Throwback Thursday: 22 Classic Mountain Bikes - IAA Mobility 2021

Sep 14, 2021 at 10:03
by Ralf Hauser  
I have always had a soft spot for classic bikes, and really, who doesn't. The History of Mountain Biking was an exhibit at IAA Mobility, featuring 22 bikes from the past decades. Julia Dobler from Bergstolz magazine helped carry together (or beg some collectors to separate from their prize possessions for a while) some iconic bikes and components for us to drool over.

Special thanks go to Peter Hopf, Thai Do, Bastian Dietz, Guenther Schoberth-Schwingenstein, Marin Bikes, Merida & Centurion Germany GmbH, Rocky Mountain, Scott Sports SA and Specialized Bicycle Components, to let us travel back in time for a bit.


1979 Breezer
Joe Breezer's heritage. One of the forefathers of mountain biking.





1981 Specialized Stumpjumper

Unfortunately, not the original '81 components, but still cool.

Stumpjumper equals history.



1982 Centurion Country







1987 Marin Muirwoods






1987 Centurion Lhasa Kathmandu







1989 Team Marin



I think the earliest RockShox Mag 21 is from 1993. Nevertheless, a quite advanced fork for the time with hydraulic damping.


1990 Klein Rascal







1992 Specialized Epic Ultimate

The titanium lugs were made at Merlin Metal Works but it was bonded to the carbon tubes at Specialized.

The Specialized FSX Future Shock with titanium and carbon had up to 63.5mm of travel.





1992/93 Carraro Husky 499







1992 AMP Research B2 (Mongoose Amplifier)

AMP's, or better said Horst Leitner's, design is iconic, even if it was a noodle of a design and had a tendency to break under hard use.


The link that made such a big splash for full-suspension designs: the Horst Link.

The original B2 had a custom coil shock installed, but Risse's air shock was such a clean design.

The AMP F1 linkage fork with 63.5mm of travel.



1993 Manitou FS

Manitou mastermind Doug Bradbury also dreamed up this full-suspension bike.

Even the stem was a piece of art.


Another gem: a ProShift rear derailleur.





1995 Marin Titanium F.R.S.


135mm of rear wheel travel.




1995 AMP Research B3 (KTM Race Line)




It didn't work great, but the AMP D1 was one of the first lightweight disc brakes on the market.




1995 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR


Fox Alps air shock.




1996 Corratec Grizzly Bow 202 Team




Obviously, disc brakes were still too modern for most forks at the time.


Corratec was one of the driving forces behind the design of the semi-slick tires.



1997 Centurion No Pogo

1996 was the first year of the No Pogo. They are celebrating their 25th anniversary this year.





1998 GT Zaskar Team


GT's legendary Triple Triangle design.

Shimano XTR V-brakes with parallelogram brake pad actuation.




2000 Scott Intoxica Pro




You were able to adjust the seat angle on the dome.


2001 Rocky Mountain RM7

This was Tarek Rasouli's actual ride.

Tarek signed it years later.

The Marzocchi Monster T. Doesn't get much bigger than this, except for the Super Monster T with 300mm of travel.


2002 Hot Chili SLite




Magura's fork with dual crown.

Decked out with super light Tune parts.




2002 Scott High Octane


Seat angle adjustments.

You could rotate the sleeve for a change of head angle.


Travel and angle adjustments galore.



2004 Scott Genius MC10 Frischknecht Edition

Thomas Frischknecht won the Marathon Worlds in 2003 on one of these.


TwinLoc shock.




138 Comments

  • 117 2
 If you haven't learned to ride on a bike from this era...you missed out some serious greatness. The hardware weights more than full bikes these days, the tires...2'' was huge, and they stems and bars are just ridiculous. Sorry but you missed out. Oh and dont forget the sound of a shopping cart being pushed down a staircase the entire ride. MISSED OUT!!!!
  • 14 1
 I really miss color coded forks! Currently building 97 GT STS-2. just for the fun of revival.
  • 28 4
 And they’re still super fun. When I ride my vintage bikes (like this 23.4-pound-with-pedals 1999 Litespeed Tellico), I regularly drop my buddies on their $8000 enduro super bikes on the uphills and downhill singletrack (before it gets steep and gnarly of course). They tell me it’s seriously entertaining to watch the loose chattery sketchiness unfolding before them =P
www.pinkbike.com/video/532712
  • 7 0
 @WRCDH: lol, dude thanks for the video evidence! Love that you've kept the period current handlebar width. I've got a 1999 s-works in the garage but there is no way I would take that out on the trails without putting wider bars on it. Those narrow bars are so sketch now-a-days after becoming accustomed to modern geo.
  • 14 0
 Took me a long time to undo all the habits I developed that are now wrong with modern bikes and trails. #1 was learning not to get my weight far back on steeps. That was an epic battle against my lizard brain.
  • 2 0
 @Lugan: That!
  • 1 0
 @WRCDH: 100%. I enjoyed all my mountain bikes even the way back ones from the early 90’s. Great memories of each one. Still love some some time on an XC hardtail in the early season to sharpen the knife so to speak before the modern trail bike comes out.
  • 4 0
 you forget to mention the vibrations that were send strait through your body so that the vision often became a supple blur... Suspension at this time went into its travel at the top and came out at the bottom... Wink
  • 2 0
 This brings some fond memories Smile
It´s unbelivebale that we rode these bikes back then. BIkes have come a looong way,
I remember the need to true my wheels once a week, kidd you not Big Grin
And the brakes were so bad untill V-brakes came along. It was a wild ride in the wet Big Grin

Love looking at them but I would never want to ride them again Smile
  • 1 1
 I'm not that upset that I "missed out"... After all, bikes nowadays are 1000000% better.
  • 18 1
 suspension ALL sucked in the 80s, but all the rigid bikes during the 80s worked great for what they were. Trails back then were so mild back then, all basically smooth dirt fire roads, deer paths, and gravel roads. Funny how we thought we were hardcore doing down steep but smooth dirt roads HAHAHAHA. I have to admit though, Mountain Biking was awesome back then, just as awesome as it is now. Just a different kind of awesome, and much more tamer awesome.
  • 8 0
 Where did you ride? My trails were all hiking trails that were rough and rutty as hell big log crossings basically hike-a-bikes unless you were total glutton.

That AMP fork worked so well for the day. So much better than any telescopic option. It was buttery and smooth, the only downside was the damper. I’m surprised that it doesn’t make a resurgence in the Gravel domain, obviously updated, but 60mm of linkage with chromo legs could have real advantages.
  • 3 9
flag HendersonMike (Sep 16, 2021 at 19:20) (Below Threshold)
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps:
Easy Tiger! Did not mean to offend you. Are you mad? Do you work in the Mtn Bike Industry Amp? AMP stuff came in the 90s believe. I said 1980s suspension sucked, not 90s. 90s suspension was pretty good, but still severely lacking compared to even 10 years ago. Even in the early 1990s most Mtn Bikes sold were rigid bikes. Yes there was front and full suspension bkes but these bikes were extremely rare.. There were no trail building back then, we rode on the deer paths, fire roads, and hiking trails mostly. I rode exclusively in the SF Bay Area in the 90s. I even raced the 1998 Sea otter classic on a rigid bike because I blew the seals on my Judy fork just before that race. I finished the race just fine without ever feeling threatened on that rigid bike. The XC race course I experienced back then were all basically glorified roads. Mtn Bikes back then even had road bike geo. Even in early 2000, "extreme" bikes like the Intense Tracer and Santa Cruz Superlight had an HTAs of 71 Degrees. I don't expect you to see eye to eye on this, if you want to believe the bikes and trails were extreme then please do so know. know what you know, and please discuss...
  • 1 0
 @romkaind: ,

yes? whagt can I do for you, sir ?
  • 14 0
 NOPE - you don't spec old-school Syncros components on a Specialized Stumpjumper. They had their house-brands and stuck to them. Also, zero excuses for a show bike with a flat tire. Back of the line for you Hot Chili.
  • 13 0
 That 2000s XT crank on that stumpy, that Judy XC fully compressed. Shame.
  • 10 0
 @t-stoff: 2004 crankset on 1981 bike is an abomination.
  • 5 0
 @50percentsure: You, sir, are not wrong; and when you’re not wrong, you’re right.
Winced when I saw that…
  • 2 0
 @50percentsure: That bike isn't a 1981 at all except in design. Specialized did a reproduction run of these bikes in 2008 model year called the Stumpjumper Classic. I have one with identical parts spec hanging above the service desk at my shop.
  • 2 0
 Flat tire was a feature.
  • 1 0
 @jonjonj0nnyjon: tubed tyres are so shit they puncture in the showroom
  • 16 0
 Evolution in action!
1979 - 1996: HA goes from 66 deg. to 71.5 deg.
1996 - 2021: HA goes from 71.5 deg. to 66 deg.
  • 4 0
 Came here to say the same thing.
  • 7 0
 Kinda similar with rim width, single walled rims were quiet wide, then they got narrow with double wall, and now we arrived back to wide rims. My ~30 year old Scott Sawtooth have 25 mm internal rim width. I bought my second hand trail bike with narrower rims.
  • 1 0
 66 in 2021, are you nuts?!! That is sooo steep and sketchy.
  • 10 0
 MONSTER T Smile Smile Smile Smile Smile what a fork !
  • 3 0
 Stoked Bender noises.
  • 3 0
 I bet it still rides super plush.
  • 1 0
 Still got a 2003 set
  • 6 0
 The Amp disc brakes weren't terrible - The feel and stopping power were actually pretty good until they overheated which of course they would do on a real descent. It helped that we had to stop every 2-3 minutes to shake out our hands anyway. They certainly felt and worked better than the cantilevers of the day, especially in the wet, again unless you were doing a big descent. I ran them for several years and put up with the drawbacks until the Hayes finally came out. Rim brakes were just terrible for MTB even 1990 MTB.

Still embarassed (ie I should have looked around and known better) that in 1999 I bought an Amp B5 to replace my cracked "Dagger" which was a boutique version of the Amp B3. I exploded the front fork on a 2' "huck" when we were learning "freeride". Bought a 2000 Specialized Enduro with 4" of travel and I remember riding it down a rocky local trail and thinking it was ridiculously plush and incredibly awesome. Which I guess it was - it survived about a hundred wheelie drops off a 4' platform in my backyard. It was eventually turned into a hillbilly hardtail commuter (shock replaced with a solid bar), and I gave it to my neighbor a few years ago who is still riding it.

And oh yea, sold that Amp B5 for $700 on ebay a few years ago. Rode it up and down the street before packing it up and was scared to death. Can't believe I rode it all over some of the same gnarly mountain trails I still ride today.
  • 2 0
 I remember seeing a red and yellow Dagger reviewed in MBA and I thought it was the coolest thing ever. BITD I had an Amp B2. The top tube split in half one day, presumably from fatigue. Interestingly, the dual downtube appeared to be fine. I grafted the rear triangle on to the front triangle of a Barracuda. Much flex. Tossed the front tri. Still have the rear in my basement for some reason.
  • 1 0
 @feldybikes: I actually had a red and yellow Dagger, the MBA bike. It was amazingly beautiful, but cracked one and then bent the replacement.
  • 1 0
 @eurekakombucha: that bike was the epitome of 90’s style IMO. Color coordinated anodized everything! Not surprised it didn’t survive, though.
  • 1 0
 Cantilevers could work really fine, under two conditions, one: good pads. Did you try KoolStop pads? They were excepcional. And second, the cable connecting them had to be as short and as close to the tire as possible. This was a crucial variable.
  • 7 0
 Back then, these bikes were all dream bikes to me but I was just a kid mowing lawns to earn some cash to upgrade out of my Huffy.
  • 5 0
 Had 3 of them Rocky RM7 , great bike , the bike was ready for anything . the Easton tubing was superb. Gt Zaskar, a great hard tail , loved the rear triangle, converted it for city riding, got stolen Scott Octane dh , first the yellow banana seat and this one , cracked the top tube and welding after 2 months. All of them were a bit heavy, but at the time i didn t care, i was fit and riding almost everyday.
  • 1 0
 That Scott, both DH and fr was freaking beauty
  • 6 0
 No Cannondale V bike ? Shame.
Or GT LTS ?
Lovely bikes. Ace to see the Zaskar
  • 3 0
 A pumpkin seed bass boat finish Schwinn Homegrown would have been cool too.
  • 1 0
 Cannondale has had some odd stuff over the years. Head shocks. Lefties. Etc.
  • 2 0
 No Softride bikes either with the silly diving-board suspension and suspension stems! And Proflex mentioned below, too. I got hooked in 1995 in high school, still have my Mountain Bike magazine collection somewhere in the basement...
  • 1 0
 Ha. I was looking for the LTS too.
  • 1 0
 @onemanarmy: moto fork more than lefty
  • 1 0
 Yes was wondering why no Cannondale Super-V .... I used to ride with coworkers a lot back in the late 90s and two of them still own their 95 V's with headshock forks. Another owns a couple Hot Chili X-Rage. Never was a big Cannondale fan but these things were alright!
  • 4 0
 Doubt this will get me anywhere, but does anyone know of a Specialized Epic Ultimate frame or complete bike for sale? I have the Carbon/Ti FSX fork in brand new condition and have been looking for the frame for ages!
  • 4 0
 not selling, but i've got an ultimate frame hanging from the rafters. pretty exotic stuff at the time; my xl weighs about 3.5lbs bare.
  • 1 0
 @xy9ine: that's awesome mate, if you ever decide to part ways with it please keep me in mind. I have been looking for one for so long.
  • 2 0
 These are awesome! I love seeing where our sport came from. It's not quite old enough for this list but I ride a Cannondale Prophet that I modernized with a 27.5 conversion, 1x11, custom tuned shock etc. Not even the bearings are period correct but I like it. I know a new bike would blow it away but this is what I could afford at the time and I love tinkering so I went wild and got myself a well specced ride after a few years of digging through the couch for change and all that. I rode it a few days ago and it loves the rock soup and root salad that southeastern Pennsylvania has on offer. All smiles.
  • 2 0
 Every once in a while I'll pull out my 93 Trek 990 and ride some easy flow trails. It has a Manitou 3 with 0" inches of travel. I tried to make it work but that's as good as it will be. It's a blast to ride just for shits and giggles. Back in the day it was the first real good mtb that I had. Still fun to ride. It still has the original smokes on it. Not from the factory but as replacement tires. Lots of fun and adventure's where had on that bike.
  • 2 0
 Hydraulic disk brakes
Horste 4 bar rear suspension
Hydraulic damped air forks
That Marin is that carbon fiber tubes bonded to titanium lugs?
All existed more than 20 years ago.
Yes bikes are better . But it's decades of refinement not amazing new inventions that made mountain bikes what they are today. At least in the past parts could be swapped or fixed.
  • 4 0
 Those 80s frames are so clean! I still hate under-chainstay mounted u-brakes though, at least from a maintenance standpoint.
  • 1 0
 U brakes. My 1988 Kuwahara Sierra Grande had them ... weren't too bad for maintenance.
  • 4 0
 Wasn't the maintenance what was the problem, the fact they were always wet (at least here on the Shore), so they didn't work worth shit.

"Hey, the brakes on these bikes aren't really powerfull enough, what can we do?"
"I got it, lets put them under the chainstay, where there is even more mud and water, that'll do the trick"
  • 2 0
 @tonestar: Rim brakes were always poor in wet weather anyway, even if mounted on seat stays.

I think the appeal was less flex (chainstays were stronger) and less interference with rider (when leaning back). It didn't stick around too long if I recall, but I liked them.
  • 4 0
 @tonestar: I doubled down on that and ran a Suntour roller cam under chainstay on the Shore. Nothing like going down Severed with the 150mm stem, 1.9 (?) tires pumped up to 60 and the Syncros forks (bonus points for OG with the quarters bonded in). The good times were had when done at night with the BLT doubles on "high beam" for the 45 minutes the battery would last.
  • 1 0
 @njcbps: Trust me, I know from experience, my Miyata had under the stay brakes, riding the Shore was insane. Brake boosters were the solution, for brakes on the seat stay. Still went through sets of pads every 3 or 4 rides, depending on how wet the weather was.
  • 1 0
 @gb8561: oooh, can SO relate. recall racing the hell of the north one year - snapping the brake cable on the rear U brake of my trimble (with a 150mm flat stem, something like 22" flat bars, and full extension seat) mid race, and still somehow surviving the severed steeps.

-i also had syncros forks w/ quarter caps. soooo bone jarring. but trick! loved the OG syncros parts.

-also ran the crappy blt lights. i think the high beam bulbs were 20w (something like 250 lumens). damn, we've got it good these days.
  • 2 0
 @xy9ine: Trimble? There probably was only 2 or 3 in Vancouver back then. Awesome weird bike. My favourite memory of those days (I worked at Robson Cycle) was when two racers (Bill and Stacey?) showed up at the shop with the first Rock Shox we had ever seen. After they left all of our collective wisdom agreed that suspension made no sense on the Shore.
  • 2 0
 @gb8561: the heat from those old BLTs was good for warming up the fingers on cold rides.
  • 1 0
 @gb8561: i had an RS-1 on the trimble (bought from wayne @ performance cycles in victoria). i also remember the first time we got the first OG rockshox @ the shop (life cycles in abby) - taking turns riding into a curb, remarking how plush the 2" of suspension was. also knew people at the time that thought suspension would never fly - too heavy, robbed efficiency, etc. oi.
  • 1 0
 My first better bike was in 1990. My first good bike was in 1993. It's been crazy ever since. So much of that stuff brings back memories. I guess I should rebuild that 1998 Marzocchi I have and put it back on its original bike.
  • 1 0
 I don't know what or where this is/was (IAA?) but some bikes are in a quite poor condition or just not worth showing. There's some good ones in there as well and thanks for sharing anyway, yes we love the MTB history and there's plenty of awesome vintage bikes out there.
  • 3 0
 This was the International Motor Show in Munich, Germany, last week. They were calling themselves a Mobility Show this time and had a lot of cycling companies partake. But that was more greenwashing, really. A shame those beautiful bikes are displayed so poorly. No background, left side front ... Heck, at least inflate the tires!
  • 4 0
 These bikes are the reason why most riders over 40 you see on the trail corner in the back seat a bit.
  • 1 0
 Is it possible, that the Marin Muirwoods used the same frame, as the Scott Sawtooth from the same or similar year? I bought a Scott Sawtooth last year, and it's looks the same, brake mounting, the way the tubes connect at the seat tube, fork angle, if both was painted black, I couldn't tell the difference.
  • 1 0
 Done a couple of restomods the last 18 months. Older frames and just put the together with newer parts, but try and keep to spirit of the bike. Tend to go for 2000 onwards frames as from about then onwards manufacturers tended to fit disc mounts. Currently running a 1x11 2009 kona four deluxe Nissan SE. Hardest thing was getting the paint matches.
  • 1 0
 Well, that Breezer is not a Breezer - its a typical entry level mid 80s Mountainbike, my guess from an italian brand. Otherwise, some really nice bikes in there.

Only the hose clamps on the nice anodized cranks make me cringe (note to myself: never give one of my classics to the IAA...)
  • 2 1
 Stumpjumper equals history - made me laugh. Specialized purchased 4 bikes from Gary Fisher's Mountain Bikes Company to evaluate (copy) for overseas production. Sensing something may be up, Gary Fisher sent them 4 bikes that had incorrect fork geometry. The Fisher Mountain Bikes were copied by Specialized, including the incorrect fork geometry.
  • 1 0
 Ah yes, the "Lightweight, Strong or Actually Works... pick one" era. Everything was light, barely anything worked, and everything always broke. It's awesome to see the old steeds because nothing looks like this anymore, and they're seriously cool. But it also makes me grateful for me 150mm 29er that climbs better than the XC bikes here, and descends better than the DH bikes.
  • 1 0
 My first adult sized MTB was an 86' Stumpjumper complete with Hite-Rite and god awful U-brakes under the chain stays lol. Absolutely terrible. It felt terrifyingly fast (to my 13 year old brain) and it would not slow down at all if there was an ounce of water on the ground lol
  • 1 0
 Fact: the two sons of the guy who started Corratec, went on to create the ill fated Sick Bicycles, who famously went on to not set the MTB world alight. You can see the bat shit lineage*





*citation needed
  • 2 0
 Not a single Santa Cruz in there? I need to pull my '96 Heckler frame down from the rafters and build it up with all the old parts. Cooks Brothers cranks and a Judy!
  • 1 0
 I don’t understand how the rear brake works on the 1993 Manitou FS since there’s a pivot between the axle and the rim break on the seat stay. Perhaps the brake didn’t really work?
  • 1 0
 Loved me some bar ends back in the day! Club Roost were my favorite but then I recall those crazy torso-puncturing XYZ bars that came stock on my Cannondale Delta V 1500 ("Headshock" anyone?!)
  • 1 0
 Good times! I still have a hard time getting my head around bikes from the 2000s being vintage, though! Seems like just yesterday I was in the LBS buying my scuba yellow Heckler.
  • 2 0
 No proflex or trek Y bikes. LOL! My buddy raced for Klein back in the day and I always drooled on his Rascal.
  • 3 0
 I still have my Red K2 Proflex with a Noleen rear end!
  • 1 0
 @bbmbc: What color pucks? LOL!
  • 2 0
 How many brands did Verlicchi make their frames for? Sintesi, Iron Horse, Carraro, Kona. Any otters?
  • 1 0
 Diamond Back racing
  • 1 0
 Anyone with a sticker that would fit a downtube actually
  • 2 0
 My first bike was a Stumpjumper, and I think it might have been a 1981 model. Surprised at the slack headtube.
  • 2 0
 Those were the days! Had a 88 Wicked Fat Chance. Still one of my favorites.
  • 3 0
 Still riding mine set up as a commuter
  • 4 1
 Some of those bikes are still cooler then some of the nEw bikes
  • 2 0
 These "vintage bike articles" need some Schwinn Homegrowns in the mix!!! Those bass boat paint jobs where f**king awesome.
  • 1 0
 Trips me out to look at all these long ass stems we used to ride back in the day. Bet it would feel quite strange steering one of these nowadays compared to modern bikes.
  • 1 0
 I'm pretty pumped that bmx was in its glory days when mtb first came about. None of those glorified dirt roadies excite me in the least.
  • 1 0
 Just as Newton discovered gravity, and Tacoma narrows revealed the phenomenon of harmonic resonance, in 1992 Carraro discovered pedal kickback for the first time
  • 2 0
 Someone get that Carrero an idler pulley!
  • 1 0
 High pivot and a coil shock with a lockout... Is it the future or the past?
  • 1 0
 @the00: Yes.
  • 2 0
 Mech on that Manitou is a Proshift, not a Paul
  • 4 0
 Correct, I can confirm, because the manitou fs & mongoose amplifier are mineWink
  • 1 0
 @one38: Nice Manitou - seatpost is back to front tho
  • 3 0
 @GTPjon: on purpose. Way easier to clean, otherwise the screw thread is under direct dirt attach (yes, I still ride all my bikes, me being not the biggest & very light, and not abusing them)
  • 1 0
 memories! damn those odyssey black widow pedals on the manitou fs...still have nasty scars on my shins from them
  • 2 0
 Some beauties there but I'd choose the Epic Ultimate.
  • 1 0
 This makes me want to get into collecting old mtbs. Beautiful history right here.
  • 1 1
 I am excited that Outside is slowly converting Pinkbike into a full retro bike site. All we need now is a paywall and Levy riding these things in full lycra.
  • 1 0
 Why did they ruin all the 'gravel' bikes at the start of this article with flat bars? Big Grin
  • 2 0
 Ahh. When $3,000 made you feel like a baller!
  • 1 0
 That amp fork was so loose - it lost more parts on a ride than a head with dandruff in the head wind
  • 2 0
 Great gallery. One correction: Joe Breeze, not Joe Breezer.
  • 3 0
 Awesome, we are old
  • 1 0
 Shout out to super monster T 300 mm travel I used to have one on a santa cruz super 8
  • 1 0
 Love this old stuff!
m.pinkbike.com/photo/20240703
A mix of old and new.
  • 1 0
 That Manitou FS still fills my heart with desire. Maybe that's because I never actually rode it.... Never meet your heros!
  • 2 0
 so good. love these.
  • 1 0
 I don't think the cranks on the 1981 SJ are period correct
  • 1 0
 I think that's correct ... it mentioned rear derailleur wasn't original either.
  • 2 0
 @njcbps: is the Spesh not an anniversary re-pop with contemporary parts (from the re-release date)?

Edit - yes. 2007 re-issue.

www.hotpursuit-cycles.co.uk/2014/01/17/specialized-stumpjumper-classic
  • 1 0
 If it was an 81 or 82 it would likely have had TA Cyclotourist cranks, Suntour XC II pedals, Mafac tandem brakes & Tomasselli Racer levers. Had a welded '82 that I had to part out & those were all stock.
  • 1 0
 @eshew: I don't think the Tomasselli's were stock on early Stumpjumpers. I remember putting them on one of my bikes ... overkill for sure. lol
  • 2 1
 Some incredible bikes there.
  • 3 1
 It's too bad there aren't any mullet bikes though, right?
  • 1 2
 @DylanH93: If you love a fad then yeah!
  • 1 1
 @DylanH93: Just for the record I don't just comment about fad bikes. I praise and applaud what deserves to be.
  • 2 0
 @DylanH93: I had a Norco VPS with a 24" 26" mullet set-up in 2002.
  • 2 0
 @DylanH93: perhaps a Cannondale 26/24? With roller cam brakes and Suntour XC? My boss had one he sold my coworker in 2006 or so. It was bright pink and completely original. Back then he tried to sell it for $300 and I told him he’d have to find a vintage kook to pay more than $150 for it. He offered it to me for $200 and I told him I’d give him $75 just so it wouldn’t end up in the landfill. I never knew what happened to that thing.
  • 1 0
 how do you get that scott genius pull shock serviced?
  • 2 0
 Where's mah Girvin fork?
  • 2 0
 good point. notable by its absence. I remember a brand called K2 from the mid 90s that had some kind of electronic damping with a girvin front end. I remember them looking amazing.
  • 2 0
 YES.
  • 1 0
 The name is Joe Breeze, not Joe Breezer… c’mon…
  • 1 0
 漂亮!
  • 3 0
 AGREE!
  • 2 2
 Man, those old URT's were ALL Pogo, talk about misleading marketing!
  • 2 0
 Not a single URT in this article
  • 1 2
 @lacuna: do you even know what a URT is?
  • 1 0
 @Bomadics: Unified Rear Triangle ..... where the BB was built into this triangle, so when the suspension moved so did your feet. Hummm. They were part of our history, learning and how we got to here thinking 'lets no do that again'
  • 1 0
 @NZRalphy: I know what it means, we all laughed at the design when it first came out, but I am not sure that @lacuna does though.
  • 1 0
 @NZRalphy: Regardless of how they rode, the Kleins looked so cool.
  • 1 0
 @Bomadics: Yes, and there are none in this article.
  • 1 0
 So terrible!
  • 1 0
 So. Much. Bike. Porn.

Post a Comment



You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.020286
Mobile Version of Website