First Ride: 2020 Propain Tyee

Jan 13, 2020 at 13:12
by Ralf Hauser  


After fine-tuning their enduro sled, the Tyee, over the past years, it came time for Propain to take a serious look at the platform and introduce some major improvements. Influenced by their experiences with its predecessors, and their first 29er - the Hugene - along with valuable input from their World Cup downhill team, they cherry-picked the most favorable features and ride characteristics to form the 2020 Tyee. Not wanting to compromise in any way, the new Tyee is available in 29” and 27.5” versions, each with a dedicated frame.

To give you a little insight about the small company's dedication and enthusiasm of their employees, their CEO, Robert Krauss, is the one responsible for drawing up the new Tyee, and most of the other bikes in Propain's history. Part of Propain's design process includes a kick-off meeting before the start of each new project, where everyone from the company - all avid bikers themselves - is invited to provide input as to what direction the final new product should head and what features should be integrated.


Tyee CF Details
• Wheel size: 29" or 27.5"
• Rear wheel travel: 160mm
• Blend carbon frame
• 64.5° head angle
• Chainstays: 445mm (29"), 430mm (27.5")
• Frame weight (w/o shock): 2,700g (size M)
• 12 x 148mm rear spacing
• Sizes: M-XL
• Colors: Bad Mint, Mars Red Dark, Raw Carbon
• Price: from €2,999 to €7,724


Tyee AL Details
• Blend Aluminum frame
• Frame weight (w/o shock): 3,700g (size M)
• Sizes: S-L
• Colors: Mars Red, Petrol, Raw
• Price: from €2,399 to €6,974
www.propain-bikes.com, @propain-bikes



2020 Propain Tyee

Frame Details

The Tyee is available in carbon or aluminum for both 29” and 27.5” versions. Propain use their Blend Carbon process, which makes use of various carbon materials with different properties that are best suited for the job at certain locations of the frame. Depending on the requirements of stiffness, flexibility, impact resistance, weight, strength or stress direction, different fibers and cloths are used and combined to create a unique blend.

Using a similar process for aluminum with their Blend Alloy concept, different alloys are combined in a single frame. Propain uses at least three different alloys on a frame, with the tubes usually being made from a more fatigue-resistant material than forged or CNC-machined parts. Parts that don’t need to be welded together, like links and axles, are usually made out of 7075 T6 aluminum, which offers very high strength, but is difficult to weld.

Weight for the size M carbon frame comes to 2,700g without shock, 3,700g for the aluminum version.

2020 Propain Tyee
2020 Propain Tyee

Both aluminum and carbon feature internal cable routing, but the carbon variant is also equipped with internal cable routing channels, making it very simple to route the cables and eliminating possible noises from cables hitting the frame walls.

The frame also features a threaded bottom bracket. Propain has developed its own system for attaching ISCG mounts, sliding an ISCG adapter onto a counter-piece of the CF's aluminum bottom bracket insert or respectively the AL's bottom bracket tube. That way, if a bash guard is mounted, impact forces are spread over a larger area, protecting the frame. Also, if the mounts get damaged they can easily be replaced. Propain used their own test bench during the development process of their frames, putting them under a load of 500,000 cycles, tested beyond their prescribed standards for performance, load and durability. The Tyee enduro model is listed in category five for unrestricted bike park approval.

Even though the older model had a guard protecting the shaft of the rear shock from rear tire spray, many people are going to appreciate the fact that the shock now sits tucked away inside the main frame triangle. There is still enough space for a bottle cage mount inside that triangle.

A new down tube guard and chainstay guard has been formed for the Tyee. The chainstay guard features soft hollow ribs to reduce noise from chain slap. Acros bearings are additionally protected by Propain Dirt Shields, an extra seal on top of the industrial bearings to shield them from dust, water, and dirt.

With three frame colors for each tire size to choose from and multiple decal options using plotted vinyl foil (with new chrome colorway added to an already broad range), you can tweak the Tyee's appearance to your liking. Frame color Mars Red Dark and Petrol are new, with Carbon Raw's glossy clear coat showing the various layers of the Blend Carbon structure. The Raw aluminum style is now treated with a special coating, featuring a matte finish.

Geometry

29" Tyee
2020 Propain Tyee

27.5" Tyee
2020 Propain Tyee

There are three frame sizes available for both the 27.5” and 29” models, although the smaller wheels are available from S to L, the bigger wheels from M to XL sizes. Most measurements between 29” and 27.5” differ only slightly.

A steep 77.1 degree seat tube angle supports the bike’s climbing capabilities. The head angle measures 64.5-degrees for all versions. Both the 29" and 27.5" versions use forks with 42mm offset and 170mm of travel.

The reach is modern but not overly aggressive by today’s standards, measuring 431mm at size S and moving 20mm up for every size, all the way to 491mm for a size XL.

Steer tube length is 15 mm shorter on the big-wheeled models for comparable frame sizes. Understandably, stack is still about 20mm taller for the 29” bikes. Also, the chainstay length sits at 445mm for the 29” version, and since Propain moved the shock in front of the seat tube, they were able to shorten them to 430mm on the 27.5” models.


2020 Propain Tyee


Suspension Design

Twelve years ago, the foundation for the PRO10 suspension concept was laid, a virtual pivot layout with two counter-rotating links, activating a floating shock from both sides. The new Tyee features the latest evolution of that PRO10 system, locating the shock within the main triangle of the frame, compared to sitting in between the rear wheel and seat tube on the previous version, and provides 160mm of rear wheel travel.

As far as kinematics go, Propain has been constantly optimizing the ratio of the rear suspension over the years to get to the point where they feel they have reached the ideal progression curve. Therefore, they chose not to make any changes to it in their latest edition.

2020 Propain Tyee
2020 Propain Tyee

Starting at a high ratio for improved small-bump-sensitivity and with strong digression (delivering high progression at the rear end) towards the second half of the travel, the system is designed to withstand a proper beating and work well with air and coil shocks alike.

Although the leverage ratio is still the same, Propain was able to raise the anti-squat values from 70 to an average of about 110%, aiding its pedaling efficiency.


2020 Propain Tyee

Specifications


Every bike in Propain's lineup is completely customizable. However, there are some predefined packages available that can be fine-tuned. With their online configurator, multiple frame and decal colors, suspension elements, components, and even handlebar heights and stem lengths are on the menu, making it possible to tune the bike to your personal preference. The online order system has been completely revamped as well.

2020 Propain Tyee

The aluminum versions of the Tyee start at €2,399 and go up to €6,974; carbon models start at €2,999 and go all the way to €7,724.

You can order the new Tyee as of now in their online-order shop, with a regular delivery time of about 35 working days. Propain is also working hard on making their bikes available for the North American market during Q1 of 2020.


2020 Propain Tyee

2020 Propain Tyee






At 168 cm tall, I could have chosen to ride a 27.5" S or M size, or medium 29" model. I opted for a 29” size M with air shocks, allowing me to fine-tune the suspension during my rides. Personally, I wouldn't want to ride a bike with less than a reach of 450mm anymore, if I have the option, so I would have also picked the medium 27.5" version. The seat tube lengths could be a tad shorter, as they might limit some people running dropper posts with longer drop, depending on their inseam, as well as limiting the option to step up to a bigger frame size a bit, in case they are looking for a longer reach.

My medium 29er test bike with the Performance spec package, which includes a RockShox Lyrik Ultimate, Super Deluxe Ultimate Air rear shock, aluminum wheels and mostly aluminum parts - had a total weight of 14.65kg (32.3 lb) with pedals.

With shuttles acting as our main source of getting up the mountains, climbing time aboard the new Tyee was limited. That limited time, however, was very informative, as it involved crawling up an uncomfortably steep paved section, some challenging and rather loose singletrack uphill, as well as mellow fire roads interspersed with hardpack and deep sand sections alike. As it turned out, the Tyee 29 with turned out to be an excellent climber.

Equipped with air shock, there was no noticeable unwanted wallowing from the suspension, thanks probably in part to the anti-squat value around 110 percent. Even when pushing harder out of the saddle it didn't feel as if your shock was replaced with a bowl of Jello. Overall, the 29"r version accepted changes in speed willingly (leading to the assumption that the 27.5 option would even excel in this category) and the bike always felt lighter than its weight on the scale would suggest, not that this value is bad at all for a 170/160mm bike of this caliber.

2020 Propain Tyee


I‘ve never ridden the Tyee‘s predecessor, but keeping the suspension kinematics and leverage ratio the same sure was a wise decision. The rear end’s progressive nature allows for running the bike with either a coil or air shock, seemingly without negative side effects... At least, I didn’t hear any of my colleagues that were running a coil shock complain.

I am a big fan of bikes that ramp up steadily throughout the mid- and end-stroke in order to maintain support at higher speeds and during bigger impacts from drops or jumps. Even though the O-ring on the Tyee's rear shock indicated that I used full or almost full travel throughout my runs regularly with my setup at about 33 percent, it never once gave me the feeling that I‘d gone beyond the suspension‘s capability. Drops to flat, rolling hard into g-outs after a steep roller or simply slamming into rocks, which we encountered plenty on our runs in La Palma, never made me think twice about the rear end‘s functionality. Apart from that, while soaking hits up thoroughly, the suspension always delivered proper feedback to the ground, making it easy to pop off lips or other obstacles along the way.

It remained composed at higher speeds, and pushing the bike into corners is a blast. WIth the predominately loose surface on our trip I found myself flicking the rear end into tight corners more often in those two days than in the past two months of my riding. The rear end might not be quite as stiff as the old one, but it’s a tune that most of the testers at Propain preferred, reducing chatter slightly in rough sections. The nicely slack head angle of 64.5 degrees might suggest that the steering would be on the slow side, but the Tyee follows rider input quickly and willingly. For a rather big bike with 29" wheels the new Tyee felt very lively and rather playful.

2020 Propain Tyee

It's the sum of all parts that makes a good bike great, and it's hard to find anything missing from the new Tyee, especiaully since there's an option for both 29" and 27.5" fans in carbon and aluminum. The seat tube could be a bit shorter for a wider selection of frame sizes or dropper posts, depending on rider height, but for many riders that's not going to be much of an issue. In the end, the new Tyee just lets you do your thing over a very broad range of riding conditions and speeds and doesn't feel like a dead weight on the way up the hill. And isn't that exactly what enduro is all about?







254 Comments

  • 324 3
 Goddam that's a good looking bike. There's not a bad angle on this thing and the paint job is spot on.
  • 16 0
 And that Performance build looks great!
  • 9 33
flag EnduroManiac (Jan 15, 2020 at 7:49) (Below Threshold)
 Exactly my thought until I stopped on the Reach value. Too short for me Frown I'm not rich enough to gain 6mm of reach. I'll wait longer (time and reach)
  • 10 0
 I've never seen a Propain in the flesh. They look amazing.
  • 18 24
flag lehott (Jan 15, 2020 at 8:19) (Below Threshold)
 You could say that's a Tyee(t) Looking bike!
  • 8 1
 A dude I went riding with recently got one, it looks absolutely stunning and, from what I could tell, rides stunning too.
  • 37 11
 @EnduroManiac: just make sure the reach on your bike matches the reach on your insta. Put some steep posts! Have to wait for The Grim Donut to become available.
  • 3 0
 Beautiful machine.
  • 1 14
flag EnduroManiac (Jan 15, 2020 at 9:47) (Below Threshold)
 @WAKIdesigns: Your Grim Donut is way too short on the front, but I hope this is an M size at 500mm reach.
  • 4 1
 It's too bad they don't come play in the US, I think they'd do well here, if likely but one this year.
  • 1 0
 Agreed

Now how do you buy one on this side of the pond?
  • 38 0
 @ehfour, @Duderz7: We are currently working on it and will post an update within a few weeks.
  • 2 1
 Sick looking ride , would love to take for a rip.
  • 14 11
 @EnduroManiac: now that I think about it I may actually opt to not buy a 24” HT for my 8yr old daughter as it may be too short for her. She should be riding my 27,5” bike with 450 reach. Short isn’t it?
  • 1 8
flag EnduroManiac (Jan 15, 2020 at 12:41) (Below Threshold)
 @WAKIdesigns: That’s what my 6yo rides ????
  • 1 2
 @EnduroManiac: The Grim Donut has a 500mm reach in size "S". How much reach would you like? 510mm, 535mm, 555mm?
  • 2 5
 People ride what they want. If they are 180 but prefer 400mm reach (like I did 8 years ago!), I couldn’t care less as long as I can find something long enough for me.
  • 7 2
 @PROPAIN-Bicycles: you are gonna have to produce A LOT of frames and bikes this year, better prepare yourselves, so there is enough for anyone Wink
  • 20 2
 @WAKIdesigns: not sure what you are doing getting such a small bike for a child that big but ive got a niece on the way and ive just picked up a sick 29er balance bike for her. its got 743mm of reach which i was thinking might be a tad small for her and i was considering welding a new headtube on it to stretch the reach out to something like 779mm. i myself have welded 3 pole evolink xl frames together so i can get my optimal 1500mm reach. that being said i am only 5'11 so the new bike should fit perfect. you should all catch up im living in the future here
  • 6 7
 I was downvoted for saying propain shoud come to the US? What is wrong with you people?
  • 3 1
 @Duderz7: they just want something twice the money
  • 3 1
 @Uchwmdr: there are definitely people here that seem to love paying a premium for a name brand with no benefit, but I'd imagine those people would still do so.
  • 2 4
 That rear triangle looks flexy
  • 1 2
 @PROPAIN-Bicycles: hurry before my kid is too big for that Yuma 26!
  • 2 1
 @Duderz7: I can only assume that someone downvoted as it says in the article that they're coming to the US pretty soon. I think most people are happy for another player with what looks like solid bikes. I know I am. I've lusted after Propains for a while.
  • 1 0
 @MarcusBrody: admittedly, I skimmed the article, my bad.
  • 2 0
 @PROPAIN-Bicycles: propain in the us would be a dream!!!
  • 1 0
 @Duderz7: Anti-Propainers!
  • 1 0
 @ejopdahl: Get international friends and get any bike or part you want.
  • 3 0
 I'd sure like to see one of those short videos demonstrating the suspension movement for this beast!
  • 2 1
 @SintraFreeride: I only remembered it had 500mm reach, not what kind of imaginary size it had. Guessed M as Levy mostly goes for M I think. This all turned out too serious for me. I just find the XL too short for me and it could be too long for some. Wtf.
For me 510-515mm is perfect. Each his own.
  • 1 6
flag Ian713 (Jan 16, 2020 at 1:08) (Below Threshold)
 @T4THH: rides stunning? No, sorry but no.
  • 2 0
 @Ian713: I didn't personally ride it, but he was going fast and having fun so how bad could it be?
  • 2 2
 @Ian713: Have you tried it? If not then I don't see any value in your comment.
  • 2 4
 @T4THH: So it "rides like a blast?"
Yes, I'm being a pedantic c*nt about it, but my bet is that just riding it didn't momentarily cause your mate to lose consciousness.
  • 4 1
 @landscapeben: Okay, fair enough. I respect your freedom to find value where you want to but why are you telling me you don't know how words work?
  • 5 1
 @Ian713: that's not just pedantic it's plain wrong. The word stunning has different legitimate uses in different contexts, such as saying that someone is extremely attractive, that a person said something shocking or as in this case, that the thing being described was very impressive.

I personally get riled every time someone tells me something 'pacifically' and don't get me started on the use of the word literally to mean something non-literal! My point is, there are some linguistic battles worth fighting... this isn't one of them, especially when their use of the word is correct.
  • 2 4
 @landscapeben: I like your moxy and the angle you're approaching this at but no, give me a f*cking break, we don't say a mountain bike "rides stunning." That's neither a legitimate nor accurate use of the word, full, f*cking stop.
  • 3 0
 @Ian713: Ok the grammatically correct sentence would read "the ride was stunning" or "when my friend took it for a ride he said it was stunning", but that's sentence structure and grammar, the word is still legitimate in the context.
  • 2 5
 @landscapeben: In your example, it would follow the scenery made it a stunning ride, the handling characteristics of the bike would not. It's why we say strong coffee and not powerful coffee.

Stunning, cringe/cringey, and cuck all need a time out.
  • 8 0
 @Ian713: @landscapeben: Guys, I'm sorry, but I'm going to have to ask you to take this to MTBR.
  • 2 1
 @MarcusBrody: guilty as charged :/
  • 1 0
 @PROPAIN-Bicycles: God Damn Propain, thats a sick lookin Tyee this year. Bad Mint is a banger, I'd trash my HTLT for this.
  • 1 0
 Yes it does.
  • 1 0
 @MAXC199: ah a man of exquisite taste I see. I personally like a 110 degree seat tube angle so when I'm climbing a hill it's exactly 90 degrees in reference to the sea
  • 105 0
 "I sell propain and propain accessories" -Hank Hill
  • 33 0
 Dang it Bobby!!!
  • 19 0
 @nyhc00: That boy ain't right.
  • 11 0
 I tell you h'what
  • 2 29
flag lehott (Jan 15, 2020 at 16:13) (Below Threshold)
 Wow so creative, where'd you get that one? The television?
  • 9 0
 @lehott: your momma.
  • 7 0
 @lehott: Me and 83 (and counting) pinkbikers found my comment funny. That's why we're happier than you!
  • 3 0
 @nyhc00: 6 o'clock in the morning, and that boy ain't right...
  • 59 1
 We did it Pinkbike! Crashed their server immediately!
  • 4 0
 now we just all need to email and see if that goes down too Big Grin
  • 5 0
 and I thought the Canyonhackers went on to their next victim...
  • 48 1
 Video of the suspension being squished please Smile
  • 5 20
flag trailtaco (Jan 15, 2020 at 7:45) (Below Threshold)
 The suspension squish videos are kind of silly, but this is one bike I would liked to have seen.
  • 46 3
 @trailtaco: you're kind of silly
  • 2 1
 @trailtaco: Why do you think that they are silly?
  • 2 2
 @C23Carrington: They really mean nothing. The linkage on this bike actually seems interesting.
  • 26 0
 Hi, we were expecting a big run on our website but yesterday you made the server melt! We have been working on the problems until late in the night and now we are back online! Cheers
  • 19 1
 Looks promising. I'm excited that Propain will be available in the North America, as I always had a soft spot for them. I'm sad that Phil Atwill doesn't ride for them though, as that was my introduction to the brand and I still associate them.
  • 1 0
 when?
  • 5 0
 @Kmccann137: The article says that Propain is "working hard" to have bikes available in NA the first quarter of 2020.

So I'd bet: End of the 2nd quarter of 2020. Smile
  • 8 0
 Brannigan is on this season - he's a badass too, but I can't see him rocking a silver suit and dancing to Rasputin half as well as Atwill did on Gamble.
  • 36 20
 As a guy standing at 1,68m too, I just can't figure out this 29 wheel size crazyness. I tried one the other day, and I simply can't ride it. Every single time I needed to move my body to the back of the bike, I would hit the wheel. Once or twice it resulted in an heavy nose dive. I admit the bigger wheel sizes might be of some advantage to taller guys, but I've seen a lot of short guys going for them, just because of pure commercial pressure, without any real world advantage. Props to Propain, YT and just a few others for keeping the 650B wheels rolling!
  • 9 0
 I ran a 27,5 wheel in the rear on my transition smuggler and I really think that would be a nice alternative for people on the shorter side. What I like about a 29'er is the big wheel in front of you that inspires you to attack the gnarly stuff harder. The rear wheel can make the bike feel a little sluggish, even though it is easier to hold your momentum. maybe you should try the mullet-setup it sometime if you have the chance.
  • 10 4
 Or maybe people a) live in an ultra rocky/rooty area and they like the better roll-over capabilities of 29er, b) race bikes and ride a 29er because they are faster in nearly every type of MTB race, or c) they are not skilled enough to have an opinion either way, so they are riding a 29er because that's what they happened to purchase.
  • 10 0
 @xphysnerd: C is the likely explanation for a lot of things in biking. Im 6'4" and bought a 27.5 bike when I was still very new to the sport. I love it and see no issue with it. At the time of purchase I wouldn't have been able to tell the difference. Perhaps now I could but maybe ignorance is bliss sometimes.
  • 6 0
 It does seem that commercial pressure has driven the change. I'm about 1,72 and looking for a new bike but torn between 275 & 29. Not ridden a 29 yet. Thinking of just sticking with a more modern 275 that current trance 275. I run a 2.6 up front anyway so it has nice rollover already, could jump to a 2.8.
One issue I see if that all the magazine riders are pro level compared to my ability so that have more skillz to throw 29 around more than I ever will! I think a lot of peeps are going to be over biked now with big wheels and 150mm travel!
  • 19 4
 @mtmc99: I'm 6'4 also, moved onto 27.5 when 26" faded and still ride 27.5 with no desire or feel any need to go 29(I'm actually looking to get another 26" bike for pure trail antics and fun).
I was on a trip recently and the majority of the group are all racers(I don't race anymore, don't want to...I ride to have fun), and each one was hassling me that at my height I should be on a 29. Why? I seemed to ride 26" just fine and I was 6'4 then too! As I always do...I shrug them off.
Next day on trail with these guys...who starts sucking up on the rear wheels of the racers? "Hey hey...big guy on little bike comin' up", I'd say.
I'll also note I never see any of these race guys on 29" bikes popping off roots and rocks and getting creative on the trails..it's all about times and getting through sections fastest.
There is so much hype on enduro racing and being fast that everyone thinks we should all be riding the same way...just plow over stuff, but some of us just want to have fun and not worry about Strava
  • 5 0
 My height is 1.71 m. First few times with my 29er, my butt will always hit the rear wheel whenever I want to put my weight back. Later on I realize that I don't have to put it as far back as I did. A 29er will always inherently harder to endo/OTB compared to its 27.5er counterpart.

Bigger wheels, smaller movement (front and back).

Need bigger movement for turning, though.
  • 4 0
 @GlassGuy: I'm also 6'4" and went from a 29er to 27.5. I'm not anti 29er but the 27.5 has been a great all around fun bike on the trails and bike parks.
  • 4 0
 @mtmc99: c is a great option.. Im just over 6'3 and the 27.5 had me feeling like a circus bear on top the bike.. Mind you this on some of the older geo frames.. Once i got on 29 around 2014 there was no need to go back. I just feel more in the bike and the wheel size to me just feels like 26 used to at this point.. Geo is just so dialed now anyways with both sizes that i dont think it matters much anymore what size a guy chooses..
  • 3 0
 @GlassGuy: I look to pop off stuff all the time, see a root or rock and aim for it- I know it's shocking and I'm a PB heretic, but it can all be done on a 29er.
  • 2 0
 @sostokedaboutthat: the size just grows with u as u progress.. When i first got on 29 i remember it feeling like an unweildy monster truck.. This was a 2014 stumpy comp.. Ive been on 3 frames since.. Now on an sb130. The new geo just makes it so much more dialed. Tossing a new 29er around is no different than a 26 at this point. Atleast once your mind muscle adjustments kick in.. Its like working out and getting stronger where the older weight feels normal after awhile.. Same shit.
  • 3 0
 @GlassGuy: sounds like u need to watch some Kirt Vories edits then.. Dude makes 29 seem like 26. Its an old school mentality to think u cant toss around a 29er in 2020 yo. The geo now is just too good
  • 2 0
 Dude, you have never had it so good. Look at the numbers and buy something like an Evil Offering. Run it in the higher geo setting with a 29” front and 650b rear wheel and you’ll have great numbers, way better than the stock 29” bike.

There are numerous bikes that you can do this to. You don’t even need to worry about SA because your height. The only potential issue can be stack on bikes with longer headtubes.
  • 5 0
 I'm 6'-0" (183cm) and I ride 29", 27.5", and 20" bikes. Well the 20" BMX is more like 21" with the modern 2.4" tires. And my previous bikes were mostly all 26". But I digress... Wheel sizes all have their place. The smoother roll-over ability of 29" is nice when you want to go as fast as possible, the playfulness/agility of 27.5" (and 26") is a lot of fun and can be as fast as 29" in most conditions, and I will always love riding a BMX bike for messing around and more techy maneuvers. Bikes are all great.
  • 1 0
 @bohns1: I might go along with your point except I bought an updated version of the Transition Scout...a bike which caused me to sell all my other bikes. The new version(SBG) has a steeper ST angle, which hadn't occurred to me until after I bought it. With the older Scout(which I still ride), I feel more "in" the bike, as you also mentioned. With the new Scout I felt pushed out in front of the front wheel and I just couldn't get as comfortable. So, it all comes down to the bike you choose, really, and the feel you prefer. My point was more that I don't want people telling me I should ride a certain bike just because of my height, when I often ride better and just as fast as the ones preaching "rules" to me. Bikes are personal and subjective
  • 1 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: I'm sure it can, but I prefer to be left alone and not criticized by people spouting their judgments of rules when it comes to the bike I ride...and this was more my point. I like my bike and I can ride as good and often better than these "race results" guys that are so consumed with what's new and "fast" that they forget about the freedom and fun that bikes give
  • 3 0
 @bohns1: I've watched plenty, and I didn't say a 29" can't do anything, and let's be honest...a guy like that can make anything look wicked and wild. My point was more that I don't care about supposed rules and what's modern and cool, or deemed better...I ride what I like and my height hasn't been a burden on these tiny 27.5 wheels, and I think it's dumb when these race types want to believe that my bike is wrong for me because I am tall, and the fact that I keep up just fine and always ride way more of the trail than they do..because my goal is fun Smile
  • 2 0
 @pnwpedal: I concur! And your explanation is exactly why I'm looking for the 26" version of the Trek Remedy..I loved that bike and I'm wanting to have more play time using a 26"...hopefully those tiny wheels can still handle my gigantic mass of 6'4 human! ha ha
  • 3 0
 Pick a wheel size and be a... well, you know what to do.
  • 1 0
 @GlassGuy: Could you just run 26 in wheels on the 27.5 Remedy? Put the flip chip in high, put a longer airshaft in the Fox 36, and go to town.
  • 3 2
 For fck sake this guy is 5'6" and everyone here is responding, hey I'm 6'4" and love my 29ers.
  • 2 0
 @pnwpedal: Sounds like you need a 22"....
  • 1 0
 @sostokedaboutthat: Well, a 275 with 2.6 tires have the same rollover of the 29 2.2 tires. So you are already on big wheels, with way more squish from the tires. This alone to me is a big bonus, since roadies are going to slightly fatty tires (for them anyway). My preferences are over the fence too, but i'm still going for a new 275 with 2.6 or 2.8 tires over the 29 wagon wheels. I'm 1,75, so basically same bike as you.
  • 1 0
 @bmxslinger: I definitely do. I tried a couple of the 24" modern BMX frames and didn't like them, but the newer 22" geometry is pretty rad and I'd love to give one a try. When I built my 20" there weren't a ton of good options on the market.
  • 1 0
 @pnwpedal: I came across a good deal on an S&M ATF, and it's rad. definitely a time and place. Tight bowls/tranny not so much. Big parks and trails, hell yeah. And it's just more comfortable, as I am also 6'. (used to be, anyways, lol)
  • 1 0
 @GlassGuy: They sure are subjective.. Took me awhile to get used to having to weight the front end on the sb130.. Once i dialed it in and got a shorter stem it felt great.. Everyone is entitled to ride what they like.. For me, the big wheels just make sense.
  • 3 0
 @acali: Well, I'm 5'5" (1.65m) and love my 29ers.
  • 1 0
 @GlassGuy: Thats great.. Depends on ones goals.. Mine is fun and fast.. My point is that once u get used to the size of wheel it really doesnt make much difference.. Sure Voreis can make anything look great.. Just referencing that u dont need to be a racer type to enjoy and habe fun on wagon wheels.
  • 1 1
 @acali: my buddy is 5'2 and shreds 29
  • 1 1
 Get a longer reach bike and ride off the middle and you will cease to have problems with the bigger wheel hitting you.
  • 1 0
 @sostokedaboutthat: I'm about 169 and I've just got a Santa Cruz mega tower. The big wheels are so fast and I've not had the wheel hit my arse once. Love it. Deff try a 29er before you buy anything
  • 1 0
 @MarcusBrody: probably but costs more than an ancient 26" frame, ha ha I want to keep it "economy" since it would be an occasional rider Smile
  • 2 0
 @bohns1: I also can't help but wonder if Voreis(and others), would ride smaller wheels if they didn't have obligations to the brands giving them stuff. His riding is amazing, but, would he be even more comfortable and more loose on smaller wheels, or has he adjusted to what he's given? Or he may actually really like the 29. It doesn't matter to me either way since I'll just ride what I have...I've bought and sold so many bikes and now there are so many variables to each frame it's nearly impossible to build a bike with swapping parts, so I'm trying to love what I have and not be concerned if "that" bike is better, because so many times I've done that, not been happy, and resale on a bike now is pennies on a dollar...I'm tired of throwing away money
  • 1 0
 I think the wheel size was in your head man. My 5’ tall wife rails on her 29er, and she started on 26”.
  • 3 0
 I also rode with a guy Yesterday who’s 6’2” maybe 6’3” and he loves his 2016 Large 27.5 Specialized Enduro. It looked like a baby bike for him, as a large then is like a medium small in modern gee, But he liked it. To say that 29” is solely a marketing craze or meant for tall people is ignorant.
  • 2 3
 @mtmc99: same. 192 cm, always ridden a 27.5 since they came up. Had a 29er just once and i swear i hate them eversince. Dunno why is this hype with bigger wheels. Better skills for the win Wink
  • 2 2
 @GlassGuy: haha . I would ask them whats with the small guys on big bikes, what are they trying to compensate for?? 27.5 for the win. Fast, agile, poppy, playful.
  • 1 1
 @mtbracken:
LOL
Im 5'4 and love my Trek Fuel 29er
  • 1 1
 @rifu: how is a bigger wheel harder to endo?
  • 1 0
 @bohns1: and yet he also still pulls out a bmx or dirt jumper, because they're even easier to toss around. I don't think anyone is saying you can't jib and throw shapes on a big wheeler, just that it's physically easier with smaller wheels. And since most of us don't get to ride all day everyday, we don't want to have to spend time letting our muscles adjust to manuevering a big wheeler, just to get a little more top speed. We just want to have fun and are already going fast enough even on 26ers to get seriously f*cked if there is crash.
  • 1 1
 @bohns1: oh so that's why bmx and dirt jump switched to big wheels eventually, just took time for muscle memory to adjust. I see.
  • 1 1
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: can be done, of course, but fact is it's easier on smaller wheels, especially for average joe rider who'd rather just ride and doesn't care at all about squeezing out another 0.5 mph top speed or saving 5 watts over the course of a few miles.
  • 1 1
 @just6979: well I've had no issue popping over stuff at all. Have to admit it's harder to manual tho.
It's not just top speed where the diff is either. I was amazed at hope much faster it picks up speed. Riding with mates that are very similar abilities and the bike accelerates away from them over technical stuff, rock gardens and landing on transitions. It's more nimble through tight stuff then expected too
  • 1 2
 @just6979: a big wheel rows over easier, but it is proportionally harder to make it row, by pedalling. Also, the same tyre on 27,5, put on a 29 requires more effort to rotate
  • 1 1
 @filryan: yes need to I'm not getting any older so would like the rollover for sure!
  • 1 1
 @Notmeatall: Magic Mary 2.6 & MM 2.35 f/r at the mo, great combo. Might step up to 2.8 on the front. Will be like a mini mullet then!
  • 1 0
 @GlassGuy: He loves his 29er has he has professed that before on his instagram.. Also niner has 27.5 in their stable now as well.. Im sure if he wanted to roll one of those that it wouldnt be an issue.. Especially say if it helped make his edits more banger(not sure thats possible). I dont know.. Like i said before.. You just adjust to what you have.. Ive been on 29 so long now that they just feel like how 26 did in the past.. Only way better rollover capabilities
  • 1 0
 @Yetimike2019: Thats how I feel on them.. Circus bear on a tricycle look.. Lol
  • 1 0
 @sostokedaboutthat: And of course you can pick 29 and no one else should care.

But the argument isn't that 29ers don't do what they say, it's whether there is any trade-off. Many people are trying to claim 29ers get all the good stuff (roll-over, momentum, traction?)_and_ non of the "bad" stuff" (less acceleration (in all directions), weight, needs more turn-in).
  • 2 0
 @filryan: It's not that anything can't be done on a 29er, it's that there is a trade-off. Bigger wheels go faster BUT require more input to manuever. Smaller wheels require less input to change direction BUT can't match the top-speed. Period.
  • 1 0
 @filryan: reading this reminded me of having a chance ride with a guy after stopping at my local bike shop. We were both on ti hardtail 26" bikes. We were both fast and strong riders. But on a packed downhill dirt road we were riding on the way to the trail his speed picked up immensely and suddenly I was far behind. We entered the downhill side by side, we even stopped pedaling at the same time and were just flowing, but somehow he managed to create speed...it always boggled me how he flew away, and I've seen it since...some people have a deal with gravity. So I still won't give the 29 credit for being that much faster when it can simply be the rider(somehow). And, when I got my first 27.5 bike I did timed loops at my local trail against my 26" bikes....there weren't any major gains in speed between the two wheels, so already the bigger wheel hype was done and dusted for me
  • 1 0
 @just6979: yea fair point. All I know is coming from a nukeproof mega 275 to a megatower is that I love both bikes but the mega tower feels so much better
  • 1 0
 @GlassGuy: yea I see what you mean. I find myself having to speed check in places I don't normally have to and clearing stuff that I would normally have to put a lot more effort in to do so. I would say the pick up speed is noticeably better. I'm also running the same tyre set up. Minion dhf/ minion dhr2. The mega tower came with assegai but they are set up tubeless on the original wheels which I have taken off and keep as spares when I got my sixth element carbon ones. Truth is they are also good tyres but I couldn't be arsed taking them off.
  • 1 0
 @filryan: @just6979: I think some of the hype over 29ers is the result of bikes getting a lot better in general as people were starting to switch to 29ers. My 27.5 felt like it could do a whole lot of things that my 26 in bike couldn't, but i don't think it was really the wheelsize. It was that bikes took big steps between 2010 and 2015. I'm likely to buy a 29er as my next bike and it's likely that I'll again feel like it's a big step up. And for some things that will be wheel related, while for most it will likely just be another 5+ years of advancement in bike/component design. It's easy to confuse those.

If I lived where the trails were pretty smooth and loamy, I don't think I'd be that excited to get a 29er. But I live in an area where roots are everywhere. I think there will be actual advantages on that front.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: input changes become unnoticeable once muscle memory takes over after being on the big wheels for a few.. No different than getting stronger in the gym and the weight that was unmanageable before is now a warm up.. U adapt..
  • 1 0
 @GlassGuy: im not even trying to be an ass but on our group rides.. There isnt a single 26 rider that can keep up.. A few of them in far better shape than me.. They just cant.. The one guy even attributes his bike to being slower but will not drop the coin to step up and thats fine.. All the guys are cool and they wait for the 26ers every few km
  • 2 0
 @bohns1: My point wasn't about 26 being faster or slower...it was about some people just have a natural ability at being faster somehow, even when on the same equipment. And not even about who could pedal faster or stronger..he and I were on the exact same downhill section not even pedaling and he gained speed where I didn't think any could be gained. Wheel size has nothing to do with what I was expressing.
And I will say I've gained on race guys on 29 and I'm on my 27.5. So, I really don't think there is one magic answer..there are lots of variables, even just how comfortable someone is on a bike, which can all come down to it's geo which can also change how fast a bike will pedal under a rider or clear roots
  • 1 0
 @MarcusBrody: yea that is a good point. I never really keep my bikes too long as I get board or something else catches my eyes. The nukeproof is by far the longest I've had a bike (2 yrs). Thinking I will keep this one longer tho as it cost a lot more
  • 1 0
 Yeaah. More and more brands start to produce 29er only enduro bikes and this us disgusting. In theory, 29ers are developed to be proportionate to really giant guys.190+cm, because otherwise putting a xxxxl frame on a 26 or 27.5 looks ridiculous. I think propain are doing it pretty right: s,m, l for 27.5 and m, l, xl for a 29. Because a small frame or a medium one on a 29er is just as clumsy as a xxxxl frame on a 27.5. Im 190 and absolutely love a playful 27.5 bike. In my riding i would never trade off maneuverability and agility for « faster rolling »
  • 1 0
 @mtmc99: ignorance is absolute bliss in this sport and industry
  • 1 2
 @bohns1: So why bother with the big wheels at all? Just get stronger and it won't matter if the big wheels roll over everything and make it boring, or if the small wheels keep it interesting but require a bit more work to carry speed.

The problems is that everyone in the media seems to think 29 is the only answer, just because it's a couple percent faster, even though more riders DON'T RACE. Then they review a 27er and say "this is so fun and I can really feel the trail!". And then short travel 29er comes in and they say "hey this is better because it's less boring and less muted than a big 29er", which is the same thing they said about the fun 27er... but that's forgotten when the next shoot-out or prediction still contains a vast majority of 29ers.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: Thats just it.. In the right terrain big wheels dont make it boring.. Just more fun.. I like fun and speed.. You can make plenty interesting on the big wheels. Not only that, at my height they're just a better fit for me..

Why would i go back to small wheels when the big wheels feels like the small wheels used to after being on the big wheels for years. All the jargon about slower input and handeling stems from old geo and riders that havent stuck with them.. I say, get stronger and step up to the big wheels.. Climbimg and steering input becomes a non issue.. At this point, its like ive never left 26. Noimsayin.
  • 1 1
 @bohns1: Then why aren't you on 36ers yet? Just get used to it.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: Bring em out homie! I'll toss a leg over
  • 11 1
 "Part of Propain's design process includes a kick-off meeting before the start of each new project, where everyone from the company - all avid bikers themselves - is invited to provide input as to what direction the final new product should be"

Wow! Must be nice to work for a company like that.
  • 5 0
 Maybe it's just good marketing, but in all the videos and reports I've seen about Propain, it's that management and development is down to earth and that one criterion for hiring employees is that they bike. Very likeable. No fat cars and only little tattoos.
  • 3 0
 @mensch-mueller: I've spent some time with them. They are just some bike-crazy dudes like most of us here. The only difference is: They build bikes!
  • 1 0
 @Werratte: I don't know them personally, but it seemed to me that they share at least some passion for bikes, across the staff and most of them ride. That is a good foundation, and different to other german brands!
  • 1 0
 @Werratte: They design and sell bikes. Taiwan builds bikes Smile
  • 1 0
 @Rainallday: No! Taiwan builds the frames, they design.
  • 2 0
 Because they really care about what they produce
  • 13 1
 Looks kinda like an old Scott Gambler , which is no bad thing
  • 9 2
 From far away it kind of looks like.... ...the Grim Donut.
  • 1 0
 It DOES look good on closer inspection. I like the linkage design.
  • 7 0
 Finally a bike where people don't comment that it looks like a session...;-)
  • 5 0
 @retrospecs: and yet you still felt the need to say that. Smile
  • 2 0
 To me it looks like an old Diamondback, Mission it was called I think.
  • 1 0
 @Mic173: Yep, I had one. Recalled for crumpling head tubes and I got to wait for 3 months after shelling out $2900 in 2006 as a college freshman.
  • 5 0
 Nice to see bikes that have decent reach, decent slackness but haven’t gone insane with wheelbase and chainstays. The 27.5 looks like it could be a lot of fun as well as fast...
  • 5 0
 Huh, cool. I came for the full squish video of the suspension working. I've come to really like them in bike reviews. Especially for a layout I haven't seen before. Looks like a nice bike.
  • 5 1
 "Depending on the requirements of stiffness, flexibility, impact resistance, weight, strength or stress direction, different fibers and cloths are used and combined to create a unique blend."

"Using a similar process for aluminum with their Blend Alloy concept, different alloys are combined in a single frame. Propain uses at least three different alloys on a frame, with the tubes usually being made from a more fatigue-resistant material than forged or CNC-machined parts. Parts that don’t need to be welded together, like links and axles, are usually made out of 7075 T6 aluminum, which offers very high strength, but is difficult to weld."

So basically like every other frame maker out there.
  • 6 1
 Dear bike companies. Tall riders like 27.5 too, this is getting old. great looking bike too, but scratched off the possible list.
  • 3 0
 yep -this is really disappointing that there is no XL in 27.5
  • 6 1
 Nice bike, you can get Fox and Rockshox for suspension, but for drivetrain only dub-ious Sram, no Shimano. And for brakes only Sram and Magura. I hope they will add Shimano.
  • 4 0
 Good looking bikes. In this era of longer droppers and short seat tubes why are seat tubes so long on the Tyee? That is a huge oversight.
  • 2 0
 That, and also in the configurator you can only choose from 125mm and 150mm seat posts (or 160 for Bike Yoke). Sort of defeats the point. Similar issue with the the seat posts and bars... choice of seats involves narrow and another narrow. Choice of Bars involves super wide and another super wide.

What good of is choice if it lacks in fitting variety? I get to chose from multiple posts, few bars and few seats but have to replace them anyway when the bike arrives...
  • 3 0
 I feel like this is almost the budget version of the RAAW Madonna that was posted yesterday (though a bit firmer suspension wise). We're spoiled with cool bikes coming out these days at reasonable prices.
  • 1 0
 Bonus: both companies are less then an hour drive away from each other
  • 5 0
 Meh no XL 27.5... this is a continuing trend that is very scary for taller riders.
  • 2 0
 As someone who's never been a fan of the behind-the-seattube-shock design, I can only say: bravo, propain. The suspension design retained while at the same time creating a bike that gets people drooling.
As an aside: IMO the business model is sound. It's been working in the car business for years and still does. The only thing that hasn't been there is the look.

Now just update the Hugene geometry (ehem, Optic, ehem) and I will probably jump on board.
  • 4 0
 as an owner of a propain myself (2018 Spindrift) i can't recomend their Pro10 suspension enough. @PROPAIN-Bycicles, any hint on an update spindrift, maybe? Wink
  • 2 0
 I really like the company and their bikes, my brother has their "old" Tyee and it´s a beutiful, very playful bike.
But that video is pure marketing bs, could also be an Italian brand Smile
  • 1 0
 Hope they fixed the configuration of their shock mounting so you can actually tune the things easily. The old ones it was near impossible to access the air chamber fill port, high speed, low, speed, etc. And forget about flipping a switch while in the saddle.
  • 2 0
 I'm mostly an XC rider/racer, and 120mm or less is my usual set up, but damn, I'd fork out a couple grand for this bike if I can get a demo on one first. That's a seriously good looking bike with good kinematics.
  • 2 0
 If you try to visit their website propain-bikes.com/en, do you also get a popup asking for your username and password? You've got to give it them, their website is better protected than that of Canyon.
  • 1 0
 I don't think you can put anything in your cart without having a login. And when I try to create an account they have all sorts of gateway errors on the website. Looks like they can't get the website working. They need to fix that shit ASAP.
  • 1 0
 @ianswilson815: Oh, but now I can actually reach their website. When I initially posted here, I only got that popup.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Yup, same. Maybe they were overloaded after this article went up.
  • 2 1
 I bought a tyee al in 2017, first and only bike I've ever bought and ridden. Incredible value, but the suspension design does not offer nearly enough progression. Super deluxe filled to specification maximum with spacers and air (320 psi...) and constant bottom outs. Admittetly I'm on the heavier/tall side but still. Can't even imagine how this would ride with a linear coil. Just something to consider in case they didn't fix that.
  • 2 0
 Good move on putting the stock in front of the seat tube. That was long overdue. Looks like a sweet bike! 1kg weight difference between plastic and alu is a bit much though...
  • 1 0
 I bought the Tyee 2018 model and love it. I can't hide my excitement about the new Tyee! However, it is unfortunate that they have stopped shipping to my country since 2019. Please resurrect shipping not only to North America but also to Japan!
  • 4 0
 @PROPAIN-Bicycles: Will there be an aluminum frameset option, because that's what I need.
  • 2 0
 1000g weight difference between aluminum and carbon?! That's over 2 pounds. Either the aluminum bike is overbuilt or the carbon bike is underbuilt.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, that`s weird and non realistic. I guess the text is wrong; it should be: 2,7kg carbon frame w/o shock, and 3,7kg alloy frame WITH shock.
Pinkbike`s confirmation??
  • 3 0
 Madonna V2 or the Tyee ? two of the slickest looking bikes in 2020 so far IMO
  • 1 1
 Stanton switch9er for me!
  • 3 0
 Both testriders from MTB-News stated, that they prefer the Tyee, because it is so playful, yet still safe and fast on descents and its great climbing capability. The Madonna is more glued to the ground.
  • 2 0
 @Werratte: I found the forum discussion you're referring to. It was good and I am always happy when the Enduro writers are willing to state their preferences in a more straightforward manner than some places.

I'm reading a Google translation as I don't speak German, but it seems to me that they would prefer the RAAW as an enduro race bike that you could ride other places and the Propain as an everyday bike that you could use to enter enduro races. Is that your sense?

To me the biggest advantage of the Propain is its slightly higher bottom bracket. The RAAW's is pretty darn low.
  • 2 0
 @MarcusBrody: Yes Sir!!!
  • 1 0
 @ralf-hauser : Do you have any feelings about the small bump compliance of the suspension with all that anti-squat? I'd potentially be curious to try a coil on it just for that.
  • 2 0
 It's official: 65° degree HTA = too steep for enduro.

Levy and his 57° degree death donut makes more and more sense now that I think about it.
  • 4 1
 my god that's a beautiful looking bike.
  • 3 0
 Such a nice bike, propain just needs an ews team
  • 1 0
 Yes they do!
  • 1 1
 @Endurip: never knew that... Awesome
  • 2 0
 @christillott: I meant; I also think they should have an EWS team!
  • 1 0
 I have been drooling over a spin drift for a while now.This bike looks sweet would love to be able to take a test drive of one.
  • 3 1
 Sees new Propain. Skips to seattube length. Curses stumpy legs. Every damn time.
  • 2 0
 2019 tyee is a beast so I can only imagine that 2020 version is damn good as well
  • 1 0
 love it, really, but...price increase from 2999 to next level is huge step up. Also seat tube lenght seems to be really big. But I love that mint colour and shape!
  • 2 0
 you can choose custom specification and adapt the bike/price to your wishes
  • 3 0
 Finally they put the shock where it should be!!!
  • 1 0
 This might be the best looking bike I´we seen! And as with earlier Propain, it sounds like the performance actually can match the look!
  • 1 0
 Great looking bike, cannot wait to see them on this side of the Atlantic in 2020 look great in pictures must look even better in person
  • 1 0
 designers and engineering crushed it, this thing looks sooooo good! unique looking too, it really stands out. looks like it would ride awesome as well
  • 1 0
 Nice work Propain! Best looking bike I’ve seen in a while. No bridge on those long seatstays driving the shock but that upper shock link does look very stout
  • 1 0
 Just noticed the asymmetrical rear triangle, non-drive side is triangulated. Interesting design
  • 1 0
 Cool to see a review of someone that's my height. That almost never happens. Looks like a cool bike.
  • 2 0
 and...not available in US.
  • 6 0
 Propain posted a reply on Vital to a comment about availability of their kids bikes saying that they were planning on selling in North America Q1 2020. Hopefully there is more truth to that than there has been to Canyon coming to Canada fall of 2019!
  • 1 0
 @PROPAIN-Bicycles: First one to make it here may very well end up with my business, and from what I see here I’m hoping its you!
  • 4 0
 @PROPAIN-Bicycles: Please please please keep the custom bike configuration option... that appears to be where the real magic is!
  • 2 0
 Where the Hank Hill jokes at?
  • 2 0
 I’ve always thought that these are the best looking bikes.
  • 2 0
 That looks awesome! Suspension layout tickles my fancy.
  • 1 0
 That's my rear suspension design I scribbled on peice of paper in high school ????
  • 2 0
 Obviously! They even used the same shock thingy and those pivoty bits, all connected by the colorful framey parts. #kengotrobbed
  • 2 0
 Mid range AL build is dope value for money, atleast in europe
  • 2 0
 Nice looking bike. Desrves a better name.
  • 2 0
 That colour reminds me of Bianchi. I dig it.
  • 1 0
 Took those jumps in La Palma. Funniest was to drift in this loose black dust...
  • 2 0
 I wish my bike also came with a "seat angel"
  • 1 0
 Steep Angel
  • 2 0
 Fox 38 on the build sheet!
  • 1 0
 I'm surprised Santa Cruz aren't having a wah about the counter rotating top pivot.
  • 2 0
 This suspension design preceded the current version of VPP, so I'd say Propain should be all good. Propain were using the counter-rotating, horizontal lower link system while SC were still on VPP2
  • 1 0
 This may be why the are not in the US yet, although that might have been just to avoid litigation initially and now they are playing catch up (pure speculation). But i think the floating shock was how they intended to get around the SC patent (some, but less speculation).
But it stopped mattering some years ago when SC stopped renewing their patent.

What they have done is provide a similar antisquat outcome to SC bikes (reducing antisquat towards suspension extension) + what I consider a good shock leverage curve + a contemporary shock position.
  • 1 0
 VPP patent is expired, Diamondback is using a VPP suspension now too. But the Propain is closer to the Mondraker setup with the shock driven by the linkages on both sides.
  • 1 0
 Loving how this looks! Amazing geo and paint is sick! Come to the US please!
  • 2 0
 Looks like another brand neighborhood bike.
  • 1 0
 "As it turned out, the Tyee 29 with turned out to be an excellent climber."
  • 1 0
 First we try shock on outside of frame. Great success. Then we try shock on inside of frame. Another great success.
  • 2 0
 ProPain make a mullet option of the frame pls! Smile
  • 3 2
 It looks like switch infinity grew up and became its own linkage design
  • 1 0
 And after actually reading the article, it also looks like a pretty cool and interesting bike. Plenty of Propains on my hometrails, I really want to test ride one of these just to see how it feels.
  • 1 0
 Cant wait to see a video of George Brannigan ‘testing’ one...
  • 2 1
 Propain, Banshee, Raaw are the most good looking bike out there now
  • 1 0
 This bike is a big league touchdown.
  • 1 0
 A very good looking bicycle.
  • 1 0
 3000eur? damn, im really pumped to buy it!
  • 1 0
 Brutal bike, is this sold in Latin america aswell?
  • 1 1
 This bike looks really cool
  • 1 0
 Wait, what?! Big Grin Big Grin Big Grin
  • 1 1
 This will be my next bike.
  • 1 1
 Mooie nickname
  • 1 1
 When will these be offered in the States?
  • 6 1
 We're currently working on it an will post an update with all the details within the next few weeks.
  • 1 1
 Well.. If it rides as good as it looks...
  • 2 2
 Where is the anti-rise graph?
  • 1 1
 Superb looking, needs shorter seat tubes and longer dropper posts
  • 1 1
 They must of bought all the leftover paint from the 2019 bronson
  • 5 8
 Beautiful bike. What’s the shock length on this thing? Any chance of stuffing something a bit bigger with offset bushings to squeeze out 20mm more travel out of it?
  • 1 0
 why? you have there Spindrift with 180mm.
I would like to see there some flipchip to tune geo/shock progression, but i think they didnt consider put there longer shock (i will tune and cut my old DHX4 anyways to fit there Big Grin )
  • 2 2
 Looks like a gambler
  • 1 1
 Regressive.
  • 1 2
 Hey PB, did you guys ever get to ride the Hugene?
  • 1 3
 Nothing is ever available here in the USA
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