Cockpit Setups - Lenzerheide DH World Cup 2017

Jul 6, 2017 at 10:59
by Ross Bell  
When it comes to bike setup, few things are more personal than the feel of the handlebars. The rise, sweep, roll and stack each contribute to what a rider prefers, but the course being ridden and the type of bike they're going onto are also parts to consider. So how do some of the world's best have their cockpits setup for the Lenzerheide DH World Cup? Read on below to see


Troy Brosnan
Troy Brosnan's Renthal bar and stem. He cuts the stock 31.8, 780mm bars down to 740mm.

Troy Brosnan

Bar Width: 740mm
Rise: 38mm
Stem Length: 45mm
Stack: 10mm under the stem, generally 5mm but changed for Andorra and have kept that way for the first run in Lenzerheide.
Brakes: Bite point in the middle.
• Grip tape on the shifter.
• No reach adjust/angle headset, tried the -1-degree but too slack.


Troy Brosnan
TB is running 10mm of spacers beneath his Integra stem, which is the 0mm rise variety.

Troy Brosnan
His lever angle is pretty standard/average.
Troy Brosnan
He runs his bite point in the middle.

Troy Brosnan
Brosnan's Blackbox gear lever, all grip-taped up.



Gee Atherton
Gee's Pro bar and stem. He runs the Tharsis 9.8 bar cut down to 790mm from the stock 800mm.

Gee Atherton

Bar Width: 790mm
Rise: 10mm
Stem Length: 50mm Stem
Stack: 10mm under the stem, if it's steep they use stem spacers to raise the front end.
Brakes: Reach set somewhere in the middle, custom bent levers—comfort preference.

Gee Atherton
Gee has 10mm of spacers under his crown. If further adjustments are needed he uses spacers beneath his stem.

Gee Atherton
Gee's levers are a little flatter than most of the others here. Check out the custom bend in them too.

Gee Atherton
Gee's reach is 'somewhere in the middle' and bites at a comfortable distance from the bar.



Tahnee Seagrave
Tahnee Seagrave's Pro cockpit. She cuts down the stock 800mm Tharsis 9.8 bar to 760mm.

Tahnée Seagrave

Bar Width: 760mm
Rise: 20mm
Stem Length: 45mm
Stack: 0mm (Was running that on the old bike too.)
Brakes: Euro/American-style even though she's from the UK, reach all the way in, bite point adjusted to remain effective. Likes the brakes to be 'grabby' and levers at 47 degrees.

Tahnee Seagrave
Seagrave is running no spacers under her crown and a 20mm rise bar.

Tahnee Seagrave
Seagrave runs her brake levers at 47 degrees, a little steeper than others here.
Tahnee Seagrave
She runs her bite point a little closer to the bar but likes them to be 'grabby'.



Miranda Miller
Miranda Miller's Joystick bar and stem. She runs the 8-Bit alloy bar cut down from 800mm to 770mm.

Miranda Miller

Bar Width: 770mm
Rise: 20mm
Stem Length: 50mm
Stack: 15mm
• Changes between +1,1.5, 2-degree angle headsets.
• Basic setup comes from base setting made pre-season and using past track experience.
• Grip tape on the shifter.

Miranda Miller
Miller is running 15mm of spacers beneath her crown.

Miranda Miller
Her brake lever angle is pretty standard/average.
Miranda Miller
She has a pretty quick bite to her levers but they catch at an average point.

Miranda Miller
Miller is also a fan of the grip-taped gear shifter.



Adam Brayton
Adam Brayton's Hope Tech Bars cut from stock 800mm down to 760mm

Adam Brayton

Bar Width: 760mm
Rise: 20mm
Stem Length: 50mm
Stack: 5mm (Never changes.)
Bite point all the way in, reach all the way out
• Set at the start of the year and "get on with it"

Adam Brayton
Brayton's stem has one 5mm spacer under it and he says that he never changes this.

Adam Brayton
He runs his brakes a little more level than 'average', but not by much.
Adam Brayton
Brayton likes his brakes to bite a little way from the bar.



Laurie Greenland
Laurie Greenland's 31.8 Renthal Fatbar Carbon bars have been cut down from the stock 780mm to 760mm.

Laurie Greenland

Bar Width: 760mm
Rise: 30mm
Stem Length: 50mm
Stack: 12mm
 • Far back on the reach and bite point around halfway.
 • Extra 6mm frame reach from headset cups.
 • Tends to stay the same, sometimes changes 5mm of height at the bars.

Laurie Greenland
Greenland is running 12mm of spacers beneath his 30mm rise Renthals. He's also running the Integra stem in the 10mm rise option.

Laurie Greenland
Greenland's brake lever angle is pretty average.
Laurie Greenland
He also runs a bite that is a good distance from the bars.



Mick Hannah
Mick Hannah runs his Spank Spike Vibracore bars cut down to 780mm from the stock 800mm

Mick Hannah

Bar Width: 780mm
Rise: 30mm
Stem Length: 50mm
Stack: 20mm under stem, 10mm stem spacer.
 • Doesn't tend to change much apart from Innsbruck Crankworx, slid stanchions down 10mm for slow track nature.
 • Added grip tape on brake levers.

Mick Hannah
Hannah is running 20mm of spacers beneath his crown plus an additional 10mm spacer beneath the stem.

Mick Hannah
The angle for his brake lever is pretty standard/average.
Mick Hannah
His lever bites a comfortable distance from the bar, but a little closer than some of the others here.

Mick Hannah
Hannah's grip tape lever for added control.



Emilie Siegenthaler
Emilie Siegenthaler's Renthal cockpit, down to the push-on grips. She has cut her Fatbar down to 760mm.

Emilie Siegenthaler

Bar width: 760mm
Rise: 10mm
Stem Length: 50mm
Stack: 0mm under the crown which stays pretty constant.
Brakes: Reach quite far in, as close as she can get it because she has small hands. Sands brake pads down too. The levers are quite loose so she can adjust them as she wants.

Emilie Siegenthaler
Siegenthaler is running the front end of her Pivot Phoenix Carbon low, with no spacers under the crown or Integra stem, which is the 0mm rise version.

Emilie Siegenthaler
Her brake lever angle is pretty standard/average.
Emilie Siegenthaler
Emilie runs her brakes really close to the bar because of her small hands and the bite point is close to the grip.



140 Comments

  • + 53
 Very interesting. Thanks for the insight. I'm intrigued to see that most pros are not riding bars wider than 780mm, with 760 representing the lower end.
  • - 12
flag nvranka (Jul 6, 2017 at 13:54) (Below Threshold)
 the super wide bar fad has never been something top level riders have participated in
  • + 27
 @nvranka: So Minnaar's not 'top level' then, nor Heart???
  • + 44
 @nvranka:

We need a chart showing rider height and bar width to see what the correlation is.

Minnaar's surely on 800mm at least, right? Many of these riders aren't tall.

I'm 6'1" and my 800mm bar doesn't feel wide in the least. Perfectly comfortable. Anything under 780 feels narrow.
  • + 28
 @WasatchEnduro: or maybe shoulder width. Wide shoulders = wide bars and vice versa.
  • + 8
 Yeah the wide as you can get crowd is going to hate this. Wide bar gave there place for people who need them but the idea it's better for someone on a S or M bike has always seems crazy.
  • + 10
 Running 825mm Diety Holeshot's. 6'4" tall with wide shoulders. Feels normal to me. Height and shoulder width make a big difference.
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: Or if you really want best number wingspan.
  • + 1
 I wonder what the average height and shoulder length of these pros is?
  • + 5
 Yeah Brosnan is a little whippet of a human and he's running 740mm, i believe the "Minnarr bar" is 810mm. Definitely ergonomically focused choices
  • + 3
 Bar width has to do more with what your push-up position is, vs. shoulder width. They definitely need to articulate a lot though, so a "full" push-up position may not let them come back far enough - hence slightly narrower bars and slightly longer stems.
  • + 3
 @Nagrom77: Truth, shoulder width crucial.
  • + 5
 @Thustlewhumber: I did not realize push up position had nothing to do with shoulder width.
  • + 1
 Think the narrower bars may have something to do with bikes getting longer? I mean, as wheels Base an reach get longer the riders may need narrower bars to centre thier wieght on the bike?
Super surprised at Brosnons 740's!
  • + 3
 Troy with 740mm bars. Enough said.
  • + 3
 @yonibois: yes but Minaar is 6'3" tall so is probably tall enough with long enough arms to justify an 800 mm bar.
  • + 2
 @amrskipro: 6'5" rider here. 800 is the only thing that feels natural to me. I would imagine the same goes for Minnaar
  • + 3
 It really is just a personal preference.

I'm 6'11", but with a 27" inseam, I'm all back and arms yet feel most comfortable on an my old Easton Monkey Lite Carbon 640mm bar with a 160mm stem.

Go figure.
  • + 2
 @mfoga: I'm not so sure on this. I think there is some correlation but a lot of it is just personal preference.
I'm 182cm (6') with a 196cm (6'5") wingspan and wide shoulders and I run 780mm bars comfortably. Had 800mm wide bars on my Reign when I got it. Didn't like it and cut them down to 780 like my DH bike.
Whereas Danny Hart appears to be running reeeeeealy wide bars for his shoulder width and wingspan.
  • - 2
 800mm down to 760mm?! That should be illegal!
  • + 0
 @richierocket: In Switzerland any handlebar over 700mm was illegal until 2017 XD!
  • + 1
 @WasatchEnduro: Agreed. Browsed the article and couldn't really put it in context as I don't know the dimensions of the rest of the bike, that of the riders and their range of motion. Riders and bikes are so diverse it is hard to look at these "cockpit" numbers in isolation.
  • + 1
 @nvranka: it actually started with the top level riders adding extensions into their bars back in the mid 2000s. It literally was the pros who wanted wider bars, and most still run 'wide' bars by most standards (30"). Troy is short and runs 29" bars but that's an outlier in the mix these days. Most are on 30" or greater, which were 'wide' bars less than a few years ago. So it's not a fad but rather we're used to 30" bars as normal when back in 07 many DH bars were only 28" wide.
  • + 0
 @jgreermalkin: actually it does in a proper push up. Look it up your hands should be lined up with your shoulders lol.
  • + 2
 @richierocket: it's not as bad as what my bro did to a spank spike evo 777 I gave him. He cut it down to 640 and completely ruined them.
  • + 2
 I'm 5'9" and I like a 760mm on my enduro. If I had a DH rig, I would run 780mm on that.
  • + 3
 @johnnygolucky: I'm imagining something between a yeti and a gorilla.
  • + 1
 @WasatchEnduro: I am 6'2" and running deity mohawk 787 wide. They feel fine. Havent tried anything wider tho.
  • + 1
 I don't believe bar width, even for these guys, is simply a matter of width, even though most may not say as much. By the time we are talking about bar width all kinds of other settings have been fettled and arrived upon. The totality of how those things affect the bike are added to by the rider style, weight, position, and lastly bar width. On my Canfield Balance I run a 720mm flat bar. On my Kona Operator I run an 800mm flat bar. They both feel right too me! I tried a 740 on the Canfield and wanted to shoot myself afterwards. OTOH, I wouldn't dare change the bar on my Operator at this point. Lit up, even in the chunder, that bike just feels right.
  • + 1
 @johnnygolucky: I think you're punking us
  • + 1
 @johnnygolucky: Yeah but that's related, isn't it? When I bought my first mountainbike as a complete back in 2001, it came with something like a 90mm stem and less than 60cm wide bars. Soon enough I wanted higher bars to keep the brakes etc from hitting my top tube in crashes. So I got riser bars which were a bit wider. I loved the width (no idea how much it was) but it felt way too long for me. So I got the shortest stem I came across and could afford. It happened to be a 60mm stem from Kalloy and worked just fine. A few years later I moved on to 40 and 50mm stems with wider bars. And you simply have it the other way around. You've got a longer stem so that suits narrower bars. Unless you've got a really short frame (reach) you otherwise simply wouldn't be able to hold the bars. It wouldn't be for me, but I do understand that that setup works for you.
  • + 1
 That's exactley
What my bikes are now, although I want to run 780 on the enduro @spinko:
  • + 1
 @aserta22: Sorry, I was being selfish as I'm 6'3.
  • + 1
 @mhoshal: I'm old and I remember doing that to a beautiful "World Force" handlebar that I picked up back in the day. Learn from our mistakes we do.
  • + 2
 @richierocket: I remember an Azonic I had back in the day. It must have had 3" rise and was 710mm wide. That thing was the widest thing around. How times have changed.
  • + 0
 @gtill9000:

I do crack myself up sometimes.
  • + 1
 @aserta22: Dang, just an opinion people (I happen to be 6'3).
  • + 24
 I have custom bend in my levers...from crashing...
  • + 12
 I can't really imagine Gee requesting the bite point is set at an uncomfortable distance from the bar. "Yeah Pete, make sure the brakes are set really uncomfortable, you know, just how I like them".
  • + 9
 I know people shorter than 5'5" who ride 800mm wide bars. They look like they're crucified. And the funny thing is, when the trail gets technical, their hands would move closer to middle of the bars until the edge of their hands are touching the bolts on the brake levers.

They wouldn't cut the bars because of resale value and their favorite rider rides them 800mm. f*ck comfort. lol
  • + 1
 I am 5'5 and went up from 710 to 740 and then 750 - current bike has 760 and its wider than I want - going to knock them back to 750 or 740 when I get the time - in the meantime I have the brakes further in board and make use of the inside of the grips which have more than enough real estate for my little hands. 800 would be ridiculous for me but I know a guy who swears by them and he is no bigger than me.
  • + 1
 It has more to do with shoulder width than height. It's like saying that you wear size 10 shoes because you are 5'10". Sure, taller dudes usually have wider shoulders, and vice-versa, but it's not necessarily the case.
  • + 2
 @ka-brap: exactly what I was going to say. I'm pretty short at 5'7 but can't get along with anything under 780. 800 felt ok but I'd shit my pants at woody sections.

Other than that, I liked that Mondraker saying 'forward geometry' while everyone was running 45 or 50mm stems...including their team riders.
  • + 2
 Resale value, of handlebars? There are components I wouldn't mind buying used, but handlebars aren't one of them. Surely must have a few knocks, subject to fatigue loads, clamped by all kinds of stuff that in turn also receives knocks, maybe even got some cable rub. I was told someday that I should replace my handlebar every two years or so because of all this. Now maybe I don't do exactly that (I don't quite keep track of how long and how much I use what I have) but I wouldn't buy or sell one of these. And then I'm still one of those who doesn't go stupid light with carbon etc and still observe the recommended torque settings.

Forget about resale value. Care about setting your bike up properly!
  • + 1
 Resale!? ... Only a gear whore would worry about the resale value of a Handel bar!
  • + 5
 Seems the right place to ask this:
How many runs do Pros do on one set of Break-Pads?
It appears to me that i has a lot influence how much wear pads have on the contact point an lever-clearence when fully pulled. My contact point adjustment on my Codes always drove me crazy because it never really delivered what i was hoping for.
I was pretty happy with my simple Avid exlir Rs without that gadget though.
  • + 2
 i think this depends on the terrain and conditions ridden more than anything. Not a Pro rider at all, but I often get through 2 weeks bikepark riding in morzine in the sun and barely wear my pads at all. On the other hand ive blown through a brand new set of pads in one (slightly drizzly) day riding sandy trails. Riding skill level will affect this a little, but nowhere near as much as trail conditions. Pad compound will also have an effect.

Contact point and bite point adjusters shouldnt really have much effect on pad wear at all, as the pads should not contact the rotor unless you are pulling the lever no matter what settings you run.
  • + 1
 You're totally right. I can tell when it's getting time to replace my pads when the lever almost hits the bars. New pads, and it bites right where I want it to. Shimano XT/Saint brakes, FYI.
  • + 4
 As the pad wears the brake should self adjust by taking more oil from the reservoir! The bite point should not change with pad wear. There is enough spare oil to componsate.
  • + 1
 @mikelee: What he means is that when he has completely worn the pad material, he's braking with the backing plate. This causes the system to overheat, vapor lock and then he finds his levers touch the bars. If this happens, he knows it is about time to replace the pads.
  • + 1
 @vinay: any rider worth his salt won't let that happen! If you're letting pads get that low and riding them,you deserve all you get.
  • + 1
 @mikelee: Not sure if it still goes for the MT-series brakes, but my old Magura brakes had small notches on the "ears" of the brake pads. As the pads material wore off and the pistons readjusted, at some point the notches started to hit the rotor spokes when you applied the brakes so you got this rattling sound. This was a safe indicator that the pads were due for replacement and Magura designed this into these pads for this very purpose. Not sure whether other brakes have warning systems built in like that. I can imagine that because of the convenience of automatic pad wear adjustment, people who hardly wear their pads hence forego this basic check and at some point wear them all the way down.
  • + 6
 Most interesting part for me are the painted bar spots under the brake clamps on Brosnans bike. I bet its a lot easier to set up their position on the bars consistently that way
  • + 2
 I've been doing that for years but use a paint pen like people use for tires and labeling wine glasses. Easy to do to mark stuff and comes off with a little rubbing alcohol.
  • + 1
 I used a nail to make a tiny scratch for the position of the handlebar, grips, and lever placing. Works magic when unpacking to hit chatel with a familiar feel in my bike!
  • + 1
 done a family car tour of europe last year, had the bike in bits under all the luggage , forks out the lot, marked everything with tape to speed up building, seems silly now that it's not an everyday thing
  • + 1
 @donpinpon29: That small scratch that you added creates a stress riser and increases the risk of the bar snapping. Paint/marker/tape is a better method
  • + 5
 @WolfStoneD: damn my bike is full of stress risers then. Better not ride it. Oh sorry my sarcasm detector was off hahaha
  • + 3
 Cool feature! Those Trickstuff brakes look awesome, the levers remind me of the DangerBoy levers you could get back in the day to upgrade the stock flexy rubbish we used to get, those Dangerboys were sic as too!
  • + 1
 Someone should probably mention on these articles that lever THROW isn't something that you can actually set or control on most brakes, even those with adjustable throw/BP will have a minimum free stroke (and usually those adjusters are useless, because most brakes have greater than ideal dead stroke even with the adjuster at the minimum setting).

What most people don't know is that mechanics are pumping excess fluid into brakes like the saint M820 at least once per ride day, but sometimes as often as once per run to keep the throw from getting excessive. It's certainly not a realistic thing to do for the average rider, nor technically ideal/correct from a mechanical point of view (the excess fluid just leaks out of the reservoir area slowly, those seals are designed to not allow pressure buildup - which means the throw gets long again in a matter of runs). But the mechanics do it because it's the only way to cut down on the excessive throw which brakes like the M820 have.

Excess throw is a problem with many modern brakes and is something that should be addressed (hopefully in the future), because the current situation is that you have to run the lever REACH quite far out (further out than ideal) to stop the lever engaging right at the grip.
  • + 1
 I don't have very wide shoulders and am only 6ft tall but I like a bar around 780 to 800mm wide. Also I am surprised to see that the 31.8mm diameter bar still is the most popular. I personally never saw the need for the 35mm versions but its interesting to see they didn't catch on nonetheless.
  • + 1
 I have not thought of needing grip tape on my shifter, the problem I have is on rough stuff, accidentally dropping two or three gears cause my thumb is ready to shift for the next corner or something, and suddenly I'm in too hard of a gear when the bike bounces and my thumb hits the lever. Sometimes I wish on a fast run, it would only click once before you had to 'reset' and drop a gear again. But then, I'd complain it was shifting too slow I suppose. . .
  • + 5
 If I was one of the apparel sponsors I'd make the grip tape mandatory for my team riders, in the hope that many average riders will copy the trend, nothing wears out your gloves faster Wink
  • + 1
 @FuzzyL: This is exactly why I'll never use grip tape...on my bike, that is.
  • + 3
 Would be great to see a similar one for the XC guys! Like many others have said as well, rider height would be a great addition.
  • + 5
 Why is everyone cutting down their 800m hbars?? How can they turn??
  • + 0
 Are you confused or something?
  • + 1
 @jaha222: Everyone in the PH who rides DH or Trails run 800mm bars either because their favorite rider rides them or because of the trend.

They won't cut them either for re-sale value. Any cutting of parts will destroy your resale value, e.g. Cut steer tubes, cut seat posts and cut handlebars.

So, it's common in the PH to see 5'5" (160cm) people riding 800mm bars and 20 pieces of 10mm spacers on top of the stems.

And a "never been opened before" fork sells better than a fork that has been in and out of a service center.
Even if it means you never re-lubed or have the fork serviced... ever...

Weird huh?
  • + 3
 I've never understood this either. I guess it's like buying a sports car to sit in your garage to keep the miles off.@onetrykid:
  • + 6
 Sarcasm... such a misconstrued art these days...
  • + 0
 @Verbl-Kint: Top tip, use /s to show sarcasm on the internet. Since you can't actually hear the tone of a written message, saracasm is often hard to pick up on.
  • + 1
 sarcasm, the language of passive-aggression, doesn't get people laid, translates poorly on the internet, is generally not funny.
  • + 2
 @Verbl-Kint: Enjoy your 800mm wide bars. ^_^
  • + 4
 760s and no 35mm. Yeeeah!
  • + 2
 35 is actually pretty decent. I switched to a 35mm bar recently and have no complaints. It is certainly not some sort of magical improvement. I do use 760 bars however.
  • + 3
 Yay for short people... or something. The riders using 760mm or narrower bars aren't exactly giants.
  • + 1
 @slumgullion: I was thinking of getting a renthal fatbar lite 35, but I haven't seen any stems I really like in 35...

then I saw that Syncros one piece bar and stem on the new Scott Genius, which is 290g for the whole thing and looks like an extra from Alien.

That's going on my Christmas list now.
  • + 1
 @jaame: With Renthal bars I would run a Renthal stem, there's nothing else that matches that "gold" color on the bars.
  • + 2
 @FuzzyL: yeah but I don't like the steerer clamp on the back of the apex. Looks like it would take chunks out of you if you hit it. I don't like the price either.
  • + 1
 @jaame: For it's looks I like the Easton Haven stem. And with today's longish top tubes I'm not that afraid of hitting the stem anymore (and have not had a problem with my Renthal so far). If I was I'd probably go for the Production Privee, but that's also real pricey
  • + 1
 @FuzzyL: yeah i like the AMS Om, but that is like... "HOW MUCH!?"
  • + 1
 With all the different stem rises and so on it would be really interesting to see what height from ground level the bars are. That way the setups would be somehow more comparable, I guess.
  • + 2
 The article lists Gee Atherton running the Tharsis 9.8 bar with a 10mm rise. That's not possible. That model only comes in 20mm and 30mm (LR/HR).
  • + 1
 Griptape on those Trickstuff brakes probably has something to do with the fact that the levers look like they have far less "hook" at the ends for your finger to stop against. Kinda the opposite of a 1 finger lever.
  • + 1
 They look pretty similar to hope/sram levers. Shimonoseki just really goes for the one finger lever
  • + 3
 funny i finally see this being used on the shifters but stayed away from skateboard grip tape for the reason it will chew up my gloves i been using the leftover of the picture frame bumpers since i do a lil picture framing on the side which is a silicone / vinyl material works great in all weather conditions last about a good year and don't tear up my gloves ...
  • + 2
 @gooseman310: I've run grip tape on my shifters and levers for a few months now- it does NOT wear your gloves out. It made a surprisingly big difference to my cockpit set up with controls having a more positive feel, even in the dry.
  • + 2
 @gooseman310: some how missed the bit in your reply there about the silicone, that's a near idea. Nice solution. It crossed my mind to use drum stick tape/wrap (such as Ahead etc)-which is not unlike 3M mastic tape but less weighty. Its super durable on drumsticks, from my own experience of years on the road drumming* so might also work well..




*playing dive bars/same venue every week to 10 ppl
  • + 1
 @nickkk: all my gloves have thumb holes in from grip tape. Just learnt to accept it, only takes a few weeks too. My sram shifters are bad without grip tape. I notice it's grip tape on all the sram shifters here too.
  • + 1
 @yeti-monster @nickkk: img0.etsystatic.com/069/0/7232258/il_570xN.804600416_6c6o.jpg yeah this is what i use after im done with the bumpers i custom cut this bad boys after i clean the shifters with alcohol solution and it stays there for a good longtime i perfer the bumpers that are tall round softer ones rather than the flat harder ones they tend to have a better grip and stay longer on shifter cuz thery more flexible when applying like on this JPG pic .. these are the ones i use
  • + 3
 The rise of Gee's bar looks much higher than 10mm. Also, good to see some quite high rise set ups, always preferred this.
  • + 2
 Gee cuts his bar from 800 mm to 790 mm. That's a whopping 5 mm per side. Why not just leave it like it is. Smile
  • + 2
 Well then, which setup should I mimic... assuming that I'll get the skills within the package.
  • + 2
 Are the drop crowns on the 40 an option, and if so what's the benefit? I've always ran the straight crown.
  • + 3
 Depends on how tall the head tube of the bike is.

The lower crown can only go so low due to fork travel. If the bike has a tall head tube the upper crown won't reach the stanchions. This is why there is an optional tall (drop) crown for most forks.
  • + 0
 Running spacers under the stem or top crown bring the bars closer while also bringing them up. Use a high rise bar instead. It doesn't have the same effect, unless angled inwards.
  • + 1
 Where's the difference between sliding stanchions down, adding spacers under the crown and adding spacer under the stem? Is there any?
  • + 1
 Sliding the stanchions down changes the effective head angle. Adding spacers under the stem or under the upper crown without moving the stanchions raises the bar height without changing the head angle.
  • + 1
 Thank you for posting this, that custom bend in Gee's levers is exactly what I need to do, not a fan of the lever shape on my Saints.
  • + 1
 Me neither, I love my Saints but the levers aren't perfect, top tip..
  • + 2
 Geeked out nicely... thanks!
  • + 2
 Gee on Maxxis DHF? A spllit from bontrager tyres?
  • + 1
 I think i should cut my bars down im about 168cm running 800mm bars bike came like this, it feels alright tho
  • + 3
 If it feels alright, why change anything?
  • + 3
 Try sliding grips, shifter, brakes in 20mm each side first and have a ride. Don't like it, go back without having to buy new bars Wink
  • + 1
 @CaptainGFX: i just bought new diety bars, i went from 660mm bars so its abit of a change for me, i dont find my hands further in tho which is good i guess,
  • + 1
 @FuzzyL: it feels good, there is just that feeling of it could br better
  • + 2
 Where can I get tahnee's grips with the oilslick clamp? Drool
  • + 1
 Troy running 740mm bars?! Seems a lot narrower than most, but maybe I'm used to the trend for wider bars.
  • + 1
 I was pretty psyched to see him running Ergon grips. Just took a shot in the dark and ordered those same grips a couple days ago.
  • + 1
 @dro-cfr: Ueah I want to try those too, but they are four (4) times the price of Renthal push ons. Are they four times as good, do you reckon? I'm too stingy to take a chance.

£40 for grips! Ha!
  • + 1
 @jaame: I was able to get a set for about $23 which is only a bit more than the ones I have been using. I'll let you know if they're any good. I work with my hands and will try just about any advantage I can to stop tingling in my hands when riding.
  • + 1
 @dro-cfr: at 23 American I would take a punt. Just a tad over priced in the UK at the moment.
  • + 1
 I run my bar fully stocked with a half hour break every 12 hours.
  • + 1
 Gee rockin' the ODI Longnecks!
  • + 1
 Thanks PB for such a fenomenal coverage !!
  • + 1
 Renthal FTW, nice to see Hope as well!
  • + 1
 Just wish they would offer in some more colors. I've seen some real good deals on them recently but can't go for the gold
  • + 1
 anyone know how tall Gee is?
  • + 1
 1m 88 from trek site
what ever that means lol. /s
  • + 45
 @mfoga: it means he's 1 metre and 88cm tall. That can be amalgamated into 188cm or 1880mm, or even 1.88m. It's typically measured from the ground he's standing on to the top of his head, using some kind of measurement device.

But if you're trying to convert to paleolithic units, he's 0.00934341074 furlongs tall.
  • - 11
flag mfoga (Jul 6, 2017 at 14:50) (Below Threshold)
 @Socket: wow sarcasm is lost on you I take it.
  • + 23
 @mfoga: not quite, but it appears that both sarcasm and mockery are lost on you Smile
  • + 2
 @mfoga: Equals to 9'15", aprox :3
  • + 4
 @mfoga: you got out-sarcasm'd
  • + 0
 @arrowheadrush: he got took out lol
  • + 3
 @ismasan: It's actually like 26 gallons
  • + 1
 @mfoga: The website uses the unit of science while us americans are stuck with the unit of freedom.
  • + 1
 Way more slip on grips than i expected.
  • + 2
 Slip on grips are awesome (except when they move), having tried plenty of Lock-ons, (Rental Kevlar, Medium, Ultra Tacky, Lizard Skins Peaty and Charger and ODI Ruffians, SDGs and Troy Lees) I always found that I was always looking for something softer and more padded, tried some ODI Longneck Pro's, same as those on Gee's bike, and they were amazing, soft and padded whilst still being grippy, and they get supertacky once you sweat into them abit. I ride without gloves, so that happened pretty quick.
  • + 1
 @MattGreenwood: Renthal push ons are unreal.
  • + 1
 @MattGreenwood: @MattGreenwood: I love me some slip ons. I haven't found them to move either. I did wire them on using my moto buddys special wiring on pliers spinner doodad.
  • + 2
 Thats pretty neat
  • + 1
 No close up on Miranda's custom shifter cover?! Great feature!
  • + 1
 She has small hands
  • + 3
 You know who has smaller hands?
  • - 2
 Gee has a bike ready to rock? Thought he said on WynTV that he was out...
  • + 7
 No he said he was going to take it easy...whatever that means for him ahaha
  • + 3
 @TheLongMan: It means top 20
  • + 1
 I asked a legit question and I get neg propped? Thanks Pinkbike comments section...

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