Video: 7 Ways to Carry Tools on Your Bike Instead of Your Body

Jan 15, 2020 at 12:11
by Pinkbike Originals  


There's nothing wrong with your backpack and that you're ready for anything, but there are all sorts of clever ways to ditch the bag without ditching the preparedness. For those times when you might not need that third jacket or espresso machine during your ride, moving the necessary supplies - tools, a tube and pump, candy, fireworks, etc - from your body to your bike can mean that you're more comfortable. Another upside: You'll forget the tools are even on your bike until you need them to save your ass.

Do you have a favorite way to carry tools on your bike, or maybe it'll be a cold day on hell before you give up your backpack? Do you want your tools to be hidden inside your handlebar, steerer tube, and wherever else, or do you reach for a roll of Gorilla Tape?


320 Comments

  • 301 13
 as a dentist, i employ people to follow me around on my Yeti (on lesser bikes, obviously)
  • 21 3
 My butler just follows me in my G- wagon- so im faster to work again
  • 41 2
 Wow, accidentally you have managed to measure number of dentists on PB, it appears to be 7 of them Wink
  • 3 0
 Guides to carry all client gear on ebikes in 2020.
  • 2 0
 Mechanical gopher, I love it lol
  • 10 0
 You hiring?
  • 36 1
 Buys super lightweight plastic bike for $10k to save a couple ounces. Then straps/hides a pound of tools on it.

Yaw'll be crazy.
  • 4 4
 @NYShred: ...then try to ignore reading the tests thats shows that lighter
bikes actually rides worse in many ways.
  • 2 1
 But yo can't hide weed dude.
  • 2 0
 @mokydot: lol rich ppl don't have to!
  • 2 1
 @mokydot: that's what my swat box is for Smile
  • 2 1
 @mokydot: Come to Canada, then you don't need to hide it!
  • 2 0
 @doggparadox: isn't it already enough you have the best riding grounds??
  • 1 0
 @doggparadox: or washington
  • 1 0
 @cyrways: or colorado
  • 1 0
 @Cspringsrider: CO sucks don’t invite anyone here
  • 2 0
 @lightsgetdimmer: tr u dat to many people and not enough room. Go to moab more space Smile
  • 1 0
 @lightsgetdimmer: As a coloradoan, don't come here everything sucks!
  • 117 2
 A couple of bits strapped to the frame helps lighten the load but when you've still got wallet, car keys, phone, flapjack, small first aid kit etc. there's only so much you can stow/hide on your bike.

Generally I ride with the following rule;

Pack free local blatt.
Hip pack for lighter rides.
Back pack for longer, all-dayer type rides.

Horses for courses innit.
  • 6 2
 This^^
  • 65 1
 What's a flapjack?? Is that the British term for a bike pump or something, or are you really carrying pancakes in your backpack!?
  • 35 1
 Cycling jerseys that actually have pockets on them are game changing...whoda thunk it?
  • 22 0
 @OCSunDevil: He rides with a UK pancake.
  • 7 0
 @OCSunDevil:
I wondered the same thing! Apparently an "energy bar".

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flapjack_
  • 4 1
 @mnorris122: Like the roadies! I agree.
  • 37 0
 @OCSunDevil: you might call it a homemade granola bar but in truth it's much nicer than that. It's oats and golden syrup sometimes with raisens inside baked till lightly crunchy on the outside but still soft and chewy on the inside mmmmm! Ultimate British trail side snack Beer
  • 8 10
 Or, just buy a specialized with swat...
  • 53 1
 @projectnortheast: the $4000 solution to a $10-50 problem!
  • 8 0
 After trying various multitools and the Granite Gear (garbage), I've reverted to carrying real tools. All of the Allen/Torx keys are small versions that came for free, except the 6mm that's a long handle for the extra torque of wheels.

A small Park chaintool, Moosetreks tire levers, Tubolito tube, TruckerCo tire cream in an applesauce pack, spare parts, first aid, lighter, duck tape, Dynaplug, CO2, and more, all fit into a $14 tool capsule for a bottle cage.

I've got lots of bags and wraps and straps I've accumulated over 40 years, but this simply works the best (I finally retired my Kangaroo Tool Wrap). Easy access, easy to locate gear, and everything in the kit really works without additional frustration.
  • 2 0
 @mnorris122: Tell me about this magical new invention....
  • 21 0
 @OCSunDevil: They are like US "pancakes", but metric and will only fit an English bottom bracket.
  • 9 0
 @landscapeben: The internet is mostly filled with garbage, but you just made a difference in someone's life. I'm gonna have to give this a try, tired of choking down nasty energy bars!!!
  • 4 0
 @ridebikesyall: haha I know... but if it's your brand, win win. I still ride with a bontrager hip pack which I've found to be the best one. Keys, cellphone, and multi tool at all times. Why not? It's way more comfortable to where the hip pack than have a jersey with pockets anyway... and last time I checked there isn't a good way to carry your keys or cell phone on your bike...
  • 5 0
 @mnorris122: That's a revolutionary idea! Why hasn't anyone thought of just having pockets on the back of the jersey that can hold all of the tools, snacks, etc. that you'll ever need...oh wait.
  • 4 0
 @chezotron: Buy your favourite World Tour team's jersey and wear it on the trails, those all have pockets. For extra style points get an Ineos jersey or one with those cool rainbow stripes that all the fast guys wear.
  • 4 0
 @mnorris122: Yeah I recall in an EWS video a few seasons back they were asking riders about packs, carrying tools, etc. seemed like many had stuff taped here and there and a OneUp EDC or rode with a pack. Then Sam Hill comes on video and just says he carries stuff in the back pockets of his jersey, or he maybe even said pockets in bids. :mind_blown: Wink
  • 1 0
 @landscapeben: Until your mum mucks the recipe up one day and uses honey instead of golden syrup... game changer mate, you'll never go back!!!!
  • 1 0
 @yonibois: I'll have to try that!
  • 2 0
 @OCSunDevil: Glad I could help Beer
  • 1 0
 ...nevermind it was Greg Callaghan, and he also still has the EDC www.pinkbike.com/news/video-what-tools-do-the-ews-pros-carry.html also came across this one from 2017 youtu.be/XayJ6k-fqko ..whatever happened with those All In One tools that fit inside the bottom bracket?
  • 2 1
 @OCSunDevil: pancakes!
  • 3 0
 @mnorris122: haha i have the us postal trek jersey just for lulz.
  • 2 0
 When Danny Macaskill goes babysitting, do people still think he has only got a kid in that trailer?
  • 31 0
 Wallet? 20€ bill note in shoe
Car keys? Under a stone for sure
Flapjack? Eat it before the ride
First aid? Clean socks
Toilet paper? Dirty socks
  • 1 0
 @mnorris122: Does neon make one faster and the three pockets more aero?
  • 4 0
 @OCSunDevil: a flapjack is a devise to keep you sugarhigh all day long. Just had mine today and surfed for four hours after 6 hours of hard work. If you have one just make sure you do lots of exercise or head to ER, sugar shock is on the way
  • 4 0
 @OCSunDevil: They are good and have a lot of calories. home made cycle food.

www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/yummy-golden-syrup-flapjacks
  • 1 0
 @serathestaii: a pancake, I too like to use pancakes as energy food.
  • 3 0
 @projectnortheast: I was just giving you a hard time. Smile I just bought a new Specialized that has a SWAT compartment and I keep telling people the SWAT compartment and the multi tool are my favorite features. Who cares about how the bike rides? I wanna know how much stuff it can fit in the down tube!
  • 1 0
 @ridebikesyall: ???? I do care about how it rides just slightly more than burrito storage but... I'm done with running a bottle on the downtube... been there done that! Its freakin 2020!
  • 1 0
 Its surprisingly easy to put together a first aid kit that you can stash on a bike. I'm using a military surplus pouch with straps long enough to wrap around a frame, and small enough to tuck just about anywhere.
  • 6 2
 @landscapeben: What the heck is “Golden Syrup”?! Sounds like you’re reading the transcript of a conversation between Trump and some Russian hookers.
  • 2 0
 @donpinpon29: You've just got to make sure you grab your own keys from under the stone and not somebody else's
  • 1 0
 @Will-HammoonCycles:
Great riding food. The oats release energy slowly and the syrup or honey is more of an instant hit.
A good layer of chocolate on top is the luxury version.
  • 1 0
 Stash bibs are also a good way to go without the pack- I honestly don’t find myself needing a pack that often. I still have one for strange circumstances like marshalling a race or supporting an event ride. On most rides I use the EDC pump with the tool/tire boot/ extra chain links/valve core/ valve core tool/plugs/ EDC plug tool inside. Zip ties connected to the inside of my grips that sit inside the bar. Tube/ ML Plier-Tire leaver combo in a Dakine Hotlaps seat bag attached to the frame. First aid/ extra water (Collapsable water bladder so I can refill the bottle and collapse it down)/ phone/ food if needed in a bib stash pocket. Often times I leave the first aid and extras at home on a quick ride in the neighbourhood and keep it light. Different strokes for different folks. This system seems to work for me and has kept me rolling/safe for a few years now. I did just invest in a custom bag that fits in the frame to put the tube/first aid stuff in. Excited to try that next season.
  • 1 1
 why do you carry your keys and wallet? get left in the car. If your going to stop at the bar, pack the id and $20 in cash.
  • 3 1
 @rzicc: cause vehicles get broke into sometimes and leaving the keys there for them to drive away with your credit cards is pretty stupid....

Also in most states u need to have your i.d. with you to carry other essentials.
  • 3 0
 @Jtray603: pretty much exactly what it sounds like; Golden Syrup, usually from cane sugar.
Personally I love Lyle's Golden treacle, for the taste and graphic design.
"From the strong came forth sweetness"
  • 2 0
 @stiingya: sounds stupid. also if you lose your keys/ CC on the trail.. seems even more stupid. hide your shit in the car then.
  • 4 0
 @rzicc: Wait, how do you leave your car keys in the car? Do you not lock the car?
  • 2 0
 @dazzhotchkin: a lot of people in the US stash their keys on a tire, bumper, etc. Or yeah in rural areas they might just not lock the car. This is not the best idea, even when I lived in Wyoming people had their cars messed with at trailheads occasionally.
  • 1 0
 @jwestenhoff: Thanks for the explanation. I normally take the car key off my key chain and stash that in my pocket or pack, that way I don't have to carry all the other keys (can leave those hidden inside car).
  • 1 0
 @donpinpon29: flat tyre, leaves, dirt, grass.. just enough to make it back to car.
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: I'd have thought Maple Syrup would work?
  • 3 0
 @serathestaii: Just the pancake is fine, it's carrying a variety of toppings and fillings, two lemons, a can of cream and 2 litres of ice cream that start to weigh the pack down.
  • 1 0
 @rzicc: Not the brightest idea anywhere near civilisation. The UK is full of savages.
  • 2 0
 Wow, never did I expect so much discussion around a flapjack. Best trail food ever! Homebaked, oat-y, syrup-y goodness.

Personally I keep it relatively simple and use good quality rolled oats, a few seeds, honey (rather than golden syrup) and raisins it keeps you going all day long, satisfies the munchies and way nicer than energy bars. And if you bake it at home you have more to come back to post ride. Smile
  • 1 0
 @mattg66: i have a keypad on my Ford. I can lock my truck with my phone. I dont care or even bring, most of the time, my personal finance information.... all on my phone anyway
  • 2 0
 @rzicc: I agree criminals are stupid... But taking basic steps to protect yourself and your property is just common sense.

We had a car broke into at a trail head they stole the purse that was "hidden". They missed the bills that were on the dashboard with cash in the envelops... Smile Roommates and at the time that was the best way to split things and then we'd go get money orders to mail everything in...

Just lucky they were too Stupid to realize there were keys to the car in the purse and that didn't get stolen right then. BUT we had a good 6 months if worrying that the car would get stolen, always blocked it in at night and used "The Club", Smile We changed the deadbolt, but there were several times someone would forget to lock that and we'd come home hoping all our stuff wasn't gone...

Hiding stuff works, till it doesn't anymore.
  • 1 0
 @rzicc: that is cool... But what's his name will probably yell at you for not leaving your phone in your truck...


Jkn
  • 3 0
 @jwestenhoff:
"a lot of people in the US stash their keys on a tire, bumper, etc."

I am going new car shopping tomorrow at the trailheads. At least they will have a bike to ride home...oh yea, with the house keys, garage door opener, and registration I can do some home products shopping too! I will set my sights on a new truck tomorrow to make the day easier. Hehehe
  • 2 0
 @rzicc: wholeheartedly agree. Wouldn’t lock anything in it other than my truck key so its there when I’m done riding. Even though its a small key/fob I worry about wrecking on it and taking it out on a rock. Or more likely, I lose it while shuffling to put a tube in after I pop a tubeless trail side. Gets messy with my downhill cause I have Cushcore in. All of a sudden i got all this crap to keep track of and I don’t even remember opening my “keep zipped truck key only” pocket. If I smash the phone at least the key is still at the truck. Ive stashed it nearby a hundred times and it’ll rain hard or snow hard and that can get interesting too. As long as I’m on my bike........It’s a good day regardless
  • 1 0
 @mattg66: Cool product, bit of a hassle if you're bike rack's attached to your hitch though
  • 1 1
 Do not see the relationship between car and bike. Just go ride your fuc.ing bike.
  • 69 1
 I carry a full set of bike mechanic tools in big internal frame backpack. You never know when you need a to install a new headset, bottom bracket, or have to cut a steer tube.
  • 6 0
 If you aren't bringing chasing/facing tools on rides you are selling yourself short
  • 1 0
 You joke, but the lad I ride with has so many mechanicals at this point I think he would be better off just doing that. I'm sure he bought his bike off Coco the clown
  • 2 0
 Where do you store your extra headset and bottom bracket?
  • 52 0
 i favour nature's carry option and insert my CO2 and multitool into my arse. no straps needed, keeps the weight off my back and my bike and is a sustainable choice. Eco stash ftw.
  • 25 0
 Great idea, I also find a tyre plug and a small multi tool can be located in my urethra and foreskin respectively.
  • 11 0
 natures pocket
  • 3 0
 When I first read the title I initially read; "...instead of in your body" This was followed by disappointment
  • 1 0
 Tools come out nice and warm during winter.
  • 4 0
 Good to know that some people will give a stool.
  • 8 1
 The Key-ster (TM).

Tested and proven by inmates all over the world.
  • 9 1
 The old tried and tested Bike Utility Tools Transportation (B.U.T.T.®) system!
Cannot go wrong with that one.
  • 4 0
 Rocking the prison pocket in the free world eh??
  • 1 0
 @peleton7: Environmentally friendly and efficient.
  • 1 0
 @PinkyScar: and go back in icy cold-very refreshing
  • 43 0
 I use the Fork Cork like a poor man's One Up EDC. I made a little rubber bag out of an old tube, shoved a bunch of short hex keys in, put the whole thing in my steerer tube from bottom, and corked it off. Perfect and so cheap.

miles-wide.com/product/fork-cork
  • 13 0
 Thanks for the helpful tip. Never heard of the fork cork. I like the idea.
  • 4 0
 Good idea, but not that convenient for quick trail side adjustments... great for matches, first aid, flat, chain repair stuff though?
  • 1 1
 @stiingya: Its actually pretty convenient and easy to get what you need when you need it. The 'tube bag' makes it easy to keep everything together so your tools don't come spilling out when you remove the cork.
  • 11 1
 Did you soak your cork?
  • 5 0
 Does water stay in the steerer and cause rust?
  • 14 0
 @gumbytex: Who are you calling a cork soaker?
  • 4 0
 @DillonFaubion: No. The Fork Cork is essentially 2 washers with a piece of rubber between them. When you tighten the screw, the rubber squishes out, forming a tight seal. I've had this set up for a couple years now on the same fork without any rust to speak of.
  • 17 0
 "Oh, and you can put your weed in there"
  • 1 3
 @BobbyLite: gotta get that SWAT storage in your down tube. so much weed to storage, then additionally in the tool kit bottle, AND then in your steerer. hook up al the homies with that much storage
  • 8 0
 "Plug your Fork with this here Cork." ...I just envision Danny Davito as Frank Reynolds saying this
  • 8 0
 @DillonFaubion: Steerer is aluminum on most forks.
  • 2 0
 One stupid question
What if the inside of the tapered steerer tube comes threaded from factory? There we have room for tools just like fork cork but safer
  • 2 0
 My favorite thing on my bike. I have a Synchros matchbox box which contains a multi tool, chain braker, and quick link storage as well a pump mount, and with my fork cork I store a wolf tooth chain plier, quick links, tire plugs and punch, $20, tire iron, valve core replacements, derailleur hangar. I also have the Tubilito strapped to my frame. I have everything I could ever need for a trail side repair right on my bike.
  • 3 0
 I use a fork cork to stash a Co2 wrapped in old inner tube in my steerer tube.
  • 8 1
 I prefer to use the DragBag ,its a small kevlar pouch thats tethered to your saddle rails that drags on the ground behind you. You can cram in all the essentials like any ordinary bag but the DragBag keeps the weight off your bike and off your body. It has a low center of gravity and theres even an optional hydro bladder with an extended hose. Problem solved
  • 2 0
 @Urwho: And as an added bonus just attach your McLeod to perform trail maintenance as you ride!
  • 1 0
 @Urwho: hilarious!!!
  • 19 0
 I like the idea of never forgetting tools - but i have multiple bikes so the rucksack is easier. And, you know, frames and bottle cages these days...
  • 4 0
 I agree. I got a $10 hip pack on Amazon and sewed some loops on it so it can hold a pump. It's very small but can carry a tube, C17 multi tool, 3-4 energy bars, my phone, some quick links, spare shifter cable, and a full size bottle. And all of those I can just leave in there permanently without having to worry about which bike I'm riding. If I'm going on a really long ride, I'll throw some Aquamira in there to purify water on the way so I don't have to carry so much. I still have a backpack for very long rides with no opportunity to fill up on water, but I find those are pretty rare.
  • 5 2
 I like the idea but I only have one bike and several bags Big Grin
  • 26 12
 Have you ever tried leaving your phone at home or hidden in your car during a ride? It's amazing. Typically no one dies while you're away from your phone. Turns out you're not that important after all.
  • 40 3
 Ever ride by yourself and get hurt badly enough someone needs to come find you?
  • 17 0
 @DHhack: I usually just scream real loud when I'm dying. I work the vocal chords real hard in the gym so I'm prepared when disaster strikes.
  • 7 0
 @DHhack: Yes, then I was eaten by a coyote.
  • 3 0
 @JohnnyVV: sure it wasn't a cougar?
  • 3 0
 @Dropthedebt: Just bite back. Putting the event on Facebook is really poor defense mechanism.
  • 9 0
 @DHhack: this. And I share my location with my wife so if I don't come back she can see where on the trail I ran out of talent.
  • 15 3
 @DHhack Mountain biking: invented 1976. Smart phones: invented 2007. Lesson: everyone who rode mountain bikes before 2007 died in the woods, alone.
  • 4 0
 That’s true but what if you’re on a new trail and need it for Trailforks?
  • 7 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: That isn't true. Before the invention of the smart phone people had real friends, not just virtual ones. So people would ride with together with actual friends, not just those watching the live stream from the helmet cam.
  • 3 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: ...but happy
  • 6 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: and back then I never rode alone. Now that I’m married with young kids, riding with other people is a luxury. Still riding over 100 days a year and part of that is because the wife is comfortable knowing I have my phone if I need it. Using it as a smart phone looking at maps, that’s only been useful in the last year or two around here.
  • 7 0
 Some of us actually try to get rides in while on call.
  • 1 0
 But.......Strava. And Instagram. Rides only happen when they've been documented!!
  • 10 3
 I like to put a spare tube, a tire lever and a pump in my water bottle.
It fits nice and (very) tight, looks better than strapping the tube to the frame.
I ride 90% bike park and don't need water with me (no backpack either), I can drink a the fountain/hose near the lifts.
I keep my multi tool in my pocket as it is nice to have on hand.
  • 23 1
 @pqbb be careful with multi tool in pocket, that can REALLY hurt when you wipe out and that tool lodges into your thigh...
  • 4 1
 My friend laid down his street bike with his keys in his pocket... Still has the scar from where his house key got so hot during the slide that it caused a third-degree burn.
  • 1 0
 Will the oneup thing work on a dual crown fork?
  • 1 0
 Yes, the OneUp EDC tool can work on a dual crown fork as long as the steertube has not been cut so short that the tool pokes out of the bottom of your steertube. I installed the OneUp EDC tool in a Boxxer with a steertube cut to 6 7/8” and would not want the steertube to be much shorter for it to work.
  • 1 0
 @DugS: That sick and perfect for park riding...I hate having a tool in my pocket...have fallen on it before and it f*cking hurts.
  • 1 0
 @RadBartTaylor: Also phones...also expensive
  • 1 0
 @gnarnaimo: been there, done that too!
  • 1 0
 That water must taste great!!
  • 10 0
 Field Test: Grim Donut vs. Tool Bike.

Huck to flat absolutely, 100% mandatory. (and someone to dial "9-1-" nearby)
  • 12 6
 Putting gear on your bike is for commuters and tourers. Keeping stuff off your bike makes it more flickable and easier to handle through technical rough stuff. Also bikes handle much better in the air when there is not extra weight strapped all over them.
  • 12 1
 Yeah I don’t understand strapping stuff to your frame trend. I can carry up to 5 lbs. in my hip pack before I even notice it. Increase my body weight by 3.5% or increase my bikes weight by 16%? The choice is obvious to me.
  • 8 4
 Same point I was going to make. In a sense the bike is unsprung weight (compared to your body anyway) and all racing disciplines strive to reduce unsprung weight. I agree it makes the bike funner to ride. Also for those of us that do a lot of backcountry riding, we spend a great deal of time lifting or carrying the bike. Of course if you're that far in the back country you'll be wearing a pack anyway, but if your habit is to strap a lot of junk on the bike it will still be a heavy haul.
  • 5 2
 @preston67: Nope, the frame is definitely sprung weight.
  • 4 1
 @jwrendenver: Not when you consider there is more suspension in your legs than in the shocks on the frame, and that by far the most mass is in your body, not the bike.
  • 3 0
 @preston67: The bike is sprung weight. Take 2 pounds off your wheels or 2 pounds off your bike and I think you'd notice the wheels make way more of a difference.
  • 1 4
 Actually-moving weight off your body and onto the bike lowers your center of gravity, making for a more stable, easier to handle bike-in the air and on the ground.

As long as the weight isn't on your moving suspension members (rocker links, stays and fork lowers) or wheels, it's still sprung weight and doesn't affect suspension performance.

Sorry, but basic physics completely invalidate your claim.
  • 4 0
 @peleton7: No it doesn't affect suspension performance but it affects the way the bike moves in a 3 dimensional space. I can't argue that a lower COG will always be preferable in a pure cornering situation, but if you're popping the bike around then its mass matters. It is of course debatable performance wise but moving weight from the pitching, moving, heaving mass of the bike to the relatively more stable area of your body can be a more satisfying riding experience. And that is why I refer to the bike as unsprung weight because mass wise and movement wise it is in comparison to the riders mass.
  • 9 0
 I tape most of my snacks, spare tube and multi tool etc. onto the underside of my neckbrace. Full Enduro.
  • 11 3
 SWAT compartment and a SWAT bib. Can carry enough food, water, and tools for a full day ride.
  • 3 1
 CANNOT WAIT to get my 2020 Enduro! Comes on May!
  • 1 1
 @cky78: sick! I'd love to get the new one!
  • 2 0
 only bummer is shit's still stored on your back. A sandwich, snacks, water bottle, and jacket can be just as uncomfortable for me on my back in SWAT bibs as if I were wearing a backpack. I find a lumbar pack to feel better than having stuff in SWAT pockets (I have both). The pockets in my SWAT bibs currently go unused, in favor of the bum bag.
  • 1 0
 @gumbytex: In all fairness, I've never tried a fanny pack, but I'd like to try one as an alternative.
  • 6 1
 and now Trek offers the same thing with their TWAT box!
  • 1 0
 @letsgoridebikes18: I got a hip pack in the last Vital Gear Box - I hadn't used one previous to getting this one. I quite like it. It sort of feels like wearing a seat belt on your ride, but I can't feel it all the time, or other than that sensation.
  • 5 0
 25 dollars for a piece of velcro? Damn. I just have 3 options: fanny bag with the most essential on the shortest rides. Small backpack that easily fits up to w liters bootle, more than enough food for the day, a small pump and a flat tyre kit, a knife and a tiny medkit plus a multitool, all this coming to 2-3 kg of weight depending on the water bottle. And the third one is my 50L military grade backpack with enough space and comfort to carry everything necessary for a week in the mountain. The cost of all of this? 125 euros fo the three bags and all the stuff in them except the tent.
  • 5 0
 Using a lumbar pack for all this stuff is a lot more convenient if you ride multiple bikes (for me, a hardtail and a boinger). Rather than two of everything, you just grab the pack no matter which bike you're riding.

Also keeps the tools, tube, and pump cleaner than many on-bike options.

I was kinda marveling the other day about how unrestrictive a lumbar pack is, and I think it's because it's sitting on your pelvis which is on your saddle. No joints/muscles/etc are supporting it, as opposed to a backpack. Even with two water bottles, a bunch of food, tools, etc. in my bum bag it never feels like much.
  • 4 0
 For me personally I'm either going for a shorter ride and couldn't be bothered to carry enough tools to fix issues. (I do have an EDC) or I'm going for a longer ride and need a pack with some water, snacks, and all the essentials should something go wrong.
  • 4 0
 One topic that doesn't come up very often here in these articles or comments is ideas for carrying bear spray. There are all sorts of nifty gadgets for carrying your tools and tubes, etc. but for those of us who live and/or ride in grizzly bear country, bear spray is an important tool to carry as well. Kinda like an avalanche beacon - everyone has one and knows how to use it in case their friend gets into trouble and needs help. Personally, I vacillate between carrying a pack (with tools, layers, 1st aid kit, and water) with bear spray in my water bottle cage on longer rides versus a lumbar pack (with tools, 1st aid kit, and bear spray) with a water bottle in my bottle cage for shorter rides.
  • 2 1
 Me and the guys I ride with have all had run ins with cougars. We all pack small .380s. I keep mine on the belt of my nomad pack. Its about the size of a phone and you don't notice it at all. I've crashed several time with it and its never had any issues. No grizzlies here though
  • 2 0
 I have the Evoc 3l hip pack and slid soft pouch thing for the bear spray on the right side (dominat hand) through the strap. Works great! Stays in place and is sorta up and out of the way of hitting your side during a crash. I can send you a picture if you would like to see
  • 8 0
 I hate it when I mix up my bottles. The other day I encountered a bear, Sprayed him with water, ran very fast, drank my bear spray, and realized my mistake. Then the bear ate me and I respawned at the bottom of the mountain. Luckily it happened on zwift so I'm good
  • 1 0
 I carry bear spray with me at all times despite the fact that bears have been extinct here since medieval times. Better safe than sorry I say.
  • 3 0
 With phones the size of tablets I often prefer a low profile hip pack anyways because I hate riding with the phone in my pocket, even if everything else could theoretically fit on the bike. So i end up putting a couple small things like a multi-tool and a snack in the hip pack since I am wearing it.
  • 3 0
 With more than one bike and different wheel sizes, it's fanny pack and water bottles in warm weather, hydration pack (for room for storing extra clothing) in cold weather, and appropriate tubes strapped to each bike. Phone goes in a bubble wrap bag in the packs. If I tried to move tools from one bike to the other each time I ride, it would take me twice as long to get ready, I'd definitely forget something at my age, and inevitably end up missing the exact tool I need. The idea of carrying sharp tools in back or side pockets strikes me as absolutely crazy.
  • 3 0
 i have the Dakine HotLaps fanny pack. I cracked a phone screen by crashing with my phone in my pocket so I always keep my phone in there. Ikeep CO2 and multitool and a tube. I can put a water bottle in there as well.

For longer rides, I take a bottle on my frame and in my fanny pack. Ican fit snacks in the pack as well. I drink a lot of water so if im doing a long ride in the mountains (I ride in colorado high country a lot), I have a small water filter i keep in my pocket. it is soft and i dont notice it at all. I can get away with having just a fanny pack and all that stuff for 20+ mile 4 hour rides. Really love ditching the big bulky camelback
  • 3 0
 The Syncros IS Tailor Cage/tool/pump is I think the slickest option outside of OneUP. Apparently it's available now but only available through brick and mortar dealerships at the moment. Why not sell it online @SCOTT-Sports ? Most folks (even the nice people at my local Scott dealership prior to me special ordering it) don't know it exists.
  • 6 1
 Do the people who fret frame grams cry when the read about other strapping tools to their bike?
  • 3 1
 Why add weight to your bike!!? A full bottle is enough!

My answer.. do a poo, and add it to your body

Not the poo

With.. an Alpinestars paragon vest. Hands down the BEST piece of kit, I’ve ever owned.

It has a removable back protector (also takes a bladder) BUT has three pockets, two on the sides, on on the back. Inside, I fit a Leyzne tool, levers, tyre boot, three CO2s and a chewy bar.

In my bars, I have samurai sword tyre plugs (weight nothing)

No pump, nothing bolted to the bike. Need a 5mm? Pull your jersey up, reach in grab the tool, bang.!

The Oneup stuff looks great, BUT. what a faff!
  • 2 0
 Scanning the comments and I see "in my bars I have samurai swords "... all I read, awesome! Smile
  • 1 0
 I have the same bibs and I like the back protector, but would you want to crash with tools, CO2, or worse keys in that pocket? I keep them all on the frame for that reason and reserve the pockets for snacks.
  • 1 0
 @dthomp325: , i also use this Vest. I use a thin small plástic box with all the stuff inside. On hotter days, i use a 500ml flask on the other pocket. Small phone and ID on the middle pocket. If it had some kind of chest protector, it would be perfect
  • 3 0
 Ahhh, if only somehow someone invented a jersey that had back pockets for stuff like phone, money, food, extra base layer and other things. How long do we have to wait for technology to catch up???
  • 1 0
 I feel like the only guy in all the internets still rocking a traditional bike jersey.
  • 2 0
 Thirty years ago, a company called Innovations had an accessory called the wacky plug, which was a removable rubber stopper similar to a bar end plug, which you could insert in the bottom of your seat post in order to use it to hold things like small tools, pieces of chain link, money, etc. The idea and product didn't take off as much as one of their other products... they were the company that invented co2 cartridge tire inflators for cycling. Now I'm sure the reason it wasn't popular was because they didn't overcharge for the things... the retail was like $10... slap an $60 charge on it and it has to be better right ? I should order some from the distributor that still has them and put them up on ebay at their original retail price... hello 900% profit.
  • 2 0
 I still have a couple of old Innovations CO2 inflators that take 12g unthreaded BB gun cartridges. $7 for a box of 15.
  • 2 0
 I've used a full on backpack hydro pack once since 2017. It was horrible. For bigger rides (over 4 hrs) or more remote stuff, A hip pack and a Sawyer for water filtration has been plenty. SWAT bibs and a BackCountryResearch Tulbag with the basics for the shorter after work rides are perfect.

Obviously everyone's tolerance for what is enough stuff to carry on a ride is going to be different, but it is worth experimenting with riding packless. There are enough products and hacks out there to start small and work up.
  • 2 0
 The crankset tool is a piece of shit. I paid over $100 CDN and it worked for about 3 months and the magnet stopped connecting. I tried it on multiple bikes and it definitely is the tool that is the problem. It falls out so now it sits in a backpack. Don't waste your hard earned cash on this piece of garbage.
  • 3 0
 I have a frame bag that fits my hardtail and full susser (both Cotic Longshot frames) so all my kit can be swapped easily between bikes. Bag of Haribo included.
  • 2 0
 V2 Rune:

- Multi-tool + CO2 + levers + patch kit in tiny under-seat pack (made from used tubes)
- Tube strapped to frame with velcro computer cable strap (super light & cheap)
- Fidlock water bottle for short rides
- Pack + pump, food, first-aid kit, water for longer rides

By moving much of what I need on any ride to the bike, the pack is lighter and only necessary for long rides

And now I'll throw in some Haribo.... Smile
  • 1 0
 tube and levers strapped to seat rails along with a frame pump and water bottle for anything under a 2 hour ride. Phone and car keys, maybe a gel in zip short pockets. Anything longer, or hotter, I'll suck it up with a hydration pack, but after years of riding with one, I just straight up prefer not having anything on my back. Just feels better on the bike.
  • 2 0
 I strap a tube onto the frame, water bottle, rest goes inside my hip pack for shorter rides or lift access days - I can refill the bottle at every lift. For all-day rides in the back country, I'll bring the backpack.
  • 1 0
 I use this little guy. It fits in your pocket and all you have to do is swap out the bits it came with for bits that fit your bike. Also, try making a small pouch for it out of an old inner tube then strap it to the bike.

www.harborfreight.com/8-piece-right-angle-screwdriver-92630.html
  • 2 1
 I put all my tools and a single spare tube in a cheap frame mounted cell phone bag. I make sure that all the fasteners use one of the keys in the bag. I don't carry low risk stuff like a bottom bracket wrench, but the single pair of Vise Grips can handle that in an emergency since my bikes all have a threaded BB.

Every tool I need to assemble the bike is in the bag. If I want to carry a phone, it phone goes in an aluminum phone holder mounted to the headset preload bolt. The pump is frame mounted on a bottle mount.

Also, you know those funny looking jerseys that roadies wear? The ones with pockets in the back? Yeah? You can put a lot of soft stuff in there, like a second tube, rubber gloves, protein bars, and even a smaller spare folding tire if you want to.
  • 1 0
 Belts/waist packs all the way

- an unrestricted ride with air on your back instead of a sweaty annoying pack is a revelation when you switch

- I'm not a runner but various running belts/packs are lighter and better designed than many bike specific belts. You can carry all the spares/tools you're actually likley to need + phone and not even notice it's there (and if you must be one of those folk who believe the must hydrate every mile pseudoscience sermons they can also carry bottles)
  • 1 0
 Absolutely despise riding with a pack in the summer.
Like carrying a sweaty monkey on your back.

Take that off was like sex without the condom

Blackburn switch wrap - wrap a tube some levers and has all the tools (including chain and 8mm)
Crank brothers pump ....everyone runs tubeless and want to have a go at sealing it first before ripping out the tube.
CO2 sucks for that, 1 shot
strap on bottle cage for the epic rides.


That EDC pump is pretty sick too though. Didn't realize the tool fit inside. probably woulda gone for that.
  • 4 0
 i sometimes ride with a mini pump up my ass. it's a little uncomfortable at 1st, but i've gotten used to it.
  • 2 0
 Just cut out the middle man and inflate your rectum to 120psi. All you need to carry is a short pump house with one of those adapters you use to blow up a football. Hey presto
  • 1 0
 And a second prison pocket user!! I guess there are some hard O.G.s on Pinkbike!!
  • 5 4
 I disagree with carrying tools on the bike. It makes the bike less flickable and hoppable. For this reason, I carry an EDC type tool in my butt hole. Its low center of gravity and efficient use of a void is ideal, plus I have some energy blocks stowed up there with it as slow release fuel!
  • 4 4
 I usually ride with my girlfriend. So I make her carry everything in her “storage” spots. Gives me an excuse to use them on the trail. Ha
  • 3 0
 @Bimmer28: why would we have ears if you weren't supposed to store c02 in them?
  • 1 0
 3rd prison pocket user. Where do you guys carry your shanks when you ride?! Never know when you'll have to cut a b!tch.
  • 4 0
 “So, Butch, your old man hid this chain tool in the one place he knew those greasy bastards wouldn’t find it...”
  • 2 1
 Is it more efficient to carry stuff on your bike than your body? I like a light bike and paid good money to make it that way. Why would I strap 5lbs of crap to it? I don't buy the argument that if I lost 5lbs of body weight its all the same; no way. If that was the case a 150lb person riding a 30lb bike would be the same as a 200lb person on a 80lb bike? I call BS.
  • 1 0
 Think I got that backwards. 150lb person with a 80lb bike..but you know what I mean!
  • 2 0
 @camcoz69: The main advantage is the increase in ventilation by not having a pack covering your back, but it also means the bike is supporting the weight instead of you. If you've ever gone bike packing or otherwise ridden with 20+ lbs of gear you'll notice that it's much easier and less fatiguing packed on the frame than in a backpack.
  • 1 1
 Basic physics, man-lower center of gravity is way more stable. So you might feel like it's easier to ride a lighter bike and carry your tools, but the opposite is true. If you look at the whole weight thing holistically, you'll get over your hangup.
  • 1 0
 Even with swat storage in my frame and a swat tool in my steerer tube, i'm still limited by the single water bottle mount. If I want to ride longer than ~90 minutes, the additional water is going on my body in some way or another. And since I already have a backpack with a 3L bladder for long rides and a hip pack with a 1.5L bladder for medium rides,
I end up doing the same thing I did before I had all of this new on bike storage, except now my tools aren't in the pack with my other stuff.
  • 1 0
 Many people carry far more than they actually need. If you just out on local ride how often do you need anything besides, tube, pump or multitool?
Unless you miles from anywhere you don't need that much. You can easily strap the essentials to bike and ditch bag for short rides.
  • 1 0
 My LBS helped me find a solution from CamelBak to help me lighten the load. It's called the Ultra Belt. Holds my too big phone and keys. It has lots of little pockets for other stuff and holds a collapsible water bottle, but I use a frame strap and water bottle mounted pump to hold the pump, tube, multitool, etc. Way better than carrying a pack, especially for short or medium rides.
  • 1 0
 Backpack it is. I like to be independent on all trails, carrying enough stuff for myself and other people, all together in one convenient pack. And tomorrow I’m riding another bike.
In and on your bike, I would have to think is it in my bar left of right, steerer tube, tool bottle, saddle bag, strapped...
  • 1 0
 I am very comfortable with carrying tools in my backpack whenever I'm riding... However... I recently realized that doing same can be dangerous for my back if I were to fall on my back... With that in mind, I have decided to still carry a backpack with me - with & for back protection - but I will have my tools(LOW, so as to keep my centre of gravity low)on my bike... (hence)I even have a new tool idea that may very well become a MTB trend(if you want to know what it is, prepare a contract & message me privately)...
  • 1 0
 This pack has me wearing packs again. No soggy back or flopping around, no belt, just enough room. I forget I'm wearing it. www.nathansports.com/products/hpl-020-hydration-backpack
I believe it's for trail running, maybe why it breathes so well.
  • 1 0
 After 30 yrs of riding MTB and carrying and using tools.
Make sure your bike is maintained and well adjusted before it ever goes out. Make sure chains are clean and lubed and brakes are bled and pads in good shape. I almost NEVER need a tool other than make a seat adjustment or bar roll change.
Long rides in rocky terrain require some tire plugs and a way to inflate. Maybe a small chain breaker and a couple of quicklinks.
My bike always has a set of Fix-It-Stix under the bottle mount. They weigh nothing are instantly accessible and handle 95% of my trailside tool needs.
I really like the Fix-It -Stix as the accessibility and weight is the best of any tool ever.
  • 3 0
 Scott Syncros Matchbox Bottle Cage just missing a 6mm allen otherwise very good option at a reasonable price. got it on my gravel bike teamed up with a swat saddle wrap.
  • 2 0
 The new IS Tailor Cage will please you
www.syncros.com/ch/en/is-tailor-cage
  • 1 0
 @qreative-bicycle: Yer looks good, and price is still competitive, tool doesn't look as protected from the elements as the match box but might be tempted to give it a go on my mtb.
  • 1 0
 Ride with someone who has paid for the fancy tool, they will tell you how amazing it is and that you should get one.

But I have one... it was free and you even carry it for me, its so precious that you will even use it for me Smile
  • 1 0
 As long as you follow the basic rule of tool borrowing. 1 beer for every time you use other people's tool on the trail.
  • 1 0
 @peleton7: beer... that's for ebikers, just chicken salads, protien shakes and smart water up here...


Ok, donuts and pies.
  • 2 0
 Dakine hot laps pouch under the seat. Cinches down real tight. I like it, but I also was running the "Enduropean" carry-all for years before "fannypacks" or "hip packs" were cool
  • 1 0
 Carrying tools on the frame is great-it means for a quick hour ride the pack isn't needed. However, all of the tools reviewed are compromised so they can be crammed into any round orifice in the bike. A good multitool in a low-profile rolltop seatbag (the medium sized Specialized Seat Pack is a really good one) works way better than something designed to be stuffed into a bar or steerer tube. And works a-ok with a long dropper on a big travel 29er. And has room for a spare shifter cable, a derailleur hanger and a CO2 inflator/cartridge or 2.

Also, the best combo for a tube in the main triangle is a strap with a little storage (like a RaceFace Stash) cinched into place with a Voile strap. It'll never come loose that way, and Voile straps are super handy to have on the bike as well as ski touring.
  • 2 1
 Group Ride - don't repeat tools... 1 pump / mini-tool is more then enought.
tubes (tubolito type) can be place under the seat.
Stream Look... Fast Riding... Just need my Skinsuit!
  • 8 0
 My issue with the notion of not repeating tools is that if you have a flat and you’re at the top of something and the person carrying the thing you need is two gnarly miles down the trail, you’re screwed. And then everyone would need to coordinate what they’re bringing, and unpack and repack their bags for each bike which takes time. I don’t want to have to rely on anyone else on the trail so my goal is to be self sufficient.
  • 1 0
 @ridebikesyall: sorry mate... but my notion of group ride, is not 2miles ahead/behind! If that was the case, I would prefer riding solo!
  • 1 0
 I really get on with my All-In multitool. I even use it the workshop a lot just because it's always to hand. One of my motivations for going with Shimano over Sram on my newest bike was compatibility with the All-In.
  • 2 0
 The wolftooth EDC# (or 4) system can double your waterbottle capacity by mounting them at 45 degrees and give you a nice spot secure mounting point for a strap.
  • 1 0
 I like the Wolf Tooth B-Rad rail with roll top bag. It allows me to carry all the tools and parts I need plus put 2 water bottles in my Santa Cruz Blur frame. Food goes in my back pocket.
  • 3 0
 You can always use the Bike Utility Tools Transportation ®(B.U.T.T) system.
Don't PM me for details.
  • 2 0
 I ride with the One Up tool kit in my head tube. No water. No extra tubes. No CO2 cartridges. No back pack. Nothing. I figure if I get a flat, then I'll walk.
  • 3 0
 I’m not a big fan of carrying anything , and yes I end up walking my bike out of the trails about once a year .
  • 1 0
 Been there, done that, never want to do it again. Walking out of the woods is overrated. My goal is to be able to get my bike rolling again without carry a ridiculous amount of extra crap. Multi-tool, shift cable, tube/plugs, pump, pliers, zap+straps and tape, chain link, pliers, and a few extra fasteners all in a fanny pack or backpack. Pedalling > walking any day.
  • 1 0
 Oh yes I have tools in my head tube. Another tool kit in the down tube and I carry three water bottles. I stash my plastic banana holder in my shorts. I can't weight to ride my Uber light carbon fiber bike!
  • 1 0
 9 bikes, one tube taped to each bike, one multi tool in pocket, one saddle bag between bikes.. easy peezy.. keep an extra saddle bag stocked in your car and its like your making money
  • 1 0
 I just pre-ride every trail and stash things I might need in the future. It's expensive and time consuming, but sure beats having it all in a pack that can go with me on any bike.
  • 1 0
 @pinkbikeaudience
Can do another article "Pinkbike User Favorite Ways to Carry Tools" or highlight all the legit comments on how to carry tools so we won't have to read through all the bologna.
  • 1 0
 pffff I didn’t learn to ride with no hands for no reason.

Allen wrench in one hand, water bottle in the other. Constantly adjusting my setup on the go. Saves the weight & cost of buying grips too.
  • 2 1
 Oh my gawd. I’ve been researching this for weeks now since I bought my Norco Optic and now you all went and did the leg work for me!!! Woot woot! Thanks Peanut Butter!!
  • 8 8
 Because a chain tool, a few levers along with a tube, some hex wrenches and a mini-pump take up so much pack space. Having it all attached to the frame does look more endure though.
  • 19 1
 It is about not carrying a pack in the first place...
  • 20 0
 I have ridden with a pack for over 20 years. Last year I switched to a OneUp pump and tool kit and a water bottle for most shorter rides. I find I'm more inclined to hop on the bike and go because my prep time is almost nothing. It may seem trivial, but my real world experience is that I want to and do ride more because of the switch. My pack is still great for longer rides of course.
  • 16 1
 free the back, free the mind, brother
  • 2 1
 Or find a ride buddy to do all the above. You go full enduro. Just water bottle and snacks.
  • 6 0
 SWAT box is pretty great. I have so much shit inside my frame.
  • 5 0
 @big-red: Agreed. Fresh air flowing down your back for a short 2-hr ride, pack-free, is incredible.
  • 5 1
 @camcoz69: Next time, carry some toilet paper and a poop sack to avoid this. Smelly cat!
  • 2 0
 @big-red: I like to go no pack on short rides too, but there is no prep time difference from throwing your pack on...?
  • 3 1
 @big-red: best argument for flat pedals too.
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: Like I said, it seems trivial, but personally it makes a big difference to my likelihood of sneaking in a quick ride.
  • 1 0
 @camcoz69: comes for free with Shitalized.
  • 2 0
 @pinkknip: True, but you could just cut a hole in any frame.
  • 1 0
 Swat compartment or frame seat bags it is for me. You can actually fit stuff in there. I always like carrying food as well as tools haha. Food always helps.
  • 4 0
 backpack for me ....
  • 3 0
 I like a pack so my back is protected if I go OTB.
  • 4 2
 Cant believe how much money and time are people ready to spend just to avoid wearing a damn backpack.
  • 1 0
 I'm just in the midst of trying stuff out these days after an absurd summer where I rode every day in July and got tired of a soggy, smelly backpack covered in mud half the time weighing me down and growing moldy in the bladder.

So I bought the Osprey Savu, shrunk my load a bit, tossed my tube on the frame for the 1st time ever with a $15 pair of OneUp frame straps (2nd one is great for the wife's 26" bike to have a tube with it so I don't have to lug it too).
Then I tried to see if the Backcountry Research Mutherload strap a lot of people are using is any easier or convenient so I'm using it now.

Can't stash CO2 in it like others, but my tire levers I can. I still use my backpack for when it's gonna be all sorts of changing weather to carry pads & rain jacket & goggles, but by in large, not having the beast marinating on my back has been nice. I go back and forth between both methods now.

Happy to have versatility now, but if I only had money to go backpack or "stuff strapped to the rig and in my pouches"...I'd always tell a rider to go with a backpack. Until you really know what you as a rider need on the trail from experience, doing straps and fanny packs can leave you frustrated. Heck, just trying 2 different strapping methods pissed me off...but I think it's because the Mutherload wasn't magical compared to the basic OneUP (which dozens of companies produce). It is way more convenient when hosing the bike off though to take off and put right back, but not any sort of epiphany product.
  • 2 0
 Generally ride with what I need on the bike but a backpack has saved my ass more than a few times in nasty crashes.
  • 3 0
 I just use my prison pocket.
  • 1 0
 The EDC stuff is smart. I have a mini pump tool kit. Water and tube on the bike as well. Some days I wear a pack some days it’s just the phone in the pocket!
  • 1 0
 Such a relevant topic. Until all frame makers start putting storage in the frame, we're stuck with fixes like these. Thank you for putting this together.
  • 1 0
 #stashmoretools - ive had more than a passing interest in this - good fun and every reason to break out the tools and make some!
  • 2 0
 I wonder if Orange will come up with a cabinet that you can actually put stuff inside of..
  • 1 0
 Guys... i always ride with a gps driven drone carrying beers, champagne and some sparkling water for other friends as Well.... Tools and clean glasses also...
  • 3 0
 I just value added $120000 to my bike just by tapeing a banana to it.
  • 1 0
 I ride with a oneup my ass. Comfy and pleasurable, especially if you case a jump, gives the tool a nice push onto the prostate. Good times..
  • 1 0
 Where do people store full face chinbars for climbing trails? Obviously attaches to a full pack but I'm trying to not wear full backpack most rides.
  • 2 0
 By tire lever does he mean tire lever.
  • 1 0
 tomato tomato
  • 2 1
 A tube is too much to carry? What happens when you need to use the mud encrusted tube strapped to your filthy bike
  • 2 0
 Spray it down with the new, OneUp 1.5l frame-mounted bladder ($99USD).
  • 1 1
 If your tube is mud encrusted, so is the tire it's going in. Not a big deal.
  • 1 0
 A keyboard Politician, make way more than Dentists...my keyboard specialists carry my tools!
  • 1 0
 Fanny pack/hip pack is my go-to. I'd rather feel the extra weight on my body than on the bike.
  • 2 0
 I carry water... that's it. If it's long i put a bar in my pocket. Done
  • 1 0
 What is it with MTB Jerseys that do not have pockets?
Solution just stitch a mesh bag inside it!
  • 2 0
 "I'm Mike Leevy, these are tire leevers."
  • 1 0
 it seems to me mounting gear anywhere but centered on the frame would affect the handling of the bike
  • 1 0
 As long as the weight isn't on moving suspension components or wheels, it's sprung weight.
  • 2 1
 peasants carry there own tools!! Your not a real mountain biker unless your mates are carry tools for you to use haha
  • 2 0
 Without my pack, no one will know that I'm a Dad.
  • 2 0
 My seat also carries a TOOL....Me!!!
  • 1 0
 The Industry Nine tool reminds me of a trick out of the "Easy Rider" movie. Except there is no gas tank.
  • 2 0
 Who wants to add weight to unsprung mass? (that tools in front axle...)
  • 2 0
 This whole “strap everything to your bike" is getting pretty ridiculous.
  • 2 0
 ….enduro
  • 2 0
 Shorts with pockets....
  • 1 0
 Look out kid, because they keep it all hid
  • 2 1
 Just get a specilized....
  • 1 0
 Always looking for a good place to hide my tool.
  • 1 0
 Can't wait to see your next Helmet collab wit Tim Horton's!!!
  • 1 1
 People spend so much money to buy a lite bike only to buy these to weight it down.......it's injustice to the bike!
  • 1 1
 You sir, are what the British call a pillock. Or just a wanker who's never more than a couple of miles from your car.
  • 4 3
 I ride with friends who carry tools. Problem solved.
  • 1 0
 Carry tools on your bike and get others to carry anything else for you Smile
  • 1 1
 so you spend top $$$ to get a light weight bike, only to fill it up with tools and gadgets that will make it a tank....
  • 1 0
 Only thing slower than a couple of pounds of tools? Walking your bike for a few hours.

If you're never more than a couple of miles from your car or a World Cup XC racer, carry some tools.
  • 1 0
 Want tools on my body not my bike thanx
  • 1 1
 This should be titled “7 ways to counteract your carbon tax weight savings”
  • 1 0
 The tools reviewed were all basic stuff every rider should carry. No weight is added by putting stuff on a frame vs a pack.
  • 1 0
 @peleton7: just being cheeky here but who said anything about a pack? I like to live dangerously and be on the edge of walking back to the car hah
  • 1 0
 I’m looking for a used 8 ball. please help
  • 1 0
 Swat - most desired and most comfortable tools set to use
  • 1 0
 I, too, think that ebikes are great!
  • 1 0
 I strap my gear to my helmet- Nam Style ( owwwrahhh )
  • 1 0
 Wait up!!! Don't we all have sponsors carrying our stuff for us???
  • 1 0
 Does anybody read comments this far down?
  • 1 0
 Maybe we should be carrying our tools INSIDE of our bodies.
  • 1 0
 I like Fannys
  • 1 0
 Marketing...
  • 1 0
 Duct Tape
  • 1 0
 Balance bike is dead
  • 3 6
 That OneUp pump/tool is awesome if you like pump scratches on your frame. After a few months, the pump extends and flops around in rough terrain. No bueno.
  • 8 0
 Are you sure you put the gasket back in the right spot? I've been using the frame pump on my bike and I've never had it extend. If you have it on the downtube, put it valve side down, that probably helps some as well.

I've been super happy with the EDC tool/pump so far.
  • 3 0
 @uncanny:

Same here. Never had a problem.
  • 11 0
 If you mount it with the handle pointing up, it won't ever extend. because, you know.....science.
  • 3 0
 Have a nice blemish in my frame from the pump rotating around and rubbing against my frame. In two park runs it wore down to bare carbon. Only response I got was to "put some frame protector there". Kinda bs fix IMO.
  • 1 0
 @uncanny: Yeah, done all that. I think it has something to do with riding in super fine dust all the time. It stays down longer when I clean it, but when I wait too long or forget it works its way off.
  • 2 0
 @Link4130: I’ve only ever mounted it that way. What idiot would mount it upside down?
  • 6 0
 Sorry for hear about the bad experience.

The Pump should never open if the gasket is properly installed after use and the handle/tool end it pointed up. If the gasket is damaged or not holding we have a service part for all the seals - EDC PUMP SEAL/O-RING CAP KIT

www.oneupcomponents.com/collections/small-parts/edc

As for rubbing, the pump bracket should be positioned outboard enough that the pump cannot physically touch the frame. If the downtube is so wide that that is not possible, a small piece of mastic tape will get you sorted.
  • 1 0
 @OneUpComponents: I love my EDC pump but it has an issue where it requires an incredible amount of force to get the tool seated all the way back into the pump. I find myself having to place it on a rock then put all my weight on it. What would cause this?
  • 1 0
 @Strelok1987i: try a drop of lube on the o-ring
  • 2 0
 just put some electrical tape there to hold, plus the tape is good for emergencies too.
  • 1 0
 @uncanny: Two years of year round riding on my Oneup pump...no problem I wish the tools were a bit easier to access, and the rubber seal for the valve stem is a lttle soft, but it's my favorite pump/tool solution yet.
  • 1 0
 @Strelok1987i: Dry O-ring on the tool itself. The rubber O-ring needs to slide in to a circular groove in the pump to retain itself.
I've found that a small coating of grease on that O-ring will help it pop in and out easily.
Also, while inserting and removing, you can twist the tool 1/4-turn while pushing/pulling to help it slide in to place more easily.
  • 1 0
 @OneUpComponents: Thanks for the reply. The gasket isn't damaged per se, but it's well-used. The alloy in the vicinity of the gasket is worn, likely due to dust sanding the surface as the gasket moves, both on its own and as a result of use. As noted above, I never install the pump handle down, that would be dumb. I know the internet is full of people who don't know how to use their gear, but I'm not one of them (in this instance, at least). I guess I'll just have to replace the gasket, though the worn alloy is more of a concern to me.

As for the rubbing, even if the bracket is installed fully outboard, once the gasket slides and eventually lets go of the handle, end of the handle is a full 6+" away from the center of the bracket - plenty of distance from its fulcrum to move about. I wouldn't call the DT of a Patrol or Smuggler exceptionally large.

"Just tape it up" is a pretty lame response, IMO. If a product, used as designed, is gonna damage another product, that can't be the official company line...
  • 1 0
 @scvkurt03: Apologies, I didn't mean to suggest that you were mounting it incorrectly. I just wanted my response to be as helpful as possible for all that read it. I do routinely see pumps mounted upside down when riding around town.

It sounds like the gasket could use replacing but I'm not concerned about the worn aluminum finish. I see the part is out-of-stock right now but it should be back in in 1-2 weeks.

Mastic tape is not an appropriate suggestion to protect the frame when the pump is fully extended. Let's take care of the root problem first. That said, I use Mastic or 3M all over my frame to protect against small rubs from housing, chain, rocks, heels, small rodents etc. I have even kicked my pump hard enough that the bracket shifted into the frame.
  • 1 0
 @OneUpComponents: Cool, and thanks again. I’ll grab one of those kits, as I otherwise like the pump/tool combo for bigger or more remote rides.

I use mastic tape all over, too. Most factory frame protection isn’t enough, even on chain stays and seat stays near the cassette. The side of a down tube is where logos live, though, and god forbid people not know what I’m riding!
  • 1 0
 @OneUpComponents:

People who can’t get something simple as this mounted the proper way are just piss poor mechanics.

On another note.. I had the problem that the O-ring was working too well (due to some dirt) and couldn’t get “inside the pump”. Cleaned it and greased the O-ring and it worked fine afterwards.
  • 1 0
 @poteran: This worked perfectly, thanks!

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