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Road Cycling Digest: A Smartwatch with 'Unlimited Battery Life', The Best Fan for Indoor Training, & More

Mar 10, 2022 at 17:06
by Sarah Moore  



What's going on in the curly bar world? Road Cycling Digest showcases articles from our sister sites, CyclingTips, VeloNews and Peloton Magazine. In each installment, you might find endurance coverage, power-to-weight ratios, gravel bike tech and, of course, lycra.





Revealed: The Cause Of The Australian Team Pursuit Bar Failure
By: Iain Treloar / CyclingTips

For Australian cycling fans, it was the defining moment of the Tokyo Olympics: the sight of Alex Porter tumbling to the ground, face-first at 65 km/h, in the qualifying round of the men’s team pursuit. The Australian team had fallen victim to a catastrophic equipment failure, with the handlebar unit on Porter’s bike snapping through completely, leaving Porter nowhere to go but down.

(Read more.)
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Cool Tool Tuesday #3: Building A Cycling Tool Kit – The Foundations
By: Dave Rome / CyclingTips

Imagine that you had the opportunity to start your cycling tool kit from scratch. What tools would you pick first?

It may surprise many, but the tools I’d start with first aren’t cycling-specific. Rather they are the general-purpose hand tools you’d likely find in common across the toolboxes of auto mechanics, electricians, DIYers, and of course, bicycle mechanics.

(Read more.)
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2022 BMC URS LT Gravel Bike Review: Ups And Downs Of Integrated Suspension
By: Dave Rome / CyclingTips

Some say every bike is a gravel bike. And while that may be true, the reality is that no one bike will be perfectly optimised for all conditions.

BMC’s Unrestricted, aka URS, is a perfect example of just this. Released in 2019, the URS introduced a mountain bike-like take on what most consider a gravel bike to be. It was designed to match the mixed terrain and high mountain riding that the staff of the Swiss company often found themselves doing. Meanwhile, in the eyes of many others, it was a bike that only further blurred the lines between a gravel bike and a cross-country mountain bike.

(Read more.)
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CyclingTips Podcast: The Violence And Silence Behind The UCI’s PR Moment
By: Iain Treloar / CyclingTips

In this special episode of the CyclingTips podcast, our Senior Features Editor Iain Treloar digs into the evacuation efforts of Afghan cyclists in the wake of the Taliban’s return.

Off the back of months of reporting, we reveal the bullying and blackmail behind a famous cyclist evacuation convoy backed by the UCI – and how the lists had been manipulated by the President of the Afghan Cycling Federation, Fazli Ahmad Fazli, to benefit family and friends instead of cyclists. With UCI backing, they received asylum, and Fazli received a major UCI award.

(Read more.)
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Team Bikes Of The 2022 Men’s WorldTour
By: Ronan Mc Laughlin / CyclingTips

It’s time for our annual look at all the bikes of the World Tour. As the men’s series kicks off first, we will start with a look at the equipment all the teams in the men’s World Tour will rely on in 2022. Unfortunately with the cancellation of a second consecutive Santos Tour Down Under, we once again have to bring you images provided by the teams rather than photos we’ve taken ourselves.

(Read more.)
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Bruce Gordon’s Rock ‘n Road Titanium: A Gravel Bike Decades Ahead Of Its Time
By: James Huang / CyclingTips

Gravel bikes have exploded in popularity recently for a whole bunch of good reasons. The voluminous multi-surface tires offer acceptable grip on loose ground while still rolling decently quickly on tarmac; they’re not too heavy; their drop bars are more comfortable over longer distances than single-position flat bars; their wide-range gearing offers plenty of climbing prowess; and they offer a lot of the experience people have traditionally sought in conventional road bikes, but now with the luxury of avoiding motorized traffic by heading off-pavement.

But the idea is hardly new.

(Read more.)
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Where Are They Now? Cadel Evans, Australian Cycling Icon, 2011 TDF Winner
By: Matt De Neef / CyclingTips

t’s a chaotic afternoon in the Evans household. As Cadel appears in the Zoom call, so too do his two young sons, Aidan, 3, and Blake, 16 months. As the 2011 Tour de France champion gets his headphones connected, his boys shriek and squawk as they duck in and out of shot, climbing under and around their dad’s desk. Blake grabs Cadel’s wallet, his headphones case, has a chomp on his dad’s forearm. This is Cadel’s life now.

(Read more.)
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Tech Mailbag #2: Drip-on Wax Chain Lube Prep And Bedding-in New Disc Pads
By: Dave Rome / CyclingTips

Welcome to the CyclingTips Mailbag column, where you send us your tech questions, and our team of nerds gives you answers. Got a question about wheel and tire standards? Want to know how to diagnose that weird shifting issue? Wondering where that darn ticking sound is coming from?! Send your questions our way at tech@cyclingtips.com to be featured in an upcoming CT Mailbag column.

In this second edition, Dave Rome addresses the commonly asked question about prepping a new chain for drip-on wax chain lube, how to run Di2 on a frame that previously had mechanical shifting, and whether new disc brake pads need bedding-in in a previously bedded-in brake system.

(Read more.)
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Tested: What Is The Best Fan For Indoor Training?
By: Ronan Mc Laughlin / CyclingTips

Indoor training has changed radically over the past decade. It’s not so long ago a blank wall was the most common form of trainer entertainment. Repeats of old races were about as interactive as indoor riding got. Nowadays we can enjoy smart trainers, virtual worlds, and even artificially intelligent training plans.

One thing that hasn’t changed is the sweating. Indoor training gets hot, quickly!

(Read more.)
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Introducing Our New Weekly Cycling Show, VENGA
By: Wade Wallace / CyclingTips

In 2012 and 2013 I was fortunate to co-host an online cycling show called The Bike Lane with Matt Keenan and Scott McGrory. Working with those guys and the rest of the crew was a highlight of my career, but sadly it came to an end. Even a show as seemingly simple as this cost many thousands of dollars per episode to make, and we had pulled in far too many favours to keep the show going without some proper sponsorship behind it. Sadly it wasn’t sustainable.

I’d always had in the back of my head getting this type of show running again, and finally, nearly a decade later, we’ve done it. I’m thrilled to bring to you our new weekly cycling show called VENGA.

(Read more.)
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The Rich Get Richer: Ten Takeaways From The Classics’ Opening Weekend
By: Peloton Magazine

The sport’s biggest teams flexed their collective muscles over the action-packed weekend that featured the opening of classics seasons with Omloop Het Nieuwsblad and Kuurne-Bruxelles-Kuurne, a battle of grand tour contenders at the UAE Tour and a pair of thrilling French one-day races at Faun-Ardèche and La Drôme. At Omloop, Wout van Aert stormed to the first cobbled classics win of the season behind a new-and-improved Jumbo-Visma one-day squad; Tadej Pogačar confirmed his status as the general classification rider to beat once again in 2022 by defending his UAE Tour overall title; and Fabio Jakobsen saved QuickStep’s opening weekend with an absolutely vicious sprint to win Kuurne on Sunday.

(Read more.)
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Tracing the Berlin Wall
By: Paolo Ciaberta / Peloton Magazine

I’ve been to Berlin several times, and the question that I ask myself is always the same: “Where was the Wall?” The location of the Berlin Wall is documented in very few places, because immediately after its fall in 1989 and according to the predominant feeling of the time—”the Wall has to fall”—it was taken down so thoroughly that almost all traces of the border were erased. Today, most people agree that this was a mistake, and I think so too. It is always a mistake to erase the past from the memory of people, so I decided to trace the entire path of what was one of the most moving and symbolic structures of the 20th century.

(Read more.)
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Korean Mtn Adventure
By: Andy Bokanev / Peloton Magazine

“One is enough,” he said in broken English after he and his fellow waiter watched me grab two bottles of soju, the local vodka-like liquor, from the fridge and haul them to my table.

“One is enough,” he repeated. I nodded and smiled: “You don’t know me.” Thus went my first night in Seoul, South Korea. A few weeks earlier I was invited by the clothing brand Rapha to take part in a Korean edition of the Prestige—part-adventure ride, part-team time trial, part-brevet in which four-person teams take on a long and arduous course. It is not officially a race but, trust me, everyone knows who “won” and who “lost.” This particular edition was based in the Taebaek region. Now, I consider myself to be well versed in geography, and can generally find any given place, but trying to find this one brought me to Google Maps.

(Read more.)
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Live Forever in Sardinia
By: Clive Pursehouse / Peloton Magazine

Last year’s 100th Giro d’Italia set off in Sardinia, an ancient island 300 kilometers across the Tyrrhenian Sea from Italy’s mainland. Though definitively Italian, Sardinians are Sardinian first. Like many of Italy’s southern provinces, the economy and local job prospects here tend to lag behind the northern powerhouses of Milan, Turin and Venice. In spite of missing out on that northern prosperity, Sardinians may have figured out the secret of the truly prosperous: a long life. Sardinia is one of the world’s five “blue zones,” where life expectancy is much higher than average. And the small Sardinian mountain village of Seulo, about 70 kilometers north of Cagliari, is the world’s bluest of zones—scientifically the place on earth where people tend to live the longest.

(Read more.)
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Dreams of Bikepacking
By: Paolo Ciaberta & Simone Bracco / Peloton Magazine

Keep a steady pace…breathe…follow the trails…breathe…leave the trails behind… breathe…look around…breathe…stop and recover…breathe…open your jacket, don’t sweat too much and breathe, breathe, breathe. Never forget to breathe—not for the lungs, which is an involuntary gesture, but for the mind, a reactionary gesture.
A long weekend on the bike, enchanting mountains, dirt roads and starry skies. The upper Val di Susa in Italy’s Piedmont region is magnificent; some roads are easier, some more difficult, but at the end of the day they’re always worth the effort. Don’t ask us “who” makes us do it, just ask us “what” makes us do it? Our answer is in these images.

(Read more.)
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Garmin Instinct 2 gets ’Unlimited Battery Life‘
By: Greg Kaplan / VeloNews

Just weeks after Garmin officially launched the latest update to the Fenix line of wearables and reintroduced the Epix 2, the Kansas-based company that’s nearly synonymous with consumer GPS devices and wrist-based performance-monitoring devices rolled out another update an existing product line – and threw down the gauntlet to its competitors with regards to battery life.

The Garmin Instinct 2 Series not only promises to add some color to your wrist-based GPS and activity monitor but also makes a bold claim of unlimited battery life for some models in the lineup.

(Read more.)
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Kit Critic: How Black Style Is Transforming Cycling
By: Aliya Barnwell / VeloNews

Picture a rider climbing a grade so steep they have to stand. They dance their way around the switchback of a snow-dusted col, later descending gracefully, knee slightly pointed into the corner. At the bottom of the descent, the genteel cyclist sits at the outdoor table of a petit cafe, slammed bike in their line of sight, kit aero, helmet and shoes white, legs crossed, and coffee in hand.

This is the language of many idealized cycling ads. Now, what color was that cyclist in your mind’s eye?

(Read more.)
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Important Strength Training Concepts For Cycling
By: Hannah Otto (Finchamp) / VeloNews

Strength training can be a vital part of any cyclist’s training routine. With busy schedules and limited training time, you want to make the most of every minute. It can be challenging to know what things to target and what exercises to do to get the most bang for your buck in the gym.

Here are some basic guiding principles to help you make your gym workout cycling-specific.

(Read more.)
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Zwift addresses weight-doping hack, and temporary ban of a user who flagged it
By: Ben Delaney / VeloNews

Just ahead of the UCI esports world championship on its platform, Zwift banned an avid user from full participation in its virtual cycling platform for publicly detailing a way to cheat during Zwift racing by changing a rider’s weight.

After the situation escalated, Zwift CEO Eric Min stepped in, apologized to the user, and rescinded the ban. Here’s what happened.

(Read more.)
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This Olympic Champion Speed Skater Trains On The Bike 30 Hours Per Week
By: Zach Nehr / VeloNews

Like many Olympic tales, this is a story that transcends sport. When Swedish speed skater Nils van der Poel toed the starting line of the 10,000m at the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics, he visualized that he’d already won. After his expected smashing of the competition – earning a world record in the process – van der Poel told everyone how he had done it. In a comprehensive guide called, “How to skate a 10k… and also a half 10k.” van der Poel detailed his training from May 2019 to February 2022.

In this document, van der Poel (unrelated to that van der Poel, by the way) bore all. Not only did he include his day-by-day training calendar, but he also penned a personalized story that was much a diary as a clinical study.

(Read more.)
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Author Info:
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82 Comments
  • 95 7
 Personally I like summary articles like this. I like bikes, ive been reading PB since 2001 so being an obsessive MTB-ONLY GRRRR is as lame as riding in baggy jeans and all the other trends that were SUPER important for their 5 minutes once you are nearly 40. Cycling tips is usually a wall of race results and analysis, something i have no real interest in, but tech and more in-depth articles are good to look through when I've read any PB articles for the day.
  • 16 0
 Same, all bikes are great I'd rather read interesting articles about all bikes. The Classics, especially the Monuments are some of the best events in cycling if you are on the fence about road cycling check out Paris Roubaix etc they are brilliant races.
  • 8 0
 @justanothermatt: 100% agree. Last years Paris-Roubaix is a good one to start with for the road curious...
Also, Cadel Evans, for the yutes here, was a pro mountain biker for years before moving to the road.
  • 3 5
 If only they were actual summaries of articles, instead of just the "hook" or first 2 - 3 paragraphs. A summary would be useful, a hook is clickbait.
  • 2 1
 @dickyelsdon It's not that aggregate/repost articles are inherently evil or we can't have some roadie links once a week or two. I doubt many would complain if this came among a sea of great, original PB articles. But when it's on top of a general repost junkyard of late AND is in reality an ad for paywalled sites... not ideal.
  • 4 0
 Well said! Back in the day (early 90's) there wasn't much content to consume so you took what you could get. Any discipline of cycling got me excited even though I was a "mountain biker". This has stuck with me throughout my life and its nice to see PB throwing us some diverse cycling news in here and there.
  • 2 0
 Indeed. I have a road bike, and a trainer, and I desperately need a fan. Liked that. If only Praxis had a response like that report. Never thought of cycling Berlin on the Wall Route. Liked that. Crossover training at the Olympic level, might take something from that as I try to engage other sports as well. Thoughts on inherent bias...I will read that. Who doesn't like toolboxes?

Anyway, a quick summary that you can altogether skip easily from the home page or selectively read the one thing that interests you. I don't think it benefits anyone to remove choices when all they do is improve things for some of us. It's like real life...you don't use all of your health benefits most of the time (if you have them, or if you're Canadian), but it doesn't hurt that they're there. Moreover, PB is free so you don't have to pay for anything at all anyway.
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: Strada Bianca (already happened) great too. The women's race was A++ this year
  • 1 0
 Thanks Pinkbike for your open mindedness and for sharing that. More or less interesting contents but still. thanx
  • 25 2
 I wonder if these guys have a background in bmx?
  • 1 0
 @tubby1536: incredible
  • 1 0
 Track racers often have a background in BMX.
  • 9 0
 Can confirm the instinct is a fantastic watch for anyone who is hard on their watches and is fed up with cracking touch screen watches that can't have their screens replaced. Gets the job done.
  • 1 0
 After destroying a Fitbit Ionic, I got an instinct that died in a month... Quick and easy warranty z it's replacement is solid 2 years later. I only take it off to charge every ten days or so. I want a new solar one... But my current one is fine. If they added a dedicated LED nav light like some of the Fenix models do, that'd be an easy upgrade.
  • 1 0
 @Glenngineer: the sensors have all been upgraded on the new model too so that's what I'm saving for Beer
  • 1 0
 No experience with Garmin, but whereas Casio G-Shock watches (which some consider indestructible) slowly fall apart in a few years, my Suunto Ambit kept up nicely for years under similar conditions. Garmin being their competitor, I suppose they should be good too. No experience with touch screen watches though. Seems like a silly choice if you wear gloves and/or are getting your hands wet.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: also a silly choice for anyone who might chip or crack the screen, cause they can't be replaced so that's your watch in the bin. I've been wearing my Garmin for coming on 2 years now in very harsh conditions smashing it around repeatedly and the thing is like a cockroach... bombproof.
  • 2 0
 I'm still wearing my Garmin Fenix 3 HR that I purchased in 2016. Very nearly 6 years old, still has great battery life and thanks to the sapphire screen it is almost entirely scratch free. One of the most impressive pieces of electronics I have ever owned.

My wife's Fenix 5s just died on her a few days ago (probably water ingress during a swim, 3 1/4 years old) and Garmin have offered to replace it with another unit for $178 NZD, less than 1/4 of the price of a new one here. Same kind of deal with fixing broken screens on our edge 520 units at a very low cost.

They have also replaced multiple heart-rate monitors that have died early. Garmin seem to either have amazing reliability or warranty. Either way the customer experience has been great.

I will most definitely be buying another Fenix when (if) mine dies.
  • 6 0
 Nils' write up of his training plan is a brilliant read, a lot of points that can be carried over into any cyclist's training plan directly! Would really recommend reading the whole document or even just the VeloNews write up!
  • 9 1
 Since I’ve yet to see it here. Vital has some good photos of the new high pivot Intense.
  • 3 1
 Yep. Unfortunately I expect to see less and less of that type of coverage over here on Pinkside/Outbike.
  • 1 0
 @bman33: ya it’s pretty sad. No coverage other than a repost of track preview for the south east races.
  • 1 0
 @sunringlerider: if you have one source why bother to have two. I find it kinda boring to have that "special review" and then it's spread all over the MTB sites with the same feedback.
  • 5 0
 Reading the article about the Aus cycling riders catastrophic handelbar failure really polarised the financial difference in support from road to MTB. AusCycling essentially spared no expense to get a bike sorted in time, Meanwhile the Zwar brothers denounced their Aus cycling Federation and took up with Sweeden (dual citizens) because they couldn't get the support they needed.
  • 6 1
 171 Pages to say “the root cause, of the failure, in the end, was that the product wasn’t strong enough” is the reason people find it so hard to justify the level of government spending on olympics…..


Anyone could have come to the same exact conclusions over a case of beer and some day old pizza
  • 1 0
 I think the implication is that it was design flaw rather an a manufacturing one. But I agree, as a conclusion it's very poorly worded.
  • 3 0
 @pmhobson: Even "design flaw" is a vague conclusion; was it not up to spec, or were the specs inadequate for an Olympic athlete? Because one lies with the manf, the other with the team.
  • 1 0
 @ROOTminus1: that's a great point.
  • 5 0
 The thing I want to know about the curly bar world is this: Mountain bikes have changed dramatically in the last ten years - the tire size and the geometry I guess being the most notable. Did road bikes get this dramatic jump stage of evolution, or was it more progressive for them? Have they evolved in the last 20 years? Are they currently evolving? Asking for a friend.
  • 6 0
 kind of. Road bikes are now warming up to wider tires (from olike 23c-28, now into the 30's even for the hardest of roadies) and of course gravel bikes running damn near regular 29 mtb tires. My road bike is longer slacker and has a lower standover than an older road bike for sure but negligable, we kinda figured out the right postion to put power down along time ago but its uncomfy, I would say the thing that is changing is they are making more categories of road bikes now, comfy ones, I have a Specialized Diverge, it looks 100% like a road bike but is pretty relaxed, if you puyt skinny tires on it no onw would know it was a gravel bike, there is also disc brakes, I got hydrauliucs where as 5 years ago that would hav ebeen rare and $$$$.but ine thing that road bikes blow my mind about is how hell bent hey are on running shotty brakes, like rim brakes SUCK! even my road bike hydraulic brakes which are relativley high end cant compare to to a budget mtb like a kona blast with shimano mt200 brakes. its weird.
also road bikes have adopted integrated headsets and internal cable routing, in extreme cases routing it through the stem, so in a way they are very much changing as fast as mtb but in a different way, its growing as a categorie where as mtb is changing the actual bike darastically like travel and HTA. Cheers!
  • 3 0
 @ridingofthebikes: While for 90% of my curly bar riding, I do prefer disc brakes, there are those rare dry & sunny days when I take the light & rim-braked bike out. Good rim brakes with good pads feel so nice. They're quiet, the modulation is great, and if you have to pull hard you're not fighting torque that tries to turn the wheel.
  • 2 0
 @ridingofthebikes: Very interesting. Thanks for the reply.
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: I couldn't disagree more. You sure it's not nostalgia your experienceing lol. Rim brakes suck so bad.
  • 2 0
 @ridingofthebikes: Ha. yeah I'm sure. Modern dual pivot (Shimano/SRAM) calipers with good pads feel really nice. It's different for sure. But with my setup (at my weight) still very powerful.

But again, I'm limiting this to nice weather, dry pavement.
  • 8 1
 I'm ok with these highlight reels in bitesize form , Thanks Pinkbike

PS: I kinda miss POD/VOD just saying
  • 21 14
 I remember pink bike
  • 9 0
 #neverforget
  • 3 2
 I want to forget
  • 1 0
 Berlin,what a cool city to ride your bike! Tons of interesting places to visit. Best place to know more about the wall is Gedenkstätte Berliner Mauer, the place with the tower,it worth a look. Loved my time in Berlin over the years as a visitor,my favorite city in EU to take a fun break.
  • 7 3
 Please put this behind a paywall
  • 3 0
 www.pinkbike.com/photo/9873407

we need to bring this back
  • 3 0
 Man, the road cycling world is weird.
  • 1 0
 Damn it. That’s the kind of hard hitting journalism we need, too!
  • 1 2
 Love the paywalls...tried to read a couple cycling tips articles only to be told to pay up. Oh yeah, I pay for the Outside+ membership too. Apparently, they want even more money to read on pinkbike now.
  • 2 2
 Road cycling tool kit comes with pre-filled syringes. Don't ask what's in them.
  • 2 0
 Just vitamins
  • 2 2
 That’s the yeti advantage!
  • 1 0
 BMC bringing back the Headshock lmfao
  • 1 0
 Indoor Cycling Fan article is lacking detail.
  • 1 0
 Ha, that's the one I read first too. I got 2, Honeywell HT-900 for $16 each. placed one on each side of my 42" monitor. Perfect setup IMO.
  • 1 0
 Velonews is a great place for this...wait is Velonews now owned by Pepsi?
  • 2 2
 Battery powered watches are cheating. I'm staying a purist with my sundial.
  • 2 0
 @mcozzy Do I get a pass for my Archimedes Water Clock?
  • 2 0
 As a mechanic, I do love my Seiko mechanical, self-winding watch.
  • 2 0
 @barp: SNK805 for the win.
  • 2 0
 @periko32: I actually have a 5 Sports, not a 5, but close enough!
  • 1 4
 *Sigh*

Raise your hand if you're still an OG Freeride, DH, DJ type...

The Pinkbike scene is getting frustrating, the E-Bikes, Waterbottles, and Lycra...
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