Atherton Bikes Launch Direct to Consumer Website Sales

Jan 17, 2022 at 13:23
by Sarah Moore  


Today, Atherton Bikes is launching direct to consumer sales to customers across the globe through a brand new website.

After launching Atherton Bikes in January of 2019, the company has spent the past three years testing and developing products. There will be two models available at launch, a Downhill bike with 200mm of travel and a newly refined version of the 29”, 150mm Enduro bike. Further product releases are scheduled for Spring.


While this is the first time the bikes will be available to purchase online, Atherton’s production bikes have already been delivered to one hundred customers around the world.

bigquotesIt’s so awesome to be taking the next big step for our start-up company. It hasn’t been an easy time to set up a new bike company with shortages of components across the entire industry; we will always be grateful to those early adaptors who believed in us right from the start and ordered their bikes unseen and un-reviewed. It’s been a whirlwind three years that has seen some big milestones, including our first three World Cup wins, and the wildly successful crowd-funding raise that has allowed us to recruit some awesome young design and engineering talent, move our manufacturing in house and quadruple our production capacityGee Atherton





Atherton Bikes are manufactured in Machynlleth, mid Wales using additive manufacturing (3d printing in titanium). This technology is widely used in Formula One and the aerospace industry but it is still relatively unknown in mountain biking. All Atherton Bikes frames are individually hand-crafted to finish.

bigquotesUnlike the majority of high-end brands we don’t rely on carbon moulds or Far East production. Every one of our bikes is individually tailored in CAD to produce titanium lugs which are bonded to carbon fibre tubes with aerospace grade adhesive. Not only are our bikes very strong but we can react quickly, with vast potential for variations in size, geometry and the incorporation of new learnings in a continuous process of improvement.Atherton Bikes CEO Dan Brown

The new website hosts a customer fit calculator that suggests one of an extended range of standard sizes. There are 22 standard sizes you can select for the enduro bike and 12 or the downhill bike, but if you still can’t find a perfect fit, you can go custom to get your perfect fit.




Atherton Bikes says that the additive manufacturing technology that facilitates this huge range of sizes also eliminates the limitations of a three year product cycle. Learnings from the race track or the company’s continuous testing at Dyfi Bike Park can be immediately incorporated into their production bikes.

To coincide with the new website launch, the product team have introduced a series of refinements to the Enduro bike. The new version 150 will have port to port cable routing, downtube protection, a steeper seat angle for more efficient pedalling and a longer seat-post insertion for more dropper post options across the range of sizes.




bigquotesIt had always been our dream to set up a bike company with the Atherton name on it. We started using Formula 1 technology and aerospace engineering to make mountain bikes in Wales which was exciting for us and our desire to do things differently.Dan Atherton




bigquotesEvery bike is made to order and built to last so there is no waste. We all love it when we see our bikes out on the trails, we’re definitely still in start-up mode but I hope this next phase of our company’s development will give many more people the chance to try our bikes.Rachel Atherton

Costs start from £3999 for a frame only option or £6700 for a full build (Prices in GBP inc. sales tax) or $4532.20 and $8783.33 (USD excl. sales tax).

Learn more at www.Athertonbikes.com


We'll be hosting an Ask Us Anything with the Atherton Bikes team tomorrow so get your questions ready!


319 Comments

  • 252 1
 Hmmmm, I can't see the option on the website to add Atherton riding skills or Gee's 6 pack to my order.
  • 349 3
 lets be honest, Gee was fitter than all of us, when he was in hospital and couldn't walk.
  • 21 49
flag mattg95 (Jan 18, 2022 at 4:33) (Below Threshold)
 @AyJayDoubleyou: Idk man, he was pretty banged up. It's his ability to keep coming back from the times where he can't even walk that's so impressive
  • 120 0
 Coming soon....
  • 52 2
 @athertonbikes: can you make the "Look as Hard as Dan" an option too please ?
  • 72 1
 Many would opt for the You Can Do It All (be a champion, be a mom, be awesome) Rachel special edition build.
  • 9 0
 I'd settle for his jawline tbh
  • 8 0
 @pigman65: Dan can walk into a pub with a flat roof and be alright.
  • 146 0
 Here Gee, hold this clipboard and look like your inspecting something…
  • 6 0
 Stand over there and look those joiners....
  • 10 0
 Looks like a Kim Jong Un photo shoot
  • 3 0
 That is 100% exactly what happened!
  • 2 0
 he make sure not to looks like a session.
  • 94 6
 I really like the way they are made, would also like to try one.

But: someone should set up a bs-bingo for bike advertisement, with sentences/expressions like:
- Formula 1 technology
- aerospace grade material
- racing proven
- extensive / continues testing
...
  • 31 0
 It was like reading early 2000s mtb ads all over again haha
  • 22 0
 - Marine Grade - CNC
  • 23 0
 Yeah, bro. More like "Formula 1 uses mountain bike technology" Wink
  • 10 0
 @bananowy:
Like the 1990s, after the cold war ended there were a lot of aerospace engineers looking for work. Everything seemed to come out of a CNC machine.

The picture of the unpainted frames reminded me of my first road bike, an aluminum lugged, carbon tube Specialized Epic Pro. What was old is new again.
  • 2 1
 challenge accepted for an MTB BS-Bingo!
  • 16 2
 Isn't it all accurate here though? Moat of the time there's nothing behind it but they can back up every one-off those statements
  • 2 0
 @russthedog: found one BS-Bingo for Rampage (in German though) www.redbull.com/ch-de/red-bull-rampage-2016-bullshit-bingo
  • 13 2
 @russthedog: it's all meaningless though. Most bikes use materials that are also used in aerospace. Most bikes have been tested. Most bikes have been raced and not failed. There's just no point in calling it out, unless you're trying to blind the customer with smoke and mirrors.
  • 8 0
 @znelson: "Formula 1 uses mountain bike technology" the car did 100m and the carbon chassis cracked :-)
  • 5 0
 @znelson: The car jacks in the pit lanes defo used DH bars at one point in time.
  • 7 1
 THIS.

Plus the, "unlike other brands..."

There's a way to market your product without looking down on those that have been doing it well for decades.
  • 3 8
flag GT-CORRADO (Jan 18, 2022 at 6:58) (Below Threshold)
 @fasterjason: Yah, cuzz 3d printed titanium lugs are exactly the same as aluminum lugs?? WTF?
  • 2 2
 @fasterjason: that Epic was made using simple lugs, same as Alan and the like with bonded aluminum frames before them. These lugs surround the inside of the tubes as well as the outside using a totally different manufacturing process . I'll leave it for engineers to nerd out which is the best, these lugs or the monocoque frames that are more commonly seen. It's a bit like saying that your Epic (and I owned one too) reminds you of a bike from 1910 Wink
  • 2 0
 @Tambo:
so you'd rather it read "we bond the lugs to carbon using glue."
  • 8 0
 @biker245: yep. Tell it how it is.
  • 6 0
 at these prices the lugs should be made from unobtainium
  • 9 0
 @km79: They are you nor I can obtain them right now due to lack of funds
  • 1 1
 @Tambo: i dint agree, I think most brands can't say all of them and have real meaning behind it.

Additionally due to their model they are doing each element to an extent that would make them a leader.

I don't have one if their bikes and don't plan to by the way, and I agree it's a marketing driven industry. I think these claims are legitimate and fair play to them.
  • 1 1
 @russthedog: Sure, I just don't care. Because it doesn't (directly) make the bike better than any other. Or more environmentally friendly. Etc. To me the manufacturing tech holds no extra value
  • 1 1
 @Tambo: lol cool
  • 57 2
 I picked my Atherton Enduro bike up a few weeks ago, and i love it. They offer a option of a bottle mount. The sizing options are amazing and that was a big plus for me. Also, being able to pickup the phone and chat to the guys that are building your bike is great. We spoke about different shock options, build options and spec. The dw6 platform is so smooth and quiet, pedals well and goes down hill amazingly well, great control and gave a real confidence boost. Toms knowledge on the bikes and frame where second to none. If you are in the market for a uk made enduro bike, different from everything else with loads of sizing options, look into one of these. Yes, they are a little more from the boutique made bikes, but the fit and finish and the support you get before, during and after purchase, have made my Atherton bikes purchase more than worth it. Also give the coil shock a try, it tracks like no other bike i have ever owned.
  • 22 1
 Thanks for the support Chris! Stoked that you're enjoying your 150. Looking forward to riding with you again soon.
  • 4 0
 The engineering and craftsmanship just looks *Chef's kiss*. Curious how the kinematics compare to 4-bar bikes in the same category.
  • 2 1
 is it the strap style mount i see floating around the internet or threaded inserts into the down tube? would be nice to have one on the underside of the top tube also
  • 3 0
 I'm yet to try a coil. The super deluxe upgraded with a meg neg is super supple already.
  • 2 0
 @mobil1syn: threaded inserts
  • 4 3
 @athertonbikes: How much of a discount did Chris get for that plug?
I'm willing to work for tacos.... DM me if your interested Wink
  • 49 8
 Can someone give me a non emotional reason to buy this?
Geo and kinematics are bog standard and since they dont mention it, the weight is likely nothing to brag about either.
  • 38 0
 I know it's not all about spec but for £6700 I would want more than a base Lyrik too...
  • 20 6
 They also don't list effective top tube. On an enduro bike. Which is meant to be pedaled. I mean, I'd like to know if I'm going to be stretched out or compressed when I'm spending more than half my riding time pedaling the damn thing.
  • 31 0
 @sorryiamtheboss: Base lyrik, GX, base Guide brakes, base Stans wheels etc. for $9100 USD. I genuinely hope they do well cuz I like the Athertons but that might be a tough sell for 99% of us since its selling on name alone.
  • 61 17
 Is there *really* a non-emotional reason to buy anything other than a Specialized, Giant or Trek?

OK, that's a little reductive, but all super-high end brands rely on more than cold hard logic in the buying decision. I'd rather have an Atherton bike than a Yeti, but both are emotional/illogical choices.

That doesn't mean there's no place for them.
  • 19 0
 I thought the whole point of this manufacturing technique was that each frame could have a unique geometry.
  • 18 3
 It's all customized. You can adjust geo and size to suit you
  • 7 3
 @cvoc: yeah and I cant see how they implement that on their website you could order a custom frame for +650 but what is custom?

Even Nicolai offer a tailormade frame and that is very different from the custom frame.

@endoplasmicreticulum
I like the 10mm reach increments but with ONLY those short seat stays on every size with that HT angle, no thanks..
  • 10 4
 AeRoSpaCe engineering!1!!11!
  • 7 3
 I really like the Athertons and hope the company works out. The 3d printed ti is sexy. But I'm not sure they'll be able to survive on that manufacturing process alone. I think a line of reasonably priced Al frames made in Asia would be a good compliment to the somewhat niche 3d ti/carbon bikes for the company. Something like a transition sentinal or a privateer with the Atherton name on it would sell well. I mean, if the value is close to other options then way more of us would buy the Atherton bike for emotional reasons, I would anyhow. Just my 2 cents.
  • 11 7
 @brit-100: I look around my mates. Who has no bike issues? The ones on Treks and Specialzed.
Who has bike issues? The ones on boutique brands.
What do I have. Ah yes. Boutique brand Frown
  • 23 1
 @kcy4130: Hey! Thanks for the nice comments. The team behind the scenes are currently working on some exciting projects which we're sure will tick alot of those boxes. We're really excited for the future.
  • 4 0
 @ilovedust: to bad, I know the opposite. Big Grin
  • 3 1
 @wilsonians: G2 brakes on an Enduro bike with 180mm rotors front and rear? Guide RE is acceptable as it's essentially the old code calipers with guide levers, also should be 200mm disks all round with 29" wheels.
  • 9 7
 Examples i can think of- Perfect fit and sizing, knowing it can be ridden and raced at the highest possible level. Low mile production. Minimal waste.

Weight - lots of people don't care (including me)

Geo - they have 22 size for the enduro, how can that not be class leading? Custom geo us offered. Sorry, but I think that is an advantage in terms of geo over anything on the market.
  • 2 0
 @bashhard: More like RSPC NGNRNG!
  • 4 3
 @russthedog: where is the custom geo , show me the link. A different seat tube or reach length is nothing like CUSTOM geo.
  • 4 3
 @Serpentras: what is it if it isn't custom geo?
  • 4 3
 Yeah. 22 sizes with options for shorter riders and longer reach in the small sizes and options for taller riders in the larger sizes, just like everyone else. Option to go custom for about $1000.

Definitely something to complain about.
  • 1 3
 @Almazing: if you click the link for the "tech sheet" on the website, it's listed on that geo drawing. I agree I'd rather have it straight on the website, but to be fair the info is there.
  • 5 2
 @KennyWatson: I've looked at the tech sheet before making that post. Unless there's another separate hidden tech sheet only you're able to see, effective top tube is definitely not listed anywhere. Which is a big mistake for a company trying to be taken seriously.
  • 2 1
 @Almazing: eh you're right sorry, I blame lack of coffee!
There's a line right under the dimension for reach, but they don't dimension it.
  • 7 3
 none, pure overpriced shit, base lyric and g2 brakes and we're looking at 8.5k bike shipped + vat and tax duties? please
  • 4 4
 @NicolaZesty314: have you seen one or had a try of one?
  • 2 0
 @KennyWatson: They likely modeled the geo chart from their DH bike. Which I guess makes sense not to list ETT on a DH bike because it's not really an important measurement. But not including ETT figures on their pedal up AND descend bikes is a pretty big oversight.
  • 2 13
flag jesse-effing-edwards (Jan 18, 2022 at 7:03) (Below Threshold)
 And it looks department store brutal. Like, holy fug nuggets, it's really bad.
  • 34 4
 @endoplasmicreticulum

Sure, I'll give you a couple. I've had my A150 since September. Bar none, the most enjoyable bike I've ever ridden. While, I agree with you that the geo seems fairly standard, in combination with the kinematics of the DW6 suspension it feels farm from standard. Even though this bike has a HT that is the same angle and a ST that's a degree steeper than my old bike, it inspires much more confidence on the descents. Back when I was in the ordering process, I kept asking Tom if he could change the angles, because I had the same concerns as you. At a certain point Tom just told me to trust what the Atherton's developed and that it's going the best bike I'll have. Being taken back by his comment at first, eventually I pushed aside my stubbornness, trusted him, and am super glad I did! I don't posses the word smithing to describe how magical the ride on this bike is.

I also think that this is one of the best ways to build a carbon bike. Not much waste, not using cheap overseas labor, not much chance for hidden quality defects. My bike is so f*cking tight tolerance wise that it might as well have wings. Forget about any kind of misalignments, or crap bearing bores that you see in the typical asian-made carbon bike. I think one of the reason why this bike rides like a magic carpet is due to this perfect alignment of components. Combined with an onyx hub, all your hear while riding is the smashing of your tires against the terrain. Not a single peep comes from the frame.

Pinkbikers love to fantasize about bikes made responsibly in the western world. Well this is the pinnacle. Besides the bearings, all of the components are made in the UK. You get a top shelf product, designed and made by people who know what they're doing, at a (frame only) price that's 25-30% higher than normal. Not for everyone, but certainly not a giant leap to make either.
  • 1 0
 @cvoc: There's a custom option for an extra 650. It's a bit pricey to come with a RS Super Deluxe.
  • 2 0
 @sorryiamtheboss: Don't forget the real point behind their brand is to custom fit you to a bike; Hence an additional $730.00.

They sure do look snazzy tho.
  • 3 0
 @alexsin: and that's 650 in eur not usd
  • 6 1
 @russthedog: Well maybe something Nicolai will do for you? Google Nicolai tailor made frames and you will see the difference.

On that A-Bike you can only change two values, thats close to just cut the seat tube shorter..
I cant change the rear of the bike as an example and that is just not custom..
  • 4 3
 Can someone give me a non-emotional reason to buy any bike? It doesn’t exist.
  • 11 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: I don't agree, I like the way the straight carbon tubes and lugs look. And let's face it, you and I both ride Ripmo AF's, so who are we to talk about bike appearances??
  • 5 1
 Also I thought direct to consumer was supposed to cut down the costs...
  • 6 2
 @Serpentras: well, really, to compare Kalle Nicolai and his incredible bikes and possibilities with Atherton is actually not fair! Kalle knows his trade, the Athertons are riding on their name to charge insane prices.
I would be surprised if they stay in business 1/4 as long as Kalle Nicolai already is.
  • 3 0
 The sizing spread, that is for sure a competitive advantage over most brands! Though not having proportional chain stays on all of the frames seems like a huge hole in that equation?

Unfortunately the spec for price VS the competition isn't very good.

So even though it's awesome to have so many sizing choices, unless it was a situation I could try those sizes before buying to really understand/experience that advantage I don't see it as something that would sway me considering the spec and pricing.

Which is a bummer cause I always liked the look of the original Robot bikes. The non painted lugs are cool looking IMO! Smile
  • 2 0
 @sorryiamtheboss: For £1050 more. you get factory X0 and other things. Kinda strange pricing model
  • 4 1
 @piotrek21:
I had the same conversation regarding head angle too. In the end I was like "I'll trust them and if it doesnt suit, then I'll throw a works components in"
I don't regret it. Like you say the kinematics and the front/rear balance never feels like it's going to tuck on really steep stuff. The way it holds the ground under heavy braking never pitches me forwards so the fork stays up.
  • 7 2
 @endoplasmicreticulum: almost all purchase decisions are emotional. We use facts to justify those decisions (and omit some facts for the same).

Being purely logical you don't need a bike at all and you should save your money. Exercise can be performed for free. Go run, do air squats, pushups, etc.

So... I hope the Athertons do great on this. The bikes look sick. They're legit riders looking to sustain life after racing. Cant see negatives in this
  • 2 1
 same reason you would buy a yeti or santa cruz over an equally capable bike for half the price from commencal or marin etc etc. because its different and you can show off your wad
  • 2 2
 @Grosey: Yep. Everyone believes they’ve made a rational decision, but in the end they made their decision first then used/omitted data to rationalize it.

I like this bike. I think it looks cool, and the DW suspension is solid. I’m not going to buy it, because it is a bit too expensive for me. But even that is a rationalization. I could just as easily come up with a rationalization to spend the money if I wanted to. (You owe it to yourself; you only live once!)
  • 4 0
 @Grosey: We dont have to take this argument into strawman territory. Buying a bike is an emotional decision, but deciding what bike to buy can be rationalized.

If you really want to rationalize it, you write a list of demands and then buy the cheapest bike that ticks all the boxes.

I personally like the Athertons and cant imagine anyone here wants them to fail, but at that price tag, asking what objective advantages this bike brings to the table that others dont have is a legit question.
  • 2 1
 @endoplasmicreticulum: Isn’t 22 different sizes for their enduro frame an objective advantage? You can get a more exact fit.
  • 4 3
 @TheR: Thats maybe 22 sizes for you but I dont see it. Same CS length all the time...
  • 1 4
 @endoplasmicreticulum: Let me ask you this… say you have two or three bikes from three major manufacturers. Generally, you’re getting the same thing at each price level, +/- a couple hundred dollars here or there, from each manufacturer. (i.e. a $5,000 Trek is about the same thing as a $5k Specialized, which is about the same thing as a 5k Giant, or whatever company you like). So on which objective criteria do you make your decision? I mean there are dozens of bikes to choose from, and generally they’re all pretty solid and have all have comparable build to each other. If emotion is not coming into play, what objective characteristics are you basing your choice? Why are there dozens of brands to choose from? And why do some people opt for a Trek that might be $200 more than the comparable Specialized? Why do people opt for boutique brands when a more mainstream brand makes basically what amounts to the same type of bike for less? Why do any of us buy from a shop rather than direct sales?

All emotion. You buy and rationalize it after the fact. All good, but don’t be fooled into thinking your choice is completely rational.
  • 1 2
 @Serpentras: You’re rationalizing. It is in fact an objective option that you can measure — top tube length, reach, etc. In fact, it’s more objective than many other options between bikes out there. YOU don’t see it as a justifiable option. It’s not worth the money for YOU. Plenty of people might see it the other way around.
  • 2 1
 @jimbob79: I had those exact same thoughts "Worst case I'll just throw in my Works -1 headset". Haven't felt the need to do that at all.
  • 4 0
 @TheR: You still dont get it, the 3d printed lugs would make it excellent to make the rear longer or shorter.
Same CS length bikes are out there for decades. Growing CS is getting more and more popular.
I want a better product with 3d custom printed lugs. Yeah and that is the thing, you maybe have forgotten the claim robot bikes had back then?
I don't see the 22 sizes because most stuff is just the same.
  • 2 0
 @TheR: Look at the field tests and show me where they all cost the same, have the same parts, climb the same, descend the same, fit the same, etc. etc. etc.

they don't.

Not saying there isn't an emotional part of the decision to buy things. But there are LOTS of reasons, some very legitimately rational. Heck, being able to find, test ride, buy is exceptionally rational and that is the most often started advice for mountain bike purchase criteria.
  • 2 1
 @stiingya: I never said all bikes cost the same. I said each manufacturer basically sells a model at the same price point as their competitors, and at each price point, the specs are about the same. The cost is usually around $200 between each manufacturer. If there were no emotions involved, why would any one pick any given bike above the other? Field test reviews? Pure subjective opinions based on the reviewers’ preferences and where they ride. Hell, they don’t even compare apples to apples. Some of those bikes are top of the line. Others, not so much.

Two years ago, the field test said the Specialized Enduro was best in class. So how in the world did Trek sell comparably priced Slashes if not for some emotion-based choices?
  • 2 0
 @Jules15: i think this is intentional. It's a sales tactic so you buy the more expensive one because it seems better value for money. Why is a Starbucks large drink only like 50p more than a small when you get twice as much?
  • 1 5
flag TheR (Jan 18, 2022 at 15:28) (Below Threshold)
 @Serpentras: You don’t get it. Your hang-up about chain stay length is an emotional response. You’ve decided it matters. The Athertons and whatever professionals they have that helped them design the bikes decided it doesn’t, or wasn’t worth the trouble. It also won’t matter to the people who buy the bike based on being able to fine tune reach size, etc. So who’s right objectively? You? Why?

For the record, it doesn’t matter why you will or won’t buy a bike. There’s no right or wrong. It’s just not objective.
  • 2 2
 @TheR: tell me again what is so great about 3d printing custom lugs again?
For the record I already said what I want from it and you should read other comments as well to understand it better.
  • 1 4
 @Serpentras: I didn’t ask what you want from it, or about the lugs. I’m asking what is objectively right about wanting different sized CS lengths. How were the designers of the bikes objectively wrong in not addressing the issue?
  • 4 1
 @TheR: na man If you cant answer me why 3d printing lugs are awesome(they are) its a waste of time, the whole discussion.
  • 2 5
 @Serpentras: No! You changed the topic of discussion, which is what non-emotional reason would someone have to buy this bike. I posited there is no non-emotional reason behind buying any bike. Unless you can tell me one objective reason your fixation on CS length is non-emotional, you’re right. It’s a waste of time.
  • 2 1
 @TheR: I'm just here for the comments
  • 5 1
 @jimbob79: Are you not entertained?
  • 4 0
 @TheR: Because a heck of a LOT of people don't like horst link bikes. Because Trek has more frame sizes then Spec. Because Trek has aluminum Slashes at lower price points. Because some people think Reactive valving and thru shocks are better then other shocks. (course that's a minority Smile ) Because most often for the price a Slash is lighter then an Enduro. Maybe because they've had better luck with Bontrager wheels then with Roval wheels. Because they like the knock block. Because Trek lets you customize the paint instead of being stuck with some random colors that happen to be available at the pricepoint your looking at. (it's not JUST emotional that I don't want a red or purple bike that gets noticed on the back of my vehicle and is more likely to attract thieves)

If all I've ever rode was a trek it's not automatically emotional to buy trek again. It can also be because there is a trek dealer close, or a trek dealer I trust, never had a trek fail, or did have a trek fail but they gave me a brand new frame for cheap after a chainstay melted behind a rented RV. Or because you used to ride Spec and had too many warranty issues, or because you think Specialized was overbearing with their lawsuits. (again, you can make a factual argument that is a true statement, doesn't "have" to be an emotional one)

As of this moment right now on their US websites the Slash closest to 5G is almost 500 bucks cheaper then the Enduro that is closest to 5G. The slash arguably has a better drive train. The Enduro probably has a lighter drive train. The Slash only has a 36 Rhythm on it VS the Zeb Select on the Enduro. The Enduro has Codes VS Deores on the Slash. Of those two bikes a bigger rider might be better suited to the Enduro with the stiffer fork and better brakes. A smaller rider might be better on the Slash? Live near a bike resort the Enduro, might only visit a few times the Slash, etc. etc.

Sure bike tests are subjective. But even if I don't agree with them all the time at this point the Mike's are very relatable to me and based on their opinion's it helps me solidify my own opinions. AND I mentioned the field tests because they point out the differences in different bikes. Not because I was saying to blindly agree with what they say. For sure the field test bikes are all over the price range and that can make it hard to compare directly. But my point is bikes don't always directly compare!! The closest to 5G Giant Reign gets you the Zeb select, but drivetrain and brakes suck in comparison to those Spec and Trek bikes above. The closest to 5G SC Mega has a Lyrik and also the drivetrain and brakes suck in comparison to the Spec and Trek. 4 of the biggest brands and their 5G bikes are very different and I didn't even get into geometry yet...

Your implying buying a mountain bike is all emotion because they are all the same thing at the same price point. That doesn't look to be true...
  • 1 1
 @stiingya: A lot of stuff you mentioned is emotional, not objective. Picking your color rather than being stuck with a stock color; trusting a Trek dealer; arguably having a better drive train (you’ve argued yourself into that position, based on what objective grounds)… You’ve made a decision and rationalized backwards into buying a Trek.

Then to prove the point of what I’m saying, despite all the rational points of buying a Trek, a good many people still decide to by the Specialized. Or the Giant. So what happened to all those good objective point? Or forget the brands — people talk themselves into buying the model that’s one step higher, or in some cases one step lower. They’ll justify it with any number of reasons.

You talk about how the field tests help you solidify your opinions… that’s classic confirmation bias. You made a decision already — you’re just looking for the mikes to confirm. And if they don’t, well then you just don’t agree with them.

I’m sorry if I gave the impression that buying a bike is all emotion. I guess I can concede it’s not entirely, but once the basics have been established (acceptable geometry, suitable components, etc.), people generally have their minds made up and then rationalize any shortcoming with perceived advantages.
  • 1 1
 @stiingya: And I’m telling you, people will rationalize just the opposite of your reasoning. The Slash has a 36 rhythm on it vs the Zeb for the Enduro. Slash for the smaller rider, Enduro for the bigger guy? Except the smaller guy says he likes the planted feel of the bigger fork or would rather have the lighter drivetrain.

Also, the Specialized lawsuit issue — clearly emotional. Unless you were the one sued, it doesn’t affect you one bit. You might not like that they did that, but your reaction to it is purely emotional.
  • 2 0
 @TheR: Your just framing everything in an emotional way. Sure it can be, but there can also be logical reasons for those same decisions. (see above)

How can it be confirmation bias if I both sometimes agree and sometimes disagree with the Mikes?
  • 3 0
 @TheR: "once the basics have been established... people generally have their minds made up that then rationalize"

BS. We just went through how different those "basics"' can be between different bikes for about the same money. (and how much different the money can be too. that 500 bucks could be the only deciding factor)

And the idea that people already have their minds made up.Again BS. I've considered every bike I think I could get my hands on between 130 and 145mm in the back. I in no way have my mind made up already?

Why would you think you can generalize so broadly about what other people think without knowing them or their circumstances? Makes no sense...
  • 3 1
 @TheR: Mate don't you think you're grasping at straws a little bit here? People gave you a load of examples of perfectly rational and tangible considerations when choosing a bike and all you reply with is "iT's StIlL eMoTiOnAl"... Well no, it really isn't.

Geometry affecting fit and handling is a fact. Price affecting one's ability to purchase a thing is a fact. Spec differences are a fact. Some parts found even on not cheap bikes are objectively shit (mo-co dampers, plastic tyres, resin-only rotors etc.) and that's a fact. I could go on.

At this point someone could show you two otherwise equal and equally priced bikes, one with SX and the other with XTR and you'd still say choosing the XTR bike is emotional, seriously. If you don't want to listen and just want to be right, then why ask for arguments in the first place?

Discussion becomes pointless when you decide to become a broken record and respond like that to literally everything.
  • 1 3
 @bananowy: If I’m sounding like a broken record, let me change my tack here. Which of the following more closely resembles your last bike-buying experience. Be honest:

“Hmmm. I like that bike. I really like that bike. Let me check into it further. Ok, head tube angle is spot on, but that reach is a little long. That’s ok. It’s only 10mm longer than what I think is my ideal, and I can live with that. And I might like something a little longer.(Translation: I really like this bike). And it comes with X forks, and I really wanted another fork, but that’s OK, because X forks work pretty well, too, and I might like them. (Translation: I really like this bike). Oh, and it’s got X brakes, too. I’d rather have other brakes. But I guess X brakes are solid. And the reviews say this bike underperforms in X conditions, but that’s ok, because I don’t ride under X conditions, and even if I do, that’s like, their opinion, man. And besides they said it excels under other conditions, and that’s what I do. Ok, done. It’s a solid bike. I’ll buy this one.”

Or was it:

“Before me stands three blind geometry charts and parts spec sheets. I shall now study all the numbers and buy the bike that has the best numbers and best parts spec.”

For almost all of us, if you’re honest, it’s going to be the first. It’s not even possible to make a real objective decision on the second — the numbers themselves mean nothing in a vacuum, and biases will leak through when viewing the parts spec.

The reality is, you’ve made 80-90 percent of your decision when a company has gotten your attention and you've decided you really, really like their product. The extra information they provide in terms of geo numbers and part specs only exist to help you affirm your decision and push you into the final direction of buying. Yeah, you like the bike — you made a good, objective choice. Our charts prove it! Reviews the same. You’re just looking for confirmation and will rationalize away any perceived shortcomings in the reviews. Every once in a while, you may come up with a show stopper that will change your mind, but mostly, once you decide you really want something, you are going to follow through with the purchase and make the objective facts fit your wants. It’s the whole reason marketing departments exist.
  • 2 0
 @TheR: Go look at threads where people are asking for help choosing a bike. They aren't asking for help picking the one that's the most pretty... they are asking logical questions about sizing, fit, spec, kinematics, intent of use, etc. etc.

Go look at threads where people are complaining about the bike they have. They aren't complaining because their bike isn't the most pretty... they are complaining about suspension set up, brakes that squeal, actual seat tube angles pushing them back off the bike, cracks, breaks, noises, warranty, fit, upgrades, if they bought the right bike for their use, etc. etc.

For sure there are threads dedicated to dudes being d1cks because you post a picture with your pedals at the wrong angle and your valve stems don't line up. So not saying that isn't out there too. But it's hardly the only criteria people are using to choose a bike...
  • 4 4
 Shut the fuck up, all of you. You've killed the topic 3x over and i don't want my little notification thing to keep lighting up because you can't just let some shit go about rational vs. emotional. Good lord.
  • 2 1
 @wilsonians: I think somebodies mad because they really do pick bikes because they are the most pretty and doesn't like to see it spoken of...


Smile
  • 2 3
 @wilsonians: ah, go away.
  • 1 1
 @stiingya: How did they end up buying a bike that has all these problems? A seat tube angle they don’t like? Wasn’t that in the geometry specs? Shouldn’t they have seen, objectively, that it was a bad seat tube angle? Why did they then go buy the bike? Didn’t they read in the reviews that certain brakes are prone to squealing? Or that certain components make noises? I mean, not every case can makes its way in reviews, but word gets out. Everyone knows press fits creak. Why did you buy a press fit? We’ve heard a lot about Fox forks creaking. Why did you get a bike with a fox fork? Shimano brakes have a wandering bite point. Don’t even get me started on a Reverb. Why did they buy these bikes/parts despite these well-known objective issues? Because they rationalized that either they could live with it, or it wouldn’t happen to them. Because they found the bike they wanted to buy.

It doesn’t even have to be about a bike being pretty. It’s something about the bike/brand that resonates with you. This is pretty well-known in the marketing world. It’s why they use good vibes and puppies to sell Subarus, not horsepower and torque. It’s why YT uses Christopher Walken and 20-minute Long commando videos to promote their new releases.
  • 1 1
 @stiingya: The absurdity of YT aside, think about all the other release videos. Do they get into geometry? Do they get into an in depth component check? Not unless there’s something they really want to deal attention to, such as AXS or whatever. It all guys ripping, having a good time. Crushing trails. This is not objectivity. It builds the emotional connection first, so that then you’ll go and give it a closer look.
  • 2 0
 @stiingya: actually bought a Propain. Both pretty and rational haha
  • 1 0
 Yep, 4k USD just for the frame does it for me. Its a beauty, but I'm out.
  • 2 0
 @wilsonians: Hugene? I was so close and could have got by end of Feb, then the next time I looked it was May... ((^&^$(*@#$%$!!

They look to make some great bikes!
  • 2 1
 @TheR: I'm glad you asked because I ordered a new bike only about a month ago (here's hoping it actually arrives when it's supposed to).

I don't know why you're saying "For almost all of us" when you have zero idea what other people think or do. Projecting much?

Honestly, hand on heart, I swear on my mother's life my decision process was the second one almost to the letter. Well, not *blind* charts obviously because I had to get them from the websites and didn't engage friends to prepare blind versions for me haha. But you get the point.

Seriously man, how daft do you think I am to suggest my process started with "I like that bike"? No. My process started with "my current bike is clapped out to shit" followed closely by "several bikes I rode recently fit me waaay better than my own".

Step 2: Considering whether I absolutely 100% can afford a new bike and at what price while casually looking at options and riding more bikes.

Step 3: Months of looking at more bikes than I can count right now, comparing geo and specs. That included some brands which, indeed, get an emotional reaction from me so I had to be careful not to spend a disproportionate amount of money on a poor spec (looking at you Kona and your UK prices).

Step 4: Having a little cry in the corner about UK import duties on all the European DTC brands because f*cking Brexit.

Step 5: dropping the search for a while because it's tedious af and, you know, my bike's still rideable isn't it...

Step 6: Back to the search and trying to remember every little brand I've ever heard of in hopes of not getting shafted on spec mistakes from my previous post (common in my budget unfortunately).

Step 7: Finding a bike totally out of the left field for me, from a brand I only thought about at the last minute. Lo and behold, it has the right geo, size and - shockingly - not even ONE spec choice I don't like. Literally down to the exact tyres and saddle I'd put on it if I were building it.

Step 8: Bike ordered.

You might have noted none of the steps included "read/watch reviews". That's not an error. I really don't know why I'd ever consider something like PB reviews in my buying process lol. You do that?

The bottom line is that your statement "The reality is, you’ve made 80-90 percent of your decision when a company has gotten your attention" is so off the mark it's ridiculous. It's also pretty arrogant and ignorant of you to assume so confidently what I've done.

To the contrary, I ended up buying from a brand that had zero of my attention when I decided to get a bike and even until quite late in the process. They grabbed my attention because after a long-arse search they had a bike that ticked my boxes. And those boxes really weren't some made up emotional bs. I wanted no back pain, dampers that work, brakes that brake, tyres that grip where I ride, a proper travel dropper, a STA that's not a big fat lie, HA that's not from 2015 and size-specific CS. Without going over budget. Is that irrational? Definitely not obvious for the money I had to spend, but irrational? Nah. Though I'm sure you'll find a way to spin it somehow.
  • 3 0
 @stiingya: Tyee. I ordered it Jan 10, they are shipping it in the next 7-10 days.
  • 1 1
 @bananowy: I’m not projecting. I’ve worked in marketing and communications for over 20 years now. We KNOW this is how people work, as a rule, generally. If you’re truly the one exception, congrats.
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: and since you brought it up, which magical unicorn of a bike did you find that you didn’t even have to make a single, rational change to?
  • 1 0
 @TheR Then explain why I'm not riding a YT? And I loved the IZZO commercial WAY more... OR since I'm from CO why I've not yet ever bought a Yeti/GG/Spot/Reeb/Durango Bike Co. despite interest in all of those brands. Why am I eating leftovers right now when Subway just texted me?

I'm not denying marketing plays a role in purchasing. But the idea that there are NO logical buying decisions is ridiculous IMO...

A#1. the amount of money you are physically able to spend is a logical factor. Sure people blow their savings and run up their credit cards buying mountain bikes. (hence so many newish bikes always being for sale) But if you don't have 15G in your bank account or CC or can't get approved for a credit installment plan or able to beg, borrow, or steal; then you physically can't buy that S-works Turbo Leav-o...
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: Because YT is not the only company playing the game, and their efforts aren’t going to speak to all people. That’s why. Some other company spoke to you more.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: Please show me the last time you saw an Ad for Banshee on PB? Show me that GLOWING review in the field tests that provided me with confirmation bias? Explain why I still put a Reverb and Shimano brakes since we all know that makes a bike un-rideable...
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: The amount of money you can spend is objective to an extent, but sorry, many people do illogically extend themselves, maxing out their cards or paying an exorbitant rate through a shop’s financing service by going into debt, sometimes beyond what they can pay. And they’ll give you perfectly rational reasons to justify why they did it. But yeah, there is a limit, I guess, based on your credit line.
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: And for the third or fourth time, I’m not saying buying is all emotional. I’d say it’s 80/20 emotional, with 20 percent rational to give credence to your emotions.
  • 2 0
 @TheR: OH... sorry. Wouldn't want to misrepresent your argument... So it's 80% emotional, and the 20% is also emotional. But your not saying ALL buying is all emotional.

Also "PEOPLE MAKE BUYING DECISIONS BASED ON FEELINGS." But for the third or fourth time your not saying buying is all emotional.

OK your position is totally clear now... Smile
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: I don’t know. Those are questions for you to answer. What was it about Banshee that spoke to you? What made it objectively better than the dozens of other bikes in its class? Why do you use Shimano brakes and a Reverb, despite their reputations? For what it’s worth, I had a Reverb that worked flawlessly for 7 years, and never noticed a wandering bite point on my Shimanos.
  • 3 0
 @TheR: You literally are projecting. You specifically insisted I did things I did not do based on your personal experience rather than facts.

You are not the only guy in the world with marketing experience. I never said marketing doesn't work. However, different product categories call for different tactics.

And since you suggested YT's campaigns were a good idea, I'm gonna go ahead and suggest that after 20 years you might want to update your toolkit. A lot of what YT did was an utter waste of marketing budget. Like you, they probably assumed that purchasing decisions for mountain bikes and fizzy drinks are the same. They are not.

Am I completely misreading something or is that article you linked 22 years old? If so, you are really making my point for me...

The snarky "question" about the bike makes it clear you're not curious but just want something to dump on. What's relevant is the buying process which was the opposite of what you insinuated. I never said it's a "magical unicorn" so don't put words in my mouth to try and make my decision look more "emotional". That's really desperate, dude. I said it was the bike in my budget that best met some simple criteria I listed above. Of course I knew you would not reply whether those criteria are rational enough for you or not, but try to change the topic - and I predicted exactly that in my previous comment.
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: You’re literally hallucinating stuff I’ve never said. I never said YT’s campaigns were a good idea. Personally, I didn’t like them and they drove me away from the brand. That’s the risk they take to maybe pick up 10 other people. My point was they invest in these campaigns because they are trying to make an emotional connection with buyers. There is not a single rational fact in them.

I never said you called your bike a magical unicorn. Those were my words. I was just genuinely curious about which bike you bought, and was going to say, “yeah man, nice job. That’s a great bike.” But you somehow read my thoughts and assigned intent.

The article I linked to was the first thing I found in doing a simple Google search. It doesn’t make your point. It’s an old established marketing principle that supports mine. I’m not making this stuff up. I also never said I was the only one in the world with marketing experience. It’s clear YT has hired people with marketing experience, and it wasn’t me. I’m saying I have significant marketing and communications experience, thus establishing my credentials and where I’m coming from with my assertions.

I’m not sure why this whole thing has triggered you so. Dude, lighten up. Have fun with the discussion. I have. If you want to believe you made a completely rational decision regarding your bike and that you’re Spock from the planet Vulcan, what do you care what I, half a world away, have to say about it? I’m not even judging you for it, because we all do it. All good, man. I mean that. I don’t think you or anyone else is dumb or bad for basing a buying decision on emotion, just human.
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: You have given me a great idea for a bike to market to you and so many other guys like you. I’m going to call it “Spock” or “Vulcan.” The rational choice for real riders. We’re going to market ourselves as no-nonsense bikes based on geometry that works for the terrain you ride. No, we’re not the prettiest bikes out there. But you aren’t looking for pretty. You’re looking for reliability. Practicality. Durability. A bike designed by experienced riders who put it through its paces on real-world terrain, not theoretical numbers in AutoCAD. Our bikes are no-frills. You don’t need XTR or XX1. That’s for racers and guys with more money than talent so their bikes look good on the backs of their trucks… Our bikes come equipped with only the specs you actually need to do the job on your local trails. Solid, but not overdone. Longer, lower, slacker? Marketing garbage… and you don’t fall for that b.s. Our bikes are long enough. Low enough. Slack enough. Oh, and there’s space for a water bottle. Spock bikes. The rational choice for real riders!

Ha! We are going to make a fortune.
  • 2 0
 @TheR: you guys still at it?
I wish I had this much free time. But today I was too busy riding my Atherton A150 through the mountains. 100km 2600m climbing (or 60miles and 8500 freedom units)
  • 1 0
 @jimbob79: Too cold to ride here. Weather’s crap, and I generally take a break in the winter. Going skiing Friday, though. Looks like a killer bike you got there. Congrats, and how does it ride?
  • 1 0
 @TheR: better than I'd hoped. Quite surprised with the grip in wet off camber roots, how it lands jumps into chunder, how it holds up in heavy braking through rough steeps without skipping about. And six months of use from winter to summer and not a creak or groan. All the pivots still tight n true
  • 1 0
 @TheR: Nothing "spoke to me"... I wasn't going to reply, but I'm bored and babysitting and my nephew won't let me play fortnite with him when his freinds are online! Smile I apologize in advance for everyone in the thread that gets pinged... Smile

There is NO marketing done by Banshee to be swayed by. (or if there is I've never seen it? So same thing...) I don't know of them sposoring anyone or having a team with podium wins, etc. I don't know of any "influencers" riding their bikes? I never owned one before, you hardly ever see them? For me it was a logical choice based on cost, availability, geometry, and few but pretty good reviews and user posts. I'm not going to say their frame design/aesthetics had zero effect on my decision, they are good looking frames. But no way is there any kind of 80% emotional choice going on there...? If specialized had been able to fill their shop orders I'd never have bought them.

The reverb came on a bike and kept transferring because it's kept working, at 175mm it kept fitting and has plenty of drop. (I did get a newer used reverb since then that had more play? but that OG is still going) If that Stumpy Evo would have come in lst year I'd have had 2 bikes with Codes in the garage and one Shimano and would have likely went all Codes or at least all SRAM at some point. BUT as it turned out I ended up left with one shimano in the garage and so when time for new brakes came I got more shimano. I'll likely get another set of 4 pot SLX for the next bike too, bang for the buck... Much nicer if all your brakes to share pads and have one bleeding procedure/fluid.

I've been "really" looking for a new bike for a few months now. I had been watching for a cheap steeel HT just because; then I decided I should probably try a Prime, then I decided I should look for something like a Prime but lighter. I finally just ordered an XL Trance Advanced X 29 frame yesterday to build up as my "tweener bike". SO if buying Banshee was some kind of emotional thing why didn't I buy a Prime months ago when they were still in stock? Shit a dude in AZ has been trying to sell his XL frame for cheap, and he even just built the frame back up into a full bike the other day that was a good deal. (course it has Codes... Smile )

The TAX29, (just coined that), is not the PERFECT bike. But I'm not using some emotional justification to buy one because it's the one I've always wanted... It's available in a week. It's not in a "steal me" color, it actually comes in "already scuffled up black" so when I drop it the new scratches should blend in. It's 2lbs lighter then a Prime. Geo is pretty good, got a -1 Wolf Tooth on the way and I think then it will be great. Now comes with a Float X which I think is a great shock and I was looking at adding an extra 500 bucks to buy one for a lot of the bikes I was considering that had DPX2's. So having that as part of the frame price makes it a better value to me. You can't try and pretend that anyone wants a Giant because it "speaks to them"...? Smile How long has it been since they had a DH bike, or since their Enduro bike was on a podium? Now maybe their XC bikes are winning and mayb the younger crowds are still rocking their dirt jump bikes? IDK, I've barely looked at their bikes in years. They used to be a great brand for "bang for the buck", not anymore. Their geometry/overall trends/updates are all over the place, it's like they are throwing darts in the board room... But I think they hit some bullseyes on this one and maestro is good, especially with a good shock; so overall it's pretty much the same factors as last time. Availability, cost, geometry and some pretty good reviews. (Not all good review, and I'm sure you'll try thst justification or confirmation bias here) But overall the bad reviews shared two things; low end heavy versions with simple low adjustment shocks. OR the top end version with Live Valve that gets pretty mixed reviews on it's own no matter what bike it's on. In the end it's a risk just like any bike yoo buy without getting to demo first?

AND, any of a dozen things could have happened differently and I'd have got something else. If that custom bling stumpy was a little cheaper, if that ripmo came with the carbon wheels in the pictures, (even though that was more bike then I wanted), if the offering wasn't superboost, If I could have found a ridiculously named Rascal in black with a warranty, if the smash was lighter, if Ferrazi didn't have such short TT's, if that custom SB140 mullet wasn't going to be 3.5 months "estimated", if bikes available to BUY online were also available to SHIP???, (isn't that what E commerce is for?) etc, etc.

So now the only crappy thing is you can't just order what you need to build from one or two places because of parts availability... OH, also pressfit is less desirable... Pry have to actually buy a press now and make sure to swap BB's on a schedule instead of waiting till they fail!! Smile
  • 1 0
 @TheR: When have you ever seen a new bike release on pinkbike that someone didn't complain about the geometry chart totally missing, missing relevant data, not being accurate, or being hard to read? I see why your talking about Spock, cause you have to be from another planet to think people don't obsess over geo charts...???

Smile Smile Smile
  • 2 0
 @stiingya: Spock will have more charts than you can ever imagine. We’ll have measurements for stuff you didn’t even know existed.
  • 11 1
 I dont know. Except the manufacturing technique there are no point for me to be interested in the bike at this price. No bottle mount or other smart storage ideas on the enduro. A standard geo. No unique design. Probably a really good bile but so far for me no point which sticks out to justify the price point
  • 5 1
 Holy shit I wouldn't have noticed the lack of bottle mounts if it wasn't for your comment. That's pretty funny on a 2022 trail/enduro bike.
  • 7 0
 they do a free cost option bottle mount.
  • 2 0
 www.athertonbikes.com/media/athertons/bikes/150_Footer.jpg

First bike (I guess Atherton's) has a water bottle holder ...
  • 4 5
 My thoughts exactly. Nothing obviously putting it way ahead of a Canyon, Propain, YT or Bird and nearly twice the price.
  • 10 1
 Hey everyone, bottle cage mounts come on the enduro bike as standard!
  • 4 2
 Why are so many Germans hating on this bike? No judgment, just find it interesting from a cultural standpoint. The top critical comments seem to be from Germans.
  • 5 0
 @TheR: I cant answer your question, but the comments in this thread seem to be legitimate critizism. It would be hate if it was unfounded.
  • 3 0
 @endoplasmicreticulum: Fair enough. I find a lot of criticism pretty subjective, though. Take this criticism, for example — “except for the manufacturing technique, there is no reason to be interested in this bike.” Legitimate criticism? Maybe. But you could also find any number of people who would say this reason is more than enough for them to buy the bike. Too expensive? Maybe. Ugly? I don’t think so. Seems pretty subjective to me.
  • 5 0
 @TheR: So what is subjective to you is not for us older Germans.
That we say "not bad" to things that are actually good is one of the thing and that we don't see anything good enough is also true. Just make it better with criticism is common. To Expensive doesn't sound that extreme when we have some brands who do carbon molds in Europe for the same price and those bikes are freaking insane.
Uno, Last Tarvo, Hope, Antidote ....
  • 4 0
 @TheR: Objectiveness. I'm actually Australian but live in Germany and this is one of the things I love about the culture.

In this case... very expensive frames and besides manufacturing technique no obvious USP - so where is the value?
  • 10 0
 Please guys , make some great pictures of the bike frame instead of riding pictures. I want to look at every detail!
I would also say the website need some polish. I cant even see the RAW pictures..


For the bike it self, where can I see what is custom? Many companies who do that limit this. So, stuck seat angle and HT most of the time.
  • 2 0
 When I ran through the size calculator it offered me a "custom" option with different reach and ST length, that's it. That was the +£650 option. I can't imagine they would make you a real fully custom geo for the same £650 but can be wrong of course.
  • 3 2
 @bananowy: that is actually very bad. The point for 3D printing titanium lugs is to go full custom geo or what do I miss here? Ofc inside of physical limits and structural testing.

I just have that Nicolai tailormade frame in my head or some Ancillotti. Both do way more then just a custom seat tube or reach. This is in comparison really bad and both are also at the same price point.
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: I'm pretty sure they would. They're just trying to advise based on your dimensions. If you're serious, just give them a call - they are amazing to chat to.
  • 3 0
 @thingswelike: I get that if I call them I might get different ST and reach numbers than what the calculator wants as that carries no more manufacturing cost. But you're saying that within the same £650 charge I'll also get custom CS, STA and HTA if I ask nicely?

I'm sure they're the most amazing people to chat to on earth but I don't know if they'd be stoked on you making assumptions/promises like that on their behalf Wink
  • 13 0
 Being able to choose from 12 sizes is pretty rad..
  • 6 0
 22 sizes for the Enduro - funny that the CC length doesn't grow though on the Enduro like it does on the DH bike..
  • 2 0
 Yeah, I think the sizing thing is super cool and will likely be their big differentiator.
  • 11 0
 My family once made a sandcastle. In yer face Athertons
  • 11 0
 there should be a website called "Gee Atherton looking at things"
  • 13 0
 coming soon...
  • 9 1
 I love the look of those frames, if they rode like a bag of biscuits ( which I doubt ) I would still like it. Very nice work, props to them.
  • 5 0
 I say fairplay to all involved! So much effort goes into creating a bike brand & arriving at this point. It is also a very tricky time to launch, huge increases in components prices & supply is patchy. Athertons & Co - We salute you!
  • 4 0
 Cheers Sandy, we appreciate the support so much!
  • 4 0
 If I was a formula 1 car, I’m sure I’d notice if my front wing was a few MM wider… I’m a bit worried for the Athertons they are betting on custom sizing being more valuable for riders than will play out in reality. That seems to be the primary “benefit” of this method of manufacturing, at least from the consumer’s point of view.
  • 7 1
 Prices are for ppl who can afford it but won’t ride it. So called dentist bikes.
  • 7 0
 the way prices are going it wont belong before you can buy an entire dentist
  • 6 0
 Wow pricey. $11k Canadian for their base DH model plus shipping and import duties. Good luck selling any over here.
  • 3 0
 It's a lot of money over here too. Twice the price of most other direct selling brands.
  • 3 0
 Hats off to the Atherton's for realizing their dreams and offering a sweet ride. There's a market and audience for everything out there. Hopefully over time though, the price point can become more reasonable for the average ripper. Party on!
  • 4 1
 People whinge about the cost of e-bikes but I would much rather they 12k (Australian dollars) bike with a motor than pay $16k plus import taxes on a DH bike without. Prices are what’s going to kill that brand, the tech is cool but not that cool.
  • 3 0
 I've had my A150 since July and it's a proper weapon of a bike. In NZ the frame wasn't that different from any other "high end" brand, even with import duty and taxes.
It rides better than I'd hoped, and it's only me holding it back. Very much a confidence inspiring bike. I get out 3-4 times a week doing about 2500-3000m descending over some of the toughest tracks (see the Nelson showcase article last week) and the bike is flawless, not a creak, rattle or loose bolt.
If anyone's in NZ and curious, send a message and you can have a look/ride.
  • 1 0
 Can you elaborate on how it handles repetitive chunky stuff as well as how well it pedals through the same? Also hoping someone has experience with the Pivot Switchblade for comparison.
  • 2 1
 @bogeydog: in heavy hitting repetitive fast stuff, it doesn't seem to ever get bogged down. Learning that I can just let go of the brakes and it'll just behave and stick to its line has been a great experience. Two massive strength are how it stays supple and planted under heavy braking. Doesn't stiffen up at all. And landing jumps in to tricky chunder terrain. It lands like a smooth trail and then absorbs the rough without pinballing around. I don't have many trails where I can sit and pedal. It's all 1 hour gravel rd climbs and steep descents, but if I'm stood up pedaling the bike still grips and doesnt skip around. Good at technical steep climbs too.
  • 2 0
 The warranty looks like it needs some re-thinking at this price point. They state up to 90 days to repair or replace, which doesn't match with the product price. Surely with inhouse manufacturing they could offer something much better.
  • 5 1
 Hey! Thanks for your comment. As every single one of our bikes is bespoke, made to order, we dont hold any warranty stock. Any spare or warranty parts required are made to order to fit your bike!
  • 6 0
 @athertonbikes: Don't get me wrong, I really want to see you succeed. The bikes look amazing and I love the brand. But this statement is off putting, if I spend £7k+ on a bike, I don't want to be out of action for 3 months!

I recently did have a warranty issue on £7k bike, the manufacturer sent me a replacement part within FIVE DAYS. That is part of what you're paying for when buying a premium bike.
  • 4 4
 @solamanda: i am sorry but i find it rather off putting to expect this kind of amazon "culture"
If you take a minute and try to grasp the extend of your expectations, you should see that a small company delivering some form of small series or custom work is not comparable by any means, which is a good thing.
  • 5 0
 @Krafkloot: I don't expect a custom manufacturer to offer as fast a warranty as a far east manufacturer, but 3 months is a very long time. A friend had his custom Nicolai require warranty, which I feel is comparable.

They replaced the part within a month during summer, which included custom sizing and paint.
  • 1 0
 @solamanda: At the end of the day, @athertonbikes have to cover their asses; far better to say 90 days and take 10 than to say 10 and take 90.

Taking a look at the Nicolai site, they don't give a timescale for the repair or replacement; perhaps to avoid being caught in specifics
  • 3 1
 I did think these bikes looked pretty unappealing til I saw one in the flesh and they look really nice. Changed my views on them completely.

One of the things that people maybe arent looking at is longevity. If you are 3 years into a direct sell bike at £5500 and its falling to pieces, half the parts have been replaced through wear and tear or failure etc... then buying one of these for a longer period of riding may actually make it more cost effective.
  • 6 1
 Everyone wants something new and innovative and western-made, until they see the price of new, innovative and western-made.
  • 3 1
 These won’t be cheap, but it will allow for a true custom fit. As with road bikes 90+ percent of riders don’t need a custom frame but some do. Nice to see such a well tested and designed option for that market.

Oh, and this is what custom means-a few purple parts on a stock frame aren’t a “custom bike”.
  • 4 1
 Changing ST length and reach isn't really a "custom bike" either. Custom size at most, but kinda half-way without changing CS.

And maybe it's just me but I can't even really "customize" those anywhere on the website. I can only type in my dimensions and the size calculator suggests reach and ST numbers for me automatically. I can't change them any further if I wanted to. Let alone do anything to CS or the old school angles.

If you've found a true custom bike option anywhere on the website can you paste a link?
  • 1 1
 @bananowy: don’t have a link, but pretty sure Ventana does full custom.

And I’ll bet if you reached out to Atherton they’d accommodate geometry requests.
  • 2 0
 Cant wait to see a version of this made with printed aluminum lugs, with bonded aluminum tubes to cut cost down to something more reasonable. Hell, even a steel version brazed together would be awesome, and still capitalize on the advantages of this manufacturing method.
  • 4 2
 Never liked the Atherton bikes. Looks like a bike made of PVC pipes. They probably safe a lot of money just making carbon pipes and make ti lugs (so the titanium material is low as well). Spec the bikes with lower end parts and still dare to ask the same prices as bikes with full carbon frames.

Sorry but only fanboi's or idiots buy these kind of bikes.
  • 5 0
 You get Gee as your private coach for that ridiculous amount of money?
  • 2 3
 Its the same price as a new trek slash 9. It can be customized more, more sizing options, uses new tech and in much lower volumes than 99% of bikes out there. I agree 99% of bikes are overpriced but this is no more expensive than them.
  • 2 0
 @endorium: same price as which trek slash 9?

The slash 9.8 GX AXS costs 1200£ less than the Atherton base model and you get an even better parts on the bike, carbon wheelset and carbon frame with storage.

Everything nowadays in the bike industry has gone mad. For example, the deore and xt 12spd cassettes. Are 2 aluminium rings really worth as almost 2 deore cassettes?
  • 3 1
 The bikes are rad. I like the design, look, and simplicity of the frames, but at $5500 for frame only, it is quite pricey. There will be a lot of people globally that will line up for them though.
  • 6 0
 Price=ouch!
  • 5 3
 Nothing shocking IMO. That's even quite "cheap" for a fit handcrafted carbon+titanium frame 100% made in UK.
It's such a amount of research, tests, involvement, commitment, risks, investments, time!!! and so on... I think it's well deserved. Well done!!!
  • 4 0
 @danstonQ: and because it was made by the athertons, who have had immense amounts of experience biking and getting a feel for what the best bike should feel like
  • 2 0
 Yeah too expensive.
  • 5 0
 Damn I have to be crucified to own a Atherton Bike. Ok sign me up!!
  • 2 0
 lmaoooo
  • 1 0
 Those are super sick bikes, and it would be so sick to have the Atherton name on your frame. I think for most of us, the value is not appealing (price vs. specs) these days you can get a super capable aluminum enduro rig, well speced, from a company with good customer service and is easy to repair/replace parts, for under $4k US.
  • 4 0
 It's true, but here in the UK, the SC Bronson costs £3500, the Yeti SB165 T-Series is £3900 and a Pivot Firebird is similar, and they are all made in Taiwan with no custom options.
  • 1 0
 @thingswelike: Yetis are made in Vietnam actually
  • 1 0
 @thingswelike: For sure. This time last year, bought my SC Bronson for $3.5k US. Lifetime warranty on bearings and frame, and it rides so incredibly well. I know people spend more on bikes than that, but I think I would rather be a better rider and athlete than start thinking I need a better bike, because the bike rides so well as is.
  • 2 1
 @thingswelike: You can get the RM Altitude or Slayer for under $4k as well!
  • 1 0
 @MT36: I think you misunderstood me - I'm talking frame-only prices in the UK and suggesting that the Atherton compares very well value-wise, especially if normal S/M/L/XL doesn't suit you.
I don't think the complete builds are as good value, but that's not totally surprising given the small numbers being talked about.

I'm not saying their aren't better value (and still interesting) bikes around - there definitely are - Bird, Pace, Stanton, Cotic, etc But I didn't immediately think the Atherton price was that crazy.
  • 5 0
 If i spend £4k on a frame only option, would Dan smile?
  • 2 0
 “And you stare at me
In your Jesus Christ pose
Arms held out
Like you've been carrying a load
And you swear to me
You don't wanna be my slave
But you're staring at me
Like I
Like I need to be
Saved….”
  • 2 0
 Not much discussion on the DW6 linkage? Axle path, anti squat, instant centre etc,,,,, Is the weight/complexity/flexibility of another link actually any better than just Horst link?
  • 6 4
 I could be wrong but I aways thought that, until proper design and manufacturing processes got adopted, early adaptors were prone to failure.
  • 11 0
 They've not exactly rushed this. There's been several years of them getting the company up and running, and testing prototypes at the WC level and Gee's mad hucks. Arguably you could include Robot bikes in this, which goes back a couple of more years. And the company that does the 3D printing, Renishaw I think, has a successful history in other industries.
  • 2 0
 @mattg95: You're obviously correct. As was apparently lost on many, I was only commenting on Gee's incorrect use of the word adaptor. Smile
  • 3 0
 Is there any reason you couldn't make an Atherton bike with CNC milled aluminium joints instead of 3D printed titanium?
  • 2 2
 i guess it's because the carbon tubing can only bond with titanium,also the 3d printing allows more complex and precise fittings for the tubing
  • 1 0
 The 3D printing allows for double lapped joints for the tubes to bond too and is less wasteful in materials and machine time.
  • 2 1
 @mau416: eh no, its not more precise than CNC milled. We can make it down to 0.00x mm precise if we want with the technology we have right now and from the past 20 years. This is oblivious, expensive and can cost some time and not everyone can do it.

I have learned this and if you have a good company even a new dude with 3years of training could do it.


@mattg95 they said they do it for the custom option because you can change it very fast and dont need a specialist like for the CNC milled part.
  • 1 0
 Fixturing might pose a little issue if you were to mill, but certainly not insurmountable. Largely because Ti is twice as strong as Al.
  • 3 0
 @Serpentras: Not sure how you'd machine the double wall in the lug needed for the lapped joint. Not saying it's impossible, but I know I'd snap a lot of bits getting that depth of a 1-2mm cut!
  • 1 0
 nope but you migh struggle to get the PI joints in a milled version, , i dont know how much the PI joint brings to the party plenty of bikes dont use them .
  • 1 0
 @mau416: carbon bonds to lots of things , steel particularly well its usually plastics with low surface energies that cause headaches for sticking them to gether
  • 2 2
 @thingswelike: those are the most delicate parts and its possible, same for tolerances.


I would really want who downvote my comment, probably someone who does not work on that stuff Wink


@thewanderingtramp I dont see a problem here, titanium isn't even that hard to mill. There is stuff like Hastelloy X who make you really scratch your head to make it work. To even get a good raw block of it is not so easy to get.
  • 3 2
 @Serpentras: you really are a bit clueless ,
  • 2 3
 @Compositepro: so you are working with 5 axis CNC milling/lathe machines too? cool!
  • 4 0
 @Serpentras: The basic fact is that this particular design is optimised for 3D printed Ti. If you were starting with a CNC instead, you'd design it very differently. Could the same custom geo 1-at-a-time approach still work. I don't doubt it and initial setup costs would be lower, but I don't think the result would be as visually minimal or as headline-grabbing.
Plus, because welding is much more accessible, I reckon the whole carbon tubed idea would probably get shelved and you'd end up with a Nicolai (which I love btw)
  • 2 2
 @Serpentras: hahaha come back when you have a pi joint lug to show us all
  • 1 1
 @thingswelike: exactly this , going 10 x even 15 x D is never going to work, ,
  • 4 0
 @Compositepro: is this a challenge? I reckon I can do 2.5mm 10D. (But I’d really rather not!!!) As a none-composite, metal-only kind of guy, is this type of joint needed. I can see how bonding to both sides of the tube adds strength, but with the strength of bonded joints being so high, is it actually adding anything?
  • 2 1
 @Cord1: the "id rather not thing" is the part that sticks out in my mind , the rest is just conjecture on our part i did a lot of work with this kind of thing in my earlier years in F1.....im off to poke the rich people now on the crappy drivetrain thread
  • 3 1
 @Cord1: oh and someone above pointed out lots of bikes use what most would classify as a simpler single lap it works, i suppose this is their thing the double la it has its pros and cons like every other
  • 2 2
 @Compositepro: So you talk about possibilities of a method you have no experience in? Right , dude and
I don't sink anytime in anything I know it works just to prove someone else wrong Wink


@thingswelike yea thats why wrote you need a specialist for the milled part in my first comment. No one who understand the whole process would set it up because its to complicated and would cost just more because of it. With 5 axis CNC lathes you could even replicate the honeycomb structure to some extend.
Its funny that some dudes don't understand my comments at all. Can you do it is different from should you do it but whatever..
  • 3 1
 @Serpentras: lol flouncer?
  • 5 1
 Trunnion shock, nope, I'm out.
  • 4 1
 Looks like there might be enough room for a water bottle. Wonder if there’s a structural issue with drilling the tubes.
  • 2 0
 its a free cost option
  • 7 0
 Hey! Every enduro bike comes with bottle cage mounts on the downtube!
  • 3 1
 Hmmmm….they are great riders and have a notable history within the sport…..just don’t see this catching on and sustaining for the long haul.
  • 4 0
 One hundred customers doesn't sound like much
  • 1 0
 You know the new float X2 performance is a pretty good shock. The damper is easily tuneable at home and can be picked up here on OB for ~$300. what's the point of something more expensive??
  • 4 0
 Too bad that's not a picture of Gee, could be Geesus
  • 4 0
 'Early Adaptors,' feat. Rachel A. as Jesus
  • 2 0
 @ceecee: Nailed it
  • 3 1
 I loved the idea of Robot Bike Co but after all these delays I'm a lot less keen to pay a major premium for the Atherton name.
  • 4 0
 6700 quid and you get a Lyric select and some G2R's.... hmmmm
  • 3 0
 Yeah not a great value.
  • 3 0
 As a rider who loves himself a hardtail, I can only keep my fingers crossed.
  • 4 1
 Margins must be nice and fat given the price of a frame and their manufacturing process...? Or am I missing smtg
  • 1 1
 Printing is still expensive, labor cost in the UK is high, and with the size of their operation they will probably pay substantially more for components. I don't think anybody will become rich anytime soon with this.
  • 1 0
 @SleepingAwake: I don't know, I'd be curious to see how the cost structure compares between classic frame manufacturing processes vs. theirs.
  • 2 0
 125mm dropper post on a size medium (450 reach) frame? What is this, 2013? I run a 170 on my current bike, and have run a 185 before. I could probably get away with a 200.
  • 2 1
 Well, i think 2013 was more fun than like 2021 or most probably 2022...
  • 1 0
 Great from a technical perspective - but how does this work as a business model?

The cost per set of nodes (and assembly) won't decrease significantly as volumes scale up (unlike traditional manufacturing processes).
  • 1 0
 Looks like a sweet pair of frames! Good luck with the business. I really appreciate the customizable geometry and being able to input my key dimensions to see how that influences the sizing!
  • 1 0
 Good luck with this!
I just saw the DREAM BUILD MTB, www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsuHi_XdH8Y
It is an insanely time and equipment consuming process to built a single frame, hopefully they got calculation right!
  • 2 0
 Im not the biggest fan of black bikes usually - just a bit boring if you ask me, but that Enduro rig looks very, very, very nice. Well done Atherton Bikes.
  • 3 0
 ❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️
  • 2 0
 I didn't think they'd ever sell their bikes en masse, but I'm proven wrong.
  • 23 0
 at those prices you may still be right
  • 3 0
 How much?! Titanium and carbon but no weight listed... hmm.
  • 3 0
 That video is the definition of bike porn.
  • 2 0
 There were some bits that looked like porn porn. Or is that just me?
  • 2 0
 Way cool, I'm set for a couple of years but cheers to a new way of making bikes!
  • 2 0
 Do you have test bikes? I'd love to try one first. Be cool to see the enduro bikes on the EWS.
  • 3 0
 Hey! We're hoping to get on the road this year at different pop up events around the uk where you'll be able to take our bike for a spin and chat with the team!
  • 1 0
 This is really exciting @athertonbikes
I have a feeling your website is a "dangerous to the wallet rabbit-hole" to go down, but I look forward to it!
  • 1 0
 I am surprised all the attention is about titanium lugs, their name, and price. Virtually nothing about the DW6 suspension. What gives?
  • 1 0
 I saw a dude on one at Peaslake Monday and totally had to do triple take. More likely to see the rarest supercars in London than one of these at your local right now.
  • 1 0
 Step 1 = Buy Robot Bike Co, Step 2 = Take all the credit for developing the technology and bikes. I'm sure they've changed a lot of things, but at least give some credit.
  • 2 0
 Soon we will be able to print a bike a home?
  • 9 0
 Why don't we print fries from mashed potatoes?
  • 2 0
 @danstonQ: now that’s a investment worth taking.
  • 1 2
 @krumpdancer101: we can already do it
  • 1 0
 @Serpentras: Instant mash potatoes or homemade?
  • 1 0
 @danstonQ: nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raspatat?wprov=sfla1

Dutch have been doing this for years
  • 1 0
 @krumpdancer101: 3d printing food Big Grin
  • 2 0
 @ak-77: True, dutch food is generally printed, I forgot it. North Europe "food" is a nightmare.
  • 1 0
 Good luck with the sales. Way beyond what I would spend on a bike but I guess someone must be able to justify it
  • 2 0
 £4K for a frame only? Guess it's not for me. Bird look like better value.
  • 1 0
 So the worlds most customizable frame but nobody over there thought people might want more or maybe less travel?
  • 3 1
 Catholic vibes from their showroom rider measurement stand
  • 5 2
 they crucified Rachel eh
  • 2 0
 Beyond my price range but fantastic work.
  • 1 0
 As of now I have not checked the website but what are the odds EVERYTHING IS SOLD OUT.
  • 1 0
 al3xabarro you should!!! We do have availabity…
  • 1 0
 @dyfibikepark: I checked, very fresh but alas I’m a broke boy so I’ll check back when I have the legal tender.
  • 1 0
 What kind of machine is required to additively manufacturer lugs with high enough performance to support mtb usage?
  • 1 0
 Ender 3?
  • 1 0
 I just READ that SPECIALIZED might be doing a direct to consumer brand also
  • 1 0
 $435 USD shipping cost to Canada for already not cheap frame? I'll pass thank you.
  • 1 0
 Would also be good if the website worked correctly on mobile too!
  • 3 0
 Hey, what issues have you had?
  • 1 0
 @athertonbikes: Select the 150, try to select colour / decal options. I see two colour, select one and then try decals, but neither choice seems to register. :-)
  • 2 0
 @athertonbikes: also check www.athertonbikes.com/tech-sheets

some docs aren't on https address Wink
  • 2 0
 Super nice bikes y’all
  • 2 0
 Thanks dude!
  • 1 0
 Good Luck with the BIZ all the best.
  • 1 0
 Thank you!
  • 1 0
 Pinkbike Launches Direct to Consumer Podcast Episode 100 . . .
  • 1 0
 I would love to see pinkbike test it Smile
  • 8 0
 The Pinkbike test bike is being printed as we speak!
  • 1 0
 @athertonbikes: very cool. I would love to see any comparison.
  • 2 0
 And why not Zeb?
  • 2 0
 Wouldn't a Zeb be overkill on a 150/160mm bike with conservative geo like this? Even more aggressive bikes in this category usually don't have 38mm stanchion forks (sight, stumpy evo, sentinel to name a few). That's mostly reserved for the longer travel models (range, enduro, spire).

Edit: though the fork choice on the lower tier model is weird for a different reason. Base model Lyrik that has a "charger" only in name on a £6700 bike.
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: Actually your view makes lots of sense. The GEO is not very aggressive and I would rather have 160 rear and 170 front.
Spire, Nuke Mega/Giga or Enduro.
Maybe this is more enduro race machine like Jack's Moir Canyon Strive? But for me personally when I ride for fun I like more traver.
  • 1 0
 What I want to know is how did they get the Trickstuff brakes?!
  • 3 1
 Jesus measures!
  • 1 0
 Rad people and bikes, I'd love an Atherton bike.
  • 1 1
 Tha k you for actually having a pair of balls woth correct reach XX-Tall) 530
  • 1 0
 Now do a 100mm XC bike with 130mm up front.
  • 1 0
 Same design with alloy tubes please for us plebs.
  • 2 1
 Geerim donut custom geo?
  • 1 0
 Keen......
  • 1 0
 Awesome! You know what to do...
  • 1 1
 Finally a brand with correct reach XX-Tall) 530
  • 1 2
 I would not buy a bike from them. The people they have listed do not have any mtb design experience
  • 1 1
 Why is Rachel crucified?
  • 2 5
 Another Trek/Giant rear suspension. Maybe it works, but I am tired of seeing it.
  • 1 3
 Never gona see any bikes just like Sick bikes ripped off alot of people.
Below threshold threads are hidden





You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2022. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.028144
Mobile Version of Website