Video: How Long Should a Wheel Last? | Pinkbike Weekly Show Ep. 15

Feb 20, 2024 at 16:37
by Pinkbike Originals  

This week on the Pinkbike Weekly Show, Mike Kazimer joins Christina and Henry as they catch you up on the latest First Ride's with a bit of insight. They jump straight into Recreational Wrecks, 2 Min of Tech with Kazimer and his latest First Ride experience, the latest Pinkbike Podcast episode with Aaron Gwin as the guest, and round it off with some Friday Fails Breakdowns.

00:00 - Intro
02:49 - Recreational Wrecks
04:39 - 2 Minutes of Tech
07:25 - Aaron Gwin Podcast Recap
08:12 - Friday Fails Breakdown

Let us know what your next dream bike will be... a solid do-everything rig or a superbike that also does it all, but with some assistance on the up's, or something else!

What is a REASONABLE lifespan for an aluminum wheel?









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Member since Feb 15, 2012
1,097 articles

141 Comments
  • 74 0
 I'd never be happy with a rim breaking because of regular use (so fatigue-based). If I case a jump or slam into a rock, ok sure, but just breaking because of normal riding? No way
  • 12 6
 Blew out 5 spokes on some brand new i9's first ride.
  • 33 0
 ^exactly. The lifetime of a wheel should be defined by rider choices and mistakes, not by how long you rode it.
  • 8 1
 @ShredDoggg: But marketing for some reason always proyect them as really good.

i havent tested them but can tell you DT swiss actually is durable from the few thats ive had.
  • 9 11
 @ShredDoggg: My $307 Chinese carbon Elitewheels with Bitex hubs are going strong after plenty of abuse on a short travel bike.
  • 13 4
 Wheel fatigue isn't a thing, but spoke fatigue is. For me trail bike wheels that haven't died from catastrophic failure, seem to get to about 3rd year and spokes just start snapping. Once 3 or 4 have been replaced, they start to snap more and more regularly and it's time for a full renewal. By which time the rim is also usually fairly peppered with dints too
  • 4 0
 @mkul7r4: same with my lightbike wheels from back in the day
  • 19 2
 This is the first time I have been blown away by a hot take from PB. Replacing a rim a year because it is aluminum is crazy, as a general statement. Maybe if your in the PNW but most of the US is not like that. And if this was the case MTB would be more unaffordable for more people.
  • 6 18
flag TannerValhouli (Feb 21, 2024 at 11:21) (Below Threshold)
 @Bike-JAM-AMA: cope/ride harder
  • 11 0
 Define "normal" riding - a season in Whistler (3 months) even if you grease every landing is going to do more damage than "normal" MTB riding in Iowa over 10 years.

Alum will fatigue eventually - it's the nature of the material, how long, fast and catostrophic is highly dependent on use case.
  • 18 0
 @ShredDoggg: i have had and known a lot of folks to have horrible experience with any sort of 'system' wheels.

hand-built with solid and boring traditoinal parts is always way cheaper and more reliable. j bend forever.
  • 8 1
 I think it’s very terrain/rider/rider goals based but if I don’t go through a wheel set every 1-3yrs I would feel very disappointed in my efforts.
  • 3 0
 @Bike-JAM-AMA: yeah, it felt like this take was rooted in the specifics of their situation and shouldnt apply to most riders. The PB folks are all riding PNW trails and perhaps a lot more importantly are riding 6-7 times a week. I wouldnt be surprised to find out they are riding 10 times as much as me (and most definitely riding harder) so their expected lifetime of a part will be drastically different
  • 4 0
 Does adding a third flatspot in a rim and junking it once spoke tensions no longer have a hope of being close to even count as normal regular use?
  • 6 0
 @mkul7r4: Had the opposite experience, chinese carbon rims developed cracks at the nipple that caused me to replace them (luckily no catestrophic failure). There are good and bad ones but it's a risk.

Been on DT Swiss aluminum (511 or 471) and they are bullet proof.
  • 1 0
 @blueninja: for what's its worth that could happen on a fancy NA built carbon rim as well, could just be luck of the draw
  • 2 0
 @totaltoads This. Just makes sense and keeps us connected to biking's simplistic roots. I just want some quality hubs that don't have any hokey "here today, gone tomorrow" driver or pawl technology laced to some light enough but burly enough rims with quality spokes by a competent builder.
  • 2 0
 @ShredDoggg: thats because it was built poorly. Sorry that has nothing to do the rim.
  • 1 0
 @Bike-JAM-AMA: New England is like that for those of us that ride frequently. It’s how people end up with more than one bike or a lot of spare parts.
  • 2 0
 @Ignaciosc22: I bought a used 29" Enduro s 1/1 after blowing out a dt 350 and a Shimano hub in the same season. The i9 has been awesome.
  • 4 0
 @IllestT: "Wheel fatigue isn't a thing, but spoke fatigue is."

The fatigue behaviour of aluminium and its alloys is a lot worse than steel. The spokes might see more severe load variation but you can't have one without the other.

I had a wheel recently develop cracks from almost half of the spoke holes. It was presumably assembled incorrectly and was replaced under warranty, but that's still fatigue.
  • 1 0
 @ShredDoggg: what i9 wheels? Not the system for sure
  • 1 0
 @totaltoads: same here, I had horrible experience with system wheels (Easton, Mavic) to the point I banned them from my bikes forever, went for Hope hubs, traditional J-bent Sapim spokes, and alloy rims (Stan, Alexrims). Never looked back. I am also building my own wheels now, and fixed some friends's wheels that had broken wheels. Not a big deal once you did one, but you need a full day (I count 7 hours) to build a pair.
  • 1 0
 @totaltoads: comparing any "system"wheel with the i9 is like comparing every bike because they have a frame and 2 wheels
  • 1 0
 @jimmyricard: how did you manage to do that. The actual HUB itself?
thanks for the data
  • 1 0
 Butted spokes (like double butted DT Competition or triple butted DT Alpine III) have better fatigue life than straight gauge spokes because the highest stresses appear in the straight middle section. Maybe I'm looking in the lower end of the market but most of these factory wheels appear to use straight gauge spokes, which seems like a waste of effort to me.

Now I'm wondering whether those riding big wheels damage their rims as often as those riding smaller wheels with a similar rim design. Of course if the "performance" those big wheels bring allows one to "tap into their full potential" as a rider then that's all good of course. I'd rather stick with what keeps me going for cheap. Replacing a rim every year sounds like no joke. Especially if you can no longer get hold of the exact same type and you end up replacing the spokes as well.
  • 55 1
 According to pb comments my wheels have already exploded and I am actually already dead.
  • 6 6
 people at the bike park thing i'm insane becaues i'm not exploding my entire bike every year or two... because i actually maintain it and don't smash into everything... funny how long your parts last if you treat them, and the trails, with respect.
  • 8 5
 I didn’t know liking my I9 wheels would equate me with Hitler, but here we are.
  • 1 0
 Depends on discipline and placing, but if I was in a position to reap more in payouts than destroying the wheel, the wheel is considered a consumable item. If I was mid-pack fodder, then more speed can be had some other place.
  • 31 0
 When you say wheel you mean the ship of theseus innit. Should last forever with the occasional new rim, spokes and hub.
  • 2 1
 I might have one or two original spokes on my rear wheel.
  • 15 2
 I have the same wheels I had when I was 13 years old, they have had 2 new hubs, the occasional new set of spokes and a few rim replacements over the years.
  • 19 0
 @browner: Lol Have you had your 14th birthday yet?
  • 1 0
 @browner: same with Trigger's broom!
  • 6 4
 @browner: Umm, if you've replaced the rims, spokes and hubs those are not the same wheels.
  • 5 1
 @Marquis: that's the joke.
  • 1 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: Yeah, after I posted that I figured out the other post was a joke. Got it now!
  • 1 0
 @Marquis: Be glad no one did whoooooosh. That said, seems like the original rim tape is still going strong as well as the nipples.
  • 30 1
 Some things can't be avoided, but if you're riding well, and not being too stupid, your wheels should last a long time, especially if you're paying a lot for them.
  • 23 0
 Maintaining spoke tension is critical to wheel life. 90% of riders don't pay attention to the the spoke tension until the wheel is already compromised.
  • 31 0
 can confirm i do not pay attention to my spoke tension until my rim is borked
  • 1 11
flag IntoTheEverflow (Feb 21, 2024 at 13:28) (Below Threshold)
 Spoke tension is very important when you build or true a wheel. But as long as a wheel is straight, I don't see a reason to check spoke tension. The chance all your spokes lost tension equally, is very close to zero.
  • 2 0
 Once you have a good flat spot all you can hope for is close enough spoke tension and knowing your wheel will eventually succumb to fatigue/ additional failure as a result of uneven tension
  • 1 0
 @IntoTheEverflow: I’ll disagree. Not saying you have to, but keeping an eye on spoke tension gets ahead of problems. Once a spoke looses tension, it fatigues, and breaks. Keeping spokes at high tension and a little bit of oil on the nipples makes wheels last a lot longer
  • 1 3
 @Lunk57: The moment one spoke loses tension, you will see a wobble appear in your wheel.
In a straight wheel you won't find the tension to be off, unless the tension was off since the wheel was built (or trued).
  • 1 0
 This is the correct answer. Learn the noise your spokes make when there at the right tension and give them a little squeeze once in a while. They will last until you smoke them into the mini K2 rock
  • 3 0
 @IntoTheEverflow: not all rims start out perfectly planar, so they might need slightly uneven tension to run straight. Additionally, the stiffness and circularity at the joint is never the same as the rest, so if you want the wheel to be really round, tension will be uneven.
Much more noticeable, once you bend a rim sideways ( taco) tension has to beade very uneven to straighten it, leaving spokes on one side noticeably tighter than the other. Next time you land sideways on the side with no support from loose spokes it all goes bad. That's why when you bend a rim, it's better to not straighten the wheel, but just re-tension evenly, giving more even strength and less spoke fatigue ( loose spokes bend a little all the time and work harden until the break)
  • 1 2
 @uponcripplecreek: That is all true, but that does not mean what I said was wrong.
  • 1 0
 @IntoTheEverflow: not true, especially with carbon rims which are incredibly stiff, and can remain relatively true even with widely variable spoke tensions. Aluminum rims are more included to go out of true with drop in tension, but aluminum rims sometimes need variable spoke tension especially on the non drive side to be true in the first place. Especially earlier Stans rims which were absolute crap. I’m a custom wheel builder and I’ve built hundreds of wheels and repaired hundreds more. I’m often surprised to see how bad spoke tension can be and the wheels still seems ok from a riding perspective. Like I said, I don’t think most people loose sleep over spoke tension but if you want to maximize wheel life, it’s a great place to start.
  • 1 1
 @Lunk57: Good point on carbon rims, I have no experience with those.

And yes if spoke tension is off when the wheel was built (or trued), then it will be off while the wheel is straight.
But you don't need to check the tension regularly, to find out the wheel was badly built.
You will see that the first time you check the tension.
  • 1 0
 @uponcripplecreek: Wheel truing is a compromise between tension and truing tolerance. I shoot for +/- .5mm axial and radial truing. If the wheel is older then sometimes you need to compromise the truing tolerance to get even tension and vice versa.
The main point is that you need to true and check your spoke tension fairly frequently to maintain wheel strength. So many people riding expensive carbon wheels with noodles for spoke tension, completely negating the performance the rim can bring. That is until the wheel starts creaking or snapping spokes. If you buy fancy rims, spend the money on a spoke nipple wrench and park tensiometer.
  • 1 0
 I used to check spoke tension by ear but eventually shelled out for one of these Park Tool spoke tension meters and use it with their app/website. As an amateur I find it easier to set priority and decide which spokes to work on first. It also also allows you to gradually lower the threshold at which point you call it good. I understand the professionals need great tools in order to work efficiently and accurately, us amateurs are much helped by tools like these to take out the guesswork. Plus, you can crank a tune whilst working on your wheels Smile .

Either way, compared to so many other elements of a bike, the tools needed to build and/or true a wheel hasn't changed much. It is a worthy investment that pays for itself.
  • 20 0
 I have a 15 year old son who races DH and my answer is please please please make it the whole weekend, I can't afford another wheel.
  • 4 19
flag totaltoads (Feb 21, 2024 at 11:36) (Below Threshold)
 invest in some coaching so your son rides with more finesse and less smashing into things. i'm 200lbs and started in XC and had to learn to ride 'light'. i've never had much of an issue with wheels apart from crappy OEM wheelsets. anything handbuilt or aftermarket has been bombproof for me. for several years.
  • 2 0
 Right there with you my son 16 races DH and fortunately has a rim sponsor, We do have to pay for the rebuild labor $100. He goes through 4-5 rear rims 1-2 front a year which ads up.
  • 19 0
 @onespeedbrian: might be time for you to invest in a truing stand and read a little Sheldon Brown
  • 7 3
 Time to let the kid pay for his own stuff if he keeps trashing them.
  • 3 0
 @dwbaillar: Stack of affordable alu rims and wheel building tools/skills are the answer for racing.
  • 15 1
 Forever, and when they are dented and bent beyond repair 10 years after your bought them, make sure you hit up the manufacturer for a warranty replacement.
  • 7 0
 How long should a wheel last? Talking about the front or rear wheel? I guess if built with the proper spoke tension and no major catastrophic damage/corrosion to the rim or any of the spokes, the wheel should last pretty much last a whole lifetime of riding. Now, regarding some of those Friday Fails... Mike Levy
  • 11 1
 Whistler bike park has entered the chat
  • 3 1
 how many folks who ride mtb are riding a full season at whistler or the equivalent? very few.

vast majority are riding in local trails on trailbikes or hardtails.
  • 2 0
 A season of bike park riding and not touching the spoke tension has entered the chat
  • 7 1
 All I know is I can still destroy wheels/tires at will (admittedly requires more stupid riding than in the past) and physically come out unscathed....still the weak link for bikes.
That said I think I want my wheels/tires to fail prior to my body strength/ impact ability??? Honestly not sure.
  • 2 0
 Good point. As far as fuses go, it's not a bad one...
  • 9 0
 DTSwiss FR570, strong as hell.
  • 3 0
 Amazing bikepark wheels even after 10 years, meanwhile the OEM Alexrims i had lasted a season and one only 2 days.
  • 3 0
 In my experience and enduro wheel could last quite long if you check spokes ever second or third ride or after every bikepark day. If not, it can blow up any day. I broke 2 carbon wheels the last 2 years because I didnt check often enough. If you only ride xc without heavy trailuse and mostly gravelroads, it should last forever.
  • 3 0
 Time/longevity is an easy measurement to survey, but everyone rides different amounts annually and in different ways. I've minorly dented some rims (rocks embedded in landers, rrg), but alloy rims have generally lasted me a long time. But, I ride with plenty of mechanical sympathy and like to run an insert in the rear (Rimpact).

Reasonable tire pressure, monitoring wheel tension (tension > wheel true, according to DT Swiss), and keeping mileage in mind is important. Aluminum will fatigue no matter what. Heavier and harder riding will greatly reduce life.
  • 3 0
 Aluminum rim or "wheel"? My hubs are alum...but when looking at a "Wheel" as a whole, assuming alum rim, they wear out, spokes wear out, rims get dented/cracked/fatigued, hubs can get worn out, depending on what hub, sometimes they are rebuildable sometimes they are trash. It really depends on riding frequency and type...3 months riding full time in Whistler = 25 years of casual MTBing.
  • 5 0
 Correct answer: Wheel life completely depends on type of bike, rider, riding style and terrain.
  • 3 0
 About 1739 rides. What a strange question, this one is subjective for not only how the rider is riding but also where they ride, and whether or not they run tire inserts and also how precisely dialed are their PSI numbers?
  • 4 0
 I wonder how much heavier an aluminum rim could be made, to make it properly durable. I find it rewarding to take the chunkiest lines.
  • 2 0
 Around 850g, it's called a halo sas rim. The 48 spoke rear sas wheel I had 16 years ago weighed as much as the entire ebike rated wheel set I'm currently using. It died from spoke failure, they were cheap spokes that rusted after the paint rubbed off at the cross overs.
  • 1 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: Interesting, I'm currently having built an Odyssey 36 hole rim for my dirt jump bike
  • 2 0
 That last fail clip looked like Bootleg trails. Last time Interbike was there I discovered the power line trail. He got bucked a little too much on the last compression, slowing down the rear shock rebound a tad helps with this type of freeriding
  • 2 0
 1 year for an aluminum rim? I had my Stans Flow wheels for 10 years and never had a problem (26" on my 2011 SJ evo). I had my aluminum rim on my 2021 SJ evo get banged up in the first two years, but I got it replaced through warranty. I think the insert helped with protecting the wheel.
  • 1 0
 13 years on Stan’s flow rims laced up zero dish single speed. Colorado Trail race twice and probably around 12-20000 miles on them most not very easy ones. They just moved onto their third frame.
  • 3 0
 while not a full wheel, I have a Hadley front hub that I purchased in 2002 that is still in use. it's been laced into probably 4 or 5 different wheels now, still going strong.
  • 3 0
 I weigh 125lbs and as a result my wheels are only ever damaged from not checking my pressure before hitting the bike park. Usually not a problem for me, but then once in a while it is...
  • 3 1
 These options are ridiculous! A week? A day?! Seriously? I hate to say it, because generally I respect their opinions and reviews a lot, but I think this just shows a certain disconnect of (some) tech editors from the general mountain bike population. I am happy that all my wheelsets have lasted me at least 3 years and counting and I don’t need to break rims constantly in order to prove myself that I am a shredder. Also this may be influenced by a recent trend of running super low air pressures. If I ran 20 psi or less in my tires without inserts then yes no problem I would be cracking rims every year or so too.
  • 2 0
 Here's some perspective for you. In a DH race scenario, especially amateur or semi-pro levels, it is absolutely common to dent or crack an aluminum rim in one race run at race pressures (22-25psi) and with inserts. This happened literally 1st practice run for my DH athlete last year at I think mountain creek? It is the nature of the beast, especially somewhere like windrock or any of the east coast nationals.
However, that same rider on the same course might not dent a rim over the whole weekend if they're chilling way off the race pace.
My Enduro rider's wheel that I built in the spring last year has lasted the whole CDC season (Multiple podiums) and is still going strong. We use exclusively Ex 511's. It is entirely dependent on how you behave on the bike.
  • 2 0
 I bought my 29" x 35mm wide Derby Rims in November 2013. I ride them as hard as I can. They have many scratches, some are more than surface deep, but they look pretty fine. I did rebuild them due to moving to a new bike with new hub standards. They've outlived every other component on my bike. I don't see any reason why they won't last another 10 years.
  • 2 0
 I think my years of formative MTB'ing on a rigid frame gave me some finesse to navigate a line and not smash through everything. I've only ever replaced an alum rim when the sidewalls started to crack, but those are rim brake days.
  • 5 1
 E thirteen DH wheels, lucky to last a ride without a significant dent or deformation. Made of butter grade aluminum.
  • 3 0
 Can confirm. E13 deserves credit for teaching me what my minimum rear tire pressure should be for all my local trails.
  • 2 0
 I have some original TRS+ 26in rims on my hardtail, I'm pretty sure they're made of Adamantium, they've gone out of true a couple of times, covered in scratches but absolutely refuse to dent or crack. I wonder what changed over the years to leave E13 wheels where they are now.
  • 3 0
 Yea, my experience with them was my almost new wheels lasted 4 days in Morzine. Convinced by a friend it was just the hubs that were terrible I got Chris King hubs (that are still fine a decade later) and laced them up with new E-thirteen rims that split open after a long weekend in Scotland. Hopefully there stuff is better nowadays.
  • 2 0
 E13 Aluminum wheels are absolute crap. Destroyed a rear on my first ride.
  • 1 0
 Apparently they changed what alloy and heat treat process they use on their alloy rims a year or two ago to hopefully lessen that. Their carbon rims are amazing solely because 1. they hold air even when broken so you can just keep running them till the warranty rim shows up, and 2. their lifetime warranty that I intend to severely abuse.
  • 2 1
 It’s a dumb question.

Wheels last as long as they do, better quality rims and hubs last longer, but other than that, there’s no technology that’ll make a wheel longer lasting.

Might as well complain about tires not lasting long enough …
  • 2 0
 tires last plenty long, if you get a durable compound. issue is people want to run soft DH compounds and complain they only last a few months.
  • 6 0
 @totaltoads: tire life is extremely dependent on where you ride. You can rip off all the knobs in one day riding DH at bootleg Canyon, and that same tire could last you all year riding loamers in the PNW
  • 3 2
 once EMTB gets motor combined with gearboxes everyone will go EMTB cos it will be simpler and easier to maintain and use system. only one main bettery to charge and you dont have to worry about 20 problems that current drivetrain have
  • 1 0
 Back when we used rim brakes, and I was racing xc, I’d wear out the brake track of four rims a year. I’d build myself a set of training wheels and a set of race wheels in spring. By the fall or early winter the training wheels would crack, collapse or dent because they were so thin. Then I’d use the race wheels until they suffered the same fate.

Now with carbon wheels I might rebuild with new spokes after quite a few seasons. But I don’t ride as much anymore and ride like the old man that I am.
  • 1 0
 5,000 miles on stans arch's before the rim holes fatigued and cracked (all 28 at onces basically, one more than the others)

Roughly 3500 miles on some carbon rims from a company that no longer exists, roughly 150 miles of which were in whistler

3600 miles on my 24 hole gravel carbon (Synergy branded) front wheel, fatigue and delamination, rear with 28 holes is okay but damaged from potholes

Over 10 ft to flat on my Nextie carbon front bmx rim, still going string despite some bent spokes from that and a bent steerer tube

Carbonfan mtb rims cracked at the nipples, 3000 miles, currently used to install rimpact inserts

Stans flow 26 inch 28 hole, about 1500 miles on my xc bike, currently being used as the spare on my dirtjumper, not dead yet

Stans flow 29 that replaced my arch under warranty i think made it 3500 miles

So I am not really getting any extra life out of carbon except on the bmx bike for which i have ovalized multiple aluminum rims in short order.

I should probably start building my own wheels with washers...
  • 3 0
 Hubs should last 5 years if you do regular maintenance. The rest of the wheel should last until you fuck up.
  • 2 0
 Got a bunch of Mag 30s and Double Tracks that are still a tough as they were new. However, to be fair, I do have a couple that aren’t so good anymore.
  • 2 0
 That's good to hear, I'm trying a Sun Ringle Duroc this year, fingers crossed. I've flat spotted two Spank rears. Haven't tried a DT Swiss yet.
  • 2 0
 Going strong into season 6 on my We Are One Agent 29!! I've refreshed the spokes twice on that time, Hope Pro 4 hubs still running clean!
  • 4 1
 What a pointless question. Makes as much sense as asking what color your birthday is
  • 6 2
 Blue.
  • 1 1
 Exactly. Or favorite color.. Is it that hard to find debatable subjects? How about, “why are bikes heavy, expensive and boring after 2017 or so?”
  • 1 0
 I have a pair of wheels 4 years in with about 3000 miles and haven’t had to touch a single spoke. Made by Colorado cyclist (now customwheelbuilder.com). CK hubs with flow mk3 rims. 32 hole. Heavy trail use
  • 2 0
 I'm still running original hope xc hubs dt swiss rim+spokes for 26 rig must be 20 years old .
  • 4 0
 A decade. Next question.
  • 1 0
 as a hyper lightweight dude with only 60kg (132lbs) and never going to a bike park, my spokes don´t even lose tension over a season Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Front wheel as long as you use, just grease to bearings every 2 years. Rear wheel, I'd be excited if they lasted 2 years.
  • 1 0
 No idea, I only run carbon wheels at this point. Elitewheels are the shit and they're cheap too.
  • 1 0
 How long should a wheel last? Which color is the best color, while you’re at it. Riveting stuff here.
  • 1 0
 I think that wheel is available with eyelet washers. That and a tink of light oil at thread and spoke hole
  • 1 1
 two sets of tires a year... $100 a pop.... thats $400 in tires... the rims and spokes better last 3 years!
  • 1 0
 i buy nice wheels and break about three a year
  • 7 8
 As a professional wheel builder, and someone with a basic understanding of the nature of aluminum and fatigue limits, the poll results are absolutely confounding to me.
  • 9 0
 As an amature comment reader, and an esteemed graduate of youtube university, i must ask - Why?
  • 1 0
 @Bro-LanDog: I think they mean it is silly to expect a wheel to last forever. If you aren't riding it hard i don't see why it wouldn't. That said I have a hard time keeping any wheel together.
  • 1 0
 ok, tell us peasants how long our wheels will last then, oh great wise one.
  • 3 1
 Until it's broken???
  • 1 0
 Cannondale $20,000.00 Canadian.
meh
  • 1 0
 Wanna use my wheel until is breaks.. Simple..
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