Check Out: MTB Specific Tow Rope, Lightweight Tools, Wind Protection, Hitch Racks & More

Dec 17, 2020 at 17:19
by Sarah Moore  



A lot of gear comes across our desks here at Pinkbike. Check Out is an occasional round up of everything our tech editors have gotten their hands on. Sometimes it's products we're doing long-term tests on, other times it's stuff we're stoked on but don't have time to fully review. And, sometimes it's crazy shit someone sent us unsolicited and we're having a laugh.



Shotgun MTB Tow Rope

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Features

• Designed for mountain bike families
• Shock absorbing stretch tow rope
• Quick to attach and remove (stem loop + carabiner included)
• Combo pack includes the shotgun kids MTB hip pack
• Unisex design featuring rad 'Shred Til Bed' animal print
• Load rated to 500lb / 225kg
• Dual pockets with waterproof zips and outer
• $90 USD
kidsrideshotgun.com




bigquotesAfter seeing what some parents come up with to tow their children on the trails, I'm sure there are some families who will be a lot safer and spend a lot less time wrangling ropes and tubes with the introduction of this product. The super stretchy rope should also make the tow smoother than a non-stretch option for both the tower and the towee.

The attachment points are well thought out with the rope hooking nicely around the adult's saddle and the kid's handlebars, which should make it easy to attach and release. It also looks like it won't cause damage to the bike they're attached to. The fanny pack can fit on an adult's waist, but the pattern will incite children to want to carry it themselves. If you don't want the fanny pack, you can also buy the tow rope on its own for $60 USD.

The tow rope is rated for 500 pounds, so while the colours might be on the more juvenile side, I'm thinking the tow rope could also be suited to towing a grown adult up behind an eMTB. Just saying.




Specialized Women's Trail-Series Wind Jacket

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Features

• 100% recycled polyester wind shell
• Water resistant
• Minimal bulk and a built-in storage pocket
• Under helmet integrated hood with fixed elastic binding

• Relaxed fit
• Comes in black and dusty turquoise
• XS-XXL
• $125 USD
specialized.com




bigquotesHonestly, at first glance, I thought I wouldn't like this jacket. I take my jacket on and off multiple times when out riding since we have long sweaty climbs followed by long chill-inducing descents; I usually prefer a full zipper over a half zipper since many anorak designs make it difficult to pull the jacket over your helmet without awkward contortions. However, I've found the Trail-Series Jacket easy to pull on and off over my helmet, and it packs down small enough to stuff in my hip pack when it's not needed.

I've also found that, unlike a lot of lightweight wind shells, the Trail-Series Jacket breathes well in addition to cutting the wind and beading when you encounter a light drizzle. There's venting at the back of the jacket and the lightweight fabric doesn't feel like a plastic bag when you put it on. You can actually pedal in this jacket in cooler conditions without becoming soaked from your own sweat on the inside. I firmly believe that's a key factor in making a good fall / mild winter layer since the drier you can stay in cool conditions, the warmer you stay.

The Specialized Women's Trail-Series Wind Jacket is also a great emergency layer since it stuffs into the built-in storage pocket and you'll barely notice its light weight when you carry in your hip pack or a storage bib shorts. The only downside is that Specialized has designed the hood to fit under the helmet instead of over which means you have to take your helmet off if you want the hood to fit properly, but I've also found it fits over your helmet in a pinch.

Despite my initial resistance, this packable, breathable jacket has quickly become one of my go-to riding pieces. Oh, and the fit is true to size, flattering and comfortable. Like I said, I'm sold.




KOM Cycling Tubeless Repair Tool

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Features

• Includes two tools: a tire reamer and a tire fork
• Includes 8 x 1.5mm bacon strips
• Made of CNC machined aluminum
• Weighs 25 grams
• Comes in Red, Black, Orange, Purple, Pink, Yellow, Green, Celeste
• $16.99 USD
komcycling.com




bigquotesKOM's new tubeless repair tool has a tire reamer for cleaning out the hole in your tubeless tire and enlarging it so the tubeless plug will go in more easily, as well as a tire fork for stabbing the plug in the tire. You can stuff 8 plugs into the tiny 4 1/4" long tube and you can combine two of the plugs on the tire fork for larger punctures.

With its light weight of 25 grams, it's so light you're not going to notice it when you throw it in a jersey pocket or your pack so there's no reason not to bring it with you and be prepared at all times. Luckily, there's an impressive array of seven colours so you can choose a highly visible one that won't get lost in your pack forever.




Pearl Izumi Women's X Alp Summit Shoes

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Features

• BOA Fit System with L6 dial
• Seamless, perforated synthetic upper
• Reinforced toe box
• Vibram ECOSTEP rubber outsole EVA heel cushioning
• Nylon composite sole
• 2-bolt SPD cleat compatible
• Sizes 36-43 (no half sizes)
• Comes in Spruce
• $150 USD
pearlizumi.com




bigquotesI've put in several rides on Pearl Izumi's X Alp Summit Shoes in the past couple of weeks and from day one they felt like old friends. It was straightforward to set up the cleats on them and the Boa dial and toe strap make it easy to find a secure fit.

Pearl Izumi says the shoes are designed for all-day mountain bike adventures and it's obvious that comfort was a priority in the design process. They do a good job of balancing comfort and walkability with efficiency however, and they don't feel like they're stealing watts on the climbs. The shoe dries relatively quickly and has perforations to improve ventilation, so while I've only ridden them in cool weather so far, they should keep your feet comfortable on a hot day as well.




VelociRAX 5X Hitch Rack

VelociRax

VelociRax


Features

• All steel construction
• Hinge assist dampers for fully loaded hinging
• 230 lb total bike weight capacity
• Price: $819 USD
• 3 to 7 bike options available. Requires 2" hitch
• Hinge assist dampers for fully loaded hinging
• Integrated anti-rattle locking mechanism
velocirax.com




bigquotesVelociRAX are a relative newcomer to the hitch rack world, but they've hit the ground running, with a lineup of options that'll carry anywhere from three to seven bikes. A rubber strap holds the front wheel in one of the hoops at the top of the rack, and another strap holds the rear wheel to the cross bar. For longer trips or on rougher roads I've been using a cut piece of tube to pull the front brake lever of each bike – that makes a noticeable difference in limiting the amount of side-to-side movement, and adds a little peace of mind when I look in the rearview mirror.

There is a latch that can be used to lower the rack for loading or unloading the bikes, which could be handy for shorter riders or when the rack is used on an extra tall vehicle. My van isn't that tall, and I'm not that short, so I haven't really needed to use this feature, but it's there if you need it – just pull it down and a fully loaded rack will slowly tip towards the ground for easy access thanks to two hydraulic dampers.

So far the VelociRAX has worked exactly as intended – assembly was straightforward, and the rack and the bikes on it have remained securely in place even when bouncing down pothole filled dirt roads. I went with the 5X since it has the most space between bikes, which helps prevent them from smacking into each other on rough roads. There is a more bike movement than the North Shore rack I recently reviewed – that rack slots over the fork crown versus the front wheel – but the VelociRAX is quicker to load, and the rubber straps make it highly unlikely that a bike could escape. Overall, the VelociRAX hitch rack is a sturdy option worth considering for riders who regularly carry multiple bikes, whether that's for a day of shuttling or a family road trip.
Mike Kazimer






OneUp EDC Lite

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Features

• 9 function Multi Tool
• Includes 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8mm + T25 Torx + Flat Head Screwdriver
• Stored in your steerer tube
• No need to remove your star nut or thread your steerer tube.
• Extra carriers are available for $15
• 75 grams
• $40 USD
oneupcomponents.com




bigquotesOneUp Components now offers a cheaper and lighter option to their EDC tool. I like the simplicity of the new tool and find it handier than the full EDC V2 tool since I invariably end up dropping one of the three parts of the EDC V2 tool whenever I take it out of my steerer. If you are riding a new bike and want a multi-tool at your fingertips to adjust your saddle height or brake levers, the EDC Lite is much quicker to access. Of course, it doesn't have a chain breaker tool, so if you're going out on more than a local lap, you'll likely still want to opt for the full EDC V2 tool with tire levers, a chain breaker, and spoke keys.

Installing the EDC Lite was relatively straightforward. All you need is the provided setter bolt that you use to push the star nut down 75mm into your steerer tube and a hammer to smash it down there. You do have to reset a couple times to make sure that your star nut doesn't get too crooked, and be prepared to hit the star nut more times than you thought you would. I was slightly petrified of accidentally hammering my frame in the process, but it all worked out. If you aren't that steady with a hammer, you could always take your fork off your bike to avoid any frame-smashing incidents.






127 Comments

  • 134 2
 Let's take a moment to appreciate the bumper sticker on the Safari
  • 27 8
 should be "one fewer" though
  • 16 0
 @toddball: Poetic License
  • 26 3
 I thought it said sphincter. Wierd flex but ok.
  • 4 4
 Mini-vans have become quite cool these days. They definitely have shed their stigma.
  • 28 0
 @tacklingdummy, they make a lot of sense. I had a full size Chevy van for a little bit, but it was just too big, and the lack of windows made changing lanes in traffic really tricky. The Safari is the perfect size for my needs, especially with the middle seat out for extra room inside. It's not exactly the most reliable thing, but it gets the job done, and it was 1/20th the price of a Sprinter.
  • 6 0
 @mikekazimer: Previa owner here, can confirm: full-size vans can be too big and onerous. My van has a middle row of captains chairs that can face forward or back. I pulled the rear split bench for additional room for gear and it came with a 2" hitch so I installed a 1Up two tray rack.
  • 5 1
 I have a Town and Country and if 20 years ago you told me I would be driving a minivan I would have kicked your ass!! lol Seats 7-8 and if I want I can fold down the back row seats and I can fit 8 bikes in there with the front wheels off. Meaning that when I get to the trailhead all bikes are nice and clean and when I go thru the drivee thru I am not scared if I remembered the bike or not. Plus the damn thing gets up and hauls ass!!
  • 11 0
 @sngltrkmnd: Previa? The mid-engined, AWD badass? It's basically a Audi R8 with extra seats amirite?
  • 2 1
 @mikekazimer: Not most reliable thing? Try driving a VW Vanagon. Our Weekender version rocks as a base camp/ride mobile, but it has required a big stack of receipts to get it to the point where I feel comfortable taking it on long out of state drives. Safari/Astros are good as well, but careful as they have really bad safety ratings in crashes relative to other minivans.
  • 4 0
 Haha glad you noticed that!. Laughing out loud I was..
  • 3 0
 @Klainmeister: One and the same! Note also they were available with a supercharger Wink
  • 4 1
 @makripper: The world could do with one less a*shole, too.
  • 1 2
 @Dispepsi: how would one less a*shole make a difference?
  • 1 5
flag gafoto (Dec 18, 2020 at 17:31) (Below Threshold)
 @mikekazimer:
You can get a pretty gently used Sprinter for 20k if you know where to look. Other vans are great but there’s a reason why everyone is driving them.
  • 28 1
 @gafoto, true, but my Safari was $2700.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: in WA that's like the tax you would pay on a used one...
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: this is the exact reason I own an element.
Massive amounts of room in a reletivly small SUV, not terrible on gas and super reliable.

Not as pimp as a sprinter, but I definitely don't have the cash for that kinda thing.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Definitely make sense. Super functional. I learned earlier on if a car isn't functional and practical that it is worthless to me. I have been waiting for a cool van to be released in the US, but none really have.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: I got a 2007 Oddysey Big Grin same thing and I love it
  • 4 0
 @mikekazimer: finally you americans have opened your eyes. Here in europe is the way to go. Everyday car, sleeping van, surf trip motorhome, rolling shack. You name it, it does it
  • 1 1
 There's more VW Transporters than Sprinters here in the UK. Do you guys in the US not do the Transporter thing?
  • 2 0
 @Woody25: I don't think they sell them here. They have Routans which is just standard minivan, the bigger and boxier one was Eurovan but I think they stopped selling those in 2004 here.
  • 4 1
 Being a Euro I have never really understood the hype about using a truck for carrying bikes like you guys do overseas. I find a van or mini-van much more practical. Especially in terms of thievery. It may be cool to show off with a truck, presenting everyone the bling bling hanging overboard, but in practical terms there more reasons speaking against it.
  • 2 1
 @Rainozeros: you have it backwards. I have 2 trucks for the utility of them. To carry stuff in the back for anything from working on the house to a wet dog. Really handy when you buy new furniture or new need fire wood. That stuff is impossible with a van.
  • 1 0
 @donpinpon29: truth. never understood why it never caught on. The lack of options for awd cargo vans here is a thing tho(not full size). The Hiace would be a nice edition.
  • 2 0
 @Woody25: they are so expensive you wouldnt imagine. Especially a shitty 80s or 90s one. Loud slow tight not worth it all but dumb people like them still.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: was it really the lane changes, or the cops following your through school zones that made the lack of windows a problem?
  • 1 0
 @whattheheel: Stow and Go for the win.
  • 3 0
 @whattheheel: I bought my first new car in 2008 when expecting the 2nd child, and despite trying really hard not to went with the Honda minivan. Beyond being the right choice it drove better than any of the comparable SUVs! I've now matured and fully leaned into the minvan persona; it's awesome - so much space, nothing on the outside, versatile and cheap to drive! Hard not to feel smug when you show up to ride with your clean and dry bike or sit out of the rain for a post-ride beer without getting the seats filthy (or need to pull over for a quick nap on a road trip). Trucks are great for groups but vans are better for the lone wolf
  • 1 1
 @butters1996: I always thought these were a great choice; the Xterra marketed this lifestyle but the element actually delivered
  • 1 0
 @plyawn: elements aren't the most reliable cars. Good concept guess
  • 1 0
 @plyawn: we have a tundra with a canopy and oh man is it awesome. You can fit everything you need for anything in it. Car seats, all the gear for the beach with a dog bed in the back for a 100lb dog, you can pop the canopy off if you need to for larger volume loads like couches or whatever. When we go for a trip to visit family it's full of kids and our gear and wonder how anyone does it with an SUV or van
  • 2 0
 @barbarosza: Got mine as a gift this year. Have you VCM muzzled yours yet?

www.odyclub.com/threads/2007-honda-odyssey-gift.359707/#post-2381416
  • 2 0
 @sngltrkmnd: Still Rocking our Previa too.. my favorite rig!
  • 2 0
 @microfiz: dude thats so cool. I have the 4 bikes rack from North Shore. Man I had a Golf mk6 TDi but f*ck that the Van is way way better.
  • 1 0
 @ccrider1: previas rule all other vans.
  • 1 1
 @twhart20: She ain’t slow bro!!!
  • 1 1
 @plyawn: I feel ya brother! First kid in ‘09!
  • 3 0
 @sngltrkmnd: Those Toyota Jellybeans are amazing! You've got a kick-ass rig there.
  • 2 0
 Now might be a bad time to admit that I just started driving a retired ambulance.
  • 3 0
 @jaydubmah: @ccrider1 Heck yes! Just did a top end rebuild in October so the egg has a new lease on life with 313K just around the corner. I know a shop in Seattle that does AllTrac conversions.... (rubs hands together)
  • 2 1
 @makripper:
You generally rent a van to move furniture. Not sure why you couldn’t move firewood in a van. The wet dog is a different matter....
  • 1 0
 @gafoto: yeah a van couldn't handle it lol. A few hundred lbs of wood would destroy the interior let alone the off roading involved getting in and out of the bush
  • 2 1
 @makripper: We put a couple bales of hay in the back of our Ford Fiesta once (100+ pounds each). A few hundred pounds of firewood isn't an issue.
  • 1 1
 @JSTootell: must have been tiny bails haha regular sized ones aren't 100 lbs either.... Sounds like you don't know what you are talking about. Maybe 50lbs.. 18x18x36 anyways.
  • 3 1
 @makripper: You are right, I don't know what I am talking about. Can you please tell me what I have been feeding my horse all these years? I must have no idea. I thought it was mostly alfalfa, but you are starting to convince me that it must be something else. Pizza perhaps?

Bales average between 90-120 pounds at my feed store depending on what type of hay, quality, and how the machine baled them. But yes, they were 100+ pound bales that were in the back of my car.
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell, @makripper, this might be my favorite comments section debate ever. Thanks for making me laugh. And now I know what a bale of hay weighs.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: lol yeah it helps if your family has farm and you had to get up at 4am to work on it when you were a kid :p
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: what dimensions of the bales?
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: just caught you said alfalfa. that makes a bit of a difference.. not much though lol
  • 1 0
 @makripper: I want to know the HT, ST and Reach!!!
  • 1 0
 @makripper: For laughs, I found the picture. It was one bale, not two. But clearly a 140# bail as it filled nearly the entire hatch opening (and the rear seats are folded down to fit). This was 6 years ago so I can't exactly take a tape measure to it. Pretty sure it was 3-way which is what we used to feed. We feed alfalfa and supplements now. And being divorced and her keeping the horses with her means I don't have to get up early to muck stalls anymore either (though I actually miss that).
  • 1 0
 @whattheheel: Typical 2000 era geo. Bit undersized, but I don't exactly 'send it' with that one. More of a gravel model.
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: You remember the wheelbase off the top?
  • 46 0
 With that tow rope, you let your buddy’s ibis do the work.
  • 2 0
 why only drop $100 on a tow rope when you can buy your kids their own ebikes?
  • 15 0
 We used to "shuttle" by getting towed up the hill behind a KTM. When the "tow-er" shifts into third is one of my most terrifying experiences on a bicycle.
  • 13 0
 Those tow ropes have been done ages ago by tow whee. Distributed into uk by Charlie bike monger. Decent guy. Works at single track world now.
  • 15 0
 $90 for a tow rope?? How much without the fanny pack...

Charlie should up his price from $40 'cause apparently these things are a gold mine
  • 5 0
 I want neither. But I do want a Shred 'till Bed allover print riding shirt. Heck, I'm not one to match shirt and shorts but if they'd make a proper DH short and shirt in this print, I'd wear it proudly. On the trail and in the pub.
  • 2 0
 @chrod: You can buy the tow rope on its own for $60 USD.
  • 1 0
 @chrod: think you are basically paying for the fanny pack
  • 9 0
 I want a tow rope that my dog can use to tow my fat ass up the hill. This doesn't work for that, cuz he STILL hasn't learned to ride a bike.
  • 2 0
 This stile tow ropes are impractical. For me, Trax tow system was a game changer. It takes seconds to hook the stem and the kids are able to unhook easy and with one hand while riding

traxmtb.com/en/trax-2
  • 2 0
 @yinyang: if you don't need 'bike specific' - one of these is basically the same for $15. I guess we shouldn't be surprised that the company who charges £25 for a book is expensive for towropes too..
www.amazon.co.uk/Silverline-443621-Elasticated-Tow-Rope/dp/B00359YX7Y/ref=sr_1_3?dchild=1
  • 2 0
 @pakleni: That's pretty damn slick!! Thank you for the heads up!! @TrentHullihen Make Tom order some for the shop!!!
  • 1 1
 @pakleni: This style isn't very useful if you run a dropper post that is slammed all the way into the seat post. Also, it's nice to have some stretch to the tow rope especially with kids. Static ropes like this are not great for towing kids.
  • 1 0
 @kcj801: That's true. I ride with my dropper only about 2 centimetres from slammed all the way in. Not enough space for attaching the Trax, but it's possible to attach it on dropper's collar. I don't have any problems riding like that.
  • 1 0
 @kcj801: it's says it's an elastic shock rope, so no, they're not towing with a static cord. I wonder if it will stretch tow like a jeep snatch strap LOL. Someone needs to hammer to the end of it and lock up the brakes and see it it snatches a kid into your back wheel screaming. :-D
  • 10 0
 I'm looking forward to reading about that Kavenz!
  • 8 1
 I wonder how long it would take for one of those tow ropes to damage your dropper? Doesn’t seem like that should be covered by a warranty
  • 11 5
 $125 for a simple windbreaker? Ok Specialized I guess you need to recoup some of your recent loss over the past weekend...
  • 14 0
 Picking on Specialized for overpriced apparel? I guess you don’t look at many of the apparel posts on Pinkbike. I, too, think it’s a high price but seems downright cheap compared to other prices I’ve seen.
  • 2 1
 @gnarlysipes: I can get a decent Patagonia windbreaker for cheaper from a company that backs it up with a great warranty and more ethical standards. Did I offend you because you bought one?
  • 1 0
 @OldScratchJohnson: Ha, no! I have one piece of Specialized apparel and it was on the sale rack at a store where I had a gift card from my parents. All I’m saying is $125 (while more than I would pay) seems downright cheap compared to some brands.
  • 7 1
 I don’t want some stupid kid slowing me down, pedal your own damn bike Jimmy!
  • 6 0
 Ever since she decided she wanted to be called "Jimmy" things got complicated
..
  • 4 0
 With every new hitch rack on the market the prices just keep going up. This one makes North Shore racks seem like a deal! Someone needs to build a bare bones budget-minded rack that’ll hold 4 bikes for $400.
  • 6 1
 The rack in this article is garbage. And a terrible knock of a ReconRack. Damn...so poorly designed.
  • 1 0
 It already exists, made by Hollywood racks.
  • 1 0
 I was just about to mention the swagman quad 2+2 not because it's a great rack but because of the price and versatility (I sometime need a 4-pack but usually just the 2) however a quick price check says it $575 USD! I'm sure I paid closer to $400 CAD but that was 5+ years ago.
  • 5 3
 @blowmyfuse: I'm willing to bet you've never tried one... I went from a NS4 to the 6 bike Velocirax and it's better in every way, so I'm not sure what you're on about.
  • 3 2
 @theloamrangerchannel: Yeah he definitely hasn’t tried one. There are multiple reasons my friends (and myself a few months ago) have been swapping from North Shores and a Recon to VelociRAX
  • 6 0
 Velocirax, a cheap knock off of the Recon Rack.
  • 1 0
 Yep. Just an abomination. :Beer:
  • 4 2
 I've used both. The Velocirax is more refined and has way more features.
  • 3 2
 @theloamrangerchannel: I dig my VelociRAX too, it has been awesome.
  • 2 0
 Sadly there are a few Utah companies that have ripped off Recon Racks.
  • 5 0
 Tow Whee is life
  • 2 0
 The KOM doesn't have room for a decent knife to protect yourself while you are fixing your tire. We need more room for knives!
  • 2 0
 Agreed. There should also be a deluxe version where you chain 2 together to make nunchuks!
  • 1 0
 two bungee straps are all you one for each saddle rail which attach either side of the stem. the other thing you need is a friend with an ebike who likes to use boost mode on climbs lol
  • 3 1
 MTB is like 4 Wheeling - endless accessorizing. I will buy a new Yankum kinetic rope for my truck years before I'll buy a tow rope for my bike.
  • 2 0
 True. Once you start doing mods, it can turn into an addiction.
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: true - I need a suspension intervention.
  • 1 0
 Friggin hell that rack is pricey!! It’d be cheaper for me to fly Bearclaw over to weld me one up! (See ‘where the trail ends’ for the reference)
  • 4 0
 If you need to state the reference to make the joke work, it probably wasn't worth saying
  • 1 2
 @sarahmoore will there be a Ripmo 2 review coming? Curious what you think so far. I've been happy with mine, but I've strayed from the recommended Traction Tune settings a bit.

I picked up a couple of those KOM Cycling tubeless plug kits to keep on my bikes. They look great for the price. They're a little bigger than the pictures here and on their website make them look, about 4.25" long.
  • 2 0
 "You want towing, you wear the bum bag". Excellent lesson in life for the little person in your life.
  • 3 5
 OneUp EDC Lite...yawn. Its been posted everywhere by OneUp and $40 for a tool that doesn't have that many features isn't interesting. Obviously they did this because everyone that had the full EDC tool was tired of having to cut threads on their steerer tube. Using my multitool on the trail happens occasionally, but not so often as to warrant having it front and center. I would rather have it in my quick strap with my tube, down low by the bottom bracket somewhere.
  • 1 1
 @ridealongside: what's this tube you speak of strapped to your bike and what is it's purpose? I vaguely remember seeing those back in the old days. How did they work?
  • 2 0
 @gilby82:
Yeah, I often wonder why I even carry it with me anymore. I think it’s been over a year since I last had to throw one in. Wait, nope. I ripped a sidewalk recently in the rocks here and would’ve had a 10 mile walk out. Tube got me back in an hour instead of an all day hike.
  • 1 0
 @ridealongside: Cush Core. I've never gotten a flat with mine but I've had buddies ride out 10 miles on them and we didn't have to wait for them to change a tire. That's assuming they weren't able to plug the hole in 10 seconds with tire plugs, which is usually the case.
  • 1 0
 @gilby82: I’m running CushCore. Doesn’t prevent sidewall tears. Does prevent the common cookie cutter effect of rim striking however. Love my foam inserts even though they weigh so much more than a beefy tire. Performance gains are worth it.
  • 2 0
 Buying tow ropes to use with all my ebike friends.
  • 2 0
 125 for MINIMAL jacket ?????
  • 1 0
 ...Where can I get the fanny pack the tow rope comes with...asking for a friend.
  • 2 0
 Kavenz!!! Looking forward to the review on that one! :-)
  • 2 1
 That Velocirax is a direct knock off of Recon Racks, a Bellingham based company.
  • 1 0
 60 dollar rope seems expensive
  • 1 0
 That toe rope looks like a seat post warranty voider
  • 1 0
 How is that’s twice as good as a towhee
  • 2 0
 Unisex tow rope. smh
  • 1 0
 Should have called it "The Sling Shot"
  • 3 1
 I love my velocirax.
  • 1 1
 My wife is now officially my shuttle bus with that eMTB I bought her and this tow rope I just ordered.
  • 1 0
 Tow rope for bikers helping regular bikers lol
  • 2 2
 Sounds like you’re not used to swinging a hammer
  • 1 1
 Yeah, if you're that scared of a hammer just take your bike to a shop.
  • 1 2
 Our Velocirax has been great so far. Super solid and it makes so that even my youngest kid can load the bikes.
  • 1 4
 Waste of time article...
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