Tales From Southwest China's Downhill Scene

May 23, 2018 at 0:25
by Scott Rapoport  

By Scott Rapoport & Josh “Stugg” Zhang

Decades ago, before it industrialized, before it became one of the largest economies in the world, before it filled with cars, skyscrapers and the most modern of technologies, China was known as the Kingdom of Bicycles. Combine this with a presently exploding middle class, landscapes that are often stunning, mountainous terrain, and you get an idea of the Chinese mountain bike community today: a huge and constantly expanding scene.

In Yunnan, one of China’s most rural, diverse and mountainous provinces, riders can enjoy an enormous variety of terrain. Bordered by Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam, southern Yunnan is rolling hills, tea fields and jungle. Yunnan’s northern and western reaches, toward the borders of Tibet and Sichuan, are the Himalayas—the famous and magnificent scenery of areas like Tiger Leaping Gorge and Shangri-La. At its heart is the province’s largest city and capital, Kunming. Go anywhere in the mountains surrounding the city, and you are bound to see XC and road riders. But unlike these disciplines, downhill is not an Olympic sport, and so garners significantly less attention in China. Sponsorships are far and few between, especially in Yunnan, and so the downhill community here is maintained by a smaller, dedicated group of riders.








Tell your friends you are going mountain biking in southwest China and they might ask something like, “what are you going to ride, old goat paths?” Come here and you will find, firstly, that old goat paths absolutely rip, and secondly, that one of the steepest and most well-built downhill trails in Asia is actually called the Goat House. Until only a few years ago, the trail really was a goat path. In 2013 the film Where the Trail Ends, which featured a segment filmed in China, was released and had an immediate influence on Chinese mountain bikers. It not only showed what was possible on a mountain bike, but what was possible on a mountain bike in China. In Kunming, many of the downhill riders say the film was at least partially responsible for getting them into the sport. So they picked up shovels and started digging. They built berms, jumps and drops, going off only what they had seen in videos. Today, only a few years later, on the mountain called Bao Zhu that dominates much of Kunming’s western skyline, there are a number of purpose-built mountain bike trails, a jump park and a proper downhill racetrack.


The Teacher


Josh Zhang is a local rider from up in Chongqing, Sichuan. After moving to Kunming some ten years ago, he was introduced to mountain biking and immediately became infatuated with the sport. Most riders simply call him the English teacher; he runs his own school and is as good at speaking English as he is at mountain biking, which is to say, really freaking good. Meet him and you will instantly recognize his passion for this sport. He is a dreamer who believes in the amazing possibilities for mountain biking in Yunnan, of Himalayan descents, ancient paths, and the thousands of trails here yet to be conquered by the mountain bike.





The Organizer

Mr. Lee's shuttle truck. A day of shuttling will run you about $5.

Mr. Lee is the man largely responsible for this downhill community. Most riders call him Lao Lee Ge, meaning big brother Lee. The 62-year-old—a veteran soldier of the China Vietnam War—still rides the downhill trails regularly. In 2015 Mr. Lee’s youngest son, like so many of us, became addicted to downhill mountain biking. Having been an XC rider for many years, Lee took a test ride on a big bike and was instantly hooked. The father-son team began to organize an effort to build proper mountain bike trails at Bao Zhu. Getting permission to build trails, especially ones with jumps, is no easy feat in China—this is a country where all land is owned by the government, and so buying a plot to build on was not an option. Mr. Lee was able to overcome this by, simply put, knowing a lot of people. He has put a tremendous amount of time, money and build hours into this project, all for the love of the sport. His efforts, with the help of others, have allowed for the downhill community in Kunming to flourish. It is certainly a story of, “if you build it, they will come.” His trails have attracted a huge number of young Chinese riders to the sport, many of whom are now ridiculously talented. Lao Lee Ge is a testament to the influence that a single trail system can have on a community.

At 62, Lee still send it.



The Rider


Every trail system has a local badass—that guy who rides fast, sends it big, and makes you realize that you’re a complete amateur. At Bao Zhu that man is Lee Song Ren, one of Yunnan’s fastest downhill racers. Quiet and humble, he lets his riding speak for itself. When he was twelve, Song Ren saw a picture of Redbull Rampage, became captivated by mountain biking, saved money for months, bought a cheap, Walmartesque full suspension, took said bike off a five-foot drop, and immediately destroyed it.

When he’s not riding, Song Ren runs a small bike shop. When riders in the area need their suspension serviced, unable to send it around the world to the likes of Fox or Rockshox, they come to Song Ren. He is completely self-taught, learning to fix suspension simply by opening it up and tinkering. He is also an expert trail builder, and designed and helped build all of the trails at Bao Zhu, relying only on what he had seen from videos posted on the Chinese version of Youtube, Youku.

Song Ren has garnered a few sponsorships here and there, but nothing lasting, and certainly not enough to travel and race around China—this just isn’t in the cards for downhill riders in Yunnan. He is a dedicated, self-supported downhiller who rides and races purely out of passion.







Song Ren's Specialized Demo. He has carved the 100 family names of China into the frame.


The Mechanic

Mr. King owns the bike shop at the base of Bao Zhu, which serves as the central hub and meeting point for the Kunming downhill community. The shop stocks Kona bikes—from the Honzo to the Operator—and a great selection of downhill apparel, as well as other bike brands. Mr. King was born and raised in Kunming, and began mountain biking here in the early 90s, when a Diamondback shop opened in the city. He spent $120 dollars on his first mountain bike, while earning just $7 a month—a true enthusiast. He has witnessed China’s mountain bike scene from its beginning, when few even knew the sport existed. He is a tremendously friendly person, always willing to answer questions and help fix your bike.

Always a bustling scene outside the shop

The best shop pup in China


There are two ways to access these trails: climb or shuttle. The road (Bao Hua) up the mountain is paved, twisty and steep. Its start point is accessible by bike from nearly anywhere in the city. It begins at a turnoff from a major road in an area that is rapidly developing. New buildings seem to pop up every day; construction vehicles and workers populate the streets. It is certainly a place pulled between the old and the new, between rickshaws and BMWs, villages and high rises. But turn onto Bao Hua and you are taken to another China. The mountain, Bao Zhu, which literally translates to “precious”, begins to climb right out of the western edge of the city. Some of the mountain is farmland; cascading vegetable crops and small farmhouses can be seen around many corners. Most of the trails, and a large portion of the Goat House itself, are lined with graves. Ranging from the Ming Dynasty to more recently, the tombs are large stone structures, often decorated with flowers and traditional art. The mountain’s slopes are covered in Eucalyptus, Spruce and Pine. In the dry season the dirt is dusty, gravelly and loose. The summer rains bring tackiness to some trails, and unforgiving, grease-like, slipperiness of death to others. It’s all good fun.

A farmer and his crop

An XC trail called Balance that traverses the mountain




Downhill races are held regularly at Bao Zhu, usually down the Goat House, and attract a number of top riders from both in and outside the province. The most recent race, which took place a few weeks ago, was down the Jade Dragon trail, which had been newly renovated. Over fifty racers participated, divided into open and 40+ categories. Jade Dragon trail is, well, like a dragon—long, twisty and mean as hell. More pedally than Goat House, the trail features a number of jumps, drops and steeps throughout its 2.5-mile length.

The race started at the top of the jump trail, which leads into Jade Dragon


Mr. Lee with a couple of pros who made the trip from Sichuan province





Race winner and pro rider Zhang Shuan on his Liteville 901

The top ten. Song Ren had a crash but still managed 2nd place


Some fun post-race activities

The future

Mountain biking has created a sort of horizontal comradeship across this world, often recognized by a particular style, which may include something by Fox, or Troy Lee, or Shimano, and realized most instantly, and purely, by the greatest thing ever—the mountain bike. This is certainly true in China. In the West, so much of our gear—bikes, bike parts, clothing—is manufactured in this country, and yet we hear so little about the actual riders and trails in China. So why is this? It probably has something to do with the inaccessibility of the Chinese language to English speakers, and vice-versa. Or that China’s Internet is significantly different from our own, both due to the language barrier and The Great Firewall. Maybe it has to do with the notion that for some, the word China solely conjures up images of massive, crowded cities. While this is true for some areas, the reality is that China’s vastness allows for an incredible amount of untamed wilderness. Whether jungles, deserts or the high Himalayas, China is a country of extraordinary natural beauty. The potential for mountain biking in the Middle Kingdom is matched by few, if any, and considering millions of its people love this sport, it’s safe to say China will play a large part in mountain biking’s future, whatever that may be.




118 Comments

  • 102 0
 If every town had a Mr. Lee this world might be a better place.
  • 23 3
 Right??? 5 dollar shuttled make the world go round
  • 24 0
 @scottlink: Bike labor here is also super cheap. I got my tires set up tubeless (sealant, tape too), wheels trued, and brakes adjusted the other day for like $9.
  • 6 1
 @scottay2hottay: that's even better!!!
  • 21 0
 @scottay2hottay: I've been to dozens of cities in China and it really is difficult to locate the mtb scene if you aren't a local. When i visited Chengdu i went on pinkbike and searched for people who lived in the area, luckily i found some american and european ex-pats living in Chengdu who knew the local riders and shuttle scene. we spent a day shuttling through old mountain villages that you'd only see in the movies. one of the best mtb experiences of my life. China needs to step up its mtb publicity game and it's guys like you who can help make that happen.
  • 5 0
 @cuban-b: Maybe you should go to Gobi Desert for a freeriding trip.
  • 2 0
 @cuban-b: I was in a similar situation last year. But when I found out about wechat groups from a local shop...oohh Big Grin
  • 2 0
 @SniperWZ: i remember seeing your post on pinkbike about the Gobi desert a few years ago. looks like alot of fun too!
  • 1 0
 @SniperWZ: you know i did;-) best mtb trip ever!
  • 2 0
 @cuban-b:
I've done loads of riding in China, lived in Chengdu for 8 years. We had a local dude with a small van to drop us off in the mountains and pick us up at the end of the day. It was really fun, but dead hot in summer!!
Did you ride with Peter Snow?
  • 1 0
 @MatsuMatsu: i rode with a guy called Mika M. (forgot his complete surname) who is from iceland or norway. this was back in 2013. we also had a local dude with a small van shuttle us up to the top of the mtn. probably the same dude.
  • 1 0
 @21Racing: Yeah.I'm shooting a freeriding video about how we local guys explore the untouched area on Tianshan Mountains and Gobi.It's coming...
  • 1 0
 @cuban-b: Hey! I remember you coming out - American guy that rode with Mika in Chengdu. Moved on to Shenzhen but those trails in Chengdu/Sichuan are still some of my favorites. Bringing back memories!
  • 1 0
 @scottay2hottay: You confirmed everything I have been thinking about Yunnan! Traveled there a bunch over the years but usually for work and without a bike. Next time will bring one a long and shoot you a message! Great write up - so happy to see China's amazing goat trails getting recognition!
  • 2 0
 @stephenhoward: Thanks, yeah hit me up anytime.
  • 2 0
 @stephenhoward: Stephen! I remember we had an amazing dinner at that Tibetan restaurant after our ride. Thanks for hooking me up with the local scene, and scottay i'll have to hit you up when im back over there.
  • 1 0
 @stephenhoward: Did you have a Transition Covert in Chengdu? Mika that cool Finnish DH rocker?
I've done tons of riding with him.
  • 1 0
 @MatsuMatsu: yeah thats him - he's a cool dude. and my mistake - he's from Finland. super ignorant of me to guess.
  • 1 0
 @MatsuMatsu: I did (selling it right now) and rode with Mika all the time.
  • 1 0
 @cuban-b: Hi I am going to Chengdu in April and really really would like to ride in the area. Can you give me some advice on who to reach out to etc. I am thinking of renting a car so I can get around.....
  • 56 0
 This is fucking rad. I had no idea Asia had any sort of MTB scene. That Specialized Demo with the name carvings is too sick.
  • 24 0
 Thanks man. Yeah I really had no idea too. Before I moved here I tried to find info and seriously found like one grainy youtube POV of a trail. Then when I did arrive I spent months riding around getting lost before I met these guys. This scene far surpassed my expectation.
  • 3 0
 @scottay2hottay: any POV on Youku ?
  • 2 0
 I agree, the carvings make it unique and it looks super dope. offers a glipmse of what a chinese themed paint job would look like, especially with all the custom world champs paint jobs that are country specific.
  • 2 0
 It's amazing. Also reassuring. I'm never worrying about a stress riser on my frame ever again. Really though, just super unique and way too fast looking. I love it.
  • 1 0
 @qreative-bicycle: I'm not sure. I'm sure there is a lot on XC type riding. There are more foreigners here who ride more XC stuff, and they were the ones who showed me around when I first got here.
  • 24 0
 What a great article- chock full of context, personalities, and lots of good photos. The focus on the people is fantastic.

I know this is user generated, but it'd be awesome to run a series on the "lesser-known" riding scenes emerging around the world.
  • 26 0
 Great read, good to learn about scenes around the world.
  • 6 19
flag jrocksdh (May 23, 2018 at 8:03) (Below Threshold)
 Just don't be a Muslim in China, you'll end up in an indoctrination camp. Oh, and then there's that credit thing going on straight from black mirror episode. Meanwhile the u.n hasn't said a word.
  • 2 1
 @jrocksdh: Your comment makes it feel like i'm in a black mirror episode! Wink
  • 1 0
 @jrocksdh: one type of indoctrination for another, freedom of religion is not a communist ideology. Whether we deem that wrong or right is almost entirely the result of where we're born.
  • 5 4
 @jrocksdh: You as an American have lost all political moral authority and no right calling out other countries faults. Look in your own mirror.
  • 3 0
 @jrocksdh: Worse still don't be a flaun gong practitioner. You will literally be harvested.
  • 2 0
 @jrocksdh: I meant to say falun gong. It changed itself and I can't edit.
  • 2 1
 @bushwacked: okay just ignore this guy, he is not the sharpest pencil in the box. He has a cushy life in Dana Point, CA and lives outside of reality.
  • 2 1
 @Boardlife69: although I get why you made the comment that you did you shouldn’t be so quick to judge America and our actions, seeing that some countries in this world need to grow a spine and not sit back and be 24/7 pacifists that let other countries deal with global problems.
  • 3 1
 @Boardlife69:

Hey I know you mean well, and I agree that my government is a raped ass, but the shit going on in China is double black diamond evil compared to our bike path of stupidity.
  • 1 1
 @CaliCol: Most of the global problems that the U.S gov' fixes are those that they created. Americans (lovely people) need to see past this propaganda but its hard because you live in a media bubble. Go read "Confesions of an economic hitman" for starters.
  • 2 2
 @endlessblockades: @CaliCol: @everyone WTF just happened - can't we just enjoy the article on some rad mountain biking that brings some hope that above politics and ass rape we're all the same and just want to rip some pow to the max!
  • 19 1
 Awesome! I want to ride in china, and that 62 yr old still shredding, fair play to that man
  • 2 12
flag rivercitycycles Plus (May 23, 2018 at 11:03) (Below Threshold)
 But did we really need to know this about Mr. Lee "The 62-year-old—a veteran soldier of the China Vietnam War" Why not say Mr. Lee has been an ambassador for the grassroots down hill scene.
  • 3 1
 @rivercitycycles: I think it helps to show we can end up in conflict that doesn't represent how we feel about each other as human beings. Personally I think it's great they pointed it out, to show that after all that he has experienced mountain biking is providing a way for him to help people come together in a peaceful and cooperative community.
  • 1 0
 That's what I call living the dream. Good on him for sure.
  • 19 0
 I think he's blown his warranty on that specialized frame tho!
  • 2 0
 in the coolest way ever.
  • 15 0
 Ahh this is a class article!

Its pretty awesome to see riding getting done all across the world with groups of riders making their own scene and just killing it!

That terrain looks prime too.....may give Morzine a miss one year and head out there Smile
  • 15 0
 Made in China!
  • 10 0
 Asia mtb scene is clearly booming. I have had awesome riding and racing in Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia and Korea. Problem is, there no unity. No real national series run by the cycling federation which could potentially create together a Continental serie. It s mostly private events, without any recognized title on the line.There are good riders here and there but they almost never meet and just win every year their own local events. Asia needs more than 1 continental event a year (Asian game) to really catch up western world level. Enduro is getting better with the Asian Enduro Series but there is still a lot of work to do so that it becomes a recognized continental serie. One of the 1st step would be that China get involved in it.
  • 6 0
 Totally agree. I think a lot of it has to do with the lack of money and sponsorships. I mean most Asian racers just can't travel to races in other countries, or even in their own. Organizing races also has to be a hassle due to the bureaucracy in a lot of places. I'd love to come check out the scene in Vietnam sometime.
  • 4 0
 @scottay2hottay: You are welcome to come have a go on our trails near Ho Chi Minh city. Vietnam is a similar bureaucracy hassle but with hard work we are getting there.
Money is an issue for some Asian racers to travel but i think it's more a question of chicken and egg. If there was a strong collaboration between federations to create a recognized serie i'm sure sponsors would jump on the opportunity and support the local champions.Even at a national level, i think it's not helping that all the big events in China are just one-off. An organizer will get sponsors and organize a big race somewhere. Then, someone else will do the same with different sponsors somewhere else. All these races are not linked together and don't lead to any recognized title. For example, let's say you win Enping race which had a pretty stacked list of riders. What kind of title or international recognition you get? None, because no one heard about it before and no one know how it compares with well established races. I heard some chinese riders will be joining Asian Enduro series round in Malaysia in July so that's a good news though.
  • 1 0
 @FlorentVN: you're right about that. It's amazing that 90% of the high end bikes in the world are made in Taiwan, and yet the riding scene here is shit. Hardly any spots, no bike parks, constant booby trapping of trails, friction with walkers, farmers and dirt bikers. Basically just a non starter, even though we have most of the industry and multiple Asian dh champ here. I doubt it will ever change in Taiwan to be honest, because politicians here are not interested in developing the country, merely happy to keep it as it is. I guess in that respect, the impending Chinese invasion might have a silver lining, even if there are no Taiwanese left alive or out of jail to enjoy it.
  • 5 0
 Sichuan, Yunnan, Qinghai, Xijiang, Xizang, Guangxi, Guangdong, Zhejiang, etc. From the east to the west, from the north to the south, you've got amazing landscapes for your eyes and fantastic trails for your bikes. It's a huge piece of land, waiting for more mountain bikers to discover.
  • 7 0
 That must be the only Evil Revolt in the world that hasn't broken.
  • 6 0
 Nice content pinkibike. Thanks for posting Scott.
  • 3 0
 Probably just me, but some of those pictures reminded me of Plattekill (and the surrounding CNY area), the way the terrain looked. Cool article. The carving of the family names is sick!
  • 3 0
 A lot of it looks like backwoods in norcal too, with all the pine trees and red dirt.
  • 2 0
 Kunming's a very unique place compared to other Chinese cities. Hard to forget the unique food, everyone's dusty vehicles, the night scene and the many many stainless steel caged e-bikes but most are without pedals so don't freak out. Was there years ago on a company trip. Definitely would love to visit again.
  • 3 0
 China is a lot of things, but the people make it special. I love the "can-do" attitude of the people featured in the article.
  • 2 1
 They need to take that spirit and get rid of their dictator.
  • 2 3
 Get rid of their dictator ? Like Gaddafi or Hussein ? For a system that is called democratic and free ? Sorry, nobody does believe that nonsense anymore !
  • 4 0
 @jrocksdh: You mean like a guy who came into office under very dubious circumstances including but not limited to voter fraud and now governs by fiat alone? On Twitter?
  • 2 0
 @countzero1101: You remind me of my dad. Comparing American politicians to Chinese is just laughable. The CCP is truly on a different level. So many things you see in the news about American civil society that would literally be crushed before they even got any media attention, that would never make it into print. Please, don't compare the shitty side of the American government with the shitty side of the Chinese government, because they are not in the same ball park.
  • 1 0
 @jaame: ...not yet anyway. As a continental European, it's always amazing to witness the obliviousness with which the Anglo-Saxon world engages on the topic of totalitarianism. Like, it only happens to "bad state actors" and "failed states". Totalitarian leaders usually get voted into office, you know. It's only after that they burn down shit and put ppl into prisons. Hannah Arendt and Max Weber are surely illuminating on the topic, but I digress and don't want to feed the trolls or being fed as one. Anyhew, rad to see the sport takes hold in China, looking forward to see the new crop of riders on the DH circuit, which is also still quite a colonial affair, as far as participating nationalities go.... I'll show myself out, thanks!
  • 1 0
 @countzero1101: hug, obama is no longer in office..or do u mean robert Mueller(same thing tho right).
  • 1 0
 @fossydh: just another guy kills his own people or puts em in re education camps if u have a different religion.
No biggie
  • 1 0
 @jrocksdh: Do you think it is better to kill FOREIGN people ? The look into the mirror is not easy when you live in the US or in Europe. The traditional brainwash is deep.
  • 1 0
 @fossydh: kill foreign people?
  • 1 0
 @jrocksdh: Sad, but daily business.
  • 1 0
 @fossydh: enemy's of the state?
  • 1 0
 @jrocksdh: It began with the wars after 9/11, and our governments didn't stop to declare whole countries and their dictators as enemys. The brainwash is deep. The result is a never-ending bloodbath.
  • 1 0
 @fossydh: those dictators were evil, evil people who didn't respect the international community or the rules based order
  • 1 0
 @jaame: The biggest international community are the United Nations. The United Nations were against the Irak war. Hundreds of thousands people were killed in this war. Who is evil ? It does not stop. We have Afghanistan, Ukraine, Syria, Lybia and some other disasters - and there are plans for more on the list. Not only the us are the bad ones, so many countries are involved to.push those wars (including my own country). If you think that this fights do change it for the better and do help the people in those countries you should do some serious research ? Those who believe the TV and newspaper can not get out of their matrix. They believe that those wars are good. The brainwash is deep.

@jrocksdh and @jaame: I am more interested in the usual pinkbike downhill bike themes. You can reply if you want, but I will not longer discuss that unstoppable war stuff that is not good for a happy live. Biking is a better tool to bring people like me and you together in a peaceful way. Wish you a good time. Ride on !
  • 1 0
 @fossydh: united nations is a joke, a really bad one. Turn a blind eye to mass killers, especially those of Christians and Jews. Im all in for happy biking life but ill def never ever turn.my back to totalitarianism/socialist/dictators.
And yes, gta get away from the lamestream media and read, especially books like 'the road to serfdom' as history always repeats.
  • 1 0
 @jrocksdh: there is nothing you can learn from books that you can't learn from TV faster
  • 1 0
 @jaame: ah man, now i learn this. Burn the books, buuuuurn the books!
  • 1 0
 i spent a few winters riding in yunnan a more then a decade ago. mostly north of kunming but a bit of time riding out of the city. back then it was mostly dirt roadies based out of kunming. looks like the trails have not changed much, just the kit. great place to explore with a bike.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for sharing this. Visited Xi'an and Chengdu last year to visit my GF's family. So many possibilities to ride in Qinling mountains. Saw some locals shuttling but I didn't bring my bike. Looking forward to exploring the riding there one day!
  • 1 0
 Hello.

I live in Guangding province, so far jsut riding local trials with some mates. I would love to go to Kunming and ride with these guys,

Does anyone have contact details so I can get in touch with these guys ? Chinese language is no problem, I can get my wife to call them.

Thanks in advance
  • 1 0
 Send me an inbox message. I live here and ride with these guys like 3 times a week.
  • 1 0
 @scottay2hottay: Message sent !
  • 4 0
 Awesome! Can locals see PB in China without a VPN?
  • 8 0
 Yeah, they are super excited!
  • 5 4
 Hopefully during in China will help your social credit score in China!
  • 3 1
 *dh'ing
  • 6 0
 @jrocksdh: ~laughs nervously~
  • 21 0
 The only items blocked and censored are Wakis comments. Everything else is fine.
  • 3 0
 在中国看PB不需要VPN
  • 3 0
 @zhinnia: Xie Xie.
  • 1 0
 I registered in PinkBike 17 years ago, and I believe there are earlier Chinese users than I did. China and the world are interconnected. Isolation is not good for people and countries.
  • 4 0
 Looks fun as shit there!! Solid crew... Terrain looks awesome too
  • 2 0
 I think you mean latitude. I really enjoyed the article, it seems like a bunch of people that would be fun to ride with and some good trails.
  • 2 0
 Awesome piece. This is the type of content we need more of. Thank you for posting!
  • 4 0
 great read, sick demo!
  • 2 0
 Look like some sweet trails. I wonder if they ride knock offs?
  • 2 0
 lol even though that's what we're all thinking, i'll see you in the "below threshold threads" section in a few mins.
  • 2 0
 @sk133872: It's a totally fair question. But no, they don't. I've seen some XC guys on Chinese carbon stuff but that's about it. It's actually shocking how nice a lot of these guys bikes are--like YTs with enves, santa cruz, custom titanium hardtails, you name the bike and someone here has it.
  • 1 0
 Anyone fancy a trip to China?? Seriously inspired to go ride there with these guys!!
  • 3 1
 Just don't forget your ten fingerprints!
  • 1 0
 Appears to be longitudinally somewhat equivalent to northern Mexico.
  • 4 0
 Yeah it's basically the same longitude as Florida, but at an altitude of around 6,000 ft. No snow except on peaks, mild winters and summers.
  • 5 0
 I hate to be a pedant but it gives me something to say: latitude.
  • 1 0
 @scottay2hottay: great article by the way
  • 2 0
 @BenPea: You are correct - Latitude = Flatitude, I had a brain fart. BBBRRRAAAAAAP.
  • 1 0
 @endlessblockades: you did make me question my reality for a second.
  • 3 0
 @BenPea: haha wow can't believe I missed that. Cheers man.
  • 1 0
 雲南人在香港,每次回家都想把駒拉出來溜溜。
  • 1 0
 Translation:

People in Yunnan are in Hong Kong. Every time they go home, they want to pull out their yo.

(???)

Be careful what you say here. I fell bad for my little rant earlier. I wish I could delete it as I don't want to endanger any of the good people of Yunnan.
  • 1 0
 @endlessblockades: It means: I came from Yunnan and living in HONGKONG now. Every time when i was back to Yunnan,want to ride my DH bike.
  • 1 0
 @huqingpeng: Sounds good to me! Keep riding, brother!!!
  • 1 0
 Cool stuff, that Demo frame is sick !
  • 1 0
 Sick shuttle rig,I’d pay $5 a day to shuttle !
  • 1 0
 Great article!
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