Video: Fork Lowers Service At Home - Tech Tina

Jan 20, 2022 at 16:17
by Pinkbike Originals  


Service your fork lowers, adding it to your routine maintenance schedule will help prolong the life of your fork and keep your front end feeling fresh. Christina breaks the task down giving you everything you need to know to perform a fork lowers service at home.








231 Comments

  • 173 1
 If anyone needs tips for spraying fork oil all over your tools and garage floor when tapping on the bottom bolts to dislodge the lowers LMK, I'm extremely experienced in this area
  • 96 0
 If you need similar results from a brake bleed, I'm your man.
  • 70 0
 @HankDamage: I too am experienced in this area. Secret tip: don't remove the stopper from the funnel that's screwed into your Shimano brake lever during the bleed process. Just push harder on the syringe at the caliper, assuming everything's fine and it's just a little harder this time, until the syringe hose explodes off the caliper coupling and sprays the entire syringe contents everywhere including all over your pads, rotor, etc.
  • 4 0
 I'm quite talented at this too. Also managed to tear my new foam seal lube bits putting it back together again... oh the joy of ineptitude.
  • 32 0
 @HankDamage: Make sure to keep your pads and rotors as close to the brake fluid as possible. Bonus points if you knock the container over on them as you try to fill up your syringe.
  • 6 4
 @rickybobby18: Commendable. If you wanna up your game, switch to SRAM ... and do not use bleed blocks ever again.
  • 5 0
 @rickybobby18: happened to me lol
  • 5 0
 @nickfranko: I infact knocked a liter bottle of mineral oil
  • 15 0
 @rickybobby18: Did that with a seized Guide master cylinder, DOT 5.1 makes a good eye exfoliant
  • 9 0
 This is tthe best thread ever.
  • 5 0
 @rickybobby18: ha ha I’ve definitely done this. Also forgot the bleed block once and blew the piston right out of the caliper.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: Aw mate, I was about to make a YT video demonstrating that! Wink
  • 4 2
 @vtracer: That's why I won't EVER buy MTB brakes that use DOT!! Scary!
  • 14 0
 Yesterday I shaved half a gram from my bike by tightening the tubeless valve lock-nipple until it snapped off. The pressure held for the ride, and now I am left with deciding if this is a long term solution or not.
  • 27 1
 Pumping up tyres to 3-4 bar when they've got fresh sealant added but aren't properly seated is also a great way of creating a reason to spring clean your garage. I call it bike bukkake.
  • 7 0
 My expertise is knocking over the plastic cups i used to collect all the fork oil and spilling on top of my work bench or garage floor or both
  • 2 0
 @rickybobby18: haha I'm chuckling to myself because I've done literally the same thing, except not only did the syringe hose pop off, but somehow one of the ceramic pistons broke apart as well.
  • 2 0
 @rickybobby18:
Dude, I couldn’t make that mistake even when I’m sober.
  • 7 0
 @HankDamage: At this point I don't even bother with gloves when handling DOT fluid, it's just natural now ;]
  • 6 0
 @pycior: Natural COVID immunity, I hear.
  • 1 1
 @rickybobby18: I feel attacked.
  • 2 1
 Wonder why she didn’t show us how to complete this in a tent….lol
  • 2 0
 @SJP - I came here instantly for the comments. I’m constantly amazed at the quality of the commentary our fellow PB readers deliver.
  • 1 0
 Yep. Done that. @ismellfish:
  • 3 0
 @commental: Bikakke
  • 1 0
 @nzandyb: "Rickybobby and HankDamage" coming to a shop near you!
  • 3 1
 Bikkake?
  • 7 0
 @HankDamage: I once purged my brakes in the kitchen, ended up destroying the wall paint with DOT4 fuid :-)
  • 2 1
 @rickybobby18: because you bleed your brakes with the pads and the rotor on? Ups....
  • 5 0
 @zoobab2: Masterful, but I think I can top it. I once did a brake bleed in the same room with the wedding dress box.
  • 2 0
 I wish there was some magical way to place the wrench/socket/hex head on the bolt/nut and then life magically had a cut scene to where it was already loose and easily came off like that...

Where is that MtBike EASY button??
  • 2 1
 Bikkake. Noun. A type of activity in which a bicycle or bicycle component douses one in gratuitous amounts of liquid, primarily but not exclusively tire sealant.
  • 1 0
 @ismellfish: oh man, I'm crying laughing after reading this!
  • 3 0
 @HankDamage: not as painful as that ,but i once exploded not 1 ,but 3 syringe full ,75ml each, of shimano mineral oil all over the kitchen,bike,me before i realised i was trying to refill the back,but the little yellow cup was sitting nicely in the front reservoir ,DOH !!!
  • 1 0
 @scoot34: haha, you win.
  • 1 0
 @HankDamage: it was low hanging fruit
  • 164 1
 Is there a version where they teach you how to do it in the cramped corner of a cold basement with poor lighting, no work stand and a disorganized pile of tools that only kinda sorta resemble the ones you’re supposed to be using?
  • 16 0
 The pain is all too real
  • 12 0
 I'm going to wait for the episode in a huge garage that is 120°F and so full of ancient junk that there's only a 2' cubic space to work in, but yeah no lights and only Grandpa's plumbing tools.
  • 7 3
 Gopnik style service is the sht. Especially at 10:30 pm because kids didn’t want to fall asleep earlier.

My “workshop” is at the attic above neighbors apartments. No insulation, just a 10” thick concrete slab. So every time I drop an allen key or fall over muc off degreaser can I need prepare myself to face a pissed off neighbor…
  • 12 0
 Don't be a sissy and do it living room or on a kitchen desk just like the rest of us. It only helps you to make better relationship with your wife
  • 10 0
 @bok-CZ: "kitchen desk" is all you gotta say. Folks, we have a champion.
  • 1 0
 How about in the kitchen of a converted school bus. Or on a blue towel lined picnic table of a campground.
  • 1 0
 Switch basement with wintertime garage and no space heater!
  • 48 0
 Not one empty beer can on the shop bench. Impressive! This looks like a 3 beer kind of job.
  • 9 0
 It was a 3-beer job the first time I did it, now it's a 1-beer job Smile
  • 32 0
 @dolface: Sounds like you're doing it wrong.
  • 7 1
 @dolface: So 1 beer for the job, 2 to celebrate now?
  • 3 0
 @aaronjb: Exactly!
  • 2 0
 @dolface: Kind of like pool or darts, there's probably a distinct optimum beer intake that balances loosening you up to where you don't overthink but you're not too sloppy yet. I'm guessing somewhere around 1.5 beers or so...
  • 1 0
 @g-42: Exactly! In my field we call it the "Ballmer peak", reference is here www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vhh_GeBPOhs (It's not a rickroll, I promise).
  • 49 0
 Anyone else here remember Tech Tuesdays?
  • 38 2
 Sounds familiar but I'm not sure...
  • 68 3
 Back when it was still Pinkbike
  • 4 0
 @mikelevy: Could Pinkbike bring it back?
  • 9 0
 Sounds un-optimized for today's media landscape...
  • 10 2
 @Koz1985: Zero chance, Tina's is way better Smile
  • 1 0
 @mammal: That's hot.
  • 30 3
 Good content, but hardly "original". Original would be a Friday fails version....

1. Make staff service things without giving them instructions, access to the internet or proper tools.
2. Do it in a PB academy format over several weeks with service followed by a race.
3. Have a set list of tools mostly from Lowes, with only very basic bike specific stuff that any hack would have like spoke wrench and cassette removal tool.
4. Have all the correct parts for the job but just dump them in a parts bin with a bunch of other parts
5. Have a link to the actual needed service video when you free lease each series.
6. Get the park tool guys to be guest judges and voice over the videos.

List of challenges:

1. Fix the taco with a broken spoke or 2
2. Service shock and fork
3. Change bottom bracket and cranks
4. Internal routed brake cable change, bleed and rotor size change
5. Change full drivetrain fron Sram to shimano ( or sh to Sr)
...
  • 19 0
 6. Fit tubeless DH tyres with inserts, only allowed low quality spoons and your own knackered thumbs.
  • 9 0
 @L0rdTom: 10mins before your race run start time.
  • 3 0
 @L0rdTom: like so many things in life, its a lot easier with a bolus of KY jelly
  • 1 0
 @dirtyburger: that's just cruel
  • 20 3
 Tip #1 for this job is do not remove the fork from the bike. It doubles the job time and doesn't make the lower leg service any easier.

Flip the bike over, tap the bolts loose. Flip it back upright, drain the oil.

I'm sure they always do it for the videos because it looks so much tidier.
  • 7 8
 It's a lot safer and cleaner to remove it. It doesn't add THAT much more time to do the job properly and will prevent you from ending up with debris in the bath oil or bent rods if you drop the bike.

Most forks are at least $600-700. Is it really worth not spending the extra 15min to do it properly?
  • 14 0
 @shinook: After doing this job countless times, I'd say no, it's not. No problem with leaving the fork attached. Debris in the fork and bent rods is not going to be caused by doing this.

However, do unbolt the brake caliper and attach behind the saddle or somewhere that fork oil has no chance of reaching.
  • 19 3
 However, removing the fork to do the lower service is a convenient time and a reminder to grease the headset bearing.
  • 5 0
 @shinook: By all means, if you've got the time do it the way you feel comfortable with. I like the idea of greasing the headset to make it worthwhile.

With the fork attached I drape the bike over a repair stand when draining the fork oil, and lay down cardboard when the flipping bike over to protect the levers from scratching.
  • 13 3
 Wrong. You are wasting too much time by removing the wheel from the fork and turning the bike upside down. Just loose the lower bolts, drain the oil, throw new oil somehow, put back the bolts, call your mum to clean the mess, ready to go. Follow me 4 mor tips
  • 6 0
 @ShawMac: True, and usually removing the fork and cleaning the headset takes more time than the lowers service itself. But the bike likes it.
  • 4 0
 @ViolaVesperlin: I also find it important to protect the levers from getting scratched, so the paint is fresh for when I flip the bike over in a gravel car park to put the front wheel in, or when doing trailside repairs.
  • 1 5
flag shinook (Jan 25, 2022 at 6:31) (Below Threshold)
 @mobiller: After doing this countless times both ways, I'd say: yes it is.

You may not bend a rod once, but it is awkward flipping your bike upside down and right side up several times. It only takes once for it to slip out of your hands and land on the damper or spring rods, then you need a lot more work. The rods are sensitive and even knocking it over while sat upside down can damage them, is it really worth that risk over, what, 15 minutes or less?

As for debris, unless you are cleaning your entire bike prior to working on it, then it will most likely get something in there eventually. If you clean it, then it is less likely.

You do you, but not removing it has objective risks. It is not that complicated to do so and if you are not capable of removing the fork from the bike to work on it, then you shouldn't be messing with suspension in the first place.
  • 21 3
 "Fork Lowers Service", I thought this sounded like a supply chain issue, stupid fork with holding service from me, screw you fork!
  • 12 1
 That'll be the error message you get on flight attendant equipped forks if you stop paying the monthly subscription.
  • 20 1
 A non-open oilbath Marzocchi is a sad Marzocchi. Frown
  • 10 0
 Your shop floor however is very happy it's no longer an open bath...
  • 1 3
 No! Kill it and it’s fire!
  • 1 3
 Kill it with fire ‍♂️
  • 3 0
 @m47h13u: pro tipp: don't drop open bath fork when already opened. Oil stains on walls and ceiling make wifey unhappy. A 888 holds quite a lot of oil. Been there, done that.
  • 15 1
 Special damper removal tools and a seal press but a wrench to pull out the seals. Someone at Park Tools has really dropped the ball! They could have a $45, blue handled tool that doubles as a nose ring remover than everyone would just trip all over themselves for.
  • 7 0
 You mean park tool part RTR-H1pster
  • 3 0
 @tprojosh: straight razor in the handle for mid work facial hair emergencies. And I hear 20w can be used as beard oil.
  • 18 0
 @mikelevy, how big of an angle grinder should I buy for this job?
  • 3 0
 Yes!
  • 12 0
 Stoked for this. Hearing Levy and Kaz talking repeatedly recommending doing a lowers service in the podcast got me as far as ordering the parts, but I keep not actually doing the work. I've always done all the wrenching on my bikes, but I definitely have a fear about wrecking my suspension, so have shied away from that.
  • 61 0
 lowers are super easy; you've already accomplished the hardest step if you were able to find, order and receive replacement parts!
  • 4 0
 It appears intimidating from the outside, but ends up. being pretty easy. Same goes for the rear shock. A few more seals and bits of plastic to replace, but most air shocks are pretty easy.
  • 3 0
 Nice side effect: You will also learn how to increase or decrease the travel on pretty much any air fork. The required parts are cheap (sometimes only spacers) compared to buying a new fork.
  • 3 0
 Do those lowers ASAP. I found out the hard way what lack of service does to a fork.
  • 1 0
 @plyawn: can’t agree more Smile
  • 3 0
 Very intimidating at first, just like that gap or drop you feared to do, but when you actually do it, you will laugh at how simple that is. No loose parts, just messy. Unthreading the shifter lever out of curiosity and having all the bits spill on the ground is far scarier.
  • 1 1
 @adam102: Basic lower fork service is easy. Only failure I once had was that I overtightened a hollow bolt at the bottom and snapped. Was pretty annoying trying to get the remains off the rebound damper unit. Just surprised to hear about how often she does it. She says it is recommended once every 125 riding hours then claims that she only does it once a year. So that's only ten riding hours a month. For her job she probably rides multiple different bikes but otherwise you'll find yourself perform the service more often. I think I do it about three times a year though I don't remove dust wipers and I don't have a foam ring (as my current fork takes grease in the lowers instead of oil).
  • 11 0
 Henry should pair up with Christina to do Budget Baller 2.0 - the home mechanic edition. While Tina gets to use all the nice Park Tools and Fox stuff, Henry only gets to use Mike Bears.
  • 2 1
 Like a regular home mechanic you mean, right?
  • 3 0
 Henry gets whatever Allen keys and spanners come with a standard double IKEA bedframe and mattress.
  • 13 0
 Up next: How to swap your reverb.
  • 24 1
 I would die if it was a 7 second video showing someone throwing it into a garbage bin and clicking "buy" on one of the many reliable posts that are available
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: Waki had a video on his Insta a while back on how to service a reverb by putting it directly in the bin
@calmWAKI Prove you're actually Waki and give us a link to that video
  • 2 0
 @vtracer: that was in my story, I’d have to upload it here. It was at my shitty dark attic if it helps.
  • 13 2
 is lower leg service a running gag video that's come back every 3 months, everywhere ???
  • 6 0
 Would like to know why official Fox "how to video" and Miss Christinas tutorial say to pre-pump airspring to 60 lbs. before putting the lowers back on, whilst most other how to"s don't, and my LBS mechanic tell me it's not necessary.
  • 8 1
 Its only to ensure that the air spring sticks all the way out during assembly. Manually pulling the air spring to full extension does the same
  • 2 0
 @vtracer: Then why do you need 60lbs. specifacally?
  • 5 0
 @tadabing: it could be as simple as that's the number they picked so people wouldn't email them asking for a specific number. Give people a range or saying something like "just pump it up enough to fully extend the air spring" leads to people stopping and asking questions while also adding doubt into their minds. On the other hand give them a specific number and they'll become more likely to not skip that step, and the people that want to know "why 60psi?" are not only much less likely to call or email, but also much fewer in number.
  • 1 0
 I never remove the air in the first place. It's independent of the damping unless you have open bath.
  • 3 0
 @iamamodel: knocking the shaft free from the lowers requires more force with full air pressure
  • 2 0
 @emptybe-er: That makes sense. I'm due to service lowers this weekend, so I'll feel the difference in the air side to the damping side (SIDs). Ta.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: The drawback for me is always forgetting to re-inflate before adding oil and reattaching the footnut. Every time.
So if I’m not servicing the air piston and just the seals/lowers I only burp the air chamber rather than letting all the air out, then forgetting works great.
  • 7 1
 One common misconception regarding the crush washer that was part of the video is that a used crush washer can cause a leak. This is false, the crush washer is not a seal. It's job is to protect the lowers from the bolt. The actual seal is the mechanical interface when the shaft wedges into the lowers.
  • 8 0
 I need a 10mm socket to do the job??????

Welp. I'm out. Ain't nobody can find that POS.
  • 4 0
 Christine, this was an awesome video and thanks for that. I just took my fork into my LBS for a service and then got recommended for bearing replacement as well - of $470.00. I think I need to do this stuff myself as I cannot afford taking anything to my LBS anymore. Can you do a dropper post service video please. Thanks
  • 4 0
 Most droppers are easy — unscrew the seal collar, cycle the dropper a few times until the bushings and stuff slide out, squirt a load of fresh grease in there, then lower the post halfway and screw the seal collar back on. A full strip down and clean is a more involved procedure.
  • 1 0
 That pricing seems unnecessarily harsh...were they replacing ALL bearings (linkage, bb, headset, hub)? Depending on your set up some bearing parts themselves are a little pricy but that seems high, even if it's full fork service w/damper.
  • 1 0
 @iammarkstewart: Nope. Just the rear linkage bearings. This was for a transition patrol. They have become outrageously expensive to support and I will use my other LBS in Lynn Valley for all future work. I just thought I'd give them another go due to COVID hardship but I am being the one screwed over...again. Twice now so no more business from me to them.

Fork was just a 2017 Rockshox Pike (200 hour service)
  • 1 0
 @disruptiveone: Meant to reply to this but life happens. Your Patrol is a little Giant-esque with the linkage set up, so 8 bearings I think. And a full 200 hour on a fork is more labour. I revise my statement a little now that I know what you had done. Compared to shops in my area and what we do, your invoice may not be that far off depending on the cost of the parts and seal kits (I assume they replaced everything).

It's a fact that you pay for time and/or convenience. Saving that costs you yours.
  • 11 6
 There's my one regret with having Fox suspension now. I'm going to need custom tools to do a job I could easily do on a Rock Shox fork with my everyday toolbox...
  • 17 2
 You don't need custom tools to do a fox lowers service. Half-thread the nuts and use your socket to tap on them. All you need are standard sockets, a mallet, and hex wrenches IIRC. And if you're installing new seals (which you don't need to do every time), a certain diameter of PVC fitting/pipe fits the seals' outer diameter perfectly. I don't remember the diameter but I had it in my garage.
  • 17 1
 The one that gets me is the foam rings. RockShox bag of 20 for $20. Fox is $30 for 2 foam rings in a kit.
  • 4 5
 @mobiller: you can get generic bulk foam rings online that fit any diameter fox fork
  • 2 0
 @rickybobby18: The seal press is a $20 piece of plastic but (like so make bike tools) makes an otherwise maddening job a non-event. See also: removing a headset, pressing in/removing bearings, installing a fork race, etc.
  • 6 0
 @plyawn: the right diameter PVC coupling also makes it a non-event, costs below a dollar probably, and is at your local hardware store. The pipe trick isn't a crappy hack - it works 100% perfectly.
  • 2 5
 @mobiller: and how much are rockshox seals? Probably just a couple few bucks (cost of a couple foam rings) less than the fox kit with seals and washers and rings.

Good job comparing apple to oranges, though.
  • 7 0
 @mobiller: i wonder if zeb foam rings fit in a 38? i've seen people use lyrik foam rings for a 36 with no issues.
  • 4 0
 @rickybobby18: I ain't risking those super soft alloy nuts anymore. It works super well on Rock Shox forks but the Fox nuts are made of jello and will die even with the right socket (ask me how I know)...
  • 3 0
 @m47h13u: seriously just did this last week. Luckily my LBS had a replacement they were willing to sell me.
  • 4 0
 @whiteranger3: That's a good point. If it fits nice workaround on the Fox foam ring price gouging.
  • 4 0
 @m47h13u: bummer. I've done it many times (tapping with a rubber mallet on the bottom of the socket with the socket in place on the nut) on may forks over a decade or so no issues. But now that you said that I'm sure the next time I'll destroy a nut haha
  • 8 0
 @whiteranger3: I am running zeb foam rings in my 38 w/o issue, go for it.
  • 1 0
 @mtbforlife4: awesome, thanks!
  • 1 0
 @m47h13u:
Unscrew them all the way and use a steel bolt with the same thread for the tapping. Still Wat cheaper than the stupidly expensive Fox tool
  • 2 0
 @Der-Kaiser: do you happen to know the thread tappings? or where we could find them?
  • 2 0
 @whiteranger3: It's an M8 x 1 mm pitch on the spring side and a modified M10 x 1 pitch on the damper side. I think you'll struggle to find something with an internal thread to suit (that's any better than the nut that you've just taken off) for either to be honest.
  • 1 0
 @bighitter: gotcha, thanks! i have some 3d printed pieces to go over the bolts when whacking with the mallet, hopefully those won't mar up the bolts too much.
  • 1 0
 @whiteranger3: no worries. If you're going down that route I'd try get some old fox nuts, the M10 side is approx .15 mm oversized if I remember correctly. In theory a nut that's been made with the thread major ID to top limit may fit but it's a bit of a gamble.
  • 1 0
 @whiteranger3: sorry, just realised I misunderstood what you meant. Ignore my rambles.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: where do you get generic foam seals? Thx
  • 2 0
 you can also buy FOX knock-offs on eBay from Poland for 2,5 times of the price. Quality is good... maybe even better than FOX. Gives me extra peace of mind as those aluminum nuts are very weak to me hammering on them with hard socket
  • 1 0
 @valrock: yea, definitely worth it for the peace of mind. I actually make and sell some of the aftermarket ones over here in the UK. I've spoken to quite a few customers who have only bought them after damaging the threads!
  • 1 0
 If you have a nice set of big sockets you can almost always find one that fits over the seals. Or any pipe. For example, an old ISIS BB tool fits perfectly over the 32mm seals. Probably irrelevant these days, but there you go. And I only change seals if there is a leak.
  • 1 0
 @bighitter: yeah I got mine BEFORE my first service... knowing how easy it is to screw up, there are a few tools that just worth getting
  • 3 0
 @christinachapetta & PB fans: Realizing ya can google mosta this type of videos and bookmark / save anything, but does PB have a set of quick-links to in-house vids like this on servicing bikes? Seems like that could be a badass series / setup / quick way to get to PB-made vids. Just thinking out loud… maybe its just as fast to run a search on the site, but seems like if there was a main homepage link to a page where this is all organized by topic, that would rule.
  • 3 0
 @Mtn-Goat-13 I open these on youtube and then click "save" then "add to playlist" and use playlists as a folder for similar videos.
  • 1 0
 @mtbthe603: Word... prob makes more sense that PB trying to set up a quick-link setup.
  • 1 0
 There’s a playlist of tech tips on the YouTube channel, but I don’t remember how complete it is in terms of topics
  • 2 0
 You could also "favourite" vids here and at least they'll be in one place in your profile, if you don't want to go the YouTube route.
  • 2 0
 @iammarkstewart: Word, seems easiest really. I prefer to just be on PB vs. youtube anyway. PB = core. U-tube = a sea of conspiracy nuts, parents, and never-ending everything else.
  • 6 0
 I’ve never had a issue under torquing a bolt or nut, over torquing is really my go to.
  • 3 0
 She has the benefit of a Pro garage. If you are doing this at home use a socket on the nut you removed from the foot with the nut several turns loose, and engaging several threads. Tap the socket with a hammer/mallet. Same as the fancy tools she used. Like she said, for the wipers you really only need to replace them if they are weeping oil onto the stanchions. Source some new foam rings (or clean the old ones) and crush washers before you do the service. That plus fresh oil is really the key element to this service. Don't be skeered. This is a simple job that done often will save your fork from needing serious work down the line.
  • 1 0
 "Fork Lowers Service At Home" this does not represent most home workshops,
it should represent the reality of how most really do it, and thats without the
costly tools such a seal press, lower leg tap thingimy amongst others, no fancy stand,
its on the floor or the bench, if anything it can be fine bloody art to do with out the proper tools.

Wash out with thinners and re use the foam rings, seals, reverse or extra tighten the crush washers : )
  • 4 0
 She also appears to be sober.
  • 2 0
 Suggestion for next video: running brake lines internally and reconnecting them. The next week can be the bleed. And while we’re on the subject of brakes, maybe something about how to fix noisy stoppers.
  • 1 0
 Every rider should learn to do a lowers service. Tools/parts required are at a minimum and it's super easy and quick to do. Either follow a video or ask another rider friend for help. Honestly paying a shop to do this for you is a waste of money.
It's one of the first things I learned to do along side brake bleeding. I haven't given any of my bikes over to a bike shop in years now. Learning to do things yourself is a useful things, plus you have full control and only yourself to blame if something goes wrong when out riding.
  • 1 0
 BTW for those who still uses socket and doesn't want to buy FOX tools... there is dude from Poland who sells FOX knock offs about 2,5 times cheaper... they are same maybe even better quality www.ebay.ca/usr/bitulpl?_trksid=p2047675.m3561.l2559
  • 7 4
 Men...you see your wife walk through the house with eye protection and her Home Goods tool bag wyd?
  • 5 1
 askin her if she needs any help.
  • 25 1
 Gonna get your lowers done
  • 3 3
 @Elikk: so to speak...
  • 15 0
 The thing you told her you were gonna do 3 months ago.
  • 2 0
 Sometimes riding the bike isn't everyone's most favorite part of this sport. Also why pay a mechanic to do a job that you're skilled and equipped to do?
  • 2 0
 I do this in my living room, sitting on my couch, while watching TV, it´s not that difficult...
Ok, for sure I´m single... :/
  • 2 0
 To remove those dust wiper seals, use a smaller size ring spanner to pop 'm out, and avoid scratching with an open end spannen altogether.
  • 2 0
 Or a moto tire lever, spoon type. No chance of scratching and plenty of leverage.
  • 4 2
 Does anyone know if on new 38 forks you could just dump the old oil through bleeding ports (removed) and injecting new?
  • 3 1
 you'd miss cleaning it out and lubing the seals but it kinda sounds like you're onto something
  • 4 1
 This video gives me anxiety. I'm such a coward.
  • 3 0
 Try an air shock first. They are easier and will give you the confidence to do a fork.
  • 1 1
 @iamamodel: This is helpful. Buying a house soon so when the work bench is set up I'll probably try and do a service.

On my enduro I've got all rockshox so stoked to get my hands dirty.
  • 1 0
 Good luck finding the wiper seal kits right now. Any parts are very difficult to get. Before the pandemic, no problem getting parts. Not good.
  • 3 0
 9 times out of ten you don't need any spare parts, just new oil.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: But if I do a service, I want to replace with the SRAM OEM SKF ultra frictionless seals. Sold out everywhere.
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: Oh, I see. I just thought you wouldn't service it because there are no parts (the video makes it seem you need parts, which isn't true).
  • 2 0
 @iamamodel: My want for SKF seals is a need. Lol.
  • 2 0
 It amazes me how many people don't frequently do their own lower servicing. Hopefully this fixes some of those folks.
  • 1 0
 Would love to see more of this ... perhaps akin to Henry Quinney's one shot real time service guides he did during his tenure at GMBN
  • 1 0
 Henrys one shot real time services on gmbn/yt are about the best and most enjoyable clips out there.
  • 2 0
 Secret tip: if you have a tire lever, it is much better tool for seals removing than a wrench, it can safe lot of money too
  • 2 0
 remember "no reefin on the bushings guys"
  • 2 0
 DVO Lowers service is even easier.
  • 1 0
 Could have used this video about 15 years ago. Thankfully I had a bike shop to teach me.
  • 2 1
 Those videos from 15 years ago were useless, no doubt. Never mind written instructions. With letters and such, like those you wrote yourself.
  • 1 0
 It's not rocket science.... OMG If I had a dollar every time I hear that!
  • 1 0
 Thank god for Go-Ride SLC! There are a few things I just don't do on my bikes....
  • 1 0
 No rash on the edge of the magnesium fork when wrenching the seal out!!! Madness
  • 1 0
 As an Italian, when I saw the jar that said "bocconcini" I started to feel bad
  • 1 1
 pushing aside all the comments from the Sarcasm-Pandas in the room.... great video
  • 1 0
 What did pandas ever do to you? Frown
  • 1 0
 Actually did this earlier.
  • 1 0
 Hmmm...I just go to my LBS for such shenanigans!!
  • 1 0
 Somehow I lost my 10mm socket in my fork lowers
  • 1 1
 We love you Christina, you can do everything
  • 3 5
 These videos are going the way of Hollywood. Just switch roles from male to female and voila! New content.
  • 1 2
 Moving on to a mechanic now eh?
  • 1 2
 This is really well done!
  • 1 2
 Great video Christina
  • 1 3
 Wish it was a RockShox or Fox. Nice vid though.
  • 5 0
 It is a Fox. Don't believe me, look it up.
  • 1 3
 missed opportunity to call it Tine (wrench) Turner
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