the only reason the helmet doesn't meet the certifications is because of its ventilation. The holes would allow things like twigs etc. to go through the vent holes. Bell did invite media outlets into their testing labs to show the helmet meets the impact standards of their other full face helmets..
  • 3 0
 @Rubberelli If Bell could have passed the hemispheric anvil hits required for F1952 they would have been all over that. The 2r EN1078 certification only requires flat anvil, at a lower flat anvil test requisite than F1952. The vent holes are no bigger than that of some other F1952 downhill helmets. An interesting side point is that the ASTM F1952 standard does not require the presence of a chin bar, but if a chin bar is present, it must meet performance criteria. The 2r chin piece is a (successful) gimmick at best, and misleading at worst. If someone needs a full face that is F1952 with as much ventilation and still around 700g, then get a MET Parachute not a 2r.
  • 4 1
 The Bell Super 2R is here but the DH-certified Met Parachute isn't?
  • 2 0
 agreed.....i like the idea of the 2r but chose to get the parachute as it meets the astm dh standard and (only my opinion) looks better and looks to be better quality as i don't like the cheap looking visor area on the 2r or the thin chin bar...if you want a light full face trail/dh helmet just get the parachute as i for one couldn't be bothered to carry around the chin bar and keep attaching it...the met is 22 grams lighter for a small or 18 grams heavier if you get the large. it has a goggle clip and is neckbrace compatible should you want to use it with one. The bell super 2r is a nice helmet and way better than an open face lid but in bikeradar's vs review they gave it to the met parachute overall www.bikeradar.com/mtb/gear/article/bell-super-2r-vs-met-parachute-helmets-44178.
  • 8 1
 Mfg'ers: Please stop using the name "EVO" in your products. It's no longer "cool".
  • 9 2
 Super 2R. I've got one. It's a great helmet.
  • 3 0
 test fit one to your head before buying one. I mostly like mine, but find it pushes on the temples and I get headaches after long rides.
  • 3 0
 @codypup That's basically the best advice before buying any helmet, especially an expensive one.
  • 2 0
 Cody... try pulling those 2 rubber pads at the temple out. Mine fit perfect but I've heard some folks have temple pressure @codypup
  • 5 3
 Doesnt even meet the certifications for a full face helmet, thereby it is a worthless piece of unsafe shit. Better invest your money in a MET Parachute. Can't understand how Pinkbike can nominate a helmet that is too unsafe to meet safety certifications...
  • 2 2
 The super 2r is meant as a compromise between a proper full face and a normal trail lid, it's great for what it is and I love mine but I get it isn't meant to replace my entire helmet collection. I tried the MET parachute and found it to be extremely uncomfortable but the 2r fits me like a glove
  • 1 1
 @Mattin The helmet meets the impacts standard but apparently due to the vents it has it doesn't stop puncture threats as well. At least that is what I've been reading.
  • 4 2
 The Super2R is plenty safe and has met and exceeding everything but getting a DH certification. But that wasn't the intent when it was designed. It is not a downhill helmet. It's a trail helmet with added protection for downhill sections. AKA a great enduro helmet. It was ground breaking. There is a reason it won an industrial design award and has won many MTB industry awards. It's great at what it is. If you want a true downhill helmet and are shuttling... this isn't what you want. That's what the Full-9 is for. Saying that... I've seen plenty of gnarly hits taken by Super 2's and Super 2R's. I've seen 2 in the last month that literally saved the people's lives that were wearing them. Both the MET and the Bell have their uses. I personally don't see a need for a lightweight full face like the MET. I prefer the 2R because I can ride it wide open when I choose and can run the chin bar when I choose. If I feel the need for more safety I prefer a legit full face to either of them. To each their own. But to call the 2R a POS is ignorant as hell.
  • 2 0
 The words POS might indeed have been exaggerated, as the shell has been certified, so it is good as a lid without the chin guard. But since it doesn't have the certifications for a full face helmet (which the MET Parachute does), you can expect it didn't meet the safety requirements for helmets with a chin guard. Thereby with the chin guard it is not safe enough, just like the stories I've read of people crashing with the old Parachute helmet that had the removable chin guard, that the breaking chin guard actually caused more damage to their face than what probably would have happened without a chin guard.
It might be possible that the 2R is less weak than the old Parachute, but fact is that it didn't meet safety requirements for a full face, and thereby causes a fake feeling of security, making you go faster and bigger, while not proving enough safety.

As long as it doesn't get the safety certifications I will stand my ground on that riding it as a full face helmet (not necessarily a downhill helmet, but as a full face helmet), it is not a safe choice. Better invest in a helmet that you can trust on saving your face when you fall, instead of risking it to cause even more damage by cutting your face or even eyes open.
  • 2 0
 @Albe23 : the reason I dont believe that is because the MET Parachute has bigger and more vents, but it actually meets safety certifications for a full face helmet.
  • 1 0
 @Mattin Yeah, like I said, it's just what I've read elsewhere. The internet being the internet, who knows why.
  • 5 0
 Nobody seems to be selling these Aerothan tubes anywhere in U.S. Or online. Are they on the market yet, and if so, where to buy?
  • 3 0
 Funny was thinking of getting that jacket. I love their shorts and pants. I needed a good breathing jacket but the weather has been tame this year. Was gonna hold out for some sales. $300 is pricey. I ended up burning vent holes in an old ua jacket for "ventilation". So far so good!
  • 2 0
 Loving the Park Torque wrench, but it isn't any better than the knipex pliers-wrench, or the Abbey Tools cassette buster my loving wife left in my stocking.

I know I'll use the Knipex way more than either of the other two and the Abbey tool more than the torque wrench. Unless the jury are essentially mechanics who solely assemble bikes the knipex and Abbey Cassette tool are much better picks as "Best Gear or Accessory Nominees".
  • 3 2
 I don't understand why you'd get the Park torque wrench when the CDI one is available.
It has more range (2-8nm) which is more useable for bikes. And it's made by Snap On. So obviously the quality is there.
The Park one seems very limited.
  • 2 1
 That has plastic internals and loses calibration faster.
  • 3 1
 I totally agree. The torque wrench by CDI is way better. You don't need an Allen wrench to adjust it, it has finer adjustment points, and has a larger range. I don't know why anyone would buy the Park wrench.
  • 4 0
 You got a link to the CDI?
  • 3 0
 Right on, thanks man.
  • 5 0
 $60 Canadian - that's almost free in USD these days ????
  • 3 1
 Jon123rjk Thanks for crapping all over my Christmas gift. Douche.
  • 2 0
 So what's the difference between the Schwalbe EVO Aerothan and the FOSS tubes that have been around for years?
I used FOSS up till I changed to 27.5 wheels and they were awesome..
Punctured once when a stick went through the side wall and fixed it but applying heat with a lighter. Held air really well and was half the price of the Schwalbe
  • 4 0
 Love those Park wrenches, can't ever keep them in stock at my shop. Those get my vote, if it counted.
  • 2 0
 I just got one for Christmas. Brilliant! Now I don't have to tote the one for my car to races.
  • 4 0
 That torque tool have to be calibrated every once in a while? And if so, how you do it?
  • 3 2
 Seriously, never heard of the Schwalbe inner tube on pinkbike yet it's nominated. Never knew about the nice Park Tools torque tool until now. The Bell helmet I've seen on countless mtb websites. Pinkbike, at least review these first for us consumers before you start nominating them at the end of the year!
  • 1 0
 ahh thanks to you both for the linkage. My bad Pinkbike!
  • 3 2
 Am I the only one who has to spend my own money on gear and doesnt get advertisement dollars? How about a site called hastoworkforalivinganddoesnt getfreeshitallthetimebecauseimnotprobike.com? Truly I dont feel that the best products get awards during the end of the year dog and pony show awards.... flame away.
  • 3 0
 Anyone have a link for the tube? Did a google search and couldn't find any in stock.
  • 1 0
 Is a hood really nice to have on a rain jacket? My Gore Tex cycling jacket doesn't have one. Haven't really noticed a need for a hood before.
  • 2 0
 Matter of preference. You wear the hood under your helmet so if you get wet neck without a hood...
  • 2 0
 I have a Gore Alp-x Jacket with a removable hood, and I never really use it either. If I was on a multi-day trip in a down pour maybe, but even for longer rides i don't find it an issue. Beats dealing it with for all the dry days.
  • 2 0
 I'm waiting for lightweight tyres made from Aerothan. Then we'd be talking....
  • 1 0
 Because it holds air well, Doesnt mean it is grippy and would last well with the friction of the (off)road.

But I do get your point, would be awesome if they'd find a new and better material for tyres aswell.
  • 2 1
 the tubes I use are only 50g heavier and a 10th of the price. met parachute better than the bell but i like the wee tool, will have to invest in one of those.
  • 2 0
 Why do butyl tubes cost the better part of a ten-spot in the US now?
  • 1 0
 I buy my tubes at Decathlon for €1,50 per piece or €1,00 if they are on sale. Been riding these for years now, and noticed literally zero difference between these and €10-15 tubes. I'm sorry to all other companies, but if decathlon produces tubes just as good as yours for 10% of the price, while you produce a much higher total amount of tubes (so cheaper production per piece), I'm not buying your stuff: you priced yourself out of the market.

These new tubes look nice though, I would seriously buy a set of these purely to mount them for races. If it doesn't get me more flats than I have now, I would probably even run them all the time (or maybe only in the front because less flats there).
These new tubes really remind me of something that I've seen roughly 5 to 10 years ago. It was a company that produced see-through tubes that were just as thin as these, costed about €50 per piece, weighed 50g, and we're tested more puncture resistant than all the butyl xc tubes in the test. Does anyone remember which company this was?
  • 1 0
 it was eclipse, swiss brand. the tubes were great but they had massive issues with the valves failing..
  • 1 0
 there is also a certain chinese factory that makes the boss tubes that's happy to send out a box if you're happy to pay freight. been using them for a few years now and the cost was comparable to a normal tube Smile
  • 2 0
 foss not boss damnyouautocorrect
  • 2 0
 Damn nice tubes. Hopefully they actually hold up over some rough stuff.
  • 10 1
 seems like more of an emergency item as opposed to daily use. best bet would be to limp out with that tube
  • 2 0
 I was thinking about it from a race perspective, as if one was stranded mid-race with a flat and had to change out to that. But it really is a great item for emergencies just when trail riding.
  • 3 2
 I know everybody hated that Bell helmet but living in a very hot place I am still tempted to get one.
  • 2 1
 how about the met parachute. really nice helmet.
  • 2 0
 Everyone hated it? Then why is it selling so well?

I like mine.
  • 2 1
 can you use that tube like a normal rubber tube are is it only a band aid until you put a real tube back in you tire????
  • 1 1
 Read the article. More pliable = better puncture resistance, more flexible and probably better for pinch flats. That's what I got out of it anyways
  • 5 4
 Why is it that most the riders I've seen wearing the bell super 2r are certified Fred's?
  • 2 0
 Looks like the Joey lived, the 2R saved the day Wink
  • 2 0
 Dang those Aerothan tubes look sick!!
  • 2 0
 Does anyone know where to get the Schwalbe Evo Tube in the US?
  • 4 2
 A $25 tube? AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH
  • 3 0
 I would buy it. It seems like a big step forwards from rubber and latex
  • 1 0
 i use to get the conti super light tubes but wouldnt hold air long....if these work i would keep a couple spare in case i needed them if i tear a tire and tubeless will not seal
  • 1 2
 Yeah get a 4 pack for $100 LOL
  • 1 2
 The bell helmet is dumb af, I forget which company use to make these but they were shit. The reason being is when you took impact to the head the helmet would Unlatch leaving your face exposed. My thoughts? f*ck that
  • 1 1
 your thinking of the Giro Switchblade and the Bell doesn't unlatch when in a crash.
  • 3 2
 Hmmm what is there to complain about oh I know oh wait I dont
  • 3 1
 none of the above
  • 3 3
 The Bell Helmet I think is a great addition to the market. I would vote it.
  • 3 1
 Didn't even meet safety certifications for full face helmets: better buy the MET Parachute. Can't understand how Pinkbike nominated this helmet..
  • 2 0
 @mattin in not a fan either. they shouldnt half ass things.
  • 1 0
 Cant believe the marsh guard isn't on this list.
  • 1 0
 Good one lol
  • 1 0
 @twozerosix neither inner tube nor chain !
  • 2 0
 EVO TUBE.
  • 1 0
 I have an EVO seat clamp Wink
  • 1 0
 How are they against pinch flats????
  • 1 0
 The valve stem looks too short to work with composite rims.
  • 1 0
 Enduro fanny pack, enduro short....anything enduro??
  • 1 0
 Parktool's for sure
  • 1 0
 I'll second you on that!
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