Check Out: A Line Comparing Lap Timer, Thule Riding Pack, Waterproof Hip Pack, & More

Apr 26, 2022 at 10:32
by Seb Stott  



A lot of gear comes across our desks here at Pinkbike. Check Out is an occasional round up of everything our tech editors have gotten their hands on. Sometimes it's products we're doing long-term tests on, other times it's stuff we're stoked on but don't have time to fully review. And, sometimes it's crazy stuff someone sent us unsolicited and we're having a laugh.



Syncros Vernon 2.0 digital floor pump



Features

• Digital gauge offers 0.5 psi precision
• Max pressure: 180 psi
• Pressure-release button
• Presta / Schrader head
• $99.99 USD / £90.99 / €99,95
Syncros.com

bigquotesThe analog gauges on most floor pumps are often imprecise and inaccurate, making it impossible to set your tire pressures to within a +/-0.5 psi window every time. Usually, I over-inflate my tires and then use a separate digital gauge to release the pressure to the exact value I'm aiming for. But that takes time. This Syncros pump has a digital gauge which agrees with my Topeak Smartgauge to within 1 psi. I couldn't tell you for sure if either is accurate, but both offer precise measurements that are at least consistent with themselves and one another.

This means I can skip a step and get riding with perfect pressures sooner. The pump feels solid and can inflate up to 180 psi, which combined with the reversible Presta/Schrader head, means it can be pressed into service to quickly inflate a fork or even a shock spring (though in this case I would definitely recommend checking/adjusting the pressure with a digital shock pump). If you already have a floor pump all this is merely a convenience. But given the price isn't too extortionate, if you need a new one it may as well make life easier.




Thule Rail Pro12L hydration pack


Features

• CE-certified Level One spine protector
• Magnetic hose retainer
• 2.5L HydraPak reservoir
• Two colour options
• Price: $199.95 USD / £180 / €199.95
Thule.com

bigquotesA 10-12-litre pack is the size I reach for most often for typical all-day rides that require more than what you can stash on the bike or a bum bag. The Rail 12 Pro has an extra reason to come out for those moderately adventurous rides because it has a level-one certified back protector, which could prevent pointy rocks or hard items of luggage from injuring you in a crash. The protector is made from Koroyd - the plastic straw-like material used in Smith and Endura's helmets - and weighs just 144 g. The whole back weighs 1,104 g including the protector and reservoir.

Another neat feature is the magnetic strip in the right-hand shoulder strap which securely locks the hose down as soon as you let go of the bite valve. There are mesh side pockets on the hip belt but they have no closure, which means heavier items like tools or snack bars sometimes fall out if moving about too enthusiastically. A medium-sized external pocket at the back is handy for frequently-accessed items, but of course, you need to remove the pack for those. The main compartment has plenty of tool-organising straps, including loops to secure two pumps, but the helmet carrier means you have to undo the buckles before unzipping it. Not a big problem, but I'm not convinced we need helmet carriers anymore, and you can't fit much else in the flap behind the main compartment when the pack is full.

It is a little stiff with the back protector installed and the waistbelt is a bit too thin to hold it securely when fully loaded, but overall I find it comfortable to wear all day so long as it's not too heavily laden. 



Apidura Backcountry Hip Pack



Features

• Fully waterproof, ripstop fabric
• 2.5-litre capacity
• 294-grams (actual)
• Hip pockets & padded internal pocket
• Price: $104 USD / £76 / €87
apidura.com

bigquotesApidura are a London-based brand best known for their understated bikepacking and commuting gear. This hip pack is designed for technical mountain biking, though, with a secure waist strap to hold it in place when the going gets rough. Its main selling point for me is the waterproof fabric and taped seams, which should keep your stuff dry on rainy days. I also like the large hip pockets, one of which has a zip, which keep basic tools and snacks handy, while carrying a little of the weight so the main body of the pack doesn't bounce around too much.

Inside there's a padded pencil case-style pouch, ideal for a phone, which also divides the pack in two to help keep things organised, but it can be pushed to one side for stowing a single large item like a jacket. The Velcro waist strap is slightly stretchy, which wouldn't be great for holding it securely on bumpy terrain, except there's also a buckle and adjustable strap which can be used to cinch it down tighter for a rough descent, then loosened up for mellower riding. Apidura say the waist strap will fit waist sizes from 70cm / 28iin to 115cm / 45in, but with my waist of 86cm / 34in, there are only about 2 inches (5cm) of overlap in the Velcro when worn over a jacket, so I think that upper bound is optimistic.



Crossbox lap timer


Features

• GPS lap timer with app to analyse performance
• Accurate to 1.5m, or 0.05s
• Hardware weight: 64g (actual)
• Compare speed, time and heart rate on every part of the track
• €249 (+€ 29,99 per 6 month for the app)
www.crossboxapp.com


bigquotesCrossbox is primarily designed for motocross, but its UK distributor, Madison, say it will work for point-to-point mountain bike trails too. By using GNSS satellite data, it's claimed to track your position to within 1.5m and to measure lap times to within 0.05s, but with an average accuracy of 0.01s. Combined with a 6-axis accelerometer, this can provide speed, acceleration and timing data not just for whole laps, but section by section and line by line. It's designed to help you decide which line is faster by overlaying the position, speed and time at each point on the track from one run to the next. Presumably, it will only be able to show you the difference in lines if they're more than 1.5 m apart, which often isn't the case with mountain bike tracks, but if you keep a note of which line you rode on which run you'll still be able to compare the speed and section times metre by metre.

As you may have guessed, this is aimed at serious racers capable of putting down consistent laps run after run and are looking to understand the split seconds which separate them. It's got a price tag to match. This is the only item on this list I haven't used yet and I'm unlikely to ever make the most of it, but I can tell you that with a real-world weight of 64g, it's light enough to be barely noticeable when mounted to a full-face helmet.





120 Comments

  • 76 3
 How much $$ can you preload on the lap timer to pay the tolls on the jersey turnpike?
  • 4 0
 i hope i can use it on the parkway too
  • 16 11
 @Outside- can you make all of the content free and stop being bums??
  • 4 0
 Until you cross the bridge and drain it in one go.
  • 25 0
 That hip pack is waterproof but also has no option to carry any water? Why would you not at least include a collapsible bottle holder on one side?
  • 139 0
 Its waterproof inside and out. Just fill it with water.
  • 22 1
 If it’s waterproof just fill it with water and put a straw in it
  • 10 3
 It's waterproof, so just fill it with water, sip it with a straw...
  • 34 0
 The capri-bum
  • 3 1
 It’s waterproof. Fill it with water and bring a straw.
  • 2 0
 @hellanorcal: LOL i was thinking the same.. bit like a pool
  • 1 0
 Just use the bottle attached to your bike. (Hater's gonna hate this one!)
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: I know you don't have any mountains, but some people do and some people need more than one bottle of water.
  • 3 0
 I don't know if anyone has mentioned it yet, but if it's waterproof you can just fill it with water and bring a straw.
  • 3 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: Or just fill it with water and use a straw... Smile
  • 3 0
 It's waterproof you can just fill it with water and bring a straw.
  • 4 0
 Make sure the straw is waterproof too...
  • 22 2
 Lap Timer for 250 Euros vs a basic Garmin watch for half that price and 5x the capabilities. Help me understand the value here . . .
  • 3 0
 I’d imagine you’re paying for the software to compare laps and segments. Pricey for software but that’s all I can think of
  • 10 0
 Don't forget the subscription service too! 250 Euros is for just the hardware.
  • 6 0
 greater accuracy? Lap comparisons? He does say its for racers laying down lap after lap and looking for consistency/small improvements.
  • 16 0
 Garmin records 1 point per second This and SkyPro XGPS160 paired with Litpro record at 10 points per second which is leaps and bounds ahead in accuracy and allows for better ghosting, comparison, etc and thus more valuable from a racers perspective
  • 6 1
 Sorry this one is 20 positions per S which is huge! That’s massive for accuracy and comparing lines
  • 10 0
 @stormracing: OK, that makes sense, but only for a few of us. Mine will show;

1.00 Thinking about it
2.00 Pondering
3.00 Spot checking
4.00 Nervously smiling
5.00 Back to car for a brew
  • 3 0
 @noplacelikeloam: for sure! Yeah, you definitely have to be seeking something a little extra for this to be the product for you. I use a garmin for regular rides but then Litpro when I’m on the DH track.

Hahah that’s a good system ya got going for ya
  • 3 0
 @stormracing: but those 20 points per second each come with 1.5m accuracy, so up close the tracks are going to be fuzzy to say the least. With some averaging, it might be useful for a 5 second plus section where there are multiple clear line choices, if you're a real pro. Or just get Ben Cathro at the side doing ghost videos...
  • 1 2
 I thought of the same, just a BS product
  • 6 0
 My son who races World Cup DH uses one and loves it. it is very consistent and gives him a good idea of where he is on speed and time and definitely helps with his DH preparation. He makes suspension/bike changes then goes down a track he knows well and gets very good feedback. We have used all sorts of other methods from the simple handle bar timer to watches but this works the best for him.
  • 3 0
 As mentioned, the 20hz rate is pretty key, but without DGPS you're limited to accuracy. If you were really interested in accurate lap timing you'd set a base station with a reference to a local geodetic marker, let it burn in for a few days and then reference to a body worn GPS, we've used this for tracking targets for human detection when I was working on some self driving technology back several years ago. We could regularly get accuracy down to about 2cm with a fairly moderate 100hz data rate. We built the system on bread boards with a small antenna in a Camelback since we were doing a lot of our work in the desert and the humans had to stay hydrated. You could probably build something now way smaller using Raspberry PIs and a low power transmitter. Our system was pretty compact, back then.
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: A few days?? Nowadays cm precision can be achieved much quicker.
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: here's a nice video of RTK GPS versus standard GPS accuracy: youtu.be/ZEQYJgNpwlQ
  • 1 0
 Not sure I understand...even if it is recording at 20 times a second, it still is only 1.5m accurate - which is more than the width of a lot of trails and is a bike length difference, so despite being accurate in terms of recording a position, the position itself isn't that accurate for most of the sections that racers would be racing on. I like the idea though, just doesn't seem as accurate as I think it should be given the width of a lot of singletrack.
  • 1 0
 @krpduner77: exactly. I think it’s a very valuable tool and use it the same way when out racing/practicing/testing. I think it works very well for what it is, the accuracy is pretty solid(no issues for me really) and definitely provides great info when practicing/testing
It’s the best set up I’ve found so far.
People on the internet can gripe all they want but there’s a reason some bigger names such as Amaury use Litpro and train with it. It works
Does your son use crossbox or litpro? I use Litpro with a SkyPro XGPS. Never knew about Crossbox but it looks solid.
I’m a big fan of Litpro
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: He uses the Crossbox. Most of his buddies had the Lit pro (the red square box)and have also switched to the Crossbox. The Crossbox unit seems to be a bit more reliable in the trees and stuff according to them. He does really like it.
  • 1 0
 @krpduner77: right on. Good to know. Appreciate the feedback on that. Might have to check out the crossbox now as it’s double the positions per S as the SkyPro(red box). Seems like a sweet set up!
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: If you do I would recommend buying an extra charging cable as its proprietary and they are in Austria or something and if you lose or break it it can take a while to get another. My son is good at doing bothSmile Otherwise great product
  • 1 0
 @mi-bike: I didn't want to start with "as an engineer", but I've spent some time with pretty expensive data acquisition, and I agree with you and @BikesBoatsNJeeps that differential GPS would be an enabler for pretty neat line to line comparison. It's a bit of a pro solution - most of the kit I was using was $100k+, so I've no idea if there are more consumer level tools that can do it
  • 1 0
 @mi-bike: needs edit post button> meant to say differential with base station...
  • 2 0
 @krpduner77: appreciate the tip! That’s a great thing to know that I’ll keep in mind.
Haha learned through experience. Thanks for passing on the good info
  • 28 19
 I always scratch my head at these expensive hydration/hip packs. Walmart sells comparable products at $30. if there is ever a place to save money on bike equipment, its with the hydration packs. All I see from these is brand cache.
  • 10 0
 I've never had a hydration hip pack, but I've had different hydration packs and been much more pleased with some than others in terms of comfort and bounce. I have a long torso and so really like Camelback's lumbar reservoir packs.
  • 17 0
 I have Oakley clothing from 2010. Pretty sure Walmart products won’t last that long. Quality hopefully equals less waste and happy customers. I have a camelback hip pack that came with a sweet water bottle for like $40. Great quality and I trust it to go the miles.
  • 31 0
 I have a Dakine Helipro (for skiing) that I have used for 16 years, my old Camelback was 10 years old when it got half inched from outside my apartment, my current Camelback is 5 years old and looks as good as new, my Dakine Drafter is 10 years old also and aside from a failed bladder still operates as new.

Quality products last so long, much better than Walmart 1 year life landfill products IMO and are often more specific to sport (Camelback has back protector, Dakine Helipro has probe, shovel and ski/board carrier) that make them incomparable to a generic cheaper model.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, the price is very expensive for a lot of brand hydration packs. However, I would not say the quality or design is comparable to the cheap ones. I have used a lot of cheap hydration packs and several name brand ones. Most of the cheap will work for the purpose, but they did not hold up or the pack and bladder were designed really poorly. The name brand ones I have are going strong and been using them for several years.
  • 11 0
 I don’t ride as much as I used to, but my Camelbak is more than 10 years old, goes in the wash every year, and there isn’t a stitch out of place.
My brother buys the WalMart stuff, and my brother always has a new WalMart thing to replace the one that broke. I paid $60 for my Lobo many years ago. I paid $80 for my kids Lobo a few years later, and both are in perfect shape.
I lost one of the buckles for the Lobo a few years ago. I emailed Camelback and they sent me the buckle for free. I like that. A lot.
  • 6 0
 @Tonedelove: it's not that cut and dry. My longest lasting shirts are, no joke, $10 western shirts from Wal-Mart that I bought 15 years ago and wear ALL the time, including for trailwork sometimes. Just because something costs more doesn't mean it's more durable. Sometimes it does, but not always.
  • 2 0
 Walmart and the like's aim is to build a good enough product for as cheap as possible. That means a product that won't be as durable-lower quality materials, less thought put into the design, more weight, corners cut (less bar tacks etc).

These things all add up to a value product. Walmart's bag will carry water, but it won't do it as well or as long as a performance minded product.

The best example I can think of is a t shirt-an athletic fit costs more because the cuts and seams respect the human body. The $5 dollar shirt at Wal Mart works, but its essentially slapped together to get the job done.
  • 7 1
 I'd take $200 on a quality product that would last 10 years + (as my Camelback has) over buying a new Walmart backpack every two years as it wears out. Cheap is cheap for a reason (not that expensive is always expensive for a reason).
  • 3 0
 @rickybobby18: yeah, I have boxers from high school too, but when talking about technical wear and packs it’s important for me to get items I can trust for the long haul. Readjusting straps every mile isn’t fun. Yanking stray threads isn’t fun. Fabric wearing through in high stress spots isn’t fun. Fasteners breaking on trail isn’t fun. And throwing away your bad decisions every year isn’t fun.
  • 6 0
 @paulskibum: "it got half inched"

For the education of anybody else who didn't know what that meant:

half inch: vb. slang old-fashioned to steal. [sense 2: from rhyming slang for pinch to steal] (Freedictionary.com)
  • 1 0
 @Ellocomotive: There are some walmart "athletic fit" workout t-shirts. I have a few for running. They are not bad. Some of the inexpensive stuff is decent, some not worth it.
  • 1 0
 This question gets a lot more interesting when you have a business like Decathlon in the equasion. (There is a us alternative i am sure)
I think, it is dang in the middle between the two options debated here!
A bit less comfy and less feature packed than most "brand name" options, but still way above the quality and durability of the cheapo stuff, for a price just a nudge over the cheapo knockoff stuff.
In my opinion, ,the btwin 12l bag i have is a dang good compromise between price and performance.
I used an above mentioned dakine heli pro for years, that was a hand me down form my broter... solid 15 years of use in it i think... The decatlon one will not last this long, but not 1 season either. This is my 2. season on it and no sign of wear so far.
Th only thing i miss is the option to use it as a back protector, but i am planning on upgradeing it with a generic sas pad. We will see!
  • 1 0
 @paulskibum: Haha, yes, I still have a Helipro I bought back in 2002.
  • 1 0
 @jaytdubs: I mentioned upthread that I've ridden with a Camelback LR pack for years now, but my pack before that was a Dakine Helipro that I got for ski touring and used for mountain biking when I started to ride. I got it used in probably 2009, skied and rode with it, and then in the past years, kept it loaded with my smaller trail maintenance kit. I don't like the fit while riding quite as much, but that same stiffness makes it great for carrying heavier things and it is still in completely useable shape despite lugging a lot of dirt/sharp implements around. Great pack.
  • 8 0
 Anyone who's ever used Strava for cycling in the woods and thought the recorded track reminded them of the random scribbles of a toddler will laugh at the accuracy claims of that lap timer.
  • 4 1
 Ha yes. Anyone who actually believes Strava is nuts. At best a guide but certainly not accurate and certainly not a comparison tool as used. Especially if from a phone.
  • 4 0
 Strava via a phone or watch or whatever is OK over a longer distance but all the ridiculously short strava segments are asking for inaccuracies - at least thats what I tell myself when I am seeing my time is five times the fastest time on a given segment near me.
  • 1 0
 @paulskibum: Strava is the worst. There is a hill near my house that has some fun, but short descents in the 1-1 1/2 minute range. Strava gives times from under a minute to up to 8 minutes on the same segment. I’m dumping Strava as soon as my subscription runs out.
  • 2 0
 @endoguru: ha! If I put the ride on public I would have the KOM on a trail here by a looong stretch. And I didn't even ride it that day, that's some serious speed!
  • 6 0
 I have the Thule pack. I bought it to replace my favorite 10 year old pack after the final buckle cracked. I work on trail, guiding and doing trail work so I use my pack every. The side pockets can be a challenge to access on the bike but nbd after a few rides. The buckles are contoured for added strength (big plus for me) and the straps on the top and bottom allow you to carry anything from a rogue hoe and rain gear to a blanket and folding chair. The dividers are adequate and the materials are all holding up 100% after a winter riding on the back of a mini ex, carrying large/ heavy/ dirty stuff and getting treated roughly in general. The magnetic hose keeper is gimmicky but works well. Especially if you're operating a machine with a roll cage. The bladder holds 3+ liters 10/10 would buy again
  • 2 0
 sold
  • 4 0
 "This Syncros pump has a digital gauge which agrees with my Topeak Smartgauge to within 1 psi. I couldn't tell you for sure if either is accurate, but both offer precise measurements that are at least consistent with themselves and one another."

so they are both potentially inaccurate. got it.
  • 1 0
 The digital gauge on the Syncros looks exactly the same as the one in the Topeak Smartgauge.
  • 2 1
 I think it matters less how accurate it is, but more how consistent it is.
  • 3 0
 "The analog gauges on most floor pumps are often imprecise and inaccurate"

Citation needed.

My pump of choice has a 3 inch 0-60 psi gauge that is very easy to hit half psi accuracy, and it's pretty precise, too (I checked, consistently matches my 3 external gauges)
  • 2 0
 True! I upgraded my pump with a new gauge which reads up to 4bsr instead of 12bar and it's perfectly fine. Plus, it's not about the actual value but about hitting the value time and time again.
  • 2 0
 My experience is that analog gauges are relatively accurate as long as they have the right range for the pressure they're reading. Eg: don't buy a 0-3000psig range if you want to measure 100psig, buy a 0-150psig range. Most pressure indicators have calibration screws on the back for setting zero and span as well, so not only are they accurate, they can be recalibrated every so often if they fall out. I've never seen cal screws on a digital gauge.
  • 6 0
 There can be more than .05s in 1.5 meters though‽
  • 10 0
 1.5 meter on start point (1 second?) + 1.5 meter on end point (1 second?) plus what sample rate (1 Hz? would infer 1 second precision on both start and end points) gives as much as 4 second accuracy uncertainty. Much more than .05 seconds or claimed .01 average. And this is why Strava or any other GPS based timing may be fun but is directional at best.
  • 7 0
 Seeing an interrobang in the wild is always a treat
  • 6 0
 All hip packs without a bladder need a water bottle holder!
  • 4 0
 Thays why there is more than one hip pack being produced. I dont want a bottle holder on mine.
  • 5 0
 I put my bottles on my bike and would prefer the hip pack use the space for something else. Full bottles are really heavy too and I prefer anything on my body to be as light and unnoticeable as possible.
  • 1 0
 Double up and wear a backpack with a bladder at the same time.
  • 4 2
 Sorry but any GPS based system isn't gonna be that consistently accurate in the MOUNTAINS where you're likely to use it. On a good day you can average 5m accuracy. Maybe. It will also be inconsistent due to weather, obstacles, satellite position and LOTS of other factors. You could be within a few seconds maybe.
  • 2 0
 Rad seeing more companies get into the timing! Would love to see it get developed specifically for MTB and not just be a moto product that we end up using. Would be cool to see a comparison between this and Litpro MX paired with SkyPro GPS160. I use the latter for DH and it’s an incredibly valuable tool!
  • 5 0
 I'm just here to say that the Syncros pump will never fall over right onto the digital thing at the top.
  • 2 0
 It is nice to have the display high for visibility but as you mention it is much more likely to break when it falls over onto that display. I had a pump with an analogue gauge in the same location as that digital one in this article and it failed after the pump fell over onto it too many times. After I got a replacement gauge I taped a chunk of foam onto the outside of the gauge so that it would not break again. It looked terrible but preserved the gauge.
  • 5 2
 All the posted reasons of why you all hate everything here are getting boring. Can you come up with some more original complaints for next time please?
  • 3 0
 $100 for a pump because it has a digital readout. Yeah, I'll just stick to my Joe Blow pump. For $100 I could just buy a Milwaukee portable compressor.
  • 1 0
 I just bought the dewalt cordless compressor. That thing is awesome. Not sure I’ll ever use a floor pump again.
  • 1 0
 @Blackhat: i saw FIXIT or whatever that company is do a portable usb rechargeable mini compressor
  • 1 0
 @Blackhat: it is pricey though and uses an adapter for presta which is lame. Probably better options out there like the Dewalt
  • 1 0
 @andraperrella27: That looks awesome. It’s significantly better than the dewalt if you just need to pump tires since it’s so much smaller and they both need presta adapters.

But mine is serving triple duty as a truck tire pump and camping mattress deflator. And you can use the battery to jump start a dead vehicle with a little foresight. Oh, and I just figured out how to use a truck tire as a tubeless inflator tank. And it can run on 12 volt if the battery is dead. And it’s easier to pack in the vehicle than a floor pump. Just a ton of flexibility and convenience as an adventure device.
  • 1 0
 I’ll second the cordless HH air compressor route. Ive got 2 diff nock off cordless pumps and they were both under $50.00 they’ll both seat tubeless setups pretty quick w/ those little adapters from LBS and you can stash one in your vehicle
there da shizz for bikes yoBeer
  • 1 0
 @Crankhed: Link? That's pretty neat if the handheld compressor can seat tubeless.
  • 1 0
 One of them is called an Air Hawk and was a gift it may have been a bit more but the other one came from Wallmart. idk if you have access to a Harbor Freight but i think they have em too @jojotherider1977:
  • 1 0
 Does anyone still make a high volume floor pump? I have an old Lezyne that is amazing, but only goes up to like max 50PSI because every stroke gives "more air", made for MTB tires. Makes tubeless installation easier and significantly less pumps to fill a tire. But Lezyne does not make them anymore, does anyone?
  • 1 0
 Bontrager Dual Charger is the best pump i've ever used as a road and MTB household.
  • 7 3
 0.5 psi recision?? that's mazing!!
  • 2 0
 I want to know how well calibrated it is
  • 2 0
 Confession. I read this headline as: A line, comparing timer. As in I thought it was only for comparing laps on A line. Fully expected some Whistler promo.

not smart.
  • 1 0
 Their punctuation was not great, to be fair.
  • 2 0
 Apidura hip pack for more $ than a comparable one made by a local cottage industry shop? No thanks
  • 3 0
 Strava bros just took their shirt off
  • 2 0
 What's the point of a 20hz update rate on a gnss tracker without rtk with mtb speeds?
  • 2 0
 This guy's asking the real questions.
  • 2 0
 Who's managing the couple-thousand-buck base stations for this RTK-equipped couple-hundred-bucks lap timer?

The 20 hz update rate is hopefully for the entire system, and 20hz of IMU data can potentially help with precision.
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: Free ntrip corrections provided by gov. basestations where I live Smile
  • 1 0
 @LaurensVR: that's... Pretty damn useful
  • 2 0
 We have free NTrip corrections in Florida called the FPRN provided by the DOT it’s centimeter accuracy/RTK and available w/any internet connection @LaurensVR:
  • 1 0
 What's the POC helmet in the lap timer photo? Doesn't seem to match to anything in their lineup. Maybe a new lightweight/airy full face?
  • 2 0
 Its the Ocotocon, there was a review on pb in march
  • 3 0
 The lap timer is a good idea, but who wants one more subscription?
  • 4 1
 Garbage .. garbage..and more worthless garage.
  • 3 3
 So an analogue floor pump gives you accuracy to half a psi is to be traded for a digital floor pump that is on measuring accuracy to 1 psi?
  • 2 0
 That isnt what he said - the analogue is impossible to set to (I agree my Park pump is rubbish, my Topeak is better but still vague), the digital agrees to his stand alone digital to within 1psi. Depends if you think the stand alone or the pump is right and whether 19 or 20 psi is actually that important to you.
  • 8 2
 I could care less about how accurate it is, I care about it being consistent each time I use it.
  • 1 0
 I think you do want it to be consistently accurate though. You just don’t care if it’s “calibrated”. Otherwise, it could be consistently inaccurate and still fit your criteria.
  • 2 0
 Floor pump said: 26 ain't dead!!
  • 2 0
 How different is a hip pack to a bum bag?
  • 7 0
 About $100.00 different.
  • 1 0
 Unpopular opinion: Hardware that requires a paid subscription to be useable should be free.
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