First Look: Hope's Carbon Crank and TR Stem

Feb 16, 2024 at 3:02
by Seb Stott  
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Nine years after unveiling their first crank, Hope has a new carbon version. It's designed for Trail/All mountain use and has a claimed weight of 422g without a chainring or 487g with a 32t chainring. That's around 140 g lighter than their alloy crank.

Alternatively the RaceFace Era crank has a claimed weight of 483 grams including a 32 tooth chainring, so very similar. The Hope is considerably more expensive though, at £550 / €690 / $695. The Era is $499 US, and Hope's alloy cranks cost £255 / €320 / $320 - that works out to about $2.67 per gram saved.

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However, like with their alloy cranks, Hope offers their carbon crank in 155, 165 & 170mm lengths. If you're after a shorter crank, these are among the lightest on the market.

In addition, Hope say they have "tuned stiffness characteristics for optimum ride feel", and that their "foam core helps to absorb impacts and dampen vibrations." I'd take that with a blood-pressure-raising pinch of salt, but they are implying that the carbon construction allows some flex to attenuate vibration much like a handlebar.

They're made from T700 fibres, which Hope say optimises the strength-to-weight ratio, and they're made with a "unique carbon construction method", though details are scarce for obvious reasons. The 7075 aluminium pedal thread inserts are replaceable if they become damaged and the hardware is available in black, blue, red, silver, purple and orange. They use the same 30mm 7075 aluminium alloy axle as their other cranks and play nicely with Hope's notoriously reliable bottom brackets. Oh, and they're still designed, tested and manufactured in Barnoldswick, UK.

Available from April 15th.



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TR Stem

Hope's new TR stem replaces the AM, and is said to be both stiffer and lighter. It also adds a 40 mm length option (previously only 35 or 50 mm were available). There are 32, 40 and 50mm lengths in Ø31.8 mm clamp diameter and 35, 40 and 50mm lengths in Ø35 mm.

Claimed weights are 123g, 131g and 150g, respectively, in Ø31.8. A 2-piece front plate design with a “no gap” clamping system should simplify handlebar installation and adjustment.

They're available in black, silver, red, blue, purple, orange and a new bronze colour (shown), which is also available on other Hope products.

RRP: £105 / €135 / $135

Available from March 1st



For more, head to hopetech.com

Author Info:
seb-stott avatar

Member since Dec 29, 2014
298 articles

202 Comments
  • 195 4
 I'm very happy they have 'tuned stiffness characteristics for optimum ride feel' as I've always felt the ride feel of my cranks wasn't quite optimal.
  • 77 1
 I've always perceived too much steepness of climbs when riding my Shimano XT cranks.
  • 12 0
 @kyytaM: damn i've been saving for those because i had that problem with my SLX's, now im not going to bother
  • 1 0
 Hahaha ! You made my day ! Cheers !
  • 109 2
 Writers, please stop trying to use "notorious" as a creative alternative to famous. Find some other words in your thesaurau!
Yes, it can mean "famous" but the usual meaning for most people is "famous for bad reasons" and it makes your description sound sarcastic. I'm no longer sure if I should want one of Hope's "notoriously reliable bottom brackets" or not!
  • 54 0
 Maybe they should use “infamous” as it obviously means “more than famous”.
  • 11 1
 I'd say the only thing of notorious reliability of all the products mentioned in the article is RaceFace's crank retention bolts. Those damn things back out no matter what torque you use or how much threadlock you put on.
  • 36 0
 Agreed, notorious has negative overtones. In replacement I proffer: renowned, legendary or even fabled...
  • 9 0
 @Klimbnbike: that could only really work for the Titus El Guapo
  • 15 0
 @GoWithTheFlo: "As the prophecy foretold..."
  • 10 0
 @Klimbnbike: the infamous El Guapo is not just famous, he's in-famous!
  • 16 0
 @bishopsmike: and he has a plethora of pinatas at every party
  • 10 0
 @bman33: oh, he has a plethora.

Lol. Glad the 3 amigos reference wasn’t missed.
  • 2 2
 What is a plethora?
  • 3 0
 @Klimbnbike: how can you tell it’s a mail plane?
  • 5 0
 @Kimbers: we need a review of the top end Rockshox forks now, then we can compare the advantages of my little buttercups.
  • 3 0
 @rockhopper70: didn’t you notice it’s little balls.
  • 25 0
 Nice pictures
Pinkbike’s backend developer needs a QA person
  • 6 0
 I find it hard to believe this is a lingering issue given how many times it keeps happening.
  • 1 0
 @MTBrent: maybe Pink Bike had layoffs and the back door person was shown the door! However it does look real sloppy for a mtn bike website.
  • 1 0
 Is this in reference to the private photo thing I always see? Or something else? Maybe I didnt catch this article when it was new enough to see what was up.
  • 20 2
 I read an article once about a very high end stereo component manufacturer. I paraphrase, "watch your industrial design. It doesn't have to actually be better, it just needs to look like it's better. Once you have it on the market, keep raiseing the price until you're exclusive, they will sell like hotcakes." I'm not suggesting that's the case here.
  • 7 0
 now the question was the stereo component manufacturer McIntosh, Ps Audio, or Naim because I feel like that applies to all 3 lol
  • 3 0
 @BovineAssassin: You know your audio. No, it was Levinson. You are certainly right about Mac but PS Audio?

Just remember....I "paraphrased", although the gist is pretty close.
  • 2 0
 @rockvoyager: levinson actually had some innovative stuff up through maybe the 30.5 and 334-5-6 series. Later /now it’s mostly a sellout. Ps audio is a company that made iffy power conditioners as their bread and butter and then somehow magically were brilliant at other stuff too? Haha, as if. They just started repacking junk in fancy chinesium boxes. Naim has always been snooty and overpriced/underdesigned. They wish they were Linn and are pissed no one takes them seriously.
  • 9 0
 @EdSawyer: Back in the early 80's, when I could actually hear, I took home a Levinson pe-amp, an Audio Research tube pre-amp, and (I think) a Precision Fidelity amp/pre-amp combo. I spent a week comparing them on two different speaker systems. A pair of Celestion SL6's and some Accoustat's. In my opinion, the Levinson didn't sound any better than the old Marantz unit I had in my garage. I could overdrive it more than the Marantz but It had the same transistor noise and the same flat sound field. The tube equipment on the other hand sounded glorious. I believed that Levinson was the classic example of "make it pretty, raise the price". I'm 74, and can't hear shite anymore. Music sucks with hearing aids. But I do fondly remember those days....smoking pot with Nelson Pass at our audio club meetings in Carmichael, having an engineer come to a meeting with a CD and player before they were out on the market. Heady times from a fun era.
  • 2 0
 I once made some carbon fibre speaker cases for a very high end speaker manufacturer ' couldn't tell the difference ••••• a bit like cranks
  • 17 1
 Is the foam core actually going to do anything? Or is that just a way of saying there is no way to remove it from the manufacturing process?
  • 2 28
flag justanotherusername (Feb 19, 2024 at 2:56) (Below Threshold)
 If the core was a stick of dog shit with carbon wrapped around it and it worked would it matter - why do you care that there is a foam core and why would you think they should explain its existence to you?
  • 1 0
 There is a mention of it in the article. I suppose it will perform as well as the Spank Vibrocore does, which I have no experience with. Either way, foam does dampen vibrations. Whether you will notice it depends on you I suppose.
  • 3 0
 Foam cores act as a bridge in simple terms between skins on a lot of co.posite structures increasing certain mechanical values so in a lot of cases there's no harm in them being there however anyone commenting here including myself is speculating as to what their goal was
  • 17 3
 SRAM GX Eagle Crankset 632 grams with chain ring, avg price $130 with a chain ring.
  • 15 2
 GX carbon is 469 grams for $199.
  • 16 33
flag Padded FL (Feb 18, 2024 at 11:20) (Below Threshold)
 It's basically like saying "my Corolla can go at 60mph, just like any Ferrari". If you think like that, you're not the person these parts are aiming at.
  • 27 3
 @Padded: what can these "Ferrari" cranks do that the "Corolla" ones can't?
  • 15 1
 @Padded: a Ferrari can do things a Corolla can't. What do these expensive cranks do differently? What's better exactly?
  • 6 0
 @Padded: If you really want “Ferrari,” you can buy Hope aluminum cranks, save $350, and only add a third of a pound (140 grams).
  • 19 6
 @DylanH93: a Rolex doesn’t do anything more than a Casio can, a Chanel bag doesn’t do anything more than a high street bag can, designer T-shirts don’t do anything a cheapo Taiwanese T-shirt can.

People like nice things, the bikes we ride are all luxury non essential items we don’t need to buy or own, make your choice, if you don’t care then don’t buy it, they won’t make you
  • 10 2
 @justanotherusername: Rolex/Casio isn't the best comparison, because the digital Casio keeps better time than the mechanical Rolex. Meanwhile I love my mechanical Seiko that runs a little fast but has cool gears you can see from the back.
  • 5 13
flag Padded FL (Feb 18, 2024 at 13:53) (Below Threshold)
 @Tambo: Don't pretend you didn't understand what I meant.

@justanotherusername got it right, thanks.
  • 8 3
 @Padded: I guess you are a victim to marketing, because for a simple component like cranks there is no mystery sauce that just makes them better. Hard facts like weight on the other hand are reliable figures.
  • 6 1
 @Tambo: I think a better comparison on his behalf would be a Corolla hatch vs a Corolla GR hatch. They do vastly the same thing, the GR is a bit faster (lighter in this case), but the real difference is the GR looks better in the eyes of the enthusiast. Let’s be honest, at this level of MTB we are all enthusiasts and hobbyists to an extent. We often buy things not because they do something better but because they look better. We are attracted to shiny hood looking parts. These cranks look incredible, I’m sure they will sell well purely on their looks. There will always be something that performs the same for less money. His comparison of a Corolla to a Ferrari was far fetched.
  • 1 0
 double post....sorry
  • 5 1
 @Keegansamonster: wrong again! They're both carbon cranks; both are high performance. Nobody here can make use of any performance difference between them; the difference is the looks and the price (and maybe strength/durability). That's plenty justification for some, and that's great...but I know how I'd spend my money.
  • 2 1
 @Tambo: ‘maybe’ strength / durability - that’s a pretty big point if it they are stronger and last longer don’t you think?
  • 4 1
 @justanotherusername: only for those who need it. And at this point it's entirely unproven.
  • 1 2
 @fred-frod: Bro when did I say I was in the market for that stuff? I just don't complain about the price of it using intentional fallacies.
  • 1 1
 @Tambo: How about Hope tested it and know it’s stronger and more durable, consider that?

You have a pretty weird view here, you seem to think you know they are no stronger or more durable using your eyeball engineering?

BTR’s are super expensive compared to some other frames, the difference is looks and price (and maybe strength and durability) …. Derp
  • 2 0
 One reason to opt for Hope would be that they're produced in the UK (which is relatively nearby for anyone in Europe compared to anything made in South-East Asia. And that Hope is known for being able to deliver spares for long after the sale. Obviously the first reason doesn't apply to anyone living in Australia, Aotearoa, (West) America or obviously (South-East) Asia. And the second reason might not be to relevant to cranks as they are to brakes for instance. Whether the weight saving of carbon is worth it over the aluminum version (or just something decent from Shimano), that's a discussion that already got me entertained elsewhere in this very same comment section so I won't go into that over here as well.
  • 4 2
 Nice job comparing an aluminum crankset made in Taiwan to a carbon crankset made in the UK. Hopes stuff is expensive but it’s really impressively priced for what it is. With replaceable threaded inserts it’s a much better and long lasting product than many other carbon cranks on the market, and even more so than aluminum cranks that will fatigue and bend over time. I find it hard to bash a company that makes products in house that are legitimate lifetime purchases. There’s a cost associated with that
  • 3 2
 @vinay: hope USA is based in Oregon. Delightful to deal with and have an impressive inventory of parts for old products. To add to your point of delivering parts for long after they stop selling a product, their components are easy to service and it is extremely rare that one of their components will fail in a way that servicing it won’t fix. Really surprised to wake up and see hate for hope on pinkbike this morning with their history of providing great, long lasting products at very reasonable prices. This one is expensive sure but they don’t make THAT much carbon so I understand it
  • 3 1
 @justanotherusername: I don't work for BTR. I do own one. Many frames are stronger/cheaper/better value. I wouldn't buy a BTR at retail price..sadly.
  • 1 0
 @Tambo: didn’t you used to be part of the company?
  • 1 0
 @Tambo: and by company i mean ‘Paul and Tam’.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: I was, yeah.
  • 2 0
 @Tambo: It was a pleasure working with you to get my frame dialed exactly the way I wanted it to be. All the best in the future!
  • 2 0
 @Keegansamonster: This is a well thought out post mate. With all due respect, I come at it from the reverse. Most bikes look pretty much the same to me with only "subtle" differences. This means that I would purchase most bikes that fit my buying criteria which are: Performance, value, feel, fit, factory / LBS support. These are the important bits to me. There are a very few bikes I wouldn't buy because I just think they are ugly. The new Privateer and the Ibis OSO come to mind. I will buy anything if it fits my five requirements, assuming I'm looking, but I won't buy something just because it looks amazing.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: Glad you're still enjoying it! Cheers
  • 1 0
 @Tambo: Yeah, actually Burf recently rebuilt it as I cracked the seattube and downtube due to some corrosion paired with a pedal strike. Other than that I now have the integrated seatpostclamp, it is pretty much exactly the same design (so size large, 26" wheel specific, 400mm seattube for that lower top tube and in RAL6001M powdercoat). The previous one has seen well over five years of pretty intense use and this one should last me even longer. Obviously you can never predict what kind of beating it will receive, but this time around I've given the seattube a thorough boiled linseed oil treatment and will repeat that annually. The previous one only got the WD40 treatment but that clearly wasn't enough.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: glad Burf has your back. Rust was one of the things that bothered me a lot on the bikes. That and price. No easy fix for either! Still love mine though...don't know what I'd get if I had to switch bikes.
  • 3 0
 @rockvoyager: absolutely! All I was saying is that on the hobbyist side, there will be people that splurge for the better looking (more expensive) component, if the two components function the same. I would never buy a better looking component if it didn’t function as well as the cheaper component though. Not everyone falls into my mindset, and I completely understand that! My wallet wishes I was more utilitarian with my components lol
  • 2 0
 @Keegansamonster: eh a corrola gr is a trim spec in this country it certainly not a performance car yaris on the other hand and gr yards cemetery different animals

The term beauty in the the eye of beholder springs to mind as they're just cranks
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: dunno the technology that goes into a crank has limits ,if you work with composites the tech is the same and it's doubtful a bicycle Co.pany are goi g to be magically doing something anyone hasn't figured out , doesn't matter how many ex f1 engineers you throw at it
  • 1 0
 @Keegansamonster: I think if memory serves a corolla gr is just a trim boost in the UK a yaris on the other hand has a version which is a bit quick and carries the GR Yaris moniker
  • 1 0
 @Compositepro: My guess would be robot controlled fiber placement over that foam insert. Magura has been using automated fibre placement on their carbon brake levers ever since they came with the MT series. I don't know of a bicycle company that does this over a foam core and even though it may not be particularly more complex than doing so without a core, it may be a first in the bicycle industry. You may know better though.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: ribble are going to be doing narrow sleds soon
  • 1 0
 @barp: does it? I bet that's a whole forum on its on "watch wars" where fanbois go to defend their watch
  • 1 1
 @Compositepro: nope GR Corolla in the us is an AWD, 6 speed manual, 1.6l turbo 3 cylinder that produces 300HP. That vs. the stock front wheel drive, auto, 2l 4 cylinder that makes 169hp. It’s definitely not a trim level upgrade.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: I don't know anything really I'm just guessing lije everyone else as I don't work inside hope however composites don't magically change because bicycles are involved and I know they certainly aren't using anything far out man you have to remember also lots of terms get bandied round we use auto fibre placement but that alone is a huge topic massive investment and skills to boot but you can also do this in a garage if you have the skills and knowledge so who knows
  • 1 0
 @Keegansamonster: ah interesting corollas are family cars here so no six speed or rapidness my GR hot hatch though is bonkers
  • 1 0
 @Compositepro: Not all knowledge necessarily needs to be present at the company right from the start. Remember Hope was a CNC specialist first and foremost but now they have had more than a few years of experience producing their own carbon products. Not sure who helped them there but of course they do have the advantage that they can already produce their own molds so that lessens the initial investment a little. If I recall correctly, for their carbon MT leverblades, Magura got help from the university of Stuttgart. They did obviously already have lots of experience with injection molding so all that was needed was a robot for fiber placement. It could really be one of those versatile KUKA/FANUC robots which they probably already own for loading and unloading their CNC machines. Back in the days I did my graduation project at a startup which used these robots for filament winding of pressure vessels. I now have a thesis student working at a major aerospace company which uses their systems for filament winding of missle components and pressure tanks for hydrogen storage. So yeah, these robot arms can already be used as such, Hope likely owns such robots and considering these cranks are foam cores with two external metal interfaces, my guess would be that they're using filament winding. The spools and tensioners are stationary, the robot holds the crank by a pole and moves it around.

The most impressive display of filament winding I have ever seen was during a presentation by Achim Menges. Check out his work if you haven't seen it yet. And still he is only using these common and versatile robot arms.
  • 1 0
 @Tambo: Yeah, though considering I hadn't gone beyond the regular WD40 shower inside these tubes in the past (which I thought was the only recommendation at the time) I suppose the yearly linseed oil bath should improve matters considerably. Burf recommends Tool Guard but it seems hard to hold of over here for non-professional use. Boiled linseed oil should be pretty good, we'll see.

Can't think of any other frame I would like to have rather than this one, which is obvious considering it's been made to spec. Curtis Racelite 26" could be fun. Considering I'd rather have the seat and top tube low than high, prefer my chainstay short and custom top tube and head angle are included in the price, it should be possible to make something that's close. I just wouldn't be too sure whether Brian would still be melting tubes together by the time my current frame is due for replacement. I obviously hope he keeps going for a very long time but so do I hope for this frame Smile .
  • 1 0
 @vinay: yeah kind of missed my point but then this place is more for entertainment than serious anything
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Tool guard is just a spray on corrosion inhibitor. There are plenty industrial or automotive products available. Smile
  • 9 0
 Canfield and Trailcraft are a better value, and if you have money and want something custom, Appleman cranks.

$700 is insane, and cranks are the worst place to use carbon fiber
  • 9 2
 So Raceface Era is lighter, cheaper and has a lifetime warranty? Guess its not bronze.
  • 9 0
 Pics or it didn't happen
  • 4 0
 Please make a crank or spider mounted bash guard. My stumpjumper can't mount one in the frame. The wolftooth camo guard is for 34 tooth and I run a 28 or 30, so it's a big difference.
  • 4 2
 Time for a new frame?

You can also get a bash guard mount for a BB. … but what you really need is a new bike Smile
  • 6 7
 well, you might look at your riding not at a bashguard if you hit a 28t...
  • 1 0
 I had a Stumpjumper for a while, and used the new SRAM cranks and chainring to get around the bash guard issue. You can run a 30 tooth chainring with bolt on bash guards.
  • 3 1
 You mean like all the new SRAM cranks / rings already do?
  • 1 0
 Yes, exactly. And the SRAM guards are sized for the chainrings, so you don’t have an unnecessarily large guard if you’re running less than 34 teeth, unlike the Wolftooth.
  • 1 0
 Plenty of bash guard around that mount to 104BCD cranks, aren't there? Not sure about these modern proprietary bolt pitches but at least Superstarcomponents offers their Trident bashguard for 10GBP now. I'm sure there must be other options out there too. My bash protection is bolted to the ISCG05 tabs but before I had that I've been running bashrings bolted to the crank spider.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: there’s a reason superstar are selling the bashguard at a loss / just break even - nobody wants them and once they sell out they won’t make them again.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: Yeah, but @rain164845 is looking for bashprotection now and @sanchofula assumes/knows the bike is due for replacement (hence old) so I suppose it might run 104BCD cranks. So rather than invest in new cranks just to get some bashprotection, that rider may just as well stick with current bike and cranks and just get the bashring now as it is available.
  • 7 1
 It's good to see some lightweight 155mm crank options but that's a bit spendy.

Sram are you listening?
  • 1 0
 I recently bought Samox M7J 160mm carbon cranks for my girlfriend(a light and mellow rider), I think they come in 155mm too. Granted, Samox says they’re for juniors, so I’m not sure if they’re up to big dudes getting shred gnar on them.
  • 11 7
 You can get XO carbon cranks at the same weight on sale for about half this price, the only thing these offer is a 155mm crank length. If you can settle for 165 or longer, look elsewhere.
  • 42 19
 @decaf. But Sram are made in some sweat shop in Asia. Hopes are made by folks getting paid a decent wage who are passionate about riding and have replaceable pedal threads as. Not Apples to Apples. Are they expensive? Yes. However, if you're on this website, we're all riding expensive toys
  • 11 4
 XO carbon cranks have a great track record of snapping in half too Smile comparing msrp to sale prices on a product negates the fact that SRAM can't sell them reliably for their initial value. There's plenty of cause for sram switching to alloy on the XO transmission parts
  • 8 2
 These are probably better though.
  • 20 5
 @bman33: this isn’t accurate at all. SRAM owns many their own manufacturing facilities, including carbon crank manufacturing. This is far from a sweat shop, ask many of the employees who have made their life-long careers there. Oh, and many are cyclists as well and have the same passion for cycling.
  • 4 25
flag WhateverBikes (Feb 18, 2024 at 10:47) (Below Threshold)
 @bman33: Sorry? All riding expensive toys?
I'm riding my 1994 mtb, and totally happy with it. Titanium frame, so still going strong after 30 years, full rigid, so no suspension setup and stuff to worry about. Whatever part I trash, I can replace it for under €50.
You know what they say about assumptions.
  • 12 0
 @WhateverBikes: is that your only bike or a relic you ride for nostalgia / punishment fetish?
  • 7 0
 @WhateverBikes: how much did you pay for that cheap titanium frame?
  • 10 1
 @WhateverBikes: That ti frame was not cheap when new and the frame itself could most likely sell now for more than a department store bike

@forsinapu Sram owning it or not, Hope are made by folks with Western pay scales. Taiwan is one of the best places in Asia for manufacturing and living standards for sure, but the point is they are not paid on the same scale as Western countries. I ride Sram on two bikes and have a set of Sram carbon cranks on one of them (until I break them) Not anti Sram at all, but calling out decaf's comment
  • 8 1
 @bman33: yeah, pay scales are adjusted all over the world—and the US itself for many reasons. If I move to Santa Cruz CA I would expect to make more because higher cost of living. My point is, by saying “sweat shop” you’re inferring that a company is knowingly exploiting humans
  • 11 1
 @WhateverBikes: cool story bro
  • 2 2
 @bman33: the $300 hardtail guys are definitely alive and kicking still. You always see them on the trail, you see em in here, and on the buy and sell. It's probably fair to say that *most* people here own an expensive toy, but it's certainly not everyone.
  • 1 0
 @forsinapu: haha I would certainly not move to Santa Cruz with those aspirations. Most jobs pay significantly less than the ones over the hill.
  • 3 0
 @WhateverBikes: so an old expensive toy?
  • 2 0
 Hope make excellent cranks. Period. I have the Evo's and love them. Quality has a price. I would not get carbon cranks myself (too many rocks on the Shore) but if I were.....
  • 1 0
 @forsinapu: Good luck living in Santa Cruz with the $18.00 per hour starting wage Santa Cruz Bikes offers
  • 2 9
flag blackthorne (Feb 18, 2024 at 21:59) (Below Threshold)
 I really don’t understand hope. They seem to be a bunch of engineers with zero product, design, and strategic expertise.
  • 3 1
 @blackthorne: yet name a more successful bike co business manufacturing such a range in house domestically - just one?

Is this just your bro capitalist view of things?
  • 1 0
 Stop this peasant's moaning, this is not made to be better than anything else, nor have better value, this is for the rich guys to play a bit, must look good in the first place. Here you pay for the carbon finish, prestige and that you can assemble all Hope bike and post it on Vital to win the BOD/M/Y.
  • 2 4
 @justanotherusername: take a look at their mtb, the v1 was a good 5-6 years behind in geo, was full of proprietary non-standard components and zero design sensibility. Next, the Olympic track bike they were commissioned to build; v1 was drop dead gorgeous because it wasn’t designed by them, but then the v2 when Hope had their engineers play around with it, turned into an absolute Frankenstein. So to answer your question why they are ‘successful’, hope occupies a grey zone below boutique brands; it’s made in the UK and it works, so a brand worth supporting, but nowhere close to desirable both aesthetically and functionally compared to the likes of trickstuff, garbaruk, Ingrid, Unno, Intend, or even SRAM.
  • 3 2
 @blackthorne: How many bike companies have missed the mark with their first build? - V2 is regarded by many as a brilliant bike, nobody forced anyone to buy a V1 either.}

You do realise its literally a business job to occupy sector of a market and do that well, don't you, or are you silly enough to think Hope should be able to compete against SRAM and Trickstuff at the same time?

Hopes main market is their components, they do very well with them and if they occupy the ficticious 'grey zone' you seem to believe exists it seems to be quite large market and many, many people like and use their parts for reasons beyond just being made in the UK on some very nice bike builds around the world.

No they aren't comparable to brands like garburak, ingrid and Intend aesthetically - Hope outsell them considerably and its likely most of their parts are as well / better engineered and are much cheaper too.

Hey, you have an opinion, and just like arseholes everyone has one, the facts say you are wrong though - While other companies shed staff and scramble for funding Hope are as solid as ever.
  • 2 0
 @KolaPanda: I don’t have experience with the new ones, but back in the day the pedal threads would explode on these. Great to see hope including a replaceable insert
  • 1 2
 @justanotherusername: It's not my only bike, but it is my main bike, and has been all those 30 years. My other bikes however are nineties mtb's also, 'cause I like to rebuild them. Basically just my main bike and a bike specific for my bike messenger job (with fenders etc.).

I don't ride it for nostalgia, I ride it because it's super fun to ride and all I need (and easy and cheap to maintain etc.).
  • 1 3
 @RonSauce: I'd had to look it up, but I was 2495 Dutch guilders, the currency we had back then. It would be about 1250 in Euro's, that's in American dollars.
It's a Dyna-Tech Torus Ti, the cheapest model of that series, and it was parent's company Raleigh's attempt to bring affordable titanium bikes to the market.

It's a moot point however, as even it it was a eight thousand dollar Merlin, I'd say if you ride it for 30 years that counts as a pretty damn cheap bike.
  • 1 3
 @bman33: copy-paste from my other reaction:
I'd had to look it up, but I was 2495 Dutch guilders, the currency we had back then. It would be about 1250 in Euro's, that's 1348 American dollars.
It's a Dyna-Tech Torus Ti, the cheapest model of that series, and it was parent's company Raleigh's attempt to bring affordable titanium bikes to the market.

I'd say $1348 counts as cheap.
  • 1 2
 @Planetx888: Nope. Wasn't expensive, paid $1348 for it back then.
Also, you can try to downplay it as a toy, I don't care, but I'd say after 30 years of continuous use it has proven itself as one hell of a dependable apparatus.
Most current mtb's will struggle to ever get to ten years of usage.
  • 5 1
 Hope should stop releasing new products and put time into solving the incessant squeak from their apparently to of the line V4 brakes! I'm getting chased around by breeding songbirds in the spring on my local trails!
  • 4 1
 The high frequency squeak is common across all Hope brakes and unique to hope. They don't care and won't acknowledge it. I went back to XT
  • 5 0
 That bronze colour stem sure looks good. Looking forward to getting a few of the new bronze parts!
  • 8 2
 $700? My XTR is 50g heavier but more durable and half the price.
  • 19 1
 My SLX is 30g heavier than XTR and a 1/3 of that price. What does it matter?
  • 12 2
 @Muckal: my deore is 160g heavier than your SLX and half the the price! My OCD doesn't like the fact we skipped deore xt!
  • 16 0
 @Muckal: my SLX is the same weight as yours but 40% more expensive because I bought it in Canada. We're really messing with @HardtailHerold now!
  • 8 0
 My Zee crankset is probably heavier than Deore and also more expensive.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: but it's also wider! More wider stance, more better stance!
  • 1 0
 @Muckal: slx is 80g heavier than xtr
  • 1 0
 @RWRides: my 165mm 7100 are 504g, but yes, comparing 175s it seems it's really unbearable 80g.
  • 1 0
 @Muckal: not unbearable but it adds up.
  • 5 0
 What's up with the private photos? Are they behind a pay wall? Am I missing something?
  • 6 5
 @dagzin @allbiker @yuroshek
Soon our comments will be privet and invisible I guess , as they will remove them when article will be uploaded with photos.
That's what happened when my friend commented on privet photos about Raceface pedals...
  • 18 0
 Hedging your bets there I see.
  • 10 0
 Pinkbike shrubbery censors miss nothing.
  • 6 0
 Hope they dont break
  • 1 0
 More than twice the money for a crank that weighs 140g less than their aluminum cranks? That’s less than a third of a pound for my Imperial people. And I can’t imagine the performance gains (stiffness, etc.) being even that much better than the aluminum versions. I guess if you’re looking for premium of premium, there you go, but I couldn’t justify it.

I do admit they look killer, though.
  • 4 0
 I love hope. So expensive, but the Hope Dropper Lever is the best I’ve ever tried. and it adds +5 steez
  • 1 0
 I 'hope' the Q-factor is a little more generous than their alloy cranks as I wouldn't want to file off a few mil of those like I've had to with their ally cranks on my Stanton... And yes my cranks are centred and spaced correctly!
  • 1 0
 Own a Hope 916 and whilst these would look very matchy matchy on the raw carbon frame...no way I could justify a set of cranks at £550, especially not using them at the Golfie etc. Biggest Hope tart out there but have my limits, lifetime warranty on these or not. Mental money and not convinced I wouldnt have these destroyed in a few weeks.
  • 4 1
 If you change to a desktop version on your phone you , will be able to see photos.
  • 4 0
 This seems to be happening very regularly atm
  • 2 0
 Didn't do shit for me
  • 1 0
 But I shouldn't have to change anything to see them. They're up now though...
  • 4 0
 I believe that NDS crank cap is challenging me.
  • 5 0
 Are you my coworker? He asked me how to disassemble a Hollowtech II bottom bracket. I walked over and pointed to where they printed "DO NOT DISASSEMBLE".
  • 4 0
 Large hex key and a flathead screwdriver ought to do the trick!
  • 2 0
 @barp: Sounds like a suggestion similar to those on a mattress tag.
  • 1 0
 I love my Hope brakes, and these cranks look ace- but way too many horror stories about carbon cranks(all brands) and the price...
I'll keep bashing my Aeffect R with a cheap heavy long wearing steel ring
  • 2 2
 That's a nice stem. However..... Hope has always made stuff to the point where I don't buy much of it as I object to the styling choices. Their laser etching guy is completely out of control on every product. I genuinely wouldn't buy this stem because of the front plate etching. Can't understand it.
  • 3 0
 Sorry, we're all going back to Al now.
  • 4 0
 That stem is beautiful
  • 1 0
 My hope bb lasted 1 Month which is about 10 rides. Love the 155mm crank and the headset seal well plus the crownrace is a blast to switch on different forks.
  • 1 0
 My BSA BB 24mm has been perfect for several years and is going strong on different frames. So it's about infinite times more durable than Shimano.
  • 1 0
 Carbon cranks? I thought we reached the point when alu is default for any gravity oriented riding, cranks probably get most abuse out of all components on the bike
  • 5 4
 As much as I appreciate what Hope is doing, weight saving on both bottom bracket as well as cranks makes no sense to me.
  • 4 4
 @AndrewFleming: Sorry, I meant to say stem and cranks, there was no mention of a lightweight bottom bracket. Why, you ask? Because I think both stem and cranks are in locations where weight saving is not needed. Both are sprung weight and the cranks do rotate but nowhere near as quick and with comparable inertia as wheels and tires do.
  • 3 3
 @vinay: at slower cadence on a really steep climb we accelerate the cranks (and the whole bike) with every pedal stroke. So I feel it's worth paying attention to the weight, if you already needed to buy a crankset anyway.
  • 4 1
 @AndrewHornor: Oh yeah, I don't question something will accelerate. My guess is that in relation to everything else that accelerates as we pedal (including legs, shoes, kneepads etc) the contribution of the additional crank weight (of say a basic Shimano crank compared to such a carbon offering, about 150g) is quite minimal. Please note, it is my guess indeed. Would be quite interesting to see how much it matters indeed. And then of course, offset it against the claimed advantages of lowering the bike center of gravity by adding weight low, which advantage AFAIK hasn't been quantified either. If your statement has been quantified as "well" as mine, let's call this a draw. Otherwise, let's fight Smile !
  • 4 0
 @vinay: I let my legs atrophy to save rotational weight, so let's not fight! Wink

No doubt, it is small savings compared to the whole system, and a relatively good place to carry extra weight. All I can say is that my bike felt quicker to accelerate when I changed to lighter cranks. And isn't that what we're all chasing when we ride bikes - enjoyable sensations?
  • 4 0
 @AndrewHornor: Oh yeah, if you do indeed notice the difference and consider it worth it, go for it. Just not to the lengths you're suggesting here Wink . Glad you're not willing to fight, I'd have chickened out anyway, cheers!
  • 3 0
 Carbon cranks clearly sell. A lot. Whether it makes a performance difference or not, weight-weenie-ing isn't going anywhere and cranks are one of the easiest places to cut 100g+ after tires and wheels.

Pricey AF, but I'm psyched to see a lightweight option in sub 160mm lengths. And a replaceable pedal insert is a really nice touch too.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: I’d agree with you for my riding, and their aluminum cranks are great for that. But there is a large market that wants to shave weight wherever they can and hope previously didn’t have a product for that market. I think most pinkbike commenters, myself included, would spring for aluminum cranks but it’s cool to see a rad company supplying a new product for a market they have tapped into with a couple of their other products. I’ll stick to the aluminum option but these are sweet!
  • 6 6
 Something no one asked for but Hope made anyway! I'm sure some shorter riders who really need to save 50g's and want 155's will be happy. All 20 of them.
  • 2 0
 Carbon cranks look trick. Is there a max rider weight?
  • 1 0
 I want Carbon Cranks which are lighter than the Titanium ones from CaneCreek.
  • 2 0
 Those are way to plain to carry the hope name tbh
  • 1 1
 I don't understand making a new stem that size length that everybody have?? If you gonna make another stem, they should be a deferent size 37, 43 and 48 would be good.
  • 2 0
 Comment is private>
  • 1 0
 I wonder if these fit 68/73mm bb?
  • 2 1
 What’s “All Mountain” ?
  • 4 0
 Ask Jeffsy, he'll explain it
  • 7 0
 It is for riding the entire mountain. Back in the days, people would use one stem to ride up the mountain and then the other one to ride back down again. Brave souls have tried to climb on descending stems but suffered horrible stem failure and ended up with their handlebar stuck up their nostrils. Similarly, some did climb the mountain but forgot to bring their descending stem along so couldn't swap. They did try to descend but always magically ended back at the summit. Their skeletons are still to be found up there, pretty grim really. All mountain stems were supposed to solve all that. The future looks bleak now that the AM are going to be renamed TR stems. Either way, thanks for asking. Jeffsy
  • 1 0
 Hey, Hope hasn’t had a crank failure yet!

“Hold our beer.”
  • 1 0
 Shimmyano EM900 alloy is 442grams and only $120usd
  • 1 0
 R2 lists them as 460g but there's no axle included.
  • 1 0
 What's the warranty on the cranks?
  • 1 0
 dammm lighter than the deity copperhead
  • 2 3
 155 already lighter than most carbon ones. Don’t see the point of the other lengths.
  • 1 0
 weird, no 160mm length
  • 1 2
 +1 point for having a crank shorter than 160... -5 points and not having 140-150 options
  • 2 3
 Why is the photo private??
  • 3 0
 @dagzin So people can test it and Hope could correct it as it was with Hope crank and Evo corrected version.
  • 6 0
 Because pinkbike employees are informed of new parts & bikes ahead of their public release date so that they'll have time to write about them, but they're under strict contracts not to leak that info before the product launch. When writing the article the images are set to private to keep them from being leaked. Sometimes when launch day comes I guess they either forget to change the pics to public, or there's a bug in their system right now that doesn't do that automatically
  • 1 1
 @tacopop: i see them on my laptop..
  • 4 0
 @matmiller: yeah they've changed them to public now. Anyone still seeing the private image> thing cached the page while they were still private.
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