Randoms: Modular Pedals, Lightweight Sunglasses, Miniature Bottles, & More - Across the Pond Beaver

Sep 9, 2020 at 12:39
by Sarah Moore  
Across the Pond Beaver 2020


Giant Romero Trail / Enduro Saddle

Across the Pond Beaver


Giant's new Romero SL saddle ($109.99 CDN) has been designed with trail and enduro riders in mind. It has stainless steel rails, a nylon/glass fiber composite base that's said to increase the flexibility of the saddle, and flexible sides for inner leg comfort. Speaking of those sides, they also have a smooth padding that covers them to reduce abrasion and the chances of the saddle getting caught on your shorts.

The Romero SL has a down-sloping nose and uses Giant's Rebound foam for comfort and shock absorption in addition to free-flow particles in the padding of the saddle. It weighs 245 grams.





Fidlock Bottle

Across the Pond Beaver


Fidlock has a new 450 ml (15.22 fl oz) Twist bottle ($41.99 USD) that uses their magnetic-mechanical bottle mounting system. It's now made of a softer material to make it easier to squeeze and has a new bottle cap with an optional dirt cover. It's dishwasher safe, uses BPA-free polypropylene and Fidlock says there is "no frame too small for this bottle."


Across the Pond Beaver
Across the Pond Beaver

Across the Pond Beaver
Across the Pond Beaver





Elite Sterzo Smart Steering Plate

Across the Pond Beaver


When training indoors, any gadget that makes your workout less mind-numbing is appreciated. Elite's new Sterzo Smart ($109.99 USD) allows you to steer for courses on Zwift, which is something that Zwift will be expanding on going into 2021. Look for the “Steering Enabled” icon at the bottom-right while you are on Zwift to see which courses are available for steering.

The Elite electronic steering plate, with its raised support and rotating pivot, connects to Zwift wirelessly and you can rotate your handlebars up to 34° on each side as you move it to the left and right. The unit works with tires up to 2.2" (56mm) and is powered by AAA batteries.

Across the Pond Beaver
Across the Pond Beaver





Light and Motion

Across the Pond Beaver


You can choose your light body color, your accent color and your front ring color for Light and Motion's Vis 1000 and the company's team in Marina, California will build it up for you for just $99.99 USD.





FSA

Across the Pond Beaver


FSA has a new MicroSpline freehub body for FSA Hubs ($59.99 USD) and a flashy Team Stem ($149.99 USD) in Oil Slick. The stem is aluminum with chromoly bolts, has a 35mm handlebar clamp and weighs 157 grams. It has a +6° rise and comes in 40 and 50mm.


Across the Pond Beaver
Across the Pond Beaver





Camelbak Chase 8 Vest
Across the Pond Beaver


The Chase 8 Vest ($125 USD) is a larger version of the minimalist Chase Vest, but still a lightweight pack, weighing just 420 grams (15 ounces) without a reservoir. With the 2-liter reservoir it weighs 630 grams (22 ounces) and features six liters of stow options for gear, phone, and fuel.

To hold your water, the pack uses a Crux reservoir with a Quicklink which allows you to disconnect the reservoir from the hose to fill it up more easily. The pack has secure zip pockets in addition to easily accessible ones at the front for easy access, mesh organization pockets to keep your CO2 and tools handy, a large secured pocket, and a stretch overflow pocket.

The harness uses the same Dual Adjustable Sternum Straps as the smaller Chase pack and the same 3D vent mesh fabric to allow for more air flow. It comes in Black or Gunmetal.

Across the Pond Beaver
Across the Pond Beaver

Across the Pond Beaver
Across the Pond Beaver





Camelbak Chase Protector Vest

Across the Pond Beaver


The Chase Protector Vest ($200 USD) also uses the 2-liter Crux reservoir with Quicklink, the Dual Adjustable Sternum Straps with mesh harness and has 6L of cleverly organized storage, but the design also includes CE level 2 center back impact protection.

In line with the theme of added protection, there's also an exterior armor and helmet carry, safety whistle on the top buckle, and reflectivity.

Across the Pond Beaver
Across the Pond Beaver

Across the Pond Beaver
Across the Pond Beaver





Fairdale x Taj Montercycle 21oz & Vanquish 24oz Waterbottles

Across the Pond Beaver


Fairdale's custom Specialized water bottles now with a fun Taj Mihelich cartoon on them!





Modular pedals from Squidworx

Across the Pond Beaver


Squidworx's Modular pedals ($159.95 CDN) are made of aluminum and nylon and have been designed so you can easily and cheaply replace damaged or worn parts. The Whistler company also allows you to choose the colour for the body of the pedal and the base cage, and choose from four different pin options before checking out.

There are 14 stainless steel pins per side that thread into aluminum inserts and the pins can be accessed and removed from both sides. The fully sealed internals comprise of an oversized bushing and double bearing design.

Across the Pond Beaver
Across the Pond Beaver





100% Hypercraft Sunglasses

Across the Pond Beaver


100% weaves carbon fiber into the nylon of the frame on their Hypercraft sunglasses ($175 USD) to create a super lightweight 23 gram frame. The rimless shield is manufactured in France and laser cut with holes for ventilation at both the top and the bottom.

A hydrophobic and oleophobic lens treatment helps repel water, dirt, and oil and there is also a scratch-resistant lens coating. The Hypercraft is available with a contrast-defining HiPER lens and photochromic lens, sold separately. Pictured in Matte Stone Grey with a Coral Lens, the Hypercraft comes with a hard case, microfiber cleaning bag, a clear replacement lens, and a spare nosepiece. It is available in four colours.


Across the Pond Beaver
Across the Pond Beaver

Across the Pond Beaver
Across the Pond Beaver





G-Form E-Line Knee Guards
Across the Pond Beaver


Across the Pond Beaver

G-Form's E-Line Knee Guard ($109.99 USD) are designed for e-bike, enduro and downhill rides with pads that are flexible as you ride and harden on impact. A hard shell gives protection and the ability to slide on hard surfaces while the Armortex Kevlar blend material that covers the pads helps fight abrasion.

There are adjustable hook and loop fit-straps at the top and bottom for customizing the fit, flatlock stitching to reduce skin irritation, and a mesh back for breathability. The Knee Guards come in sizes S, M, L, and XL and there is also an E-Line Elbow Guard available for $99.99 USD.









128 Comments

  • 67 3
 I had some Crank Bros. pedals that were modular. I was able to change out the bearings, then I got to change the bearings, from there I customized them with some new bearings, and before I knew it I updated them with a set of bearings. Totally modular design.
  • 4 5
 I had some crank bro’s pedals and liked the float/ release action so I bought 2 more pairs, then the axles broke on at least 1 pedal of all three pairs over the course of 2 years. Didn’t bother to check if they were modular before tossing them on the trash and going back to shimano.
  • 12 12
 I had some tires that were modular. I loved those tires. Then I took my bike in to the 'cool' bike shop. They all said how everyone that ran my modular tires always got holes in them and they slashed so I should only ever ride Brand M tires since they all ride Brand M tires, all the cool people on the internet ride Brand M tire, and the fact that my tires will murder me in the middle of the night. So to join the cool kids I purchased Brand M tires, without ever having my modular tires fail me after 10 years or riding on the brand, no one else I knew had any issues with the same tires. But because Rampage dudebro X rides Brand M, dope website people all have the same tire, the cool kids at kool kids bikes ride brand M tires, and the best bike bro shop in town all said Brand M is far better than my modular tires even though no one there has ridden my modular tires, I purchased Brand M tires without taking in to account my riding style and preferences. After 2 years of riding Brand M tires, I've only slashed 5 sidewalls, added a bunch of weight to my bike, but man it's cool to fit in because I can hate my old modular tire brand that never did me wrong or any one I knew that actually rode them wrong. You're a big dummy if you ride modular tires, Only real mountain bikers ride Brand M tires!!!!
  • 3 0
 @ceolmhar: must ride retyre
  • 3 0
 @ceolmhar: u salty bro?
  • 1 0
 Yeah, their modularity in that regard is second to none! Although at some point you'd usually have to stop customizing the bearings because the bolt on cap that covers them would either get seized or totally deform. Comparing that to Shimano's pedals is almost as laughable as comparing Presta to Schrader Smile
  • 40 3
 My goodness!!! If these indoor trainer “turning devices” continue to evolve, one might even be able to take their bicycle OUTSIDE and turn it. Imagine the possibilities!!
  • 5 0
 except that the minute you go outside on your road bike and "turn the wheel" you're likely to crash and show everybody how much trainer time you've logged vs. actual riding.

At this pace trainers advance by 2025 they will approximate the same experience I had on Sega HANG-ON! at the arcade in the 90's.
  • 2 0
 @plyawn: Look, props to the Hang On reference, by buddy has a restored sit on version in his basement. But seriously, there is no correlation to real world. No counter steer or anything. It’s just for distraction.
  • 3 0
 @plyawn: Dunno man. I think riding a bike is a lot like riding a bike and you don't forget how to do it by training/playing a simulation. I do a bit of Zwift riding during the week and ride outside on the weekends without any noticeable decrease in my admitted limited handling skills.

As a kid/teen I played American football, and a bit of Madden. I didn't show up at the field and try to joystick my way around the field.
  • 4 0
 @Counsel: Other kids on your team: that kid is all thumbs.
  • 2 1
 @plyawn: Its like climbing. You can find the indoor gym super stars outside having no idea what to do. They get lost looking for holds and have no idea how to set ropes or deal with gear. Plus they seem shocked that you have to hike to climbing areas.

That said I converted a Peloton rider into a gravel biker so maybe a realistic virtual world will make a real rider. But being selfish the trails are too crowded still, people need to go inside!
  • 1 0
 Wouldn't there be an UCI Zwift world championship this year? I recall it was announced last year. But maybe they canceled it because the internet is already overloaded?
  • 2 0
 Still waiting for the full mtb program for Zwift. They sort of intimate it on their site, but when push comes to shove, it seems like they really don't want to sell it.

Zwift, if you are listening.... We want to be able to put our OWN mtb on your trainer, not buy one from your store. We want to be able to put our own cassette on the trainer. Hint, most of us run SRAM or Shimano 12 speeds. We want to be able to pedal trails and the turning front end thing mentioned here would be fantastic for this. Please?
  • 1 0
 @Poulsbojohnny: If you run 12sp, can't you just install a NX or SX 12sp cassette on a regular HG body? Don't come tell me you're trying to save weight on your indoor trainer. If the concern then becomes that you can't use the 10t sprocket, you know you're taking this indoor thing way too serious.
  • 2 0
 @Poulsbojohnny: Huh? Zwift doesn’t make trainers. We’re you confusing it with Peloton?
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: Zwift compatable wheel off trainers allow you put on your own cassettes. But they are shimano or sram and thru axle compatable. Not sure but you might need a newer one for a 12 speed of you might have to get a new cassette body to make it work. Most come with a road cassette, maybe the he wants to spec a mtb cassette?
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: what is peloton?
  • 1 0
 @ExShopRat: I know that. I have a Tacx Neo 2. However he seems to think Zwift makes the trainers, which is kinda weird.
  • 1 0
 @DaFreerider44: Are you serious?
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: Well, fair enough I wasn't familiar with the brand either. Had to look it up:
www.onepeloton.com/bike
So yeah, I suppose he was serious.
  • 1 0
 @Chuckolicious: OIC, and yeah your right. Plus Zwift doesnt care about your gears anyway. You would be fine on a single speed, just target watts and vary the ERG if you want to go harder or easier. The training programs especially dont care about your gears in my experience.
  • 26 0
 Everyone shut up..... there are Taj water bottles.
  • 1 0
 But no link on where to buy them??? I WANT THE CORGI DOG!
  • 19 0
 That stem needs a Canfield Balance limited edition to go with it.
  • 18 7
 I've often thought to myself, "Wouldn't it be nice if I could pay $41.99 for a water bottle, instead of like $8-12."

Thanks Fidlock for finally giving the people what we want.
  • 10 4
 My fidlock bottle has outlasted my regular bottles by 3* . It you live where it gets muddy, they don't end up looking worn from being pulled in and out, and grit getting between the cage and bottle. So I don't think they work out any more expensive in the long run. My current fidlock bottle has been ridden in horrible conditions for 2 years still looks great.. previously id be through a bottle every 6-9 months. The system is way slicker when your not carrying a bottle too. They used to be more in the 25-30 range and that was a no brainer for me, maybe a bit overpriced now.
  • 22 0
 @Karve: Who cares about marks on the bottle. I've used scratched up bottles from cage rubbing on them for years. I'd rather have a cheaper one for when it gets lost, stolen, or just smells too much like tequila Wink
  • 3 0
 @lukeshort7: The tequila smell is essential. It's great for that mid ride nap
  • 6 0
 I'm curious what an $8-12 bottle (plus cage) looks like.
  • 11 0
 If you include the price of the bottle cage it costs about the same as a normal bottle. The specialized zee cage is $25 and doesn't come with a bottle so its like $33-37 vs $41, not that bad imo.
  • 2 0
 @Barafu: Fabric Cage less 600ml costs in Germany about 12,99€ or 15$.
Works flawless for the last 2 years. Never Lost a bottle not even in the bikepark.
  • 3 0
 @FreeRider2111: halfords - £4 cage, £4 bottle. $11. Has worked well for me for about 4 years every day use.
  • 1 0
 Because some people literally can't fit any other cages, because you wouldn't be able to put a bottle in or take it out.
  • 2 1
 @Barafu: uhm, you don't have to replace the cage with every water bottle, or like ever...
  • 2 0
 Please tell me how you plan to attach a bottle to the frame without a cage (which costs money as well). I am never going back to a normal bottle+cage combo after using the fidlock bottle.
  • 1 0
 @FreeRider2111: Damn I would love to find your secret on holding a Fabric Cageless bottle! Lost mine on a tame trail. Then got another one and lost it on the same trail. Thankfully my gf was behind and got it (not in her face haha)
I'm planning on getting the fidlock to see if it's any better. If not, I will put a regular one
  • 2 0
 @A1990ToyotaHilux: specialized zee side entry cage. And if the frame doesn't have bosses, zip ties or SKS anywhere cage mounts are your friends
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: Doesn't work for me, because it sits to high up. Would only fit a super small bottle. With the fidlock mount I can get the 600ml on there, it gets close to the top tube but it works. The problem I have, is that the top tube and the down tube are pretty close to each other and I have a vertically mounted piggyback shock. The bosses sit pretty high up, so the zee cage also sits way to close to the point where the top tube and the down tube meet. I also want to have at least 500 ml of water with me and that simply wouldn't be possible with the Zee (I have a Fuji Auric LT 1.3).
  • 2 0
 @A1990ToyotaHilux: at least your Fuji starts life with bottle bosses unlike my Mega. Looking at photos of those bikes, do you gain anything from flipping the shock upside down?
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: That might work, although I'm afraid, it would end up pinching the bottle between the down tube and the piggyback.
  • 9 0
 I genuinely question who would spend $150 on an FSA stem when there are better and better looking less expensive options from Thomson, Deity, i9, Chromemag, Burgtec, Renthal, etc. You better really like that oil slick looks.
  • 3 4
 I agree. Add syntax megaforce to your list. Extremely light with 5mm ti bolts all around that are rated up to 8nm.
  • 1 0
 @diegosk: Too bad the syntace looks like a 15 euro noname OEM stem. If they made it in a polished mirror finish i would buy one.
  • 1 0
 Probably the same person that's willing to lay down $175 on some carbon sunglasses!
  • 1 0
 Even NS has some oilslick option stem and they dont cost that much.
  • 9 0
 Bunny rabbit skulls don't have ears. And yes, I am fun at parties. Well, I'm sure I would be if I was ever invited to one.
  • 6 0
 @sarahmoore any idea how the camelbacks handled going over rough stuff and jumps? curious if the extra strappage keeps it better in place...
  • 9 0
 I haven't ridden with the 6L pack yet, but the mesh 2-strap harness was awesome on the smaller version of the Chase Vest with 2.5L capacity. I rode with it every day during BC Bike Race and on some longer trail rides since. It barely feels like you're wearing a pack at all and I like the storage pockets at the front.
  • 6 0
 the chase bag one of the best hydration solutions I've used and I've tried all the things. stays put, jumps, rough stuff, whatever
  • 4 0
 I ride with a trail running vest very often (done it with a few manufactures) and it's WAY better in terms of staying in place. Since when you're running you have more constant up and down movement and the momentum penalty of it swaying around is more when running, running vests are further ahead of load management than a traditional backpack.

Also another advantage for super hot rides with a trail running vest is being able to half freeze the flexible bottles that sit on your chest and you get a much better cooling sensation than a back bladder filled with ice (or do both for those really hot days!).
  • 1 0
 I ride both MTB and gravel with a Chase and Chase 8 (depends on how long I'm going out for), and I've been super happy with the vests. They fit high on your back and you wear them snug enough that they don't bounce, slip or slop around. I ride super chunky, rocky stuff and have done multiple lift days and they work awesome, plus they have plenty of room for all of my snacks, tools, rain gear, phone (My S10 fits perfectly into the shoulder strap zip pockets).

I've tried everything from lumbar packs (Camelbak's LR line), hip packs, and other packs and vests, and I think the Chase is an awesome pack if you aren't needing to carry a ton of extra gear.
  • 3 0
 @sarahmoore: thank you very much.
  • 2 0
 @NorCalNomad: trail running vest for long days/bike park days is the way to go. Osprey Duro 6 is my fav.

cons: look like a dad. mooching parkrat friends.

pros: carry the essentials up front for easy access (snacks, "the kit", multi tool etc), plenty of water, first aid kit, spares/ tube, lift beers in the back, can usually hustle post ride libations from afore mentioned friends whose stuff you end up carrying.
  • 2 0
 @NorCalNomad: Thanks for the freeze suggestion!
  • 7 0
 Been running the squidworks pedals most of this season and they are awesome!
  • 3 0
 It's a cool concept. I wonder if they plan to offer different thicknesses to create more/less concave
  • 2 0
 @chacou: They do have plans for other platforms. But you can also make them more/less concave by adjusting the pins.
  • 17 0
 I'll wait for the spongebob pedals
  • 3 0
 @NorCalNomad: So I'm not the only one who read it as Squidward at first
  • 7 1
 Of all the products here, the squidworks pedals make me scratch my head the most. Why add failure points to a system that's already fairly well refined and in no need of being changed? They're not cheaper than the competition, they're not lighter, they're not more robust, it really does just seem like a different product for the sake of being different.
  • 2 0
 I love my squidworks pedal as well. Such an awesome upgrade to my bike.
  • 4 0
 @sherbet: custom colors.

it's a top 3 criteria for buying a bike approaching $10K, so why not pedals that show the world the real you?
  • 2 1
 I've been running Squidworx pedals for most of 2020, and I love them too!

They are thinner than TMAC or Chesters, and they have just enough concave-ness to help sit my feet in the correct position. I like being able to change the colors to match my ride too.

I don't consider the modular design a "failure point" as the design is very robust and well thought out.

I do wish they would have included a cheap wrench/socket for the pins, as they do need periodic tightening checks.

If you run the black anodized spindle, consider getting some Birchwood Casey Super Black Touch-Up Pen, in the Gloss finish. This will touch up those inevitable scratches you'll get and the pedals will always look new. This pen also works better than a Sharpie for other black components (it's made for guns).
  • 3 0
 @Geochemistry: I can't tell if the last part is serious or not - you use a touch-up pen on the spindles of your pedals to keep them looking new?

And I need to force myself to rinse of the dust and lube my chain every couple of rides?
  • 1 1
 @plyawn: I use it. It's a great product. Best $7US you'll spend to keep the bike looking fresh. I use it when I do my monthly rinse/lube/torque/touch up. smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00JSAE00Y
  • 2 0
 Jesus...
  • 5 0
 Still can't believe that pad companies haven't really made any good lightweight trail/enduro pads that you can remove without taking your shoes off. 7idp tried one set of removable pads, but it didn't quite make the cut.
  • 4 0
 Maybe because lightweight trail kneepads are designed to be worn both up and down? I've worn my Raceface Indy's on 4 hr rides without any discomfort in the middle of summer.
  • 1 1
 @kkse: Of course, they are to be worn the entire ride. I ride with them the entire time, but they are still a pain in the rear to remove. I have tried so many lightweight kneepads (too many) and still annoyance to get them off especially when wearing pants.
  • 5 0
 check out Ion's K Traze Amp
  • 2 0
 There is two (well three) problems that you're running into with being able to take off a knee pad without taking off shoes. 1. Adjustability/ securing 2. Material bulk/ flex 3. Cost

Pads have to have a decent amount of adjustability to fit different body types, but the more adjustability you have the more bulk, weight, and stiffness you're adding. Also you're trying to secure something to an area of the body that has A LOT of flexion and a lot of compounding curvature that is changing (flexing the knee + your muscles expanding and contracting). Trying to fit something compounding curvature is hard enough let alone make sure it doesn't move in a crash. Now you could theoretically add something like BOA to try to get over that but it doesn't deal with flexing that well and also would make pads WAY expensive. OR you could go the low tech way of basically putting knee pads on like a corset with lots of little eyelets and a shoe lace. But no one is going to enjoy that user experience of taking 10 minutes to just put on your knee pads just to avoid removing your shoes.
  • 4 0
 IXS Flow Zip. They're great medium-duty pads, and stay in place very well. I've had my pair for over 2 years, and they're still going strong. My GF has the non-zip version, and they're also still going strong.
ixs.com/us/moto/motorcycle-garment/protectorsslider/protectors/1467/flow-zip-knee-guard-grey
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: the problem with removable knee pads is in the wash. Velcro sticks to everything.
  • 3 0
 @DHhack: You can use mesh wash bags. Works great.
  • 2 0
 @jzPV: Or K-pacts. It's a little tight but it works
  • 2 0
 @DHhack: Yes, mesh washer bags solve this.
  • 1 0
 @NorCalNomad: I had the 7idp Transition Wrap pads that were removable. They were good except the straps were awkward, cumbersome, and didn't work well. I still think a good set of lightweight trail/enduro removable pads could be made.

www.bikebling.com/7iDP-Transition-Wrap-Knee-Black-p/7idp16-7008-05.htm?gclid=CjwKCAjwnef6BRAgEiwAgv8mQYKOWdmT68NecGFvJvVaLmA4sIJUWOUToR_A0ZRScofctMcTBbCQKBoCDH4QAvD_BwE&Click=120514&utm_source=googlebase&utm_medium=shoppingengine
  • 6 0
 @DHhack: you wash your pads? What, do you ride with the queen?
  • 1 0
 @plyawn: I sweat more than any reasonable human being should. -5C while riding and I’m still not wearing a jacket.
  • 2 0
 Maybe not the lightest, but I'm loving the Race Face Ambush knee pads.
  • 1 0
 @DaFreerider44: K-Pacts are the shit. Full shin protection, but it has 2 pieces that slide so you can pedal all day. Then it has 4 straps to adjust the fit. I forget I'm wearing them 90% of the time. I'll probably never use slip-ons again, and the shin protection saves me all the time.
  • 1 0
 @Endurahbrah: Yeah, I have RF Ambush pads. Great pads, but not the best for pedaling for hours.
  • 1 0
 @plyawn: I wash my pads because I can't stand my own stank when I ride.
  • 1 0
 Got that bottle for the lid for my dub bottlemount so it wouldnt get japped up... unfortunately that very cap has a hole pointing right in the direction of the tire so the cap does not keep it from getting mucky at all...well designed folks
  • 2 1
 Why a 450ml bottle? Much too small. Since they aren’t restricted by the diameter of a bottle cage why not make a 800ml bottle that fits in the same space a 600ml bottle fits, that way more bikes could carry a larger bottle and I could get away with just the one bottle for most rides.
  • 1 0
 am i the only one that has problems with lightweight glasses bouncing off my face on the dh? and those straight sides don't hang onto my head. been wearing prescription maui jims for decades and they're the only thing that stays put and is rx-able. anyone have a suggestion on rx-able riding glasses that don't have the straight sides? I need some clears for winter, but after falling for the POC hype and spending bank another pair that slide down and bounce while riding, I'm done guessing if online frames will work.
  • 1 0
 Have you tried croakies?
  • 4 0
 That oil slick bandwagon needs to stop. Tacky AF.
  • 2 0
 Modular pedals... yet the only real thing you can change is the color.

Why not let riders choose from different lengths (medium / long / extra long)?
  • 8 5
 camelback to uswe can i copy your homework?

oh noooo e-moped protection
  • 3 0
 @vitality agreed, USWE packs are fawesome at hardly moving at all
  • 1 0
 Anyone tried both? USWE looks more stable, but prob looks all bunched up over your shirt. Idk. No actual experience, just curious.
  • 1 0
 @speed10: So I'm more XC than most of the crowd here, and the USWE stuff we own we put over closer-fitting jerseys and enduro shirts, and it does great. I would think if a person wears it over a loose-fitting Hawaiian shirt, it may not look as good.

Also, I'd like to add that the USWE closure is cool and functional.
  • 2 0
 @speed10: I just went from 20 years of camelbacks to a uswe. All packs have their purposes in my book: giant dakine pack for chainsaw and other packable trail tools, camelbacks for one packable tool or a couple handhelds, but I gotta say, for lightweight packs that only fit the necessaries, sit higher up and don't move... uswe is great. granted, after riding almost 30 years with a pack, a month after I got the uswe, I finally put my phone and keys in a pocket belt, slapped on that dusty waterbottle cage with a tool and pump attachment... and man. I'm never going back. I was so late to the "no pack" party that everyone left, went home, slept, and came back and found me going, "hey guys! this no pack thing is great!"

I'm an idiot.
  • 1 0
 @ranke: don't worry - you're just really early to the "packs are great for keeping your bike simple and also provide back protection!" party.

You'll be known as a true innovator ahead of his time.
  • 1 0
 @ranke: ha ha man I used to ride with a little saddle bag strapped on and a water bottle in the cage constantly getting dusted with horse crap. I loved when Camelbaks came out. Swore I'd never go back to the old days. I day in the park recently and now I'm shopping for water bottle cages with hidden tools and thinking of where I can strap on an emergency tube and CO2s. I still have an old saddle bag, maybe I'll use that to be retro.
  • 4 1
 Is the company name not “Have you seen my Fidlock?”?
  • 2 0
 I bought one to fit in my frame (not a lot of clearance) and have never lost a bottle even on big park days.
That being said, Im getting rid of mine as they rattle loud as hell in janky terrain.
  • 1 0
 Fake news.... Never lost a bottle in the years i've been using them
  • 2 0
 I'd like to know what your experience is with the fidlock bottle. Honestly I think it's a pretty decent system.
  • 1 1
 There’s a large Facebook group in Wellington NZ and cageless bottles have got to be the most frequently lost item.
  • 1 0
 The stock giant seat on my 2018 Trance was really more of an ass hatchet than a seat. Hopefully they’ve improved the feel on this one
  • 1 0
 This new Romero is good. I have tossed my Giant saddles in the past and replaced with SDG. However the stock Romero saddle on the new Trance X is a keeper
  • 1 0
 Ass Hatchet was my nickname in college
  • 2 0
 So I just read the entire comments section and there's no mention of the e-bike specific knee guards? You've changed, man...
  • 1 0
 Is it me or are those pedals unnecessary? You can already rebuild Hopes and pins reverse out so rock bashes don't destroy the threads. What more do you want?
  • 3 4
 That zwift steering plate is silly. Sitting perfectly upright and steering without leaning will feel terrible. In a worst case you will learn bad cornering technique, unless you ride a tricycle...
  • 10 0
 Stationary riding doesn't feel like outdoor riding, whatever you do. The point of Zwift is to make it like a video game so it isn't as boring, not to make it like riding outdoors.
  • 2 0
 I made my own with a small lazy Susan and my phone as the accelerometer. The MTB course was fun. Like SJP said, this ain’t no outdoor simulation even with my Tacx Neo 2 and road feel. It’s just a way to make it more fun and distracting from the fact that for whatever reason you’re stuck inside.
  • 1 0
 @SJP: except sega and a bunch of others absolutely nailed this back in the 90's at every arcade and fun zone. And now cutting edge trainer technology is my Mom's lazy susan?
  • 1 0
 @plyawn: For steering your own bike, pretty much. How else would you do it? Remember, the actual trainers your bike is attached to are pretty advanced, like mine even simulates the road, or boardwalk, or dirt, or whatever you’re riding over in the game.
  • 3 2
 I could buy multiple pedals for those cost of those dork pedals. Who even asked for an overpriced “Modular” pedal?
  • 1 0
 idk man, I see it as more parts that can just fall off
  • 1 0
 Two things I dont get...those silly small water bottles and people who cycle indoors.
  • 2 0
 Well, I set up the best indoor trainer I could so I could finally stay fit over the winter. Zwift, a Tacx Neo 2, and my old Litespeed mounted to it finally got me to stay engaged. First time I came into spring not being an anchor for my friends in SoCal who don’t have a winter.
  • 2 0
 @Chuckolicious: same here. Work and kids means in the short days of winter i cant ride during the week. If I want to be in any shape for the weekends I need do something. My knees hate me too much to run and I hate going to the gym. Zwift and my old road bike are interesting enough I actually do it.
  • 2 1
 Why would i pay 42 usd for a water bottle? lol
  • 1 1
 Because packs are for chumps dontyaknow
  • 1 0
 @alexsin: i know but I know I can go buy a 12$ water bottle and 5$ bottle cage and put that on my bike instead
  • 1 0
 My shins started to bleed just looking at those pedals...
  • 10 0
 A shinmata?
  • 2 0
 @Sscottt: I am the chosen bleeder!!
  • 5 4
 42 dollars for a bottle. In the words of the virgin Mary, come again?
  • 2 1
 $42 for the bottle and the mount, which isn't quite as bad. I bought the 450ml bottle and the Uni base (straps on) for my Capra. Fits perfectly on the front of the seatpost mast and I can still slam the saddle all the way down.

I will bring my pack on longer rides, but it's nice having a small bottle within easy reach for short rides.
  • 1 0
 @monkeybizz: I'm aware, I bought a complete set of two bottles and two cages on Amazon for even less (think it was $15 total) for my wife's bike and my old bike.

But I bought a Capra which doesn't have bottle mounts and no great place to put a full size cage, which I didn't want on the bike unless I was bringing a bottle. The Fidlock was the best option for me, even if it was expensive.

Edit: www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B07CS1WJWZ?psc=1&ref=ppx_pop_mob_b_asin_image
  • 1 1
 Cue me pouring water from my bladder in to tiny bottle every half hour.

Post a Comment



You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2020. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.028769
Mobile Version of Website