CyclingTips Digest: How SRAM Was Built, Silca Hot Wax, Internal-Gear Hubs, and More

Jul 20, 2020 at 11:50
by Sarah Lukas  


What's going on in the curly bar world? CyclingTips Digest showcases articles from our sister site, CyclingTips. In each installment, you might find endurance coverage, power-to-weight ratios, gravel bike tech and, of course, lycra.




From the Top: How SRAM was built
By: Wade Wallace

SRAM is credited with having three co-founders, but Stan Day is the man who planted the seed. And you could very well are argue he is the man where the brand’s culture and values stem from. At least that’s what I got out of speaking with him in this episode while listening to his polite, humble and understated approach when sharing his story.

(Read more.)







This all-wheel-drive fat bike is built to cross continents
By: Iain Treloar

We cover a lot of bikes – road bikes, gravel bikes, the occasional mountain bike – but it’s fair to say we’ve never written about a bike quite like this. That’s because this bike, and the expeditions it is built for, are well outside the ordinary.

(Read more.)





Silca launches hot melt wax in a bag
By: Dave Rome

Coming hot off the heels of Silca’s new Super Secret chain lube that claimed to be a hot melt wax in a drip-on bottle, the Indianapolis-based company has launched its own hot melt wax. And of course, it comes with a point of difference.

(Read more.)





Terske titanium tubeless valves: predictably expensive, unexpectedly good
By: Dave Rome

You’re probably familiar with the concept of a forever bike, commonly made of steel or titanium, that’s built to your specifications and intended to last you until you’re no longer able to pedal. Well, Lindarets took that “buy once, cry once” philosophy and applied it to a tubeless valve stem. Yep, this is a review of a titanium tubeless valve stem. You thought I’d stop at boutique bidon cage bolts?

(Read more.)





Meet the Superstrata, a 3D-printed carbon bike that’s blowing up on Indiegogo
By: Iain Treloar

2020 is shaping up as the year of the crowdfunded bicycle.

Earlier this year, a company called FLX released a bike called a Babymaker (nope, not joking) that quickly became an internet sensation. Through a targeted social media marketing campaign, the Babymaker was suddenly everywhere, following people from Instagram to Facebook to YouTube and back again...

...Because, guess what folks? There’s a new Indiegogo smash called the Superstrata which is now stalking cyclists all over the internet!

(Read more.)





This rear hub has 2x wireless shifting inside and 11 gears on the outside
By: Dave Rome

Removing the front derailleur from a drop-bar bike comes with its benefits — simplified frame design and increased tyre clearance — but it’s also fraught with compromise. We’re now at a place where 1x drivetrains can indeed match the total range of a good 2x setup, but that comes with greater gaps between each shift.

As spotted by Cycling Weekly, Classified is a Belgian company with a yet-to-be-released two-speed internal-gear rear hub which hosts an 11-speed cassette on the outside. And while that may sound simple, there’s a whole lot of cleverness here and it’s not nearly as radical-sounding as SRAM’s patented concept.

(Read more.)





Bontrager TLR Flash Charger floor pump review: Tubeless without a compressor
By: James Huang

As far as tubeless technology has progressed, it’s still more often than not that you’ll need more than a standard floor pump to get tires seated. If you’re not interested in adding a good air compressor to your home workshop, something like Bontrager’s TLR Flash Charger floor pump might be up your alley, and the latest redesign is a big improvement over the original version.

(Read more.)





Alberto Contador breaks Everesting record with time of 7:27:20
By: Iain Treloar

Seven-time Grand Tour winner, Alberto Contador, has set a new Everesting record in a time of 7 hours, 27 minutes and 20 seconds.

The record, set on Tuesday, July 7 on a steep, gently arcing segment of the climb of Silla del Rey in Castile and León, Spain, beats the mark recently set by Lachlan Morton (EF Pro Racing) by some two and a half minutes.

(Read more.)






145 Comments

  • 100 0
 During COVID I am pretty sure I have Evereseted with the scrolls of my mouse and swipes on the screen. Pretty impressive, I know.
  • 7 15
flag NorCalNomad (Jul 20, 2020 at 16:54) (Below Threshold)
 On a bike at low altitude it really isn't that hard compared to actually exercising at high altitude.
  • 37 2
 Everesting sounds so unambitious. I think its time to ramp this trend up to its next obvious standard: whose up for Mooning? Sure, any pro rider or asshat can ride the equivalent height of Everest but it takes a really committed fool to spend days Mooning. I'm sure some bro out there needs someone to hold their beer now. Let the Mooning Games begin.
  • 9 0
 @goffboy: ...he says turning around, bending over and reaching for waist band of shorts...
  • 4 0
 @fartymarty: Yeah, I'm over mooning. It was a teenage thing for me.
  • 3 0
 @carlitouk: none of us are as pert as we used to be
  • 4 0
 @NorCalNomad: was he in a plane? Altitude is for planes, elevation is where he’s at, having done a half Everest at low elevation I have nothing but respect for a man who can do the full thing in that time weather it be at low or high elevation.
  • 3 0
 Sounds like a lot of work... Did you ever rest????
  • 19 0
 I wish there were some articles about bike tool hacks. IE: using a bug sprayer as a tubeless setup pump, the infinite ways to use zip ties, and how beer improves ones wrenching ability bar none
  • 15 1
 Also a Q&A with pro mechanics. I want to know about their tricks of the trade in regards to brake bleeds. Specifically SRAM brake bleeds.
  • 6 0
 One of my favorite things to do is trying to do bike work without the specialized bike tools that you need once every couple of years. I'll spend an hour trying to remove a quicklink on a chain instead of buying chain pliers.
  • 8 0
 Ahh zip ties, the tool used for truing wheels and kidnappings
  • 3 0
 @OCSunDevil: long nose pliers, pops that quick link off in seconds
  • 3 0
 @tacklingdummy: Hmmm. My last few bleeds with Codes and Guides have turned out to be perfect. I did figure out a trick or two recently that has left me with rock solid bleeds. What issues you having?
  • 2 0
 @BrianANC You mean the Youtube channel Seth's Bike Hacks?
  • 1 0
 @OCSunDevil: Not that hard to do by hand. Make a "Z" with the chain with the angled part of the "z" being the quick link. Push the plates towards each other and pull the ends of the chain keeping it in that "z" fold. Or use needle nose pliers
  • 2 2
 @OCSunDevil: chain pliers are like $8 on amazon.... that seems more like stubbornness than frugality. An hour of my time Is far more valuable even once a year vs a tool that will last a proverbial lifetime and save me “hours” over its lifetime.
  • 3 2
 @tacklingdummy: I finally found the trick to properly bleed SRAM brakes. Its called getting Hayes Dominions...
  • 1 0
 @bhuff: I still really like SRAM brakes and figured out some good tricks (not in SRAM guidance) over the years to get a good bleed, but would still like to learn from the pros how they do it. Listening to the pros, you will always learn something.
  • 4 0
 @OCSunDevil: use an old gear cable. Thread either side of quicklink and the cross ends and pull.
Stubborn link removed. tup
  • 5 0
 @tacklingdummy: It's quite simple, you just bleed them in outer space where there is no air to get stuck in them. Of course, even in a near perfect vacuum, with older Elixirs you will still need to repeat the bleed 2 or 3 hundred times to get it right.
  • 7 4
 @tacklingdummy: professional wrench here... this is how to fix sram brakes:
Step 1. Locate a garbage receptacle.
Step 2. Firmly grasp sram guide brakeset with both hands (one hand on caliper, one hand on lever).
Step 3. Hold brakeset over your preferred garbage receptacle.
Step 4. Gently release grip from both hands simultaneously.
Step 5. Buy Shimano brakes
  • 8 0
 @RGonz: how do you fix your new wandering bite point issue?
  • 2 0
 @OCSunDevil: I end up using my chain pliers probably 6 times a year!
  • 1 1
 @RGonz: I actually bought a new set of 2020 Guide Rs off Pinkbike Buy/Sell rather than pay a shop to "bleed" the set I own
  • 3 0
 @RGonz: LOL. If you want to send me your throwaway SRAM brakes, I will gladly take them. Haha. But seriously, I really like SRAM brake feel, modulation, and their matchmaker clamp system.

The biggest issue with SRAM brakes was always when you take the lever syringe off as final step, too much fluid leaks out. SRAM solved the problem with the "bleeding edge tool" so you can force more brake fluid into the brake lines.

However, over the years, the thing I have learned about SRAM brakes is to not follow their bleed instructions. I have been bleeding SRAM brakes with a much thinner bleed block. That way the pistons are pushed further out and you can get more brake fluid into the brake lines. There is more to it than that, but I'm sure you get the just. Of course I also have the lever all the way in and pad contact all the way out to help as well. I still haven't upgraded to new brakes with bleeding edge tool, but don't really need to.
  • 1 0
 @spaceofades: toe strap
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: I trashed the levers after multiple rebuilds with updated internals. I kept the guide calipers and use my old non series oem shimano levers with mineral oil. Best feeling brakes I've ever ridden and they've been going strong for 2 years now and I've only bled them twice.
  • 2 0
 @tacklingdummy: I found this exact method with the small bleed block to work very well i just wouldn't put them on my bike. And bleeding edge is definitely superior to the old threaded design.
  • 23 5
 WHERE IS THE GRIM DONUT
  • 4 3
 I don’t even know what this is, seriously. Care to briefly explain?
  • 2 2
 Hiding somewhere behind the t-shirt.
  • 1 1
 @beanandcheeseburrito: do an article search and you'll understand
  • 3 0
 I don't know, but you can now buy Grim Donut merchandise. I hope it turns up quicker than the review.
  • 6 0
 I recall when they first mentioned the bike, someone said "Shut up and take my money!" I think they did just that. Pretty Sick, actually.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: Pretty Sick. I see what you did there.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Nice
  • 9 0
 Take out the wick of a candle make profit
  • 7 0
 sell wick as chain flossing devise; make greater profit
  • 2 0
 What do you do with the underpants?
  • 22 13
 SRAM was built to a poor tolerance with subpar materials.
  • 39 7
 Yet many of us ride Eagle and have never had a single issue.
  • 19 8
 and yet they stand behind their product and warranty most issues if they arise versus shimano sweeping any potential warranties under the rug till you get fed up waiting and buy more
  • 15 5
 Sram was built using a design team with a limited budget and a marketing team that had an unlimited expense account.
  • 21 3
 @schulte1400: then why has sram beaten shimano to 11 speed, 12 speed, wireless shifting, and proper narrow wide chainring profiles? Are you saying that shimano has even less of a design budget?
  • 6 0
 LOL the kid who's younger than grip shift trying to talk shit. Know a guy who's worked for Shimano and he said they love having SRAM as a competitor since they are actually pushing Shimano to innovate and make stuff in the race to keep up.
  • 8 2
 @Tr011: Shimano is infamous for working on products for a long time before releasing, which does speak in a different way to a large design budget. The opposite would be rushing an idea to market because you need to start getting a return on it instead of investing more in development and testing
  • 2 9
flag Tr011 (Jul 20, 2020 at 18:21) (Below Threshold)
 @showmethemountains: so the 8 year wait for saint is good then? Shimano doesnt care about cycling plain and simple, they are so far behind the curve and they dont innovate to make things better.
  • 5 2
 @showmethemountains: Having worked as an industrial engineer with Japanese semiconductor manufacturing tools Shimano seem to be a very typical Japanese company.... Well engineered products released later than the competition. The only question becomes whether you can hold out long enough for them to actually deliver their next product.

And they don't need chintzy eagle grafix to sell, because it works flawlessly and is superior to the competition (except for Shimano's recent brakes; those could use some work).
  • 6 3
 @Tr011: Because SRAM realized their 10spd wasn’t as good as shimano’s so they just added another gear and let there marketing team go to work. Same with 12spd. And then when they realized shimano’s 12spd was better, they announced AXS (an altered version of etap that had already been out for quite a while and not really anything new but their marketing team doesn’t want you to know that) and ignored the fact Shimano shifts better, more consistently, and has better spacing between gear ratios. And now they ‘updated’ 12spd with 10-52 gearing so their market team could claim it has the widest range while making the jump between gears even worse than it already was. SRAM: build hype, rush to market, fix it later. Shimano: We’ll release it when its perfected. Another reason Shimano took so long is because they couldnt get their cranks right. Sure, they could have just slapped a new chainring on some old cranks (which they did have to do to fill some OE orders for a month), but instead they pushed the public release date back so that everything was perfect when it went to market.
  • 3 1
 SRAM was built on the smoldering carcass of the venerable Sachs!
  • 2 0
 @schulte1400: Nah, 11sp wasn't 'adding a gear as a marketing excercise because Shimano's 10sp was better'. It was to have the right combo of range and steps between gears to convince the mainstream user to ditch the dreaded front mech. You can say what you want about shift quality but we would have waited so much longer for 1x to become the standard and not a mod on trailbikes if it wasn't for SRAM's 11sp. And even then, some were saying the range was a compromise (not that I agree but the fact remains that opinion was common), so 12sp upped the range to exactly what front mech drivertains offered and put the last nail in that coffin.

Even earlier with 10sp, quality arguments aside, SRAM were the ones who introduced it and immediately went from 3x to 2x. Shimano followed because they had to, but misunderstood the point so badly that they offered those utterly stupid 3x10 drivetrains. Hell, even with 11sp Shimano kept clinging to the front derailleur which was absurd and showed how out of touch with riders' needs they were.

Shimano make incredibly good quality, reliable, precise stuff but for some time now they've been a follower and not a leader in reading the market. And maybe for the better because last time they innovated, we got Dual Control, Airlines and Rapid Rise...
  • 2 1
 @showmethemountains: I'm glad Shimano finally came out with a competitive 1x system years after Sram, but Shimano has a had a lot of stinkers too. Rapid Rise, mtb brifters, their 11speed 11-46 cassette, their variable bite point brakes, their original 1x chainring that didn't work at all, they've had issues with cranks breaking recently, wired di2 (does anyone even run this?).
  • 1 3
 @Tr011: Shimano doesn’t care about mountain bikes anymore or mid to high end mountain bikes anyway. They have stopped innovating, they do the absolute bare minimum to stay relevant. They don’t listen to their customers. They haven’t done anything about all the complaints we’ve been making over the last ten years. We’re still experiencing the same issues. Same issues with the brakes, random bite point, leaky pistons, noisy brake pads. Same issues with the drivetrain. Cheap cassettes that don’t last, clutches that don’t last, cheap plastic thumb shifters that rattle and are awkward to reach with loads of drag. I could go on all day. They’re three times the size of SRAM. They could easily compete with them if they wanted to, make products as good as theirs but they’re clearly not interested. It seems they make so much money from low end mtbs / Walmart bikes, fishing, road and especially ebike that they’re happy to give the Mtb market to sram.
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: When did you become the grumpiest dude on pb?
  • 2 0
 @Tr011: Sram innovates, Shimano refines
  • 1 0
 @lehott: shimano 11 speed is far from refined, the 11-46 cassette is such a ham fisted blunder its a wonder people bought it
  • 1 0
 @NorCalNomad: I’m old, I’ve been here a very long time and I’m a total dick but I’m not wrong though. Wink
  • 5 1
 The concept behind that hub is awesome. I've switched to a 1x drive train from a hammerschmidt, and regret it; dragging the chain back and forth across the cassette when the terrain is rolling. It looks like that hub could be the best of both worlds. Keep up the real innovations!
  • 1 0
 Yeah, it might be great, in theory. Tho I'd hope that wireless shifting isn't required for it.
  • 4 0
 I have too nearly identical bikes, one Shimano XT group the other Sram . I have had 10 times more issues with the Shimano group bike, brake issues, shifting issues. ... seems like I'm always dealing with it in some way or other. The Sram bike has been set it & forget it other than typical upkeep.

I'm been riding & setting up my bikes for a long damn time & I was a Shimano disciple for years but not anymore!
  • 1 0
 Only issues I am running into is that the Shimano doesn't upshift like a dream like people swear it does. It does downshift better though (Sram upshifts better, but doesn't downshift as well). Other than that, both my 12 speed systems have been working well.
  • 7 1
 Maybe just luck, but I've never needed anything more than a floor pump to mount tubeless.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, its luck. I've only had to use a compressor a handful of times, but lighter tires are much more difficult to seat.
  • 4 0
 I dunno about y'all but last time I replaced valve stems it was because they were full of sealant, which unless I missed something the titanium would do nothing for?
  • 3 0
 The attached article was claiming that they didn't clog as much.
  • 3 0
 That's exactly what those valves aim to solve. Wink
  • 1 0
 They have a wider bore and a different opening into the tire to combat that
  • 5 0
 Anyone else notice the flat pedals (with pins) on the Superstrata?
  • 1 0
 A buddy of mine does the hot chain wax thing and claims that it works great. He has 2 chains and just swaps them every month to clean and re-wax them. I've never heard his chain squeak, so it must work... but he also had to buy a slow cooker to cook chains in...
  • 1 0
 I use two pots. One put water in, then a smaller one to put in the pot of water. Chain and wax goes in the inner pot (inner pot was from a rice cooker I found next to a dumpster). Water regulates the temperature.

Definitely works great. Pain in the ass though.
  • 3 0
 Just came here to say that I bought one of those OG bontrager flash charger pumps back in 2015 when they came out and it's still going strong.
  • 9 8
 All you people that love tearing into Sram should give it a rest.
You try making innovative bike parts that need to satisfy one of the biggest and most diverse user group of tech nerds on the planet.
You want it light and strong and completely redesigned every year to keep up with a sport that’s constantly evolving? Good luck keeping up with that.
I’m not sure what their pivotal moment was going to be.
But when Shimano forced everyone to shift with the finger that absolutely needed to be on the brakes and Sram had a better option was it for me.
That and many things like it are the result of a company being made up of bike riders of all kinds in the country that invented the sport of mountain biking.
  • 15 3
 SRAM employee has entered the chat
  • 9 1
 SRAM has great innovation. What they seem to lack is building products designed to last. Also innovation isn’t changing specs on something by a few mm, that’s just designing parts to be obsolete. That’s what people can’t stand about SRAM.
  • 2 1
 @freestyIAM:
Man I just work for the people. And there’s merits to both brands.
But this just isn’t a brand thing.
It’s a human thing. Humans produce a lot of junk. You just have to decide which junk you like. Speak with your money. Get smarter. Warranty the things that don’t work. Don’t just sling shit.
Would you be happier if you were still riding with a front deraileur and a dropper you could barely reach?
Almost all of the fork brands make creaky steerers.
Most brake brands offer failures of some kind.
Dub didn’t screw anyone over. You can and will be able to buy parts for either system for as long as you need.
  • 3 1
 It was impossible for us to get into oem manufacturing due to Shimano’s pricing on full group sets

Proceeds to increase market share by offering discounts on group sets when brands use RockShox suspension
  • 1 2
 Ha, So true. Had Shimano just offered discounts instead of penalizing for not running the whole group sram wouldn't have had the opportunity to sue them and they definitely would have gone out of business, as he alluded to in the interview. The history of sram is a bunch of bungled innovations until they finally came up with esp, a good decision to buy Rock Shox and push 1x, and more bungled innovations ever since.
  • 1 0
 Last summer my partner and I stumbled upon a bag of chain wax at the Wabi Sabi in Moab. Thinking we had just unlocked the cheat code, we vowed to wax our chains religiously. (Skier mindset) Turns out, taking apartyour chain to wax it REALLY sucks. As in, 4 chains broken last summer sucks. Learning from past events, I would not recommend waxing your chain religiously, or really at all. It does however make your chain feel silky smooth.
  • 1 0
 So.... the drag of an IG hub,
the exposure to filth and damage of a derailleur setup
the potential lack of suspension influence of a 2x setup (in granny ring, most suspensions sit up and climb better)
the cables to get stiff and gritty on the mech
the battery to charge on the hub.

Dont get me wrong, i'm all in favour of new ideas, but its a joke, right?
  • 1 0
 I like the idea of hot wax, I've heard good things about it, but I don't think I'm organised enough to run 2 chains for each bike and get it together to set up the slow cooker every time.
  • 2 0
 www.polandmotors.co.nz/product/spectro-chain-wax-aerosol

this does exactly the same thing in a can. another rider heard the tensioner on my zerode giving me grief in the carpark, walked over and sprayed that on it - sorted in 2 minutes. it's $20 a can at most motorcyle shops in NZ and last ages.

If that's not to hand I use squirt - their wax based bio-lube that isn't quite as effective on the tensioner, but it's biodegradable so I feel all warm and fuzzy.
  • 2 0
 @coney: Thanks Coney. Going to have to give it a try. How is it as far as dust collection? Says it leaves a dry film but here in the desert SW we have super fine dust (crushed granite) that tends to eat up chains & sprockets.
  • 1 0
 @Augustus-G: it's pretty good I reckon...my trails are sand and clay based so there's definitely crap there for the chain to collect, but the dry wax-based lube performs far better than a wet or liquid compound in my experience. I'm on a single speed taniwha without a rear cassette to change through though, so perhaps wouldn't notice the grit as much as others.
  • 1 0
 Lots of flaming going on here... I was just thinking that the Superstrada's logo looks, if not suspiciously, then confusingly like Scott's logo. I wonder what they have to say about it
  • 1 0
 Damn, that hub looks like the dinglespeed solution I've been waiting for, one gear for going up and one for coming down. Shame it's for road cyclists for whom burning money is more a part of the hobby than riding.
  • 3 0
 Superstrata... if Levy was a roadie
  • 3 0
 Supsrtata....Kestrel had this design 15 plus years agol
  • 1 0
 I converted an expansion vessel from an old boiler into a ghetto compressed air tank. Cheap, easy, portable and works every time.
  • 2 0
 It's like a Hammerschmidt inside of a freehub body!
  • 2 1
 SRAM was built with the money they won suing Shimano for monopolistic practices
  • 2 0
 Imagine the number of bottles you could fit on that bike....
  • 1 0
 Nah thanks, passing on the Wax. Had to wax-pot guitar pickups once and it was hell of a mess...
  • 1 0
 New bike co’s that use indiegogo & kickstarter always deliver on their promises, right?
  • 4 4
 Any reason why we still use presta valves instead of Schrader on modern wide mtb rims?
  • 1 0
 What's wrong with presta?
  • 2 2
 @N-60: more prone to clogging, damage than Schrader. More restrictive air flow means harder to seat tires.
  • 1 0
 @nonhero: In retrospect, those are fair points! It would be sweet to be able to use gas station compressors as well. I guess I just like the look of presta, and have had pretty good luck seating tires.
  • 3 1
 @nonhero: the airflow is actually more restrictive with schraeder because you have to overcome the spring preload of the valve when inflating. Noticeable especially when using a small pump trailside.
  • 3 2
 @thegoodflow: I'm comparing in regards to setting up tubeless tires. I remove the valve, seat the bead, add sealant, replace the valve then pump to desired pressure. Way easier with Schrader.
  • 1 2
 @N-60: I think that's why they've stuck around. People associate them with high end bikes so they must be better right?
  • 2 1
 @nonhero: fair enough w/ regard to seating tubeless tires, but if you remove the presta core, it poses so little restriction that even less restriction seems to be a moot point. But you asked if there's any reason we still use presta instead of schraeder, and inflating with a hand pump trailside is the big reason that everyone likes to ignore when advocating for schraeder. It's also more convenient to air down a tire with presta, but that's a fairly trivial difference.
  • 3 2
 @thegoodflow: I'd gladly take the increased pressure to overcome the spring on Schrader vs all the problems I've had with presta trailside. Having to be super careful not to bend the valve with pumps that attach directly, or if the pump has a hose, then I have a 50/50 chance of the valve coming out when I remove the hose.
  • 3 2
 @nonhero: well, you're doing it wrong. But fortunately you have the option of drilling your rims and using schraeder valves.
  • 2 0
 @nonhero: Presta's are 2mm narrower than Schrader's. 6mm vs. 8mm. Presta's are more restrictive especially when you remove the core. It takes more pressure to open up a Schrader but the volume is potentially greater.
Presta's are better for narrower rims as the weak spot created by the hole in the rim is smaller.
  • 1 0
 @N-60: You can use a Schrader Pump/Head on a Presta valve if you have a Plastic Presta Cap and something to cut with.

Take the cap and cut it half, just above the step down in the taper.
Open up your Presta Valve.
Flip the cut Cap upside down and thread it onto your Presta stem. The big open end is the same size as the opening of a Schrader Pump/Head.
It works best with a locking Pump Head but will also work with a gas station type press on head. You just have to hold it very firmly. Not a perfect solution but if you don't have an adapter it'll get you out of a jam.
  • 2 3
 @thegoodflow: maybe I am doing it wrong, but if the only pro you have for presta is that the little spring pressure on Schrader is too hard to overcome, you might want to find an easier hobby than mountain biking..
  • 3 2
 @nonhero: yes, mtb is too hard for me. Good one. Ok, so use schraeder valves then.... or just complain, up to you
  • 1 0
 @Augustus-G: good advice! I've used that technique, with varied success, but it's definitely good in a pinch! All in all I'm satisfied with presta, but my current rim/tire combo has been easy to seat with a floor pump.
  • 3 2
 @Augustus-G: yes, presta was the solution for narrowing road rims in the early years of less weight above all else. But now that rims are wider and made from stronger materials, the cons far outweigh any benefits. I don't know why people still put up with them.
  • 5 3
 @nonhero: here's the thing... most people don't struggle to use presta valves without breaking them. Everyone else, besides you and lezyne apparently, have also realized that pumps that thread onto the valve suck and have stopped using them, and then accidentally unthreading the valvecore is no longer an issue. They're both valves. They both work. They both have subtle advantages and disadvantages. If you struggle to use either kind of valve then it's probably a personal problem. Whenever someone brings this up they act like they've had some revelation that everyone else is too dumb to see. And for some reason, they have to try to convince all the people that just don't give a shit and use presta because they work fine and it's the industry standard, that schraeder is vastly superior and they're being duped by the industry. If you care so much, just drill your rims and use tubeless schraeder valves, and move on with your life. Nobody cares.
  • 1 0
 @nonhero: I don't either, I just carry the adapter that came with my Shock Pump. I have a Topeak multi-tool and it fits right in the middle of it. 1.15gr isn't much of a weight penalty for the safety net on long rides. LOL
  • 2 5
 @thegoodflow: I don't know why you're so hung up on this dude. My comments are perfectly reasonable given the subject article.
Let me try a different tack. Let's say you weren't the obvious MTB God that you are and had some issues with presta like a lot of us lowly joeys. Would you spend the 40$ on "improved" presta valves, or switch to Schrader?
  • 3 3
 @nonhero: Lol, I didn't know that it made me an mtb God if I didn't struggle with presta valves! That's a pretty low bar. I'm not hung up on anything, but you asked a question, I answered it objectively, but you don't like the answer. I'd probably choose option C... try to learn to not be so ham-fisted. But, here's a question for you, if you're so convinced that schraeder is superior, why haven't you switched already?
  • 2 1
 Presta valves seem significantly easier to get air into that Schrader. They allow more air in and the pump doesn't need to be positioned just perfect to press the spring loaded valve down.
  • 2 1
 If we switched to Schrader, everyone would be bitching about the changing standards and having to replace everything that uses Presta.
  • 1 0
 Not sure what is cooler, the AWD fatbike, or the woman riding it.
  • 1 0
 Though...some of the comments in that article lead me to believe she isn't as awesome as the article makes her sound. So...maybe just the bike then.
  • 1 0
 Forever bike...
  • 2 0
 Imagine a stable industry that had consistency in standards for decades?....... I mean; “stupid roadies”.....
  • 2 0
 @Mattysville: it's almost as if the surface they ride hasn't changed in 50 years.
  • 2 0
 @Mattysville: road bikes have just as many changing standards as mtb, flat mount disc brakes, 12mm axles, a whole bunch of proprietary seatpost shapes, most of the wackier BB standards started on road bikes, there are also a ton of proprietary stem/bar systems, and forks (especially on gravel bikes) no longer have anything close to a standard geometry, each model has it's own proprietary offset and length.
  • 3 5
 Saw the title of the article and came here to say this:
If you take the time to melt wax to put on your bike chain go f*ck yourself.
  • 2 0
 I neither agree nor disagree but I love your passion. I'm here for entertainment, not to learn.
  • 1 0
 You really need to go ride your bike...
  • 15 18
 Now you know to blame Stan Day when SRAM puts out another under-engineered product for users to test. Truly, he's a visionary.
  • 12 4
 such great innnovations such as DUB 28.99, marketing the vivid as a shock that 97% of riders won't be good enough for, the sagging reverbs, elixir brakes, 2015-17 guide brake pistons that stick without a recall, am I missing anything?
  • 4 0
 @strickland-propane: SX derailleurs whose return spring cant shift off the 50t cog...NX shifters which get stuck in the middle...creaky pike CSU's...that's all I have to add.
  • 4 1
 @takeiteasyridehard: You forgot GX jockey wheels.
  • 3 1
 Every rider is a developmental blackbox rider for SRAM
  • 2 0
 Rockshox Super Deluxe Ultimate..... if we give it three names that mean great nobody will realize their OEM shock is absolute garbage.
  • 1 0
 @strickland-propane: road front mechs
  • 2 0
 To play devil's advocate they are also the company that finally killed the front derailleur in the mainstream and for that alone they deserve some kudos. Also, I have a Reverb and a Pike - no sagging, no creaking. Maybe I'm lucky or don't ride hard enough, plus I don't weigh a lot. And it's not like you don't hear creaking CSU stories about other brands' products.
  • 2 1
 @bananowy: it’s just the noisy minority of shimano fan boys who still think it’s 2009. They’ve only really even used shimano and don’t know how far behind they’ve fallen over the last five plus years.
  • 1 0
 @strickland-propane: oh yeah... pg1230 eagle cassettes whose 10t cog let's the chain slip...
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: I miss my front derailleur, all the smaller indexed gears, and wide range it allowed
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: but yeah, I have a 2014 pike - no issues. And I had a 2011 reverb for ages without ever needing service - finally sold it due to external routing
  • 1 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: Different strokes for different folks I guess. Don't Shimano still make some decent 2x setups you could use, or is it now limited to lower groups?

Personally I gladly got rid of the FD and that was when I still had 10sp in the back (12-36 cassette on a relatively light hardtail in a place with no big mountains so was OK). Somehow the idea of chainrings specifically designed to drop the chain on a bike ridden over rough ground doesn't appeal to me Wink

I'm totally fine with front mechs on road/gravel though.

I was kinda ashamed to admit I've never serviced my Reverb (4 years and counting) but I guess I'm not the only one Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: Yeah...Shimano makes 2x stuff for their latest and greates, but hardly any frames take a front derailleur anymore.

I've never used SRAM front derailleurs, but Shimano 2x front derailleurs are rock solid(at least in the XTs I always used). Unless you don't install them right, they shift perfectly at all times.

What I miss with a front derailleur is the larger gear range. I climb up to the best of my ability but I also pedal down when the trail is wide open and fast. I hate running out of gears either way. Unless someone can get a 9-tooth in the rear that works well, 1x isn't going to be able to match the 5.7:1 range I have on my 2x setup...and I wanted more out of that. The geared hubs up above would be great if they can make them strong enough to deal with my needs. With their hub and a 4.1:1 cassette, you'd get a 6:1 total range.
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: well a lot of frames dont allow front derailleurs now. I also work at a shop, and I was clinging to my 2x10 XT XTR mix until 2019. I decided I had to try eagle to have a solid opinion on new stuff. It wasnt that I always used the whole 2x10 group. But it was there when I wanted it. I do really miss the finer indexing points though. Otherwise 1x is fine. 1x wears out parts faster, and cassettes are expensive. I also had a super custom upper chainguide that I shaved to match the back profile of the FD, and a lower 2 pulley roller. So I never dropped a chain on 2x. There a things I like about both 1x and 2x. But for me 2x just had more options in many ways. Now most frames I would consider dont allow it.
  • 3 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: I’ve not used a front derailer since the 90’s honestly I’d rather not ride than go back to those dark old times.
  • 1 3
 Was Contador drug free at the time?
  • 1 0
 More than yourself
  • 3 0
 Perhaps Viagra. Helps get things up.
  • 1 4
 Sram was born out of mediocrity let’s be honest here

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