Video: That Time Jinya Rode Trespasser On A Hardtail - Throwback Thursday

Aug 1, 2018 at 12:44
by Pinkbike Staff  

Trespasser is still one of the most heinous trails around, and Jinya made it look easy on a Chromag Gypsy back in 2011.


Mentions: @Chromagbikes



49 Comments

  • + 22
 Hardtails for hard folks. Not everyone wants to float with ease over every line and instead put value on reading terrain on a micro level instead of full motoing the entire track.
  • + 5
 The next step in reconnecting with the ground is fully rigid. I was riding my rigid fork a month ago and it's a blast but not for the weak or faint hearted. It is really surprising what you can ride without any suspension.
  • + 2
 @fartymarty: just google the old vouilloz vids where he wins dh worldcups on his zaskar (not fully rigid if you count a judy as suspension)
  • + 2
 I just reactivated my trusty steel hardtail and i'm not planing on going back to fs soon, for general trail riding. Besides i ride my DH Bike at the lift-assisted stuff. I love it, never thought it could be so much fun.
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: all clipped in for a reason
  • + 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: I didn't spot that. Maybe it's time to get the clipless pedals back out.
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: did not spot it either, someone asked and the vidmaker replied. after trying both clips feel a lot better offroad, on the fs both have their merrits
  • + 2
 @fartymarty: Yeah, the guy's not even running locked out knee and elbow braces... what kind of loser uses their joints as suspension!
  • + 3
 On slow trails i kinda disagree - i found full suspension has a huge edge in going faster on choppy stuff. But on slow, super technical, twisty stuff, i think a hardtail often has its' advantages.
  • + 15
 But please: keyboard warrior spooge and microparse your half degree of head angle: debate the incremental micro improvement stiffness of tube diameters: and fap over 1 tooth gearing plus or minus.

For all that will make a massive difference in your Strava times - you mid pack fill you.

Alternatively just ride a bike lots. Like Jinya did and still does
  • + 3
 @jdegaetano: If John Tomac (and others) can race & win both XC/DH on a 26" HT with a 70° + HA, minimal stand over, narrow drop bars, long stem, short TT/reach, cantilever brakes, skinny tubed single compound tires on narrow rims, non boost hubs, spaghetti noodle suspension forks, and a front derailleur amongst other things I think I'll be just fine on the trails.
  • + 2
 @fartymarty: IMHO the less suspension you have the better a rider you must be, or will be.
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: Thanks for that, bud! How about this classic:

www.pinkbike.com/video/102365

The segment on goat's gully makes my knees hurt.
  • + 1
 @m1dg3t: re-read what I wrote.
  • + 1
 @m1dg3t: that's my theory and I'm sticking to it. If you can ride stuff rigid you can ride it FS altho you don't go as quick rigid.
  • + 2
 @geephlow: cheers, straight to favs.
  • + 2
 @geephlow: In my mind that is how I ride every downhill (the reality is more slowmo).
  • + 7
 Nothing better than flying past the yeti’s and scott’s On my steel orange p7 hardtail up here in the mountains of Switzerland
  • + 7
 If anyone wants to see a gnarly crash from the other day down trespasser check this! instagram.com/p/Bl8dkrUheik
  • + 1
 Ugh, rock cleaver right in the gut. I suspect that other sections might have you falling a lot farther.
  • + 4
 I love steep teck trails. You dont need a modern bike. You need powerful brakes for control and exelent braking skills.
  • + 5
 I'd expect that a slacker HT angle would be very helpful though.
  • + 5
 still remains a pretty "secret" trail thankfully.
  • + 5
 Apparently fight club rules no longer apply to TP on PB?
  • + 1
 Seriously. WTF.
  • + 0
 After owning a hardtail for 7 years before i got a real bike, i can honestly say i would never even contemplate buying one ever again. Any steep section you are just sliding your back wheel and all the fun sections you can never go full speed, honestly i would rather watch someone rip that trail on a new commencal or something
  • + 16
 Each to their own... After 25 years of owning every genre of bike imaginable, nothing puts a smile on my dial like my steel hardtail.
  • - 4
flag optimumnotmaximum (Aug 2, 2018 at 3:06) (Below Threshold)
 @gravityfreak: after not riding a hardtail in the woods for 23 years i have mixed feelings about my new meta crmo with big fork and 26 wheels: manualing, bunnyhopping (big stuff !), sprinting and low speed tech (down) is awesome, but: riding a partially unsuspended vehicle offroad at speed is just a stupid idea. Flat rooty trails are the worst, you have to put in so much effort and kung fu that your done after a couple of kms - even if you get it right it feels still shitty. Riding down medium rough trails at the pace i am used to is nearlly impossible on flats, you can not focus on the big moves because in the meantime something small bounced your feet of the pedals while unweighting for the big stuff. with clips its ok but then again you dont want to turn up at the jumpspot with clips. dont get me wrong , i think the commencal is as compliant as a hardtail gets, there is ar eason why almost everyone rides a fs these days, though.
  • + 5
 i always have a couple of of hardtails in the fleet. its nice to have a bike that doesnt creak or squeak or leak oil, and is alway ready to go despite sitting unused or unwashed for a few months. my Chromag is my favourite bike despite owning 4 squishers.
  • + 3
 @optimumnotmaximum:
Maybe you just need to give it more time? It takes a while to get your hardtail skills back on point especially because of how easy it is to get away with lazy technique on a full sus.
Where I live and ride its really rough and rocky. Yes there are some trails where unless I go deliberately slowly things can get out of hand pretty quickly. But even on those trails, I like that I have to back it off. It puts me into a different headspace where it becomes about flow and smoothness and not trying to fly down the trail like I do on my dualie. Anyway, I get that it doesnt make sense. Some people get it, some never will.
  • + 2
 @optimumnotmaximum: your problem is the 26" wheels. I'm on a 29HT and love it. Used to ride a 26HT and it was really hard work and not overly enjoyable. The 29 is really fun.
  • + 2
 @optimumnotmaximum: I disagree, you can ride some gnarly stuff and have fun on a hardtail while sporting flats. Just gotta be prepared to take different lines as you pinball down the trail. Plus, I think it makes people a better bike handler all around.
  • + 1
 @schlockinz: Agreed you can ride gnar on 26 but for general riding 29 doesn't beat you up so much. I'm currently riding my 29HT with flats and 100mm travel so have to pick lines anyway. I'm on flats most of the time as they're more fun.
  • + 1
 @schlockinz: I can see parts of the replies above beeing true. I wanted a bike to ride dirts, the pumptrack with my kids and home from work via some trails. Still having 26 inch stuff that wheelsize seemed the best, also i wanted to hone my kung fu. I ve been riding it for 1.5 months and 400 km now. I can ride it pretty fast but it is alot of hard work and i am getting just as fatigued as on my heavy slow rolling fs - more important it is often not very enjoyable. It is better with clips because when your going fast on rougher trails hits come so fast I cant actually deal with each of them seperately, jumping whole sets is also not always possible. It certainly hones your body and skill but i am not sure if all of it helps you riding an fs. if you ride an fs fast you ignore small stuff and concentrate on the general flow, when riding a hardtail you have to zoom in far more. i am not sure if i will continue riding it as at trailbike -its good fun on dirts and while fooling around on the street though.
  • + 3
 @optimumnotmaximum: you can't ride steep teck fast.
Think of it as DH trials.
Hard tail is all you need.
Perhaps you need to ride super steep teck trails to understand.
And this is holy shite steep!
  • + 2
 @Sshredder: I think you misunderstood me. Really steep tech stuff is usualy ridden not that fast since you have a hard time slowing down ever again. A hardtail is fine in that kind of terrain. On a hardtail i have the least fun when the terrain is fast and choppy. At least with flats I have not found a way to make this fun and i am not quite sure that there is way.
  • + 2
 @optimumnotmaximum: It improves fatigue, strength, and reading the trail. I can usually set records for the season on trails on my Riot after riding my NS surge for a few days. Teaches me how to flow the trail better which I don't always notice on a 29er FS since it will suck up most hits, but those hits that are bone jarring on a HT suck speed away from the FS.
  • + 5
 @optimumnotmaximum: "My local trails are impossible to ride on flats" -Some dude from Germany

Let that sink in
  • + 2
 @optimumnotmaximum: That's pretty much it. If the trail is that steep, most of your weight will by on the front wheel anyway and the back end isn't doing all that much. Like you said, if you get going fast on a trail like that, then you'll lose all control and smack into a tree in no time.
  • + 2
 @Sshredder: The videos never really convey just how steep those trails really are. Some of those in BC, I'd need a rope and harness to get down.

Agree that a HT will work fine for that stuff if you can stomach going straight down.
  • + 1
 @optimumnotmaximum: Five Tens and a great set of flat pedals is all you need. I'm on Burgtecs and my feet are planted.
  • + 3
 This one time at band camp
  • + 3
 Not to mention this video is self-shot.
  • + 1
 Genuine question..... Lots of cameras, or one camera at each section meaning the trail wasn't ridden like a single trail?
  • + 1
 I dont really think he made it look easy...but that was rad. Daydreaming of 2004 myself...
  • + 2
 Hardtail soul.
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