Video: Structure Cycleworks’ Carbon Enduro Bike and Linkage Fork - Sea Otter 2019

Apr 11, 2019 at 22:31
by Pinkbike Originals  


Remember that wild looking linkage bike that showed up at Crankworx in 2017? The Structure Cycleworks SCW 1 was a futuristic and unrideable prototype back then, but I did get to take out their rough proof-of-concept rig. That short-travel creation was aluminum, had more hoses than a fire station, and some pretty dated geometry... But it worked really well.

Even so, I wasn't expecting to see a production version of the bike, and certainly not a production version that looks nearly as crazy as that black and blue prototype, yet here is the carbon fiber SCW 1 that will be available this coming summer.

SCW 1 Details

• Intended use: all-mountain / enduro
• Rear wheel travel: 150mm
• Fork travel: 150mm
• Wheel size: 27.5''
• Integrated WTF linkage fork
• Frame material: carbon fiber
• Frame/fork/shock x2 weight: 13.5lb
• MSRP: $5,995 USD (frame, fork, shocks x2)
• More info: www.structure.bike


Sea Otter 2019
The SCW 1 has 150mm of travel at both ends, identical DVO shocks controlling that travel, and it's rolling on 27.5'' wheels. That frame, fork, and two-shock kit goes for $5,995 USD, and Structure will have complete bikes as well.


First, the basics: It's rolling on 27.5'' wheels, has 150mm of travel at both ends controlled by identical DVO Topaz T3 shocks, and it's clearly not even trying to look normal. The frame, integrated linkage fork, and the two shocks will retail for $5,995 USD. That's a big number, of course, but keep in mind that it includes a fork when you're doing the mental math comparisons.

The frame, fork, and two shocks weigh 13.5lb, which is a bit heavier than other high-end combos, but Structure said they wanted to build a "brick shithouse" of a first bike.


Structure Cycleworks
Structure Cycleworks
The bike on the left was an unrideable prototype they had back in 2017, while the aluminum bike on the right was their proof-of-concept.


The Canadian company knows they're up against it when it comes to the bike's polarizing looks that'll surely be an instant turn-off for many riders, but Structure Cycleworks' Loni Hull says they're aiming to convince people with its performance rather than its appearance.

Sure, but what's up with that appearance, though?


Sea Otter 2019
Equal parts praying mantis and mountain bike?


Structure refers to the bike's front-end as WTF (Without Telescoping Fork) and Hull says that while "normal" linkage suspension does do a decent job, integrating the fork with the frame is how to get the most out of the idea. But it's not like high-end telescoping forks suck right now, do they? ''There's only so much we can do to make forks maybe only a little bit better for next year, but it's all incremental improvement from maximum effort,'' Hull told me when said that to him back in 2017. ''We're designing with a clean sheet; we're looking at how to make a bike ride better for a rider. It performs well enough that I feel there will be a market for it with people who want something that's a quantum leap over the best of what's currently available in enduro.''

That leap, Hull said, is possible because the WTF front-end controls the bike's geometry. There's a big anti-dive factor, and the design actually adds trail while lengthening and raking out the front-end by as much as a whopping eight-degrees at full travel. All that should add stability, and stability means more control and more speed.


Sea Otter 2019
Sea Otter 2019
The funny looking nose linkage (left) is only there to transfer steering inputs. It's also carbon fiber, of course.


Structure has carbon'd all the things on the SCW 1, with the fork legs, both headtubes, the main linkage, the nose linkage, both the front and rear triangles, and the rocker arm all being made from the expensive black stuff. The two fork crowns are aluminum, though, as is the mini crown on the underside of the top headtube. That sentence sounds nearly as weird as the bike looks.

If you expected the bike's geometry to be way out there, you're wrong. It's running a 66-degree head angle (don't forget how much it changes), a 435mm rear-end, and the medium gets a roomy 470mm reach number.


Sea Otter 2019
For as wild as the SCW 1 is, the bike's rear suspension is a pretty straightforward Horst Link system that delivers 150mm of travel.



MENTIONS: @pinkbikeoriginals



350 Comments

  • + 166
 Looks like a session... of crazy engineers smoked DMT and designed a bike!!
  • + 6
 I know everyone is thinking about that "forward" facing steering linkage, It is to "prevent" trail debris( including people) from getting sucked/eaten as you go abouts your day. could have been angle backwards but im sure this is mostly "forward thinking"....correct me if im wrong.

PS; If it was about ~$4000 CAD I'd buy one right now !
  • + 27
 They should have partnered with Polygon!!! They we could have had a nailed react to play WTF suspension... Smile
  • + 44
 Pinkbike NEEDS to do a series of field test on these bikes.
  • + 6
 this bike somehow reminds me seat multipla.
  • + 4
 A session with a brand new bunny/mouse trap upfront. Dual purpose hunting dinner while slaying trail...
  • + 4
 Looks ready to kill the first time you crash it
  • + 23
 It looks like one of those nature documentaries where lions have ripped apart a water buffalo and you think its dead, and all off the sudden it stands up and its face is half ripped off and its guts are spilling out on the ground..but it's still alive,just standing there,minutes from death. That's what this looks like.
  • + 1
 Damnit I was gonna make the session full of dmt joke.

Idk ugly as sin but I’d ride it just to see what kinds of crazy reactions it got
  • + 4
 @chyu: I think we would find out they do not hold up to the abuse. I want to see a Huck-2-Flat of this bike and a Lefty Fork.
  • + 1
 @chyu: isn't on of the staff already on a Trust Message?
  • + 1
 @trails801: we want moar.
  • + 0
 It was good stuff. look at the result.
  • + 2
 @viatch: sadly with first releases, meeting that price point is difficult. There were issues with it facing backward. In regards to specifics please feel to drop a line at the structure.bike site
  • + 3
 @chyu: We are working on this exact thing. Timing is everything as we have a busy circuit. we are definitely on top of this. Appreciate your enthusiasm.
  • + 2
 @Danielyk: reminds me or a praying mantis and just as deadly.
  • + 2
 @mkotowski1: you may break, it won't. All joking aside, by the time you are in that position there are more things to worry about
  • + 1
 @scary1: if you place 1st, what is the problem :-) The thing is, this is the lion.
  • + 3
 @core-macneil-rider: where are you located? please reach out at the structure.bike site to arrange your bum and our seat! Looking forward to it.
  • + 2
 @rivercitycycles: I'm gonna say that it is stiffer than any other frame on the market place (there is a reason I am stating this, we beefed it up significantly.
  • + 1
 @Warpedcog: That’s what she said! When are you submitting a sample to PB to be included in the Huck-2-Flat test?
  • + 1
 Its nothing new, Amp, Whyte, BMW. They all did it. But this excits me as to have the balls to do something like this when bikes are so dialed these days, is to say it must be pretty damned impressive.
My only concern? When I had a forced marriage with a tree a few days ago at speed, other than a huge bruise and a hole in the tree from some XT lever wedding night penetration, all was good. Would not have been so on this I suspect. That front link is mighty vulnerable.
  • + 1
 @Danielyk: Fiat Multipla? ;-)
  • + 3
 @stiingya: This thing makes the Trust linkage fork look normal.
  • + 1
 @scary1: You sir, get an upvote.
  • + 1
 Don’t judge a book by its cover ;P or so they say. @Warpedcog:
  • + 2
 Personally I think the prototype looks the best
  • + 2
 @Warpedcog: you’d be surprised, I grew up riding street bmx and though I have no way to prove, I can break some shit
  • + 2
 @chyu: I agree.....in depth expose on all aspects. This could be the biggest advance in bikes since the advent of the multi-link rear suspension.
  • + 82
 3 thoughts- Definitely ugly, but I would love to try it out. Out of my price range so whatever. I'm happy people are challenging the norm.
  • + 11
 Couldn´t agree more. That thing looks very different, but I´d love to give it a try.
  • + 7
 I totally agree except on point one, I think it is different looking but I don't think it is ugly. The proportions and angles work pretty well and it is finished beautifully.
  • + 4
 As one of the few people to have actually ridden their prototypes, I can honestly say its worth a try.
The faster you go, the steeper the trail, the better the bike gets.
The prototype I tested had a little more flex than I'd like in the steering, but it looks like they have addressed that in this new version.
That being said, I don't think this would be a great bike on slow speed, technical trails, or really flowy stuff (will NOT do well on a pumptrack). But if you're riding at mach chicken on a gnarly, raw, enduro style trail, then its definitely worth trying.
  • + 2
 I think they made it uglier than it need be. Horst Link rear suspension has been well slicked out by every other brand, and yet somehow they made even that look awkward on this frame.
  • + 0
 thanks. New is an adjustment. perhaps in another color?
  • + 1
 @Patrick9-32: I think you're gonna win comment of the day with us in our hearts. Geometry rules!!!
  • + 1
 @ratedgg13: TY for your honest feedback.
  • + 1
 @ninjatarian: new is always strange, yet nerds are the new sexy. I can guarantee this was designed and created by Nerds, the function then became form.
  • + 0
 @Warpedcog: Having met them all, can 100% confirm they are nerds. Also nerds that shred, HARD.
  • + 3
 I'd definitely try it out if someone said, "Hey dude, check this out! Wanna give it a try?" I'd be like, "Yeah, sure." As long as it's free.

Maybe it will completely change the riding experience. I don't know, man. Best of luck to them, but I just don't see this thing catching on. My bike that looks like a bike rides just fine. Small minded? Maybe. But I think I'm a pretty average dude. If that's what I'm thinking, that's what A LOT (probably most) people are thinking.
  • + 82
 Kill it with fire before it lays eggs...
  • + 26
 First you have to say "Get away from her you bitch!"
  • + 7
 "Close your eyes baby!"
"That's it, man. Game over, man. Game over! What the f*ck are we gonna do now? What are we gonna do?"
  • + 1
 First fill it with tannerite, then throw it off a hundred foot cliff. And if it doesn’t blow up, shoot it. And then gather the pieces and burn it.
  • + 3
 The eggs will grow and we will then present the SCW2...
  • + 1
 @iamamodel: it will make all jealous. Do you know much weight paint adds? :-) I know you know.
  • + 2
 @loopie: riddddde it! I will tell you now, it is a sexy ride... Arent nerds the new sexy? If this isn't nerdy...
  • + 4
 @loopie: they mostly come out at night, mostly...
  • + 0
 @Santamtnbiker: That actually sounds like fun. However, I think we're a little busy to get around to it. I just thought of the permits, you busy?
  • + 3
 Designed by H.R. Giger.
  • - 1
 WITNESS ME and my hybrid linkage/lauf fork 79er with 32" training wheels and a gearbox belt drive graphene frame Super Boost+ eMTB!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • + 1
 Nuke it from orbit. It’s the only way to be sure.
  • + 37
 no water bottle mount! deal breaker right there.
  • + 5
 Idiots! What were they thinking letting a pinkbike editor review their bike without putting water bottle bosses on it!?!
  • + 0
 @GOrtho: peripherals can always be added. This wasn't his first time on the bike, he's just in love with the ride.
  • + 26
 I'd like a linkage fork with a telescoping rear suspension.
  • + 6
 Manitou made FS frames that essentially had a fork at the rear. Just put an AMP fork on one of those and you're sorted.
  • + 1
 @lacuna: Ya, I remember those Manitou frames. They were bizarre!
  • + 23
 Love it. In this world of ever smaller changes that somehow still result in new standards and obsolescence, something this radical is awesome
  • + 16
 Ok, I’m going against the grain here...I think it’s actually really nice looking! I love how the front links flow into the rear, there’s some elegant lines going on. There’s plenty of ugly bikes out there with telescopic forks too, I think Structure did a good job of getting the bike looking as good as it does!

As for the concept, I recently tested out the Motion Ride linkage fork and I was really impressed, anti-dive really does make a difference when tackling steep terrain and since going back to telescopic forks I’ve in all honesty not really wanted to ride my bike...it feels like I’ve taken a step backwards.

I think integration is a good way to go to remove any flex and really control how the front and rear suss works, I’ve not had any rear linkage come loose in two years so I’d be confident in trying front linkage too.

The other appealing thing to me is how supple linkage forks are...I suffer from arm pump quite badly and having extra supple forks is a good way to relieve it.

I’m pestering Structure for a test bike as the whole idea and final outcome is really appealing to me
  • + 0
 I do not really like the looks on all the other stuff i can agree. I really like how it squats in the vid, that looks so dangerous and badass, i would love to try one.
  • + 7
 "I’m pestering Structure for a test bike..."

I was like, who is this clown? - looks at user name - Oh, not a clown at all. I hope you get one and can test it out in some cool videos.
  • + 2
 please contact us through structure.bike, depending on your location, we may be in the area... Love your enthusiasm and sense of adventure. as a novice rider myself, it makes a few things easier. I've seen medium level riders keep up with pros, just saying.
  • + 2
 I’ve been hoping for someone to perfect the linkage fork for over 20 years. I’ve ridden friends Girvins and Amps back in the 90s and they had some serious strengths, along with some big weaknesses. With that, telescoping forks have plenty of weaknesses as well (such as steepening the HA as it goes into the travel). But tech has improved and should solve a lot of the problems they had with linkage in the day.
If linkage wasn’t a good idea, we wouldn’t be using it on the rear.
  • + 11
 In my eyes the most interesting thing of this concept is that the steering angle actually slackens when you dive into the travel compared to getting steeper as with a normal telescopic fork. I imagine that this will inspire a lot of confidence!
  • + 1
 This could potentially change how people ride; I’m very interested. If it became the norm, I can promise it would become less ugly. Look at the first VPP bikes (looking at you, 2001 V10) compared to now.
  • - 1
 @ninjatarian: don’t think it’s going to change the way people ride lol
  • + 1
 @ninjatarian:

Outland VPP aa built in the 90's and held the patent that Santa Cruz and Intense had to pay for.

m.pinkbike.com/photo/8525948
  • + 2
 It will not disappoint.
  • + 1
 From how it looks in the video the angle gets steeper not slacker.
I took 2 pictures from the video.
One static and the other one bottomed out.
When I draw a line from the headtube to the front axle on the static picture and lay this line over the bottomed out picture you can see that the angle indeed gets steeper not slacker.
Yeah I know it could be, because of the camera angle or whatever. So who knows?
imgur.com/a/wH0yDkL
  • + 1
 @OneTrustMan: I would like to see that again with the rear suspension compressing as well.
  • + 1
 @damo: this is not a vpp. Wrong link?
  • + 1
 @fracasnoxteam:

I was responding to ninjatarian about the VPP and the V10 being the first bike. I know this bike is not a VPP.
  • + 1
 @damo: I never stated the V10 was THE first VPP or that SC invented it, simply that it was one of the first production bikes utilizing it, and that it was ugly. Thanks, though.
  • + 2
 @OneTrustMan: Under compression of both front and rear, the SCW 1 definitely gets slacker, moving from 66° to 58° at full compression. Under pitch (front compression only), our head angle changes by only .5° through the entire travel.
  • + 8
 An amazing new feat in engineering. The guys at structure cyclesworks should be applauded for this. It takes courage to step up and do a project like this because of the hate that will come about the "looks" which all fade away as soon as you crank those pedals and get lost in the moment. This is elevating the traditional bike to heighten the riding experience and that's what I'm all about. And as much as I don't care about looks when comparing it to the engineering feat I think it looks good to my surprise haha.
  • + 2
 google Yuri Minki, Good Aussie ingenuity from way back.
  • + 1
 excellent! we look forward to having you put your bum on our seat!
  • + 1
 @ZelvyIndustries: very astute, a few other honorable mentions as well
  • + 1
 @Warpedcog: ELF from back in the day must have had some inspiration. For some reason that's what comes to mind when I look at this. . . thing.
  • + 7
 Now that would be embarrassing to ride
  • + 2
 maybe if you dressed really funny or go naked? Once you feel the bike underneath you, you quickly forget what it looks like.
  • + 1
 Haha. I dunno. Reminds me of various nerdy things, like Nike Shox shoes. Saw a video of Ali Clarkson riding a, Motion France fork, and it seemed to work great. Can't really knock something that works great.
  • + 3
 While I appreciate that a great deal of intelligence and earnest effort was put into this novel design, this bike is ugly as sin to me, and I suspect the potential buyer that can realistically afford this brick shit house of a bike will have that initial opinion.

Stating that you hope that the current market will appreciate this unconventional design more for its performance than its looks is akin to saying your new lover ain’t much to look at, but they are a honey badger in the bedroom. The only person who gives AF is the person making such a statement.
  • + 3
 There are plenty who couldn't care less what the bike looks like as long as it performs the way they want it to. Look at Ellsworth, Orange, Empire. All make very polarising bikes that sell reasonably well regardless. Your very strange analogy probably shouldn't hold up to the 'test ride' argument either - you'll know whether you want it or not once you swing a leg over it.
  • + 3
 While we appreciate your comments, you are looking at unfinished Carbon. Splash a little love on it (paint), expand the lines and it starts to look like a beautifully sized model. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. I believe every human started like this as well...
  • + 5
 ARNIE: I need your boots, your jacket and your bike..."

"....on second thoughts keep the bike, its one ugly m***** f*****!!!"
  • + 1
 Ha! Good one. Underrated...should be up there with the Alien references...
  • + 2
 I had the chance to sit on the bike in Calgary at Bowcycle and meet the owner of the company. I am by no means an engineer and yes it looks weird but, with it's praying mantis type looks I bet it would eat up the trails. I look forward to demoing one of these one day on our local trails in Alberta. Big up to Structure for thinking outside the box. The world needs weird otherwise it would be boring as F.
  • + 6
 This is getting out of hand
  • + 4
 no and no. we designed it to stay in hand and underneath you.
  • + 2
 I spent a lot of time looking at the blue bike in the photos trying to imagine how the engineering could be packaged into something attractive and came to the conclusion it wasn't possible, but actually I think they've done a really good job proving me wrong here, I think it's looking pretty good now.

I also think that this is the sort of bike that would really benefit from something like the Spengle wheels, it would give the front wheel some presence, which it needs with all that mass above it and would tie in with the futuristic theme. Bigger 29" wheels might help a bit too.

On an unrelated note, I've said this before but Mike is absolutely nailing the whole presenting thing!
  • + 1
 I will pass on the Spengle wheel mention. 29" will come, or a hybrid. it hasn't been forgotten, yet we needed to start somewhere.
  • + 2
 Ok. let me understand it. Few (?) years ago you had an alu prototype, which has ridden well and looked good (maybe bit industrial, but generally good). Now you have built the ugliest thing on this planet, just because carbon? Really?
  • + 2
 Still, the same geometry, if you hit the bike with paint it brings out a whole new being. Give us a moment to get these bikes out there.
  • + 2
 WTF indeed.
Stable it may be, on account of the nonlinear front suspension path. But I'd guess there's no chance that steering arm between the bars and the fork crown proper will work, compared to a handlebar mounted to the steering axis directly.
Has an engineer massively underestimated the amount of torque that Vastusaurus and other beast mountain bikers put on the steering axis?
  • + 1
 We have taken all riders into consideration. sadly the very far fringes still need accommodating. anyone over 6'6" will be hard pressed as well as over 260lbs.
  • + 2
 At this point in my life, my normal fork seems to do the job just fine. Seems like a complicated design and does eliminating brake dive outweigh all the other drawbacks? Not to mention it just looks funny. Also, wondering why sports such as motocross (that typically have a bigger R&D budget) haven't gone with linkage forks. Seems like if there really was something to this linkage fork thing it would have already been developed in other two wheel sports.
  • + 7
 Ore maybe the industry only makes what they can sell to people like us?
  • + 30
 'If I had asked them what they wanted, they would have said faster horses '
  • + 0
 Honda uses standard Ohlin’s forks (as does the entire MotoGP and Supercross paddock) on their $50 million MotoGP program so whatever the advantages of the linkage front end are there’s obviously enough disadvantages to keep them running telescopic forks.
  • + 2
 @TPLRacing: I don't get this comparison with moto. Sure we've got two wheels etc.
But Moto is a multi billion $ industry with poor rider performance judged across multiple media channels instantly affecting sales and value of the company that makes the bike he was riding. There's no margin for "let's try this and see if it's better".
We're pedalling bikes on the dirt away from distractions and largely away from judgements and care about what you are riding. The ideal place to try something new.
  • + 2
 @nouseforaname: Moto GP, and Motocross have budgets much bigger than cycling companies and who's to say they haven't tried stuff like this behind closed doors (free from judgement) before it ever made it to a racetrack, let alone the market. Basically what I'm getting at is there must be some drawbacks to this linkage fork thing if it's never made it to a race track or market in any sport with two wheels. Plus, how many EWS and DH World Cup racers are running linkage forks? I dare say none.
  • + 3
 @TimnberG: A while back there was a great discussion about this by the engineering director of Ducati-maybe Fabio Taglioni, but I can't remember for sure. He said that telescopic forks were the worst possible solution. The problem was that they had about a fifty year head start, and it would be severely cost prohibitive to actually develop something new that would work better. This was back in the days when John Britten was making a lot of waves with his linkage front end. Too bad we never got to see what Britten could have accomplished.
  • + 7
 BMW has been using linkage forks on the front of their Enduro/Adventure bikes for years, for many of the same reasons they're supposed to be good for MTB.

Look up the BMW Telelever or Duolever front suspension.
  • + 1
 @nonk: I'll take a look. Maybe there's something to these linkage designs. I would just think that if a linkage fork could be so good why have we only just started to see them recently.
  • + 3
 @nouseforaname: Honda tested all of these designs decades ago..... www.motorsportretro.com/2009/12/elfs-experimental-bikes
  • + 1
 Loni won the Isle of man TTzero race with his design 2010-2013, he was also involved exstensively in Nascar. We had to pick an area to start, we followed our passion.
  • + 3
 @wittereus: exactly. People don't like 2 things. Things that stay the same and things that change.
  • + 3
 @TPLRacing: yet BMW uses them as do a few other teams :-) to my knowledge (I'm not the designer though).
  • + 4
 @wittereus: you are bang on. Telescoping forks have improved very little, considering the number of years they've been out. The accidents that Loni, myself and many others inspired this change of direction. Dare to be different.
  • + 2
 @TPLRacing: All major manufacturers in every technology driven industry have advanced engineering programs that the public never sees; so, rest assured that the majors have evaluated many front suspension designs that were never commercialized. There could be many reasons for this, including cost, manufacturing capability, performance, or customer reluctance to accept radical new technology. All of these things play into the commercialization decision. Thus, just because a technology does not go to production does not mean it does not provide benefit to the end-user. Personally, I cannot wait to demo this thing, as the claims, if true, would be a game changer. Of course, as a mechanical engineer who has done a lot of development work on commercial vehicles, to include suspensions, I love this type of thinking, regardless if it looks “ugly” (I prefer to think of it as radically different).
  • + 1
 @TPLRacing: Thanks for the article link, very interesting. Unfortunately it is pretty vague in some areas. It talks about mechanical unreliability, but I don’t believe that was front suspension related; I would expect it was more related to using a cast engine block as a structural member to replace the frame (I am assuming these were traditional cast iron engine blocks, but I could be wrong). In terms of suspension, it does say the last iteration had exceptional brake anti-dive performance, which would be very helpful braking in the steeps to avoid a rapid forward CG shift and avoidance of an OTB experience.
  • + 1
 Looks like a great idea and I think it could work really well. I personally wouldn't buy it right away because I prefer to be a late adopter. I may get myself a smartphone in the next decade or maybe the decade after that. Facebook account is planned by the second half of this century, stay tuned. That said, I know there are some progressive minds on here who like to be on the bleeding edge. Bummer is, they always seem to want room for their bottle inside the front triangle.
  • + 1
 it's so funny that, isn't it. I thought the same thing.
  • + 2
 Well...if it rides well enough and you can get enough buyers to keep a humble roof over your family's heads...all the power to ya Smile
To even touch the mainstream market...it'd have to win races...like every time.
  • + 3
 I certainly hope pinkbike gets one in for a review. And with @mikelevy 's time on the Trust fork it'd be interesting to find out how big a part the integration plays.
  • + 1
 I am really stoked to see Mike on one again with a full spread about the SCW1. 6.5 years to get here
  • + 3
 That aluminum one looks great; they should offer an aluminum model.

Edit: just saw it full size and it also looks strange. I'd still love to try it out!
  • + 1
 Props for tying something different. I place far too much emphasis on aesthetics and also have a budget, so not something I would ever own but it is definitely interesting. Just killing brake dive would be a huge bonus. Slackening the front as you blow through travel sounds great as well. I could see riding this with a large price reduction and much more effort spent on making the lines flow together.
  • + 1
 As enduro riders go...I'm fucking hopeless. If this thing can, in any way,, help me get down off the mountain without becoming a rag doll then I'm quite ok with how it looks. Terrifying trails and terrifying looking bikes are a perfect combination in my mind...
  • + 1
 IT WILL
  • + 1
 Interesting how much it changed from the non ride able prototype. (proto had better aesthetics, lines flowed better) I think its pretty cool! And maybe in 20 or 30 years all bikes will be linkage up front??

My only concern with these bikes ATM is they are so proprietary, and there have been so may of these kinda crazy designs over the years that have come and gone. What do you do if it's gone and you can't get parts and you threw a boat load of money at it. At least with the Trust set up you can migrate it to your next frame. (still, if they go out of business your sitting on a ticking time bomb) But for sure I can see the logic in combining frame and fork to get the most effective ride solution. Not diving, getting slacker deeper in the travel "seems" like it must be superior, just not sure it's worth it for a hack like myself! Smile

Also, other than an Unno or maybe? some custom one off, (course aren't Unno's pretty much custom one off's? How many of those can they sell a year?); what other frame and fork combo's would hit 6 grand? That makes it "out of line" in my book!! (now it may be that a person would think this tech is worth the extra 1500 bucks?)
  • + 1
 Goog thing about carbon is you can have just about anything made locally by you carbon shop for 100 to 300 bucks.
  • + 0
 After riding it, I was sold, that was the aluminum one 4 years ago. The only real difference in the bike that just landed on shore were a few iterations. The paint does a lot to thin out the downtube. WIth these bikes, all the components are standard.
  • + 1
 On a further thought plus after reading the alien references. Do a build kit in all carbon like raw carbon bits. And alien green for all the aluminum. Pretty sure hope has the right color. That build kit would be its own argument for the looks even if it felt the same as other bikes. “But dude it looks like a xenomorph had a kid with my bike!”
  • + 3
 Dont care what it looks it if its superior, but that front linkage looks like it would get broken pretty quickly/often, but who knows?
  • + 1
 In four years of testing - and more recently, racing - believe us, we're tried. In 2017 Mike Levy even cased our alloy bike straight into a tree with no damage to the steering or linkage system. Only the fork steerer was damaged (single-crown at the time), which was an easy fix.
  • + 4
 If a few pros love and ride them, us lemmings will follow. I mean come on - we’re wearing fanny-packs again!
  • + 2
 Every time I see a new full suspension bike coming out, the first thing I do is look at the linkages and count the number of bearings I have to replace ... KISS
  • - 1
 We agree with the KISS principle. Because of that, a bearing service on our bike will take a good tech about an hour. Every bearing on the bike is available at your local bike shop, can be driven out from the opposite side of the frame, and has internal sleeves connecting the bearing seats, x-ring seals on the caps, and the largest side-to-side spacing in the industry. Also, you'll never need another fork bushing and seal service. We think it may actually be less maintenance-intensive than other full-suspension bikes.
  • + 1
 I just really want to see video of some ripping though some chunky rock garden on this bike. Slow-mo comparisons with a “normal” bike with similar travel would be a bonus.
  • + 2
 Steering precision once the bolts loosen or wear out? You don‘t want anything to mess up your steering in general...but this is next to suicide
  • - 1
 We use 17mm colleted through axles at all of the main pivots. We can't even imagine a scenario in which they loosen or wear out if thread locker is used during assembly and maintenance.
  • + 0
 Looks intriguing and I bet it rides well. But one thing about traditional forks...they're tough and can survive serious crashes. How would that linkage take a that "off" hit when you're on the gas? But kudos for thinking outside the box...
  • + 0
 Why would it be more fragile than your rear suspension?
  • + 1
 @fracasnoxteam: Because it's exposed and in a position to get hit. True, when compressed like it's supposed to be used, there'll probably little difference between the two. But, I'm talking about unintended strikes into trees, rocks, falls, the usual happenstance from fast-aggressive riding in the woods. Nobody intends to crash, but they do happen.
  • - 1
 @camm67: Have you seen the video of the Santa Cruz guys hitting a frame as hard as they can against a concrete block? Out front linkage is by no means delicate.
  • + 2
 Obviously looks wild but that's alright if it works. What I'm most concerned about is the strength and precision of the steering linkage.
  • - 1
 We know that nothing validates a product like racing, so we entered the SCW 1 in three races at the Sea Otter Classic and won three podiums in two days on two separate bikes, with two riders. So far so good!

As for the steering linkage, the links are almost as large in diameter as a bar end and have much heavier carbon layup. You'll twist the stem on the steerer before you get any deflection from the links. In almost four years of hard testing (including a few hard crashes), we never even think about the steering except during maintenance inspection.
  • + 0
 We respect the Whyte Prestons greatly. They rode extremely well, by all accounts. The Structure SCW 1 does a number of things very differently, though. Check out www.structure.bike for all the details.
  • + 2
 @Magellan35: thank you for your comment and your link. it's a very interesting design and I wish you the very best. the world needs dreamers and people wing to accept norms
  • + 2
 I was watching the video and thought "that Levy guy is just a normal guy after all" ????. I would try one, curious to see the handling, flex ect.
  • + 0
 THIS is the most progressive MTB product of decades that will hopefully manage it to successfull production life. At the 2nd place I'd put Message fork with MOTION fork, at the 3rd place a Pinion with Speedhub. . For the next version, STRUCTURE should get rid of that 1-by-PIZZA plate oddity by integrating PINION box as their FSR rear suspension layout asks for that. I generally don't like FSR, but could I find 5000euros laying on the street I'd immediately buy this frame.
  • + 1
 Do you mean a Rohloff Speedhub (a rearhub) or a Pinion gearbox (where the bottom bracket goes)?
  • + 3
 @vinay: Hi. I mean Pinion whichever gearbox and Rohloff Speedhub that can be simply used as gearbox within mainframe as Aaron Franklin showed on his Lahar and Zerode copied that idea.
  • + 1
 @fluider: Ah thanks. Yeah I recall Nicolai and more than a few used the Rohloff in their frames a good fifteen years ago or so. I don't recall Lahar but then that must have been even earlier. GT used the Shimano Alfine hub in the frame by the way, also a good (and cheaper) solution. With the resurgence of high pivot bikes, we may see more Effigear too as these can give you a higher chainline right away.
  • + 0
 Drop Loni a line at structure.bike he'd love your feedback. This discussion is a little out of my league.
  • + 2
 Double the headset bearings. At least 30 suspension bearings including suspension mounting hardware. That alone would put me off
  • + 3
 ...although this bike most likely has more pivot points and bearings than the Enterprise.
  • + 2
 and is just as fast and nimble, giver all shes got Captain!
  • + 0
 Thanks structure for doing this. Telescopic forks are nice looking but all the engineers know linkages are the future of mountain biking. The first company to figure how to dial it in should in theory smash it (though unfortunately there is always cool factor and getting people to accept the idea)

Dropping the ha 8 degrees at full travel sounds nuts but I can't comment til I try it.

For what it's worth, I think you're onto a winer here. And it looks amazing, those lines are awesome!

Can the steering linkage be folded back though so it doesn't stick out the front? Or replaced with a scissor linkage?
  • + 0
 Because all of the space behind the steering links is eaten up by suspension compression, we can't face the links backward (see our Instagram feed for videos).

We know that nothing validates a product like racing, so we entered the SCW 1 in three races at the Sea Otter Classic and won three podiums in two days on two separate bikes, with two riders. So far so good!
  • + 0
 I love innovation but looking at this I can only think of three things -
1. more linkages means more weak points to break & more bearings to replace
2. more shocks means more setup dilemmas and
3. drugs and engineers don't mix.
  • + 19
 About your 1, a fork needs lots of love compared to bearing, and servicing is something else. Why would it be weaker than your rear linkage?
2. why setting up a shock would be harder than a fork?
  • + 1
 @fracasnoxteam: setting up doesn't matter much.
Maintenance wise, high pressure IFP's can be relatively difficult for the home mechanic.
Replacement wise: you add more factors to compatibility problems: shock eye-to-eye length, leverage ratio (high and low leverage bikes require different tuning) and mount style (trunnion, metric etc. and bushing sizes).
  • + 5
 From my armchair engineering standpoint, this thing is really going to take a beating. The bearings are relatively close together and the shock introduces loads in a new direction. All loads you introduce through the bars are taking a much longer route towards the front wheel so front part of the top tube is being subject to a lot of bending which a conventional top tube wouldn't be. Yes telescopic fork bushings are subject to wear, develop play and actually need a bit of play to still be smooth when warmed up. Rotating bearings like what you have here are more accurate to produce etc, but for a similar amount of movement at the front axle, these bearings need to be a whole lot more accurate. So yeah, that may end up with a similar service interval with a whole lot more complex and expensive bits and pieces.

Look I'm not saying this isn't going to work. Just meant to say that in their pursuit for that perfect axle path, they introduced a whole lot of new challenges. Not saying they can't be solved, but these are new challenges nonetheless and they aren't easy ones. I serviced my fork last Wednesday evening. Took only a few minutes using simple tools (especially as mine has grease lubed lowers). And for me that is important. To be able to service my own stuff and not have to send anything off mid season. Then again obviously for people with more complex forks and/or rear suspension, they may need to do that anyway.
  • + 1
 @vinay: one proper crash and the whole front end is scrap metal, all for innovation but this is not the way forward......back to the old drawing board!!
  • + 2
 @jimmythehat: Even slight crash of your telefork lowers against a rock can make that lowers a beautiful piece of home furniture, and you spending hundreds of pennies for new lowers.

What kind of crash did you mean to totally destroy the Structure's front end? 3 massive monocoque carbon arms can stand some hitting and bending.
  • + 1
 @fluider: End over end, difficult to test on a rig
  • + 1
 @fluider: The impact that could destroy a cast magnesium lower could also destroy other thin-walled structures. Look, anything can break and anything can be made so strong that it doesn't break under foreseeable conditions. My point is, the loading on that downtube and its bearings is quite unfavorable, which is why it is so huge. And because steering is controlled via a different path, they can't allow much elastic deformation/flex there.

I'm not saying it is a bad design, see. If axle path, anti dive and all that are priorities then this could be your solution. But if the Gary Fisher dilemma is still a thing, it has a long way to go before it could beat the conventional telescopic fork with a steerer.
  • - 1
 there is actually 1 less shock. there are 2 shocks on the telescoping and one back shock.. The shock doesn't want to bind through travel, like your conventional fork. All the push through bolts are standard. Lastly, sobriety was the key.
  • + 1
 @vinay: TY for an honest assessment. If you have any direct questions for Loni feel free to visit structure.bike and drop a line
  • + 0
 @vinay: Our bearing spacing is the largest of any linkage bike in the industry, and the entire system has been designed and built to take a beating.

We entered the SCW 1 in three races at the Sea Otter Classic and came away with three podium finishes (bronze, silver, and gold), which we feel is a pretty fair test of the bike's capabilities.

We hope you get a chance to come ride with us soon to see for yourself how well our Without Telescoping Fork system works.
  • + 0
 1. We designed the system to take a beating and be easy to maintain. 2. Our two DVO shocks are the same and can be interchanged. Setup may be the easiest of any full suspension bike on the market, although we admit that's subjective. 3. We are high on life. We just entered three races at the Sea Otter Classic and won bronze, silver, and gold.
  • + 1
 @Magellan35: Thanks for coming over to PB to join the discussion. @Warpedcog already invited me to your website and I was planning to, just hadn't yet. I hope you didn't misinterpret my comments. My point wasn't that it couldn't be done or even that you failed. Instead my point was that, for it to work properly, it really needs to be done very accurately to make it work as reliably as a conventional front end can be. Steering seems like the biggest challenge to me. But as you've made it work, props for that! I've got to say I'm curious how it works out. Being mostly a hardtail rider, fork dive never really bothered me but the rear end coming all the more. I suppose your system is so different from the conventional systems we are used to, that it may take a tiny bit to adapt and then even more to go back. Being one to also ride unicycles (which really is much easier than people seem to think), I believe there is a lot our bodies and skills can adapt to. But going back and forth between nearly identical but just slightly different systems can be confusing. What's your experience with this? How do experienced riders but newcomers to your system adapt to it? And how do those experienced with your system adapt to conventional bikes again?

Thanks again for clearing things up!
  • + 1
 @vinay: You definitely raise some interesting points. Precise bearing location and careful post-machining are absolutely required on our bikes (a point in which our factory takes great pride), but that is also true of other designs in common use, such as twin short link rears where a pivot that is improperly located by half a millimeter can have noticeable effects on kinematics.

As far as getting used to the bike, the riders who just raced two of our SCW 1 bikes to podiums at the Sea Otter Classic found the bike very easy to adapt to, with each of them having less than an hour on our bike before winning a medal. That deserves a moment of thought that even we had not given the subject until you asked your question.

On the other hand, getting back onto a bike with a telescoping fork can be a problem. We have never had a rider get off of a hard ride on the SCW 1 and back onto a standard bike without complaining about the way their old bike rides and feels. We can't help with that one!
  • + 1
 @Magellan35: Have you already test-ridden the Message fork? How would you compare to your SCW 1?
  • + 2
 @Magellan35: Cool to hear that it works this well. These were the only two things that could be an issue.
1. Production needs to be very very accurate for it to work well. It seems you have that dialed.
2. The advantages of the suspension should outweigh the construction challenges it brings. And considering how well your riders are doing, it probably does.

So that's really great and makes your bikes an interesting alternative to what we've seen until now. It will probably not replace the telescopic forks entirely simply because it won't be possible to offer this level of accuracy and reliability in the lower end market, but in the higher end market you seem to be a serious contender. I'd love to see this thing to take off big and stir up the high end market!
  • + 1
 @fluider: We're glad that a number of brands are hard at work offering alternatives to telescoping forks. The big differences between our WTF linkage system and the Message relate to anti-dive and steering angle. Under compression of front and rear, together, our fork steering angle slackens from 66° to 58°, starting out nimble and becoming more stable the harder it's pushed. In pitch of just the front, our fork steering angle remains within .5° of constant. As for anti-dive, we provide eccentrics that can vary anti-dive from a 17% reduction of front brake dive (vs telescoping) to 22%, 33%, or a very racy 41%. We also use the same very serviceable DVO shock front and rear, so setup is a breeze. No other product in the world offers these features, and the result on the trail is an incredibly fast, confident bike.
  • + 1
 @Magellan35: I've been thinking about your concept again (which takes time for me, hence the delay). I ride my hardtail most of the time, even though I do have a full suspension bike (a Cannondale Prophet). The full susser is great at straightlining rough terrain off the brakes. But on steep technical switchbacks with slow drops etc, I am rather on my hardtail. It is just so much more predictable for. I may not have rear suspension helping me, but at least it isn't fighting me either. Especially as I rode a lot early on with only a sensible disc brake in the front (the rear would only take a V-brake and I soon started to ignore it) and only front suspension. This style didn't suit the full susser because when braking hard with the front brake and forcing the front end through difficult sections, the rear would rise and throw me off course. I've been told to increase rebound damping on the rear and even though at least it doesn't buck me off after bigger landings, I find it even harder to predict when it is going to come up and compensate for that. Obviously big part is technique as lots of people get along with rear suspension. But then again they use the rear brake way too much to my liking (damaging trails) and it seems boring too.

Initially I thought your design wouldn't help me much because I don't have issues with my front suspension, only with the rear. But then I just thought, as my fork compresses the front center shortens and just puts even more load on the front and less on the rear (if I wouldn't shift my weight). Obviously I do compensate with my weight and it is all fine on the hardtail. But if I do so aggresively I effectively throw the bike forwards (as I throw my weight backwards relatively) and may actually put even more load on the front and less on the rear in this dynamic motion. But if your front center increases with the compression, the rear will still be loaded hence it won't come up as much. Does this make sense and is this how you experience it too? I've got a new headset on the way for my Cannondale Prophet, bringing the head angle down from 67.5deg back to 65.5deg which should increase the front center a bit. I expect that to help. But then yeah, I can imagine your design would help even more. Most specifically on a full suspension bike, more than I would need on a hardtail.
  • + 1
 @Magellan35: Do you know of other brands, or soon to be brands, besides TRUST and MOTION France, that've been working on linkage front-ends? Thank you for providing exact numbers. How much does alternating the anti-dive behavior using those eccentrics affect the front-wheel steering behavior (front-wheel normal trail throughout the travel)?
I just wanted to know if you had managed to ride the Message fork and compare its approach of keeping the front-wheel trail? :-) WTF does it by slackening the steering axis, Message does it by changing the axle offset.
  • + 2
 @vinay: We've noticed that some have gotten have the impression that our wheelbase grows during suspension travel. Actually, it doesn't grow, but it does stay pretty constant through the first 60% or so of travel, with a front axle path that comes up more vertically than the axle on a telescoping forks. Regardless, in principle you are right; keeping the front wheel out front and stable (due to less weight transfer and constant - or even elongating - trail allows our riders to stay more centered, with a feeling of being "in" the bike as opposed to "over" it. With linkage front and rear the feeling is that the front and rear are working together around your center of mass. I honestly believe you would thoroughly enjoy the way both ends stay hooked up while tracking smoothly over extremely rough, technical terrain, and I hope you get a demo ride as soon as we can arrange it.
  • + 1
 @fluider: With the addition of Adroit, those are the only brands we know of at present.

Regarding how much the eccentric positions affect handling and kinematics, there is a small effect on shock leverage ratio, and riders may prefer to adjust shock air pressure once they've changed anti-dive percentage, as the most aggressive (we dub it "Race", as opposed to "Plush" for our most compliant setting) setting can be a bit harsh over choppy rock gardens or braking bumps (while being very supportive at a 41% reduction in brake dive). In Race setting, we recommend dropping shock pressure by 10 psi or more from what you'd use in Plush. My personal favourite position is Low (22% reduction in dive), as it offers the best balance of bump compliance and support against dive and makes for a very fast bike.

I have not had opportunity to ride a trust fork yet, sadly, and I would not want to comment too directly about another company that is proving the advantages of linkage (we're on the same side, after all). Regarding the different approaches we take to managing trail, though, they really are quite different, with differing axle paths as a result.

With full integration of the front suspension into the frame and a virtual pivot point for the front axle, Structure has the ability to vary fork steering angle and trail independently of the frame's steerer angle. The result is that the front wheel stays exactly where we want it all the way through the travel, and the difference in stability and compliance at speed is remarkable. I hope you get to come ride a demo with us this summer.
  • + 1
 @Magellan35: I would love to test ride your bike, but it's out of my time and other possibilities to come to North America. Maybe, if you are present at Eurobike 2019 I'd do a trip to see you.

Why did you decide to go fullcarbon instead of using aluminum for your frame?
  • + 3
 Looks like ......The Enterprise from Star Trek. Scotty, I need more rebound! I'm giving her all she's got Captain!!
  • + 2
 cant polish a turd lads sorry..............just make something like the honda rno 1 with updated geo and single crown usd showas on it and you will be very rich....
  • + 0
 this was at Bow Cycle last weekend.. WTF (Withough Telescoping Fork) makes the front wheel go forward and slackens the rake of the front end. it propels the bike forward over obstacles instead of diving the front wheel into the bike.

www.instagram.com/p/BwF7VfmBMrU
  • + 3
 Lots and lots of pivots to come loose and wear our. Just not practical when riding in rain and dirt for a lot of riders.
  • - 1
 we haven't had any issues with 4 years on the prototype ;-)
  • + 0
 We actually had British riders in mind when designing our bike. A bearing service on our bike will take a good tech about an hour. Every bearing on the bike is available at your local bike shop, can be driven out from the opposite side of the frame, and has internal sleeves connecting the bearing seats, x-ring seals on the caps to keep water out, and the largest side-to-side spacing in the industry. Significantly, you'll never need another fork bushing and seal service. We think it may actually be less maintenance-intensive than other full-suspension bikes.
  • + 3
 Looks like a Kona Process shagged an HR Giger sculpture. I dig it.
  • + 1
 We love this comment.
  • + 2
 I can sneak a lot of bike upgrades by my wife, but I'm not sure I'd get this one by her.
  • + 3
 LOL, integrated "WTF" linkage fork! They named it right! Wink
  • + 1
 TY. it is aptly named due to the overwhelming response.
  • + 2
 PB: Man, that Trust fork is the ugliest fork ever.

Structure Cycleworks: Hold my beer!
  • - 1
 Have you seen it in person? Most people agree it looks far better than in photos.
  • + 3
 Lot of trouble to make a "theft-proof bike" Smile
  • + 1
 Hahaha. It's also great 'birth control'.
  • + 1
 @dstroud70: that's not fair, everyone needs loving.
  • + 1
 Yes, how did you know we would be offering GPS in the short future.
  • + 1
 Kiss, keep it simple stupid! If it looks wrong it usually is, but in this case maybe its good. Hope they never do it on mx bikes though!
  • + 3
 I would definitely want to be high the first time I rode it.
  • + 1
 Does that top link pivot at the frame eccentrically, or is that an eccentric bearing housing to adjust the effective "head-tube" angle?
  • + 0
 It carries an eccentric that varies front brake anti-dive from a 17% reduction vs telescoping forks up to a huge 41% reduction, with two middle settings (22% reduction and 33% reduction) to split the difference. This allows riders to set up their bike to their preference and take the bike from plush to extremely supportive.
  • + 2
 @Magellan35: Cool tech right there!
  • + 3
 Yadah Yadah Yadah, ride the damned thing !
  • + 3
 Imagine giving this thing a bearing service
  • + 0
 I am, its drop dead sexy all naked
  • - 1
 A bearing service on our bike will take a good tech about an hour. Every bearing on the bike can be driven out from the opposite side of the frame, has internal sleeves between bearing seats, x-ring seals on the caps, and the largest side-to-side spacing in the industry. Also, you'll never need another fork bushing and seal service.
  • + 1
 All I know is if I was at a bike demo where this was an option it would be the first bike I would be standing in line to try.
  • + 1
 I'm all for thinking outside of the conservative box of doctrine and conformity. Literally nobody liked the Eiffel tower when it was erected.
  • + 2
 Aesthetics in bikes matter to me, so I'd rather get something that rides really well while still looking clean and tidy.
  • - 1
 Have you seen the bike in person? Many feel that it looks far better than in photos. I think so too.
  • + 1
 Looks like something that will sound like the Titanic sinking on the trails in 5 months of use.

youtu.be/ep8a35G546Y

????
  • + 0
 lifetime warranty and stiffer than any current bike from the tests I have witnessed, we will see you with riding one soon enough. ;-p
  • + 1
 I'd ride it, although it's priced too high for my tastes. I love the wild design, if it works I could care less about traditional aesthetics.
  • + 1
 I'm trying to imagine what it would be like to ride a bike that gets slacker as the front end compresses. Brain fan is winding up to full speed.
  • + 0
 It is outrageously good. The front just demands more and more speed, while telegraphing confidence and staying out there where the wheel is supposed to be instead of tucking. And because we can start out reasonably steep at sag, the bike handles well at all speeds.
  • + 1
 I usually don't mind if a bike is a bit ugly but functions well, although this one is really odd looking, so it had better ride incredibly well.
  • + 0
 it does, you will be surprised.
  • + 2
 There is obviously something to the whole linkage push. I think it's heading in the right direction.
  • + 1
 Now combine that with pinion gearbox that can shift under power, 29er wheels and modular ebike conversion ability... Ugly and awesome. Just the way I like em.
  • + 2
 Engineers and Designers sat and watched Alien vs Predator... Looks like Team Alien won
  • + 2
 The Aliens were superior. didn't see a predator impregnate Ripley
  • + 1
 4 minutes of video and only one bounce on the bike? More bounce, less talk!
  • + 2
 Give it an honest review please!
  • + 3
 how about noooo scotty
  • + 3
 Sisser me Susan!
  • + 2
 where do i put my one up edc :,(
  • + 2
 I would ride the shit out of that thing.
  • + 1
 That is very nice project indeed Mr. designer but now go home, you're drunk.
  • + 1
 It reminds me car suspension design, however ' out of the ground look ' is not something I would invest.
  • + 1
 That is a F*cking RAD looking bike!

Will definitely keep my eyes open for a demo ride...
  • + 2
 i should sell my mcdemo and buy this one.
  • - 2
 Just because you can doesn't mean you should....good products should consider both form and function. Seems like an overly complex system considering modern forks do an amazing job and look way better. Funny how these creations make their appearances at events and trade shows but you never see this kind of wacky tech out on the trails.
  • + 0
 Have you seen our Instagram? A few thousand Sea Otter riders and attendees might disagree.
  • + 1
 YET !!
  • + 0
 With that linkage Anti-dive is not going to be too different from a telescopic fork, so it's a bit overcomplicated for nothing.
  • + 0
 Our system provides a range of anti-dive from a 17% reduction vs telescoping forks up to a 41% reduction vs telescoping forks (with two additional positions splitting the difference at 33% and 22%. The difference vs telescoping forks is profound, and absolutely changes how hard you can ride.
  • + 1
 I'd have a go. Seems stupid not to try something new out. Just need some money
  • + 2
 Wait a minute... where do I put my bottle cage?
  • + 1
 On the bottom of the downtube. Less than ideal, we know, but at least it's there.
  • + 2
 All fine and dandy till you need to pack it up for air travel
  • + 0
 Is that a new water-bottle crap? How often do you air travel with your full susp. bike?
  • + 0
 It travels exceptionally well for air travel. We brought the bikes from Taiwan to Sea Otter in travel cases with only the wheels and handbar off. No big deal.
  • + 1
 Is it me or does 470mm sound like a very long reach for a medium size?! I would expect that for a large.
  • + 0
 We designed long, low and slack geometry. With a very low seat tube we offer a 180mm dropper for our G2 (med) frame and a 210mm for our G3 (lg) frame. This allows for a wide range of fitting options with stem selection and saddle rail position.
  • + 2
 i hate forkdive, so if 5k would not matter to me i would get it.
  • + 2
 It sounds like you need more low speed compression
  • + 2
 @hmstuna: ye, kind of tired of numbing down forks by running the lsc fully closed though
  • + 2
 No water bottle mount, no thanks
  • + 1
 It's on the bottom of the downtube, which we know is less than ideal, but it's there.
  • + 2
 "Nice bike Levy (snickers)... hold my beer..."
  • + 2
 looks like a session...that my cat threw up.
  • + 2
 No water bottler cage..... no thanks
  • + 2
 funny how you never see a video of actual riding... next.
  • - 1
 Please check out our Instagram and ask around.
  • - 1
 Play play play.....play? On the frame the top bearing link for the top parallel links going to the fork, looks adjustable which would adjust head-angle? Want to go go and play with it.
  • + 1
 Yes, that pivot carries an eccentric for adjustment of the anti-dive percentage, which varies brake dive reduction from 17% (vs telescoping forks) to 41%. At a 17% reduction, the bike is very plush and eats up bumps while still offering meaningful resistance to brake dive. At a 41% reduction, the front is extremely resistant to dive, to the point that you'd better have strong arms if you nose dive or case something. But that's better than an OTB in our books.
  • + 1
 We also supply a second set of eccentrics that split the difference between 17% and 41%, so you can set up your bike ideally for you.
  • + 2
 Hey Mike, you Giant is getting jealous, stop flirting .
  • + 3
 YuK
  • + 1
 I love the look, and if it rides amazing I'd definitely consider getting one if I could afford it.
  • + 2
 what about that water bottle?^^
  • + 2
 Actually, I like the design!
  • + 2
 One thing for sure; they nailed it on the front end name.
  • + 2
 Somebody gonna lose a testicle riding that
  • + 0
 I've never ridden a linkage fork off road that I liked. Hopefully this one is different.
  • + 1
 We promise. We offer a two-month money-back guarantee (see structure.bike for details), so if the SCW 1 isn't the best enduro bike you've ever ridden, just give it back!
  • + 1
 Just because something can be done. Doesn't mean it should be done.
  • + 1
 One endo and you'll need a very expensive steerer linkage replacement.
  • - 1
 Mike Levy cased our alloy bike straight into a tree. We have done the same repeatedly. Although it's almost ridiculously difficult to endo this bike, hitting a hidden stump does the job. Because the front steering links are thicker-walled carbon than a bar end, you'll spin your stem on the steerer before you ever break the links. In almost four years of testing, we never even think about the steering anymore except for during routine maintenance.
  • + 1
 Now I can finally crack walnuts on my rides.
  • + 0
 On the plus side, you wouldn't have to worry about anyone wanting to steal your bike.
  • + 1
 this bike looks to be the absolute safest way to crack a cocnut!
  • + 1
 Why isn’t someone doing this with a lefty hub?
  • + 1
 This will pair nicely with Fox's new helmet.
  • + 1
 Doesn't look like enough room to mount my fenders to!
  • + 1
 We can accommodate a number of fenders. It depends on tire size somewhat, of course. We ship with 2.6" front and 2.5" rear, with plenty of mud clearance. A front 2.5" with fender could work very well.
  • + 1
 I take the rear, you the front!
  • + 1
 I still like the traditional look even if this rides like a dream...
  • + 1
 It's April 11 not April 1.
  • + 1
 Are we engineers or mtbers?!
  • + 32
 Yes.
  • + 0
 @brianpark: ????
  • + 0
 I wanted to but an emoji Smile and got owned by pb. Noob
  • + 1
 Brick shithouse comment was gold
  • + 2
 WTF indeed
  • + 0
 That shock in the front looks very exposed....think won't last long without anything to cover it from flying stones etc.
  • + 0
 The front shock will have a cover / small fender when delivered to buyers.
  • + 2
 that's the DEVIL'S work.
  • + 1
 OOf the bearing replacement cost on that thing will be huge
  • - 1
 We give a lifetime warranty on the frame and bearings. The main bearings are all 30mm with 17mm colleted axles, and can be driven out through the opposite side of the frame in minutes once every couple of years. We have the widest bearing offset (side-to-side bearing spacing) in the industry, internal sleeves for stiffness, and x-ring sealed bearing caps. Also, you'll never have to do another fork bushing and seal service. We figure our bike will be on par or even less maintenance-intensive than bikes with telescoping forks.
  • + 2
 @Magellan35: thanks for the response, great to see it taken care of Salute
  • + 1
 This bikrs needs the Syncros integrated bar/stem and its perfect
  • + 0
 Cool bike. They should focus now on the rear end. Looks very ordinary, compare to the front
  • - 1
 I designed a split-pivot rear for it and then did a patent search that revealed that DW's version for Salsa was within a mm or two of my own. At that point it was an easy decision to make the bike as normal as possible at the rear, in geometry, and in spec, since the front was going to be anything but normal.
  • + 2
 i want one
  • + 1
 That fork has "pedestrian safety first" all over it Big Grin
  • - 1
 If stopping before you hit the pedestrian is the goal, you are definitely right. The Structure SCW 1 dives up to 41% less than a telescoping fork under front braking, which means you're much more likely to get stopped before you run over the pedestrian.
  • + 2
 @Magellan35: I'll be very happy to test that system.
  • + 1
 @EnduroriderPL: We'll be at Crankworx Whistler and a number of other demo events this summer. Hopefully we can find a willing pedestrian!
  • + 2
 @Magellan35: let me know when you'll be in UE and I provide some pedestrians for testing Wink
  • + 1
 Bold move, Cotton...bold move.
  • + 1
 Just what we need...more bearings and pivots to fail
  • - 1
 They aren't failing often on rears when done right. Ours have x-rings seals on the bearing caps, wider side-to-side spacing than any bike in the industry, internal sleeves for stiffness, and can be driven out from the opposite side of the frame in minutes. At 30mm, with 17mm colleted axles, our bearings are all industry-standard and can be found at any bike shop. Also, no more fork bushing our seal service. You might actually work on our bike less than on other full-sus bikes.
  • + 2
 Looks like the future.
  • + 1
 The front end doubles as an aluminum can crusher.
  • + 2
 Looks like a scissors
  • + 2
 I would love to try it.
  • + 1
 sometimes it's best not to try to be different
  • + 2
 Let's see how it rides.
  • + 1
 That bike looks like a burn victim
  • + 1
 Won't fit on my Northshore rack, so meh.
  • + 1
 Arnold's T-800 wants his bike back.
  • + 1
 LET MIKE RIDE IT. For God's sake, he could barely touched it.
  • + 1
 UUUGGGGLLLYYYY!!!
  • - 1
 If this is a good idea then why don’t we also see linkage forks in the Moto world?
  • + 1
 We do.
And I‘ve ridden a BMW with their „telelever“ fork, that frontend felt very stable, while still being quite sensitive to small bumps - I liked it.
  • + 6
 Because motocross isn't mountain biking. Just because it has two wheels doesn't mean it should have the same suspension layout. The impacts, terrain, steepness of tracks, corners etc are all different in mtb to motocross.
  • + 2
 BMW’s telelever comes to mind.
  • + 2
 It's been tried in the motorcycle world, on and off for decades. Shortlived experiments. As for the BMW telelever, it's never been used on a proper offroad bike. On the HP2 and the dakar bikes they had conventional forks.
  • + 0
 But a 250 kg motorcycle and a mtb is clearly not comparable. It may well be brilliant!
  • + 1
 @FuzzyL: Duolever or Telelever?
  • + 2
 @jollyXroger: Actually, I had to look that up now... It was a K1300 R, so obviously duolever is correct.
  • + 1
 @FuzzyL: I suspected that it might be Duolever instead of Telelever, because Structure's design is basically the same thing.
  • + 1
 @jollyXroger: One significant difference is that Duolever uses two large automotive-style ball joints to handle both steering and suspension loads. On our system we separate the steering axis from the control arm pivot axes with standard colleted through axles and 30mm bearings that can be found at any bike shop. We didn't want to stray any farther from readily available parts than necessary, and 30mm bearings can take a serious beating.
  • + 1
 @Magellan35: I see your point, the benefit. My question, is there a trade-off?
  • + 1
 @jollyXroger: We haven't found any downsides to date functionally. Where telescoping forks steepen under braking, eat up travel, and experience stiction from side loads on their bushings, our WTF suspension dives less, responds smoothly to impacts, has easily tuned, matching dampers (you could actually have a third DVO ready to go in your race kit and swap it in), becomes more stable the harder you push it, and begs to be ridden faster and faster.

The downside many mention is the number of pivots. Yes, we have lots of them, but we made them as easy to replace as possible every 250 hours, although annual maintenance service/inspection is required. They can be driven out of the opposite side of the frame, and we have no fork bushings and seals to replace.

Nothing is perfect for everyone, but we're making a sincere effort to build a smoother, faster, more confidence-inspiring bike. We are extremely happy with the results, and we hope you'll take it for a hard ride and tell us what you think.
  • + 2
 @Magellan35: Fair enough. Thanks.
  • + 2
 @Magellan35: That's a fair offer.........progress scares all of us at the beginning.....Kudos to you for thinking outside the box Magellan35.
  • + 1
 Shocking!
  • + 0
 it needs a bucket in the front for the vomit
  • + 1
 Demo tour?
  • + 0
 Burn it!... burn it with fire!
  • + 1
 Levy would love this
  • + 0
 I demand a Pinkbike test!!!
  • + 1
 36er when?
  • + 0
 Terminator bike, cut to the part where Arnold Schwarzenegger walks out ...
  • - 2
 Deer makers of linkage forks,
We are not interestsed in you. You are hideous! No need to "re invent the wheel". Please stop.
Sincerely,
Everyone who rides mountain bikes
  • + 3
 medic? we thought you might like to be less busy? considering the SCW1 has 40% less dive... come ride one!
  • + 1
 When you find your 'big girl panties' you can come try one medicdan....
  • + 0
 Looks like expensive dental bills if you ride it
  • + 0
 As long as you close your eyes when you’re riding it, it’ll be fine.
  • + 0
 Technology is absolutely present but looks is definitely not there.
  • + 0
 Missing gearbox and motor!
  • + 1
 why
  • + 0
 Nah. Pass. It's missing a high pivot.
  • + 0
 Imagine this with a naild rear end????
  • + 0
 The final frames look quite ok
  • + 0
 Really fires me up to pin it when everyone is pointing and laughing at me
  • - 1
 Looks wild. I'd totally ride it.
  • + 0
 I'd ride it
  • - 1
 What a waste of money, time, and resources.
  • + 1
 Three racers on two of our bikes have entered four races in less than a month. None of them had more than an hour on our bike before racing. The result was four podiums.

Post a Comment



You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.173317
Mobile Version of Website