Pinkbike Poll: Do You Work on Your Skills?

May 22, 2015 at 14:07
by Rachelle Frazer Boobar  
It's so easy to get wrapped up in the two basic veins of improvement on the bike: fitness and strength. Season in, season out, we try and build on our base and come back into the next year fitter and stronger than the last so we can crush our friends and the trail just a little bit harder. But how much effort and thought do you apply to improving your skills? When embarking onto the trails as a new mountain biker there is so much to learn, from bike handling, to body position, reading terrain and so on. But as we progress, we can sometimes get stuck in our ways and the progression slows down. We start to know what we're good at, and what we're not so good at, and can become culprits of pigeonholing ourselves. Phrases such as, "Oh, I'm not a jumper," or "I am not a good descender" can become entrenched in our vocabulary.

So, when these things happen, what do you do? Do you take a lesson?

Chris getting all sideways while shooting my Deep Summer slide show...

Fancy cornering like the Karver? Chris and his wife both coach riders with a wide range of abilities.


There's an absolute plethora of bike clinics available to riders these days that cater to beginners, intermediates and the advanced. But how willing are we to acknowledge our weaknesses and slow down for a day or two in order to speed up? Is taking a lesson too expensive, too boring or too un-cool?

After years of success with Women's Wednesday's, Whistler Mountain Bike Park last year started Testosterone Tuesdays. Men from all ability levels came and learned riding skills and tips from some of the best riders in the area: Adam Billinghurst, Corey LeClerc, and Harry Armstrong among others. The turn-out was big, and groups of men returned week after week to learn better lines and better habits. The guys got a free beer and a chance to win prizes at the end of it and no doubt they improved up their placing in the local weekly Phat Wednesday race series as well. It wasn't break the bank expensive - was it un-cool? You'll have to ask them, but there's no doubt, the participants rode away each day with another tip or two in their back pocket and likely some sense of achievement.

What would the catalyst be for you to want to take the time to progress your skills and become that well-rounded bike rider you've always dreamed of being? Would you ever go so far as to take a lesson?

How do you progress your skills?

This poll is closed




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Author Info:
rachellefrazer avatar

Member since Jul 20, 2010
143 articles

146 Comments
  • 148 6
 I'm too concerned about having fun, I don't care if i'm slow or not enough skilled.
  • 46 1
 This is why bike parks and local trails are so good. Just keep working at one or a few particular parts, like that scary double, a large drop, or that technical switchback climb, until you mentally and physically are there and send it. That's one of the most fun parts of riding for me personally.
  • 25 0
 Damn right. Now sending the big ass kickers which i was afraid of last year. best feeling ever
  • 5 1
 Damn right Now doing wheelies like neger before, turning corners like. Well... youd get the idea
  • 16 0
 you're always fast for you're ability. If you're not very good and you're going 20 km/h you will be just as excited as if you're good and you're going 50 km/h. Its all in the mind Wink Obviously not being able to send the big jump line but seeing others doing so aint as fun as doing being able to jump the whole thing...
  • 5 1
 I have found that after a few skills clinics...my skills improve. Weird. Being able to make your technique and riding an unconscious extension of your body rather than having to think about everything you are doing and worrying about the trail comes from having people teach you the skills to do so. Take a skills clinic, you won't be disappointed.
  • 27 1
 Wheres the option for'I watch countless bike videos and learn from them'? It works i tell ya!
  • 4 2
 @jakecallcut
that's what i do
i repeat every single video to see exactly what they're doing
if you watch brandon sememnuks videos repeteatly you can see exactly what muscels he is tensioning and what muscels he was training

little hint
stright back and loose/strong arms/legs ... brandon is one of those guys where you can see that the bike is no longer a bike or a tool.. it's a part of him ..that's how it looks like
  • 8 1
 Bas vansteenbergen is my inspiration because he is so sick plus he is actually human. Brandon S is not human, he belongs to the same race as 'The stig' from top gear, and the masked woman from the program 'The cube'.
  • 4 0
 I agree, I watch as much footage as I can (avoid the crash videos), and try to visualize what the pros are doing and when I ride, as odd as it sounds, on those good, flow, ninja moments - I feel like I look like what I have playing in my head. . . It's hard to explain, and I'm sure I look like a squid, but it really helps (or adds to the fun).
That, and I hit the gym more now and spend more time doing corner repeats and muscle memory drills. Over and over. My riding buddies don't like it, but when I do finally just ride (once or twice a month) - it's SO RAD.
We'll test it all out in Mammoth in a few days / weeks!
  • 2 0
 Your like the American me Smile
  • 3 6
 They Should do a poll to see how many people think the prices for half these bikes on here are ridiculously overpriced. In my opinion nothing thats five years or older is worth even 1000 bucks
  • 1 0
 If you hone your skills, you can only have more fun. I just focus on one thing I want to make better each ride, i.e. braking, leaning in turns, etc. Then you get the fun of your bad habits while making other habits less prevalent.
  • 1 1
 The go to video would be "SRAM: Wandering, Brandon Semenuk". Watched that one in slow-mo countless times.
  • 6 1
 WTF? Where's the option "I compensate for skills by buying the latest and greatest crap the bike industry suckers me into??!"

There's a lot of folks out there who think new gear = more skills.

Take a lesson! It's worth it!
  • 4 0
 You have to ask yourself this question: Would you hire yourself for a skills lesson? Even Aaron Gwin has a coach...

There is no better money invested than in yourself. Why use trial and error for years trying to figure something out, when you can just take a skills clinic and learn it correctly in a weekend? (shameless plug for DirtSmartMTB.com - you're welcome Andy)
  • 5 0
 I just huck shit n hope it works out. That's pretty much how I learn tricks.
  • 1 0
 you can have MORE fun if u work on your skills
  • 1 0
 @NWuntilirest I have same method. #YOLO
  • 1 0
 @hutchjr

Spot on, everyone's battle is ultimately with themselves and 'the edge' is a very personal place and available to anyone. This always fits nicely in with my theory that you can be on the ragged edge and/or have fun on almost any bike. As far as not being able to do things you see others doing, if it's attainable it's a carrot on a stick. If it's not, it's just a dude driving a Bugatti when you earn minimum wage... Nice to look at, unlikely to be achieved.
  • 1 0
 I need help. Tried riding without a chain....not getting better. Any tips?
  • 2 0
 I watch videos of Isaac Wallen cause he is the best rider in the United States. He is my favorite rider ever, I wish I could be him.
  • 65 1
 There's no "I ride chainless so I don't need a lesson" option ?
  • 15 0
 i was once forced to do that an entire day in a bike park which just has little elevation and just natural trails and keeping your momentum is the only way to have fun (even with a chain). best lesson of my riding career so far. speed carried through turns basically doubled during that day. i can only recommend that to anyone!
  • 16 0
 cant wait to see how many people are chainless at the bike park this weekend
  • 34 1
 chain for sale: pedalled twice
  • 3 2
 ))))
  • 1 0
 Haha we used to do 'no pedalling' 4x races down at chicky. Great fun, always pretty close. Good practice too and tbh just as much of a workout trying to pump everything as doing a few pedal strokes and sailing over shit. Probably more.

Here's a thought, did neko kinda prove that on modern steep dh courses the time spent putting a chain back on if you had only dropped it, isn't worth it? If he hadn't broken his chain, had stopped and put it back on the ring and carried on, do people think he would have caught up with the other version of him that just carried on regardless? I don't. He was flying!
  • 52 0
 Apparently 54 people are Josh Bryceland
  • 13 0
 128 now. Too many ratboys.
  • 31 2
 **BREAKING* HOSPITALS WORLDWIDE EXPERIENCING BROKEN FOOT EPIDEMIC*
  • 30 1
 Bike parks save millions no longer making landings for jumps, as previous attempts went unused.
  • 8 0
 Either 305 people are liars, or Brycleand is secretly a Ninja and he's got shadow clones...
  • 3 0
 Holy sh*t they're everywhere :0
  • 3 0
 hahaha the world can't handle any more RatBoys!
  • 11 1
 'On today's news: Barbers go out of business due to sudden long hair epidemic'
  • 5 0
 The colony of little rats is growing up... O-O
  • 6 3
 sudden drop in linguistic ability in local communities. but sudden rise in cunning linguist abilities. go figure.
  • 5 0
 This is to prove that rats not only ride fast, they also reproduce incredibly fast, hundreds appear in just a few hours.
  • 3 2
 I am the real Ratboy. Fuck off, wankers!
  • 1 0
 When I was a kid playing football, we used to say shit like 'I'm Lineker!' and pretend you were them when you scored or whatever. I wonder how many grown ups still do this, popping out of a local berm with a roost flying and Warner in their head going 'look at the speed on the Rat'. I hope it's a lot.
  • 2 0
 I say Jordan when I dunk. Kinda like that?
  • 1 0
 YeaBooooooooii
  • 1 0
 over 1100 Rats now, WTF
  • 45 0
 Ride w/ people better than you, you'll improve.
  • 2 10
flag bikerguy957 (Jun 19, 2015 at 0:12) (Below Threshold)
 yes i agree but the best thing you can have in biking is confidence and there is no to much Thats why i think i am a josh bryceland
  • 7 4
 I always think you need to be careful using that technique. Somebody better than you may have the ability to make something look easy, when it comes to your turn you could find yourself in trouble.
  • 4 1
 From my experience, if you are good enough to keep up then you most likely will be able to ride the same lines as they do if you don't freak out and hinder the bike. Being towed into a jump line or big drop may be a different story because these take more confidence and skill.
  • 2 0
 it really depends on how much the better guys care about you. When i'm riding with someone less experienced i try to ride with the speed needed to clear particular sections, not as fast as i could. But i've ridden with people who don't give a f*ck about you and just hit it, there's no way for me to improve when i can't see them anymore after 1 min riding. (and when you try to keep up with them and u don't even know the trail, it's not gonna end well)
  • 1 0
 It all comes down to the individual trail, a better rider will naturally carry more speed through a section without the need to push and will maintain that speed better. on rough ground for example that extra speed will allow you to bounce across the section a lot easier than the slower person who gets bogged down. I've been In situations where people have been following me, knowing this I took things steady but yet they were nowhere to be seen after 200m.
  • 2 1
 You don't learn skills by riding with people better than you. You learn by practicing a specific skill, practicing often, and practicing well.
  • 3 0
 I agree with AllMountain. Riding with better riders doesn't help your skill so much as helping your confidence. To master any particular skill and hardwire it into your neurons you need to practice it (a lot, if you want to really get it down). Following a better rider closely on a sketchy line may help you to prove yourself that it can be done, thereby boosting your confidence. Following that same rider down a jump line will eliminate worries about casing/overshooting, since they will have the speed for each feature already nailed down. Not worrying about the speed needed gives you the confidence to work on other skills.

That's my .02 anyway.
  • 2 0
 @allmountin

You're right, but the distinction is that whilst you don't 'learn' skills that way, you're almost guaranteed to 'pick some up'.
  • 25 0
 I suggest getting a copy of Mastering Mountain Bike Skills by Lee McCormack. Practice what that book says and then pay for a lesson to fine tune your new skills. Clinics are more expensive than books so you'll get more value for money when you drop the big bucks.
  • 4 0
 I missed this option in the poll too. There's plenty of content out there (from which, Lee's is still the best), and apart from "just riding" sometimes I try to work on my skills based on these information.
  • 3 0
 i got that book for my birthday and i read it every night before a race back when I was smaller.... It taught me a lot of stuff that nobody has (even to this day) ever told me about
  • 3 0
 That's a super book. I need to dig mine out and re-read it.
  • 2 0
 Been riding and racing MTB for 20 years, did a clinic with Lee Likes Bikes last year with my brother before we headed back to Whistler, was great and pointed out where we were making some basic mistakes that we'd been riding around. It helped by starting from really basic foundation level things like position and weight balance at very low speeds and working up to real trail speeds with good form. A couple of hours with a real coach definitely helps and made my riding more enjoyable, and faster! His book is a good resource as well. Riding with faster riders gets you faster, but you may be skipping steps in building proper technique and hit plateaus that are frustrating. Strong foundation of proper technique means higher potential.
  • 1 0
 This book and his website are amazing tools. I have not taken a clinic, but it's on my list.
  • 1 0
 Agreed - great book. If you get a chance to work with Lee, do it
  • 24 2
 Who needs skills when you have #swag
  • 16 2
 Is that what you kids call a hashswag?
  • 15 1
 No option for selecting self skilling by practicing lines and obsticles? Do this a lot with riding companions, watching others then re practicing helps a lot.
  • 8 0
 No option for watching gmbn vids on YouTube either, which is what I do if I need tips Smile
  • 1 0
 Agreed. I build confidence by just hitting the same section of trail or the whole trail as much as possible so i can memorize every little rock or root ahead so there is no surprises when u decide to let the brakes go.
  • 1 0
 Was wondering this too. Being self-aware and comparing yourself to better riders is the best way to improve in my experience.
  • 10 1
 I just go do the things I'm scared of, and build it up slowly. I talk to people at the trails about it and listen to any advice. I've never liked jumps and being in the air so I've focused on visiting jump parks and DH parks for the last year and am now really enjoying some sweet airtime! I feel I might take a skills clinic when I no longer improve my skills by talking to people and pushing my own limits.
  • 8 0
 Jumps and drops is a major confidence issue for me. On a trail I know if have no problem, but come up to a drop on a trail I don't know well and I start to have doubts
  • 3 0
 I had a big off a couple of years ago, unil then I had no trouble getting in the air over quite a lot of stuff. But since the crash I lost all confidence, and haven't really got it back since. The problem is overthinking mainly. I've been considering skillschools and the like to build that confidence back, but I'm gradually getting there!
  • 3 0
 I think everyone from a pro like Semenuk to the likes of us has been there. The best cure I have found for the doubts and anxiety about trying new stuff or bigger stuff is to gets some skills whether by a course or reading and videos. Then remember the fact that you have the skills and how it all worked out last time. Armed with the knowledge/skills base and remembering that you have the skills and applying them does work, works wonders for confidence. Walk a new tech section before you try it and imagine riding it applying the skills and then only do it.
  • 2 1
 Dude, have some coaching. I too have had some big offs recently that knocked my confidence so had some coaching (mainly jumping but also followed the coach whilst he was shredding it which taught me a lot). The difference in my riding is like night and day. And you know know what....best thing is I now absolutely shred my mates
  • 2 0
 Another one for coaching. When I learned to jump at Dirt Series, I was blown away by how easy it is when you know how to do it right! From never-ever at 8am, to many laps of the baby jump lines at Whistler's skills park, to backsiding everything on Crank It Up by 4pm, and feeling totally safe and in control. Do it, it's the best money you'll ever spend.
  • 2 0
 I hope it's cool to link to Lee's site - but this: www.leelikesbikes.com/the-triangle-of-trust.html
  • 3 0
 I've taken quite a few skills clinics/camps and the big take-away has been "technique first; practice second, and third, and fourth etc". Something as universal as cornering is incredibly complicated and a good coach will break it down and focus on where you're going wrong - this quickly translates into increased speed and fun.
Getting some coaching on jumps and drops helps too; I don't know how many people I've had to tell "don't pull-up on a drop", but I didn't know any better until a coach taught me about preloading before the drop, so I'm grateful for that.
I also had some great help in line selection, letting the rear wheel square off corners, etc. The reality is that riding is fun, but seeing yourself improve makes it "more funner" - so do whatever it takes to improve!
  • 1 0
 This discussion has reminded me of something we planned to do last summer.. In the gym you perfect techniques by watching each other and giving advice what to change to improve. Me and my brother said we were going to go session somewhere and watch each other ride, because normally you would ride a section, you know you hit it badly but you just carry on to the next section.

I've always used the Fabian barrel videos to improve skills in cornering etc, unless somebody knows of a better one?
  • 1 0
 Same here, even same height, always hesitate
  • 6 0
 I work on my skills as much as I can. I ride park and dirt jumps cause it helps with flow. I practice corners and pushing into them as hard as I can. Parking lot drills work a lot better than you think guys, just set up markers and try to corner them as fast and as sharp as you can for an hour and your cornering improves greatly! I practice downhills and technical sections as much as I can because I'm a downhill rider, so a lot of that comes with finding good trails. And sometimes not taking the smooth line - taking the sketchy and difficult line isn't pretty but if you can figure out how to make it smooth and fast it definitely helps your riding!
  • 5 0
 I had a huge off at fort bill a few years ago. (Think torn ACL, goosed meniscus a cracked kneecap and shredded cartilage!) Due to work I haven't had a lot of time to get back on the bike but that's what I'm trying to do right now. I found that all my confidence had gone but it's getting there slowly but surely. Following better riders is definitely helping as is talking to them and getting tips. Couple of months ago if my back end slipped on a root I went all rigid and had to change my pants. Slowly but surely I'm getting back into letting the bike do its thing and move around under me. Thinking about taking a class or two, so if anyone's got any feedback on good or bad points I'm all ears. It's a long road but I'll get there with the help of random people at the parks. Cheers randomers!
  • 1 0
 I had a day with Joe Rafferty at Pro Ride Guides, I would wholly recommend it. The guys who didn't come on the course couldn't believe how much quicker and more smoothly I was riding. We ended the day doing stuff I never imagined I would be doing like hitting a little berm at full speed with my handlebar next to the ground. I highly recommend getting some expert tuition even if you hadn't had your confidence knocked back.
  • 1 0
 I may have a little look at that mate. Thanks for the recommendation matey!
  • 3 0
 Lessons are the only progression point for me as all my mates are now with kids and the ride groups in Bristol seem way too clicky for a new and fairly shit rider to be welcomed on board which is a shame.
  • 1 0
 Come to Canada man, no cliques here!
  • 2 0
 I recently realized I pretty much flatlined on my mtb downhill skills. Partly due to me not riding harder/faster but not looking for trails that push me. Then I went to BC to ride....that woke me up. I was really flatlined! Now I'm looking for more techy stuff, I'd love to learn how to huck more stuff. Growing up a XC guy I never really wanted to catch much air. Now that I'm older I wanna have FUN!!
  • 2 0
 I find it hard to ride with faster people or groups mainly because mtn. Biking is VERY cliquey (sp?). A lot of the faster guys won't even want you to ride with them because you're too "slow" or not "cool" enough. That's why I ride alone %95 of the time. I don't have time for cliquey bullshit. I just wanna ride and get faster and I've found since I've been riding alone I am getting faster and having more fun.
  • 1 0
 Started...buying bikes, in shop, 1994...worked part-time for said shop while also keeping a full-time job, getting friends hooked on this sport...20 years later, I still have a full-time job but, but time, I am an "outside salesman"
20-% off on parts, wholesale price -10% on my bikes, as I pay cash, and the bike is on the box, know what you do, do what you know!!!
  • 1 0
 Been riding bikes all my life but, only been into DH the last few years 17 yr old lad in my town had no driving licence an needed a lift to the hills At nearly 40, I learned SO MUCH, just trying to any where near keep up with that young blood Riding with him taught me the DH style to just let go an charge through stuff
  • 1 0
 Crashed straight into a tree after the drop on the top of stage 4 of the EWS Ireland trails. Going back up to practice practice practice so I can nail that type of drop on my HT. I usually work on my weakest links as they show themselves. Always tring to be an all round rider able for anything! That's the plan anyway...
  • 1 0
 Ride with the fast guys and try to keep up. Then you can ask them to give pointers and advice.
Next best thing I did was read a guide to mountain bike skills that mountain bike magazine put together with Ned Overend a while back. Lots of good skills I still work on fine tuning (the book is at least 15 years old).
  • 1 0
 Why can't we have multiple answer choices? It's not cut and dry that simply. Any top pro has had many coaches and actively rides with their piers. The role of pier switchs for them reularly, but it's all in the name of progress and it reciprocates. I understand that others may feel differently, however it is part of progression. My 2 cents
  • 1 0
 Would kill for some good lessons. I become a better rider every time I pedal, but if biking is like literally every single other sport on the planet, 1 lesson can fast forward through 6 months of improvements. I don't give a single shit about being fast, or steezy, just want to be able to ride the fun lines which unfortunately I'm neither fast nor steezy enough to do.
  • 1 0
 I have been riding DH etc., for around 18 years, have been in whistler for the last 14 days and decided to take a coaching session with Chris Kovarik - I would recommend anyone take a lesson from any registered coach as you will be surprised at what you will pick up. I have found new ways to corner - improve my cornering, line choice, braking habits and much more You really do improve and that adds more fun to your riding - and that can never be a bad thing
  • 1 0
 I took a skill at my local bike park and its the best thing i ever did for my riding. My corner was awful! no matter what i read on video i watched nothing seemed to work a few hours working on it with someone that knew what he was doing totally changed my riding. In fact i plan on booking another one soon as i want to get better at jumps.
  • 1 1
 I find using the park next to my house helps a ton (like a public park with benches and swings) you can turn parking blocks into downed trees, hills into berms, and walls into skinnies. Watch a couple YouTube videos before going out and you have your own skills clinic (with a bunch of kids and parents starting at you)
  • 1 0
 I work on my skills every time I ride. I dont complacently go down a trail. I always push my abilities, which allows for constant improvement. I may not be Ratboy, but I am the Fanzanoon
  • 2 0
 Buy a hardtail and that will teach ya some handling skills. Plus you get lots of looking of surprise when you show up at downieville on one !
  • 1 0
 I just want 2 bike skills to master - bunny hop ( the kind where you can hop over 2 feet) and the wheelie. Yes i practice it in my rides but no i dont ride just to practice it.
  • 1 0
 How about "I read the pinkbike forums and practice what I read" option. But seriously, I'll pick a corner or jump or tech section and run through it until I feel like I dialed it.
  • 1 1
 GMBN How-To Videos on youtube (www.youtube.com/channel/UC_A--fhX5gea0i4UtpD99Gg)

Then lots of manualing, bunny hopping, endo ridin practice in the yard and road until I can get out on the trail again.
  • 4 1
 Simply had to click "I am Bryceland".
  • 2 0
 You rat! Razz
  • 1 0
 As did I. The answers are rigged to basically read: a) i attend skillz clinic or b) i suck at life
  • 3 0
 By working on skills do you mean drinking beer?
  • 1 0
 I did one of the Kovarik clinics earlier this year. Money well spent. Nothing like following the master down your local trails. (Even if he was going 1/4 speed)
  • 1 0
 I mostly read stuff first then apply later. Also trying out different discipline aside from MTB. Crazy how you can transfer one lesson to another discipline.
  • 2 0
 hahaha i'm in my job and them i read "I don't need a lesson, I am Josh Bryceland" pretty funny
  • 2 0
 "I read books" should figure among the list of survey questions. Shouldn't it? Brian Lopes's book anyone?
  • 1 0
 I've taken 2 skills clinics from Myles Rockwell, 2 awesome learning sessions. It has really helped me up my game and be more confident. Pr's on every descent now
  • 1 0
 Where is the `I`d employ any resource to better my riding skill set`. Or the `a clinic is on my to do list`.
  • 1 0
 riding with people who are better than you is for sure one of the best ways to improve
  • 1 0
 Ride different types of riding, get fit, get strong, get to a BMX track, get to dirt jumps, commute on your bike etc. etc.
  • 2 0
 i just ride, sometime following and asking people who are faster than me
  • 2 0
 Having someone to egg you on! Smile HAAVVE IT!! WHIP IT OUT!!! WOOOOO
  • 1 0
 Griz's lessons at Fontana are the way to go. Even if you think you're ratboy, cutting the shuttle line is worth it alone.
  • 1 0
 Combination of the first three, always looking to push beyond what I can do at that moment in time...
  • 4 1
 Fabien Barel videos
  • 2 0
 Plus 2 if I could! I bookmarked them and re-watch them at least twice a year - also don't forget the epic - "optimum vs. maximum"
(google Fabian optimum vs. maximum)
  • 1 0
 I don't even have any good skills. You know like nunchuck skills, bow hunting skills, computer hacking skills.
  • 1 0
 Pumptrack. Since I've been riding a pumptrack my riding skills have gone up a level or two.
  • 1 0
 I just ride and try to get better.
  • 1 1
 If ya ridin to pay bills, ya better work on dem skillz.

Riding for fun, ya can still work em a ton. :-)
  • 1 0
 Really good to see alot of people are Josh bryceland.....
  • 1 0
 I have done a few one on one lessons with Karver himself. Helped so much
  • 1 0
 I have a jump setup at home and I practice pn those.
  • 1 0
 More like do I not work on my skills?
  • 1 0
 Okay so far at least 261 people on this site are lairs
  • 2 1
 I just try to go faster every time I hit atrail that I often ride on
  • 2 0
 I drink wine Big Grin !
  • 3 1
 I am cam zink
  • 1 0
 Could I get a YT with Hope E4 steel braid line brakes, and the super thin Deity pedals and King hubs and BB and headset?
  • 1 0
 you forgot to say........please!
  • 1 0
 Please? and Thank you.
  • 1 0
 *I don't need a lesson. I am Aaron Gwin.

That's a bit more accurate.
  • 1 0
 Betterride class, best money spent ever
  • 1 0
 Where's the "just huck it" option?
  • 1 0
 Don't sounds... Really?
  • 1 0
 Shure I do work that
  • 1 0
 Do you even ride bro?
  • 1 0
 Lawton & Sternberg.
  • 3 3
 I'm Josh Bryceland.
  • 14 0
 Nice to meet you, I'm Josh Bryceland #61. How are the others doing?
  • 7 1
 I am Josh Bryceland 142. Can't believe that more people did not go for that option. I was sure that it would have been the top result.
  • 1 0
 I am Josh Bryceland 141, who the hell are you?
  • 2 5
 well I'm working with Downhill Mountain Bike Simulator on my PC in order to improve my skills.
  • 2 5
 "I'm not a good jumper........I am Josh Bryceland!"
  • 3 1
 you a fleece then?







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