Stages Cycling - Power Contest

Aug 10, 2016 at 5:53
by Pinkbike Staff  
EWS Whistler 2016 Stages Contest image

Stages Cycling makes power meters for all types of riders. Power meters are a tool that help cyclists get the most from their training. You may be surprised, but many of the riders you follow through Pinkbike’s race coverage use Stages Power to maximize their performance. In Whistler, Stages Cycing collected rider power meter data and used it to quantify how much mechanical work the athletes did over the course of the EWS event. Kilojoules (Kj) are a direct derivation from power data of how much work was done by each rider, thus how 'big' the day was. For reference, a 1hr ride at moderate intensity for a normal rider is around 150kj and a Tour de France rider may expend around 3000kj. For more, read here.

At the EWS in Whistler, Richie Rude (Yeti-Fox), Chris Johnson (The Nomads), Rene Wildhaber (Trek Factory Racing), Brook MacDonald (GT Factory Racing), Nate Hills (Yeti-Privateer) and Geoff Kabush (Scott-3Rox) all recorded outputs. Match the rider with their correct kj expenditure for a chance to win a Stages Power meter of your own. Only Registered Pinkbike users are eligible for entry; one winner will be selected at random from the correct entries.

Stages XTR image

**Stages Cycling will give away one Stages Power meter, valued up to $649.99 USD. (XTR M9000 Stages Power meter pictured.)

HOW TO ENTER


STEP 1 -
1. Make sure you are Logged in to Pinkbike. If you are new to Pinkbike, create a Sign in to enter the competition.

STEP 2 -
2. Select the correct Kj output for each athlete and submit your entry. (The winner will be contacted via Pinkbike. Pinkbike users are only eligible for entry.)

**Contest Closed**


Thanks to Stages Cycling.


MENTIONS @yeticycles / @foxracingshox / @trek / @GTBicycles / @SCOTT-Sports




39 Comments

  • + 38
 Rude is going to need at least 5 digits after all of his training for that new movie "Jason Bourne".
  • + 7
 Hahaha. I've never thought of that but he does look like Bourne!
  • + 27
 The Rude Identity!
  • + 26
 All my answers are random, so if I win I stop working and starting a carrier in poker
  • + 6
 Give this man a spoke!
  • + 5
 "For reference, a 1hr ride at moderate intensity for a normal rider is around 150kj"

Huh? I have a power meter on two bikes and my "moderate intensity" 1hr rides are usually right around 1,000kj.
  • + 2
 Average vs. total
  • + 5
 Forget what I said, it was nonsense
  • + 1
 ...
  • + 7
 Some weird numbers here

150kj is 150,000j (energy)
1 watt is 1 joule per second (power)
1 hour is 3600 seconds
150,000 divided by 3600 = 41.6W (which seems very low)

1000kj = 1 million joules = 277W = which is pretty impressive (about 1 hour for a 25 mile road ride type power)

For an all day EWS by pros, I'd be expecting to see some big numbers up there....

Hope there's not a silly mistake in there!
  • + 2
 @captainian: seems like most of the variation here is going to be by weight since the bulk of power expenditure is on the climbs and all riders have similar transfer times (yes, Rude had to put down some extra power after his flat to make the transfer time).

Let's say an hour at 250W vs. the average peaky power trace on a 3 minute timed stage (even with brief stints in the 1000W range)
  • + 2
 The numbers do seem way off. If you read the link that is provided there is a nice article which explains that the work measured by the power meter in kJoules is 22% of the actual kcalories burned (human mechanical efficiency). "For reference, a 1hr ride at moderate intensity for a normal rider is around 150kj", this would calculate to 163 Calories burned/hour (using capital 'C' actually means kilocalories). If you go to any website that estimate calories burned per hour of bicycling it's much higher than this, i.e. for 175lb person, "moderate intensity" would be about 600 Calories/hour. And for Tour de France, the average guy is lighter but they are at extreme intensity but they are still only burning about 1,000 Calories/hour (this article says 3,000kJ which would equate to 3,260 Calories/hour which is way TOO HIGH)... So yes, those number do seem way off.
  • + 1
 @Hammerschmidt: No...those numbers are right. They said kJoules is 22% of kcal burned...so about 1/5. So that would put their "normal hour ride" at about 750 kcal. Sounds right to me. These numbers align pretty closely to my kJoules burned for a normal day of enduro...
  • + 1
 @UtahBrent: read the link. 1kcal = 4.18kJoules, therefore 150kJoules = 35.9 kcal. NOW apply the human mechanical efficiency factor of 22%, so 35.9 kcal / .22 = 163 kcal.
  • + 2
 @Hammerschmidt:You are correct, somehthing doesn't quite add up...
  • + 0
 @Hammerschmidt: Dude don't divide, multiply.
  • + 1
 Yea definitely something up with the numbers. Unless you had uplifts or were pushing up and barely peddling on the way down. Then you might be able to get numbers like the ones mentioned. In which case its completely rubbish data anyway
  • + 1
 @dhridernz: its a stages. They are known for producing questionable numbers
  • + 6
 I don't remember seeing the results from the last poll for these.
  • + 1
 Anyone know the total climbing on that course? The total output numbers seem low compared to what I would estimate output on a 5k vert 40mi xc ride but if these courses don't have that much climbing I would guess the total output would be lower. On a mostly lift access EWS course like Keystone I would be surprised if anyone put out more than 500Kj for the day.
  • + 2
 The total of actual climbing was around 900m for the race as 3 out of the 5 stages were lift accessed.
  • + 5
 Here goes with complete guesses!
  • + 0
 A lot of riders walk up the climbs during transfers (to rest, to be able to take their full-face helmets off, and because they have big gears for the timed stages) and you obviously don't get a power reading while walking, so energy expenditure is going to be recorded as a big zero for a lot of those climbs.
  • + 2
 so enduro
  • + 1
 I was trying to pick based on the presumed weight of the bike itself, heavier bike = more Kj...

In other words, total, unequivocal guessing going on here.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the opportunity, but I don't need a power meter. I automatically know my output from how many burritos I eat post ride...
  • + 2
 Just looked at the results page for EWS Whistler and Nate Hills isn't even on there...what's goin on here pinkbike?
  • + 1
 He was there and doing well the whole day. He flatted on the final stage not sure if he finished.
  • + 1
 I feel like he will be 5239 because its a stages and they are about as reliable as a condom with a hole
  • + 2
 Did mtb just go full lame?
  • + 2
 The measurements should be in "penis inch" units.
  • + 2
 It would really be a 2-way contest between Chris Johnson and Dick Rude.
  • + 1
 1 watt = 1 joule applied for 1 second

1000 of those joules = 1 kilojoule (KJ)

kilojoules = watts X seconds / 1000
  • + 2
 You could make a better guess if they put the weight of each rider.
  • + 1
 This is all just torque as far as I'm concerned.
  • + 1
 No one is going to win this...
  • + 1
 Are these average watts or peak watts?
  • + 4
 think it's pretty clear in stating that it kJ...
  • + 2
 neither, the unit of measure is kilojoules. So not watts at all. Nor is it peak or average, but rather total energy expenditure

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