close
Pinkbike is now part of Outside! As of December 3, 2021, please refer to the Outside Terms of Use and Privacy Policy which govern your use of the Pinkbike website and services.

First Look: 2022 Orbea Rise Hydro - More Range at a Lower Cost

Dec 1, 2021 at 7:52
by Seb Stott  

Just over a year ago Orbea launched the Rise - a lightweight, mild-assistance eMTB. That bike made a great first impression and has been a big seller for the Spanish brand. By using a carbon frame, a restricted version of Shimano's EP8 motor, a modest battery and lightweight components, Orbea dropped the weight towards the realm of pedal-only bikes, reportedly giving the Rise a "normal bike" feel ... for those who could afford it.

Predictably, they're now releasing an alloy version that weighs a little more but costs a lot less. Less predictably, they've actually increased the battery capacity with this cheaper model, from 360 Wh to 540 Wh.

Orbea Rise Hydro Details
• Hydroformed alloy frame (1 kg heavier than carbon)
• Larger 540 Wh battery (600g heavier)
• 140mm rear travel, 140 or 150mm fork
• 29" wheels
• Claimed weight: 19 - 20 kg / 42 - 44 lb
• 77° seat angle, 66° head angle (140 mm fork)
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• Price: €4,999 - €6,799 / $5,299 - $7,299 / £4,599 - £6,099
orbea.com
Orbea reason that buyers of the alloy bike won't typically want to pay extra for the range extender they offer for bigger rides, so they decided to pack plenty of capacity into the main internal battery.


Motor & Battery

Both the carbon and alloy versions are compatible with Orbea's 252 Wh range extender battery, which costs €499 and weighs 1.4 kg. But thanks to the milder electrical assistance of their Ride Synergy (RS) motor tune, Orbea claim the internal 540 Wh battery is good for around 3,500 meters of height gain in Eco mode, 2,200m in Trail mode and 1,600m in Boost mode.

As always, e-bike range varies a lot depending on riding style, terrain, rider weight and more, so take those numbers with a pinch of salt. But Orbea think the range should be enough for most people.

If you do want more, the 252 Wh range extender increases capacity and range by almost 50% and Orbea claim you can get 5,000m using the range extender in Eco mode - though you'll need strong legs for that.

It's worth noting that, according to Orbea's numbers, the weight of the alloy bike is barely heavier than the carbon bike with a range extender and has just 12% less battery capacity. Plus you can use the bottle cage for, well, a bottle.

Unfortunately, the carbon and alloy bikes have different battery mounts, so you can't fit the larger battery to a carbon Rise or the lighter one to the alloy bike. Also, the Rise Carbon and Rise Alloy have two different range extenders. They are both 252 Wh and cost the same, but they use different cables and battery communications so the range extenders are not cross-compatible.

The Rise Hydro uses the same RS tune version of the Shimano EP8 motor as the carbon version. That means the motor torque is limited to 60 Nm (not 85 Nm) and the assistance peaks in the 75-95rpm cadence range, where the motor is most efficient. The motor itself weighs the same as the standard Shimano drive unit, but the RS tune gets more range and ride-time from a smaller battery, and the reduced torque makes it possible to use lighter drivetrain components.

The Rise's 540 Wh battery uses the latest 21700 cells and weighs 2.7 kg (600 g more than the 360 Wh battery in the carbon Rise). It's claimed to retain 80% of its capacity after 500 charge cycles; that compares to 60% for smaller 18650 cells. To put that in context, if you're averaging 40 km from a full charge, then 500 cycles correspond to 20,000 kilometres of riding. Alternatively, if you ride the battery from full to empty once a week, you'll do 500 charge cycles in about ten years. Of course, the battery should keep working beyond that point, just with less than 80% of its original capacity. On the other hand, battery degradation in the real world can vary so, again, I'd take these numbers with a little salt.




Frame Details


Another way Orbea avoids unnecessary weight is by having an intact downtube, rather than having a door in the tube to allow removal of the battery. This does mean removing the battery involves first removing the motor and you can only charge the battery in the bike; you can't take it out for off-bike charging.

According to Orbea, the alloy frame weighs 1 kg more than the carbon version, at 3.4 kg. The hydroforming process is what gives Orbea's alloy bikes their Hydro name; the tubes are also triple-butted and feature high-polish smooth welds for a carbon-like look.

Thanks to the bigger battery and alloy frame, the Hydro bikes weigh around 1.6 kg more than a carbon bike with the equivalent build. Claimed weight goes from just under 20 kg for the H30 base model down to around 19 kg for the top-tier H10.




Geometry

The alloy Rise shares the same geometry as the carbon version; both are unashamedly trail bikes with modern rather than boundary-pushing numbers. The geometry is nearly identical to the Occam trail bike, though the Rise has 5 mm longer chainstays. Going for the 150 mm fork will slacken the angles by half a degree, but this is no "mini-downhill bike" either way.



Models and specifications


Rise H10 - €6,799 / $7,299 / £6,099

Rise H15 - €5,799 / $6,299 / £5,199

Rise H30 - €4,999 / $5,299 / £4,599

Specifications are customisable on Orbea's website using their MyO ("My Orbea") programme, so it is possible to upgrade to a 150 mm Fox 36 on any model. You could also choose what type of display you want among many more options.



According to Orbea, the first bikes are arriving with dealers now.




185 Comments

  • 197 0
 Orbea is living in 2030! Dang, 42 lbs for an alloy ebike with an average sized battery.
  • 44 0
 It's super impressive. The pricing isn't bad either tbh
  • 43 1
 Same battery size as YT and other brands, but 8-10 pounds lighter and cheaper, ya you won't find one of these in stock anywhere.
  • 25 2
 Fair to say that they did Rise to the occasion
  • 5 0
 @hamncheez: They're in stock here in Boise
  • 14 0
 Give Specialized incentive to up the SL ante. Us consumers win!
  • 2 3
 .LOL
  • 3 0
 Interesting that they don't have a big hole in the downtube for the battery... wonder if that allows them to make the frame lighter?
  • 12 0
 Edit: read the article properly, they state it does
  • 1 0
 @danielfloyd: more for less!
  • 39 4
 They are impressive. Here’s some math some of you might appreciate. My wife has a Rise carbon OG version. The second best model. She is on a small and weighs 125. She’s what I would call an intermediate rider. I have a wild FS and weigh 175. I turned her boost mode all the way up and tuned her other modes to line up closely with my Bosch modes. Boost, sport, tour, etc. This way we’re putting out about the same effort in the same mode going the same speed so we can ride together. We ride our regular bikes more, but when we’re on the e bikes we’ve been able to do some super long days with tons of elevation. No big surprise I know. What’s interesting to me is my battery only last about 15% longer than hers and our boost modes are very similar. This is largely due to the weight difference between us and the bikes. This has been a really good fit for us. She gets a much lighter bike( for an e bike) that’s easier to handle and we get close to the same distance while going the same speeds regardless of mode. This has allowed us to go on some epic rides together which has been awesome. I’ll add that I put some Maxx grips on for her which really upped her confidence. Their too draggy for her Maverick, but when you have a motor why not. All I got. Peace out.
  • 2 1
 @txcx166: Perfectly reasonable anecdote, yet yobs downvoting you. Yobs gonna be yobs I guess. :/
  • 1 0
 @stalkinghorse: What about today? Still?
  • 106 1
 First the Eminent, now this. I'm not prepared to be liking two ebikes in one week. Send help.
  • 18 1
 I am in the same boat as you, BOTH the bikes I actually found 'relatively' attractive compared to most other ebikes..... I need to see my shrink.
  • 9 17
flag pipomax (Dec 2, 2021 at 8:01) (Below Threshold)
 @bman33: nah, no shrink needed it just mean that the department of brainwashing (marketing) has done it's job perfectly and deserve a pay raise.
  • 2 1
 The Eminient is like 8 pounds heavier for the same battery capacity, and its carbon.
  • 7 1
 @pipomax: how is that? I didn't and won't buy one, I just visibly like the 'look' of the two bikes better than 99% of other ebikes out there. ZERO 'brainwashing' at all since I won't buy one.
  • 4 5
 @hamncheez: Eminent has proper tires, rotors and suspension. This bike has a flimsy fork, 180 rotors, XC tires. Eminent is also 160mm/170mm, Orbea is 140/150 bike. Both bikes have a good bit going for them, but different horses for different courses
  • 6 1
 @bman33: So th weight difference between a lightweight140mm trail bike and a well spec'ced 160mm enduro bike is 8 pounds?
  • 5 3
 @bman33: How thefuq is an EXO+ tire proper for an enduro?
Even my Local LBS is shredding with DD on the FRONT! The Eminent got EXO+ on the rear, lol.
  • 4 3
 @Serpentras: Raced Colorado Enduro series for a few seasons on an EXO + zero issues depending on the course. Point is that one bike has beefier tires than the other
  • 3 3
 @bman33: different doesn't mean better or worse. This Rise will be faster for most riders on their regular trails than the Eminent. Bigger bikes are overkill for all but a small percentage of really aggressive riders. My buddies have Orbeas, one has the Wild and 2 have the Rise. They all agree the Rise is the "better bike" that rides like a real bike while still letting you go farther/faster.
  • 4 0
 @SprSonik: Never said at any point 'different means better or worse'. That was/is Serpentras and Hamncheez insinuating to a degree one was 'better or worse'. I was pointing out partial reasons for the weight difference. Nothing else. I didn't comment on which bike is 'better'. I did say 'different horses for different courses'.
  • 2 0
 Have you seen the BH iLynx trail? I't also a lightweight eMTB and it look stunning in red. www.bhbikes.com/nl_NL/e-bikes/elektrische-mountainbikes/trail/ilynx-trail
  • 63 1
 Hint to other e-bike builders, this is how it should be done.
  • 6 0
 ...this style is identical to none.
  • 8 0
 @LemonadeMoney: Actually looked like the older version of the StumpJumper until I saw that it has a mid-Drive motor.
  • 64 2
 looks like a bike
  • 51 2
 Which is quite the compliment for an e bike!
  • 40 0
 Top of the frame looks smooth as carbon! It would be nice to see more aluminum frames as polished as this one.
  • 12 0
 orbea does a good job
  • 4 1
 Yeah, the frame does look carbon-like. Other bike frame companies should take note.
  • 5 0
 Their Alu bikes are really well finished. And they're pretty light!
  • 4 0
 That's the impressive part. I don't need an ebike, what I do want is an alu bike with as much attention to weight and aesthetics (those welds) as this one.
  • 31 1
 sexiest ebike alive
  • 8 32
flag yoobee (Dec 2, 2021 at 7:32) (Below Threshold)
 Even more with a girl riding it Big Grin
  • 7 1
 @yoobee: even more with Kapfinger riding it!
  • 10 9
 lol WTF! An ebike is "sexiest" but a girl must not be mentioned? All these straitlaced downvoters make me sick... this has to be a bot.
  • 1 0
 It's tough. Rotwilds Ebike is pretty bangin'.
  • 23 3
 The rise is definitely on my ebike shortlist. Being super picky I'd like that bigger battery but in the carbon frame so I could still run a water bottle.

My gut feeling is that in seven years time this is what a "mountain bike" will look like (maybe with a physically smaller motor and battery due to motor/battery advances). With aggressive trail bikes at 36lbs and and light ebikes at 40lbs I think the majority of people are going to end up with a motor. Not saying I like it, but I reckon it's the future.
  • 6 0
 Weight is one part of the equation, cost is the other, when a midrange built MTB costs 4-5k, you might as well through in another 1k to get a motor...
  • 6 1
 Throw, you dumb phone
  • 6 0
 @Mugen: Exactly. Why spend 2k+ for xx1, carbon wheels and parts, when you can just spend 1k for a motor and not worry about the weight?
  • 5 3
 @rideallday110: weight still matters in the handling and feel of the bike. These light weight ebikes are awesome. The chunky ones feel like tanks.
  • 22 0
 That DPS is going to be putting in work.
  • 10 0
 Yes, and the same goes for the EXO Rekon rear tyre, 34 fork, 180 mm rotors etc. I suspect a lot of buyers will plump for the 36 mm fork, swap to DD tires and up-size the rotors at least, which could add about a kilo to those weight numbers.
  • 3 0
 @seb-stott: you can upgrade tyres, front rotor size, brakes and so on in their configurator.
As far as I understood, you could even get Assegai+DHR both in DH casing
  • 5 0
 @seb-stott: what about going for a Pike, much lighter than a 36, and probably just the front rotor.
  • 2 0
 @seb-stott: Yeah my Levo SL alloy with 200 rotors, fox 36, and proper tires comes in around 45 pounds (w/pedals). If they can hit that target with a 540 wh battery, that's quite impressive!
  • 7 0
 @seb-stott: Absolutely nobody works harder than an EXO Rekon on the rear of an e-bike
  • 1 1
 @Danmcdan: you can't select Pike in configurator. Fox/Marzocchi
  • 2 1
 @seb-stott: I have a Rise with stock 180mm Galfer rotors and XTR brakes and they are fine. I weigh 215 and ride them in Pasadena and San Diego without issues. They outperform the SRAM G2 with 180/200mm rotors on my Jeffsy.

I’d only upgrade the Rise rotors if I was park riding.
  • 3 3
 Yup..needs coil...150 rear would be nice and 160 up front.
  • 3 0
 yes, that is why I would go for the h15. it doesn't have kashima coat, but it has a piggyback float x (correct me if I'm wrong), and its also not that bad to forgo the factory suspension, as lap times and mild performance gains from a factory DPS will be nulled by the damping from the beefier, stiffer, although heavier shock.
  • 2 0
 @jrocksdh: Sounds like you mean the Wild, that they already sell Wink
  • 1 0
 @seb-stott: The Rekon will be like the Wonder Bread NASCAR - toast on the fourth lap.
  • 1 0
 @Danmcdan: this is the way
  • 1 0
 @mior: You aren't right or wrong, but the Float X is a cheap $80 upgrade.
  • 1 0
 @tom666: I know I don't.
  • 1 0
 @mior: Yeah the H15 looks like the one to go for IMHO.
  • 20 1
 Shimano needs to fix that ep8 rattle
  • 3 0
 I've tried the bike and it is amazing but just for that rattle I wouldn't buy it
  • 1 0
 I rode a Rise for a weekend in Squamish. I was listening for the rattle, but I never really noticed it. The bike itself is impressive. Very poppy and easy to toss around. Night and day difference between the heavy e bikes and hardly any difference from a normal trail or enduro rig.
  • 2 0
 @b824: apparently its really only noticeable in about 25% of the motors according to my very scientific facebook poll
  • 11 0
 I really think this lightweight ebike concept has something going for it. I demoed a Specialized Turbo Levo SL, expepecting to be thoroughly unimpressed, but boy was I wrong. It feels like riding a normal mountain bike, just with permanently good legs, so you get longer rides and more fun. And for transport to the trailhead I’d imagine it would be great as well since you can just use full power on your bike instead of a car. I really think these should be called hybrid bikes instead since it feels just like a normal bike, but with some ebike juice when you need it, although it never becomes overpowering like a full-on ordinary ebike can be.
  • 2 0
 Specializeds lightweight ebike value is an absolute joke. 7000 gets you an aluminum frame LMAO
  • 6 2
 @Kimura: why on earth do you "need" a carbon frame on an ebike? it has a motor, who cares about the extra pound or two..
  • 2 1
 @billybobzia: when did i say people NEED it lmao
  • 1 0
 @billybobzia: It matters when you can brake at the same point as I do on my 27# pedal bike. You mean 3 lbs.
  • 10 0
 I'm sure every major bike manufacturer is working on a transmission that's housed within the motor. At least I hope they are. This separate motor-at-the-crankset, transmission-at-the-rear-wheel is ripe for innovation on the eBike front.
  • 3 0
 Gearmotors are very common in industrial settings so I'd say that you're right on with this thought/prediction. Ebikes will drive this innovation then hopefully they can be refined to be light and efficient enough for normal pedal bikes.
  • 1 0
 I think the hard part is coming up with something that has a wide enough range to eliminate rear shifting, shifts smoothly up and down including under load, is reliable and doesn't need to be serviced by nasa, is light enough to be worthwhile and, on top of all that, doesn't require a mortgage to buy it.
  • 1 0
 @h82crash: Light. Robust. Cheap. Pick any two.
  • 6 0
 Already have a carbon Rise which has been brilliant, but I’d probably chose this alloy one over it if buying now. The slight power reduction from the RS motor is fine but I’d love the slightly bigger internal battery this comes with, which for me looks perfectly sized. The price, battery size (and flexibility with range extender, which I use and works great), weight, geometry, motor power (and easy tuning to full power) all make this a pretty perfect ebike for most riders.
  • 6 1
 Orbea is freaking crushing it. Not sure what sort of juju they used to make a 42 pound alloy ebike with a 540 Wh battery, but if these specs are legit, they are way far ahead of the game right now. That H15 build is spot on.
  • 4 2
 Unfortunately, reports from forums and friends show that the Rise frame breaks WERY easy. I had mine for only a few weeks and the carbon fit break without I even crashed it!
Then Orbea refused warranty. So don’t expect the alu triple reduced version to be reliable.
  • 4 4
 @Endurip: Shit, well there's another thing they're copying Specialized on!
  • 1 0
 @Endurip: That's a real shame and I wasn't aware.

The Orbea does look nice but I think both the Mondraker Crafty (44#s with a 36mm fork & a full size motor) & the Spesh Levo look like more compelling options overall.
  • 1 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity:
Is it so? Didn’t know that. So sad when companies don’t hold their part of the deal.
  • 1 1
 @Endurip: I've been hearing way too many Specialized horror stories recently, which is too bad because I think they make extremely rad bikes.
  • 5 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: you hear a lot about cracks on Specialized simply because they sell more bikes (from pinkbike survey it's around 10% from the whole market). I assume % of fails are similar around brands of the same level.
  • 1 0
 @wyric: I am not going on internet banter, just the people I know who've cracked their Enduro's head tubes and chainstays.
  • 1 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: not the first time hear such a thing about Enduro. And frankly, there is a crack post a least once a week at fb stupjumper group.
  • 3 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: that is still anecdotal, and means nothing without looking at the actual failure rate. Plenty of small brands don't sell as many bikes as S sees break each year, yet I bet S still has a lower failure rate than the small brands.
  • 1 0
 @SprSonik: I don't have anything against specialized, but first hand experience and all the online chatter leaves an impression. And since we don't have a comprehensive database or independent third party lab for these things things, it's the best we've got.
  • 4 0
 @Endurip: I've been riding my M10 hard since June and it's been bullet proof. I've also been on various Rise Forums since late 2020 and I've seen 2 and heard of another that I recall with broken rear triangles. One was from a mangled derailleur that contacted the carbon, so to me your claim sounds a bit over the top. Both frames I saw were also warrantied. Sounds like you got screwed.
  • 7 4
 still waiting for the day when they(all of "they") will offer for sale the frame only, at a resonable price.
As long as they are not doing that, they don't think about their clients, they only think about moneeeeeeey!

most of us have much better components on our bikes. We can we just buy a frame, swap the parts and sell the old frame. Why we must buy bikes with sup-par components and then up-grade them.. spending much more money in the process?
  • 4 1
 Thinking about money and thinking about clients is the same thing in any business plan. Most bike company's clients are bike shops, not direct consumers. I was in a bike shop yesterday and they said over 50% of their bike sales are complete e-bikes. This is what the customer currently wants. Those who want a frame only represent a nitch. If a company is sold out with a backlog, and most of their customers (bike shops) want completes to sell, are they still thinking about their clients if they cancel bike shop orders to make sure they have frame-only inventory for the few who want that?
  • 1 0
 Foes Racing sells their ebike as a frame only if I’m not mistaken.
  • 5 0
 @eugenux - you sir are an outlier - most people want a new bike, not a giant project.

I would buy the frame only as well - but I'm in the industry and have a sweet workshop.

Ever notice how most big brands that do sell frames, sell them for almost as much for the base complete? Yeah, because they hardly sell any and it's for ultra-picky high end crazy custom builds most of the time.

The value is just not there - for them or for the riders. Stupid economies of scale maybe, but it is what it is

[edit: not to mention the liability of the improperly installed/improperly specced nonense - "warranty my frame that I put a 180 fork and this incorrect length coil I had lying around"...selling a frame is asking for those headache.
  • 1 1
 @dontcoast:

you sir are probably 100% correct. In my defense, most if not all my bikes in the last years have been custom builds. I have a specific set of components that I prefer then, I also to put some part that a guy somewhere on the right side of the NZ makes machines it, then some specific wheelsets(hubs, spokes and rims that I like) and, without an exception, whatever bike I build, I build it at a loss, of course, paying to much for a frame or paying for a complete bike that I had to disassemble, put the parts I wanted on it then sell the parts I did not, at a loss. Orbea did help a little with this by allowing me to paint the bike in whatever color combo I wanted and select some upgrades that I could use. I still had to partially strip it and rebuild it with my preferred components. For this rise hydro.. I do not want any of the components on the bike so, the hussle/strugle would be pretty big and I am also at a moment in life when the available time is close to zero and so are the finances. I would very much prefer just the frame at a resonable price...around 2500 euro than to buy the entire bike, strip it and rebuild it.

p.s. the only brand that sells its frames at a resonable price is nukeproof... although.. in the last year, they started increasing the frame prices as well, encuraging you to buy full bikes. Still resonable enough to warrant a chance, which is why my next big bike is a giga, probably ready this saturday. #newbikeday.. yeey!

cheers man!
  • 2 0
 Glad to see some sensible decisions here. Sick of gimmicky marketing stunts that claim that a frame structure can be compromised to host a swat compartment or a removable battery or that e-bike needs some gigantic battery and super powerful motor.. If you need a more powerfull motor, you should be on a dirt bike and not on a Mtb trail If you need to ride farther and longer, you are fit enough to ride a regular mtb
  • 2 0
 My 'full fat' Vitus e-sommet is about 22.5kg on paper so perhaps 20kg for this bike isn't so mind blowing - same sized battery but they've cut weight by putting on light tyres, forks, etc
  • 3 0
 Yeah, but what is it on the scales? Lots of bikes are light ‘on paper’ ;-)
  • 1 0
 If only it was a degree or 2 slacker and 10mm more travel.
Also has terrible toffee arc rims which struggle to keep a tyre sealed (I know from experience).

But may just get one anyway, seems to fill the gap between the sl and full fat ebike. Test ride here I come.
Then can ride with all my buddies again that have switched to ebikes.
  • 2 0
 Search Orbea Rise Mullet. You can convert these bikes into 160mm rear, 170mm fork mullets with 64deg HT
  • 3 0
 buy a Wild.
  • 1 0
 @vanillarice19: that sounds promising.
  • 1 0
 I built seven ebikes back in the mid to late 2000s and have owned a Rise for a few months now. Lightweight ebikes throw an exclamation mark on regular bikes; heavy ebikes feel like an underpowered dirt moto. I still have the lightest ebike I made back then, the rest were Craigslisted long ago. Now I haven't gotten on my "analog" MTB since the Rise arrived. Orbea has this figured out, except that stupid EP8 rattle. Other manufacturers should take notes.

I'm in decent shape and I've never had the Rise battery go below green. I don't ride more than 3 hours and I charge after each ride. But I'm on the light weight side at 140lbs.
  • 1 0
 I researched bike reviews and it was between the Rise and Levo SL. Based on what I read, I was hoping the lower specked m20 would weigh about 40 pounds. Bought the Rise M20 and it weighed 43 pounds on my scale. Overall I’m very satisfied with the bike!
  • 4 1
 If I was looking at getting an ebike it would definitely be something like this! But I’m not.
  • 2 2
 I've got a compliance question for this one:

I thought one of the reasons that most e-bikes had removable batteries was that in California, law requires the batteries to be removed when being transported on a bike rack outside of the car.

Is that not correct?
  • 2 0
 If that's true..this still is technically removable.
  • 2 0
 nobody does that
  • 3 0
 @nickmalysh:

Less about what people do, and more about what is required to sell in CA. Similar to reflectors and spoke chain guards.
  • 4 0
 @Rconroy: dorkdisk is the official term i think
  • 1 0
 No!!!
  • 1 0
 I have a Rise that I have modified quite a bit. If the H10 were out when I got mine I absolutely would have purchased it instead. For anyone considering, the rise, and presumably this variant, is an awesome bike.
  • 1 0
 Considering I purchased my M10 at 8k before the price increase, the H10 with identical spec/upgrades from Orbea is only $360 cheaper than my M10 was. $960 cheaper now. Is 3lbs worth the $960? I guarantee you won't be able to late brake in the same spot with the added 2.5-3lbs.
  • 1 0
 @chicane32: The difference was $700 (H10 is $7299) so now $1300 with the M10 being $8599. H10 comes with a bigger battery too. Once/if you put the range extender on the M10, weight goes up 3 lbs, and the price difference is now $1900 (excluding potential tax..) Not saying one option is right, but math.
  • 1 0
 @sci-biker: The REAL facts are= H10 for $7299 comes with Fox 34, Fox DPS and Shimano 8100 2 pot brakes. As I stated with the M10 spec, the H10 is roughly $7635-M10 $8600=But math! Try your but math again! Yes the range extender adds 3lbs, but for me it’s not needed on my average 19 mile, 3,000-3,500’ ride. So ya, I add 3lbs about 2% of the time.
  • 1 1
 First I thought the bigger, more solid bottom bracket area looked weird. But I got used to it. And now I understood, that they did not introduced it because of more stiffness, they wanted us to get to used to motors. And now we don't dislike bikes like this. And I'm sure in 5 to 8 years we are all on ebikes. Like it or not. Believe it or not. Let's meet in 5 years and proof me wrong. Please.
  • 1 0
 Same motor so same damn RATTLE. Deal breaker til they fix it. I'm waiting for Santa Cruz or Ibis to build a lightweight emtb like the Rise that DOESN'T rattle then I'll put my money down!
  • 3 0
 It is perfect for tours/trails. I want it!
  • 3 1
 My Rise has been exceptional, this is going to give it a run for it’s money I suspect.
  • 2 1
 Hey @Orbea, can you hook me up with a 24" Laufey H20? I don't ask for discount of any kind, just that delivery date is somewhere in the next 6 months?
  • 1 2
 I've built up my new (previous generation) Levo Expert and it came to 20.5kg in size XL with Suntour Durolux RC2 fork, beefy carbon wheels, Magic Mary and Hans Dampf tires, XT/SLX groupset and pedals.

It's not like Orbea made something special here. It's artificiality nerfed motor and lightweight tires that are not particularly suitable for an ebike.
  • 2 0
 Try ordering a medium size in the UK. Not a chance for a LONG time. Disappointing.
  • 2 0
 Weird, the M30 low end model comes with a Marzocchi Bomber Z2 in the Netherlands. It's a 250 euro upgrade to the Fox model.
  • 1 0
 This is probably the most visually appealing ebike to me. They don't have a massive downtube and bottom bracket compared to the rest of the frame.
  • 2 0
 Seems like you have a typo, H30 comes with Bomber Z2 and not with Fox 34
  • 3 1
 I love my Orbea Rise. Going to go ride it right now!
  • 2 1
 This is the first e-bike I've seen with great form and function. I love it!
  • 1 0
 If you are in US I have the shop for you to pick up or order a new Rise.
  • 3 1
 I get a Rise just looking at it
  • 1 0
 I'd take this over the Rise for the extra battery capacity while still having room for a water bottle
  • 1 0
 Well done Orbea! Definetely you are the benchmark in the light eMtb category.
  • 2 0
 Orbea - can you do this with the Rallon?
  • 6 5
 An ebike that looks like a bike! You know what’s even better?
A bike.
  • 2 0
 Doesn't look rank
  • 1 0
 had me convinced this was a carbon frame for a sec
  • 4 3
 My girlfriend loves her rise too!
  • 1 0
 Oh it’s a older stumpjumper
  • 1 0
 So basically the almost perfect e bike. (160/170 next time please)
  • 1 1
 From what I gather the Orbea Wild is due for an update next year...... Hope they make it waaaaay longer!
  • 1 0
 Surprisingly light, wonder what size those numbers refer to.
  • 1 0
 Is anyone boosting the power from 60Nm to 85Nm yet?
  • 1 0
 They should just sell it full power since it's same weight 540wh is enough.
  • 2 1
 @Garradmiller: They made the frame light and designed the power output around that lighter weight..... If you get your local Shimano rep to up the power, the frame would not have a very good lifespan.
  • 3 0
 @mudcycles: i don't think the torque increase would effect the frame.
  • 2 0
 @Garradmiller: i dont really see why it would "destroy"the frame either.
  • 1 1
 These batteries are not made for that peak output power. You will prematurely wear the batteries.
  • 1 0
 Wizardry! There are no valves on those rims.
  • 1 0
 Please sell me the H15 frame+motor kit now Orbea. Xd
  • 1 0
 Well who ever wins the academy is getting a hell of a prize.
  • 1 0
 Anyone wanna buy my Spectral:on? :/
  • 1 0
 And theres goes your yt decoys resale value.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, why not you get nicely uphill and than just swap your bike Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Lots of orbeas breaking of late.
  • 1 1
 Sram version coming later?
  • 8 1
 it'll be released on the 5th.. of never
  • 6 5
 E-Bikes are cool!
  • 1 1
 This is what the Meta Power should have been.
  • 1 1
 blimey i could hardly tell that it was an e bike...Go Orbea
  • 3 2
 It's actually great when you ride places where ebikes are banned, just turn down the motor and no one will know (not that I do this of course...). Can't tell you how many times I've mentioned it has a motor and folks start giving it a once or twice over to sort it out.
  • 3 5
 So e bikers if it takes strong legs to pedal one of these in Eco mode to get good range does that not defeat the objective, in others words get a normal bike
  • 5 1
 Um no - with strong legs this bike feels like a 25lb XC rocket on eco, even though it's a 45lb trailbike.

As someone who primarily rides a singlespeed hardtail, this bike is AWESOME and the only eMTB i've ridden that I would really consider buying. (rode an M10 multiple times)
  • 1 0
 On my Rise M10 if I'm off road it spends a lot of it's time in Eco mode unless on a fire road climb, wouldn't call myself fit either as I generally only get out for 1 ride every 2 weeks at present.
On the road commute to the trails I crank it up but to be honest it's not running for a lot for the road part as I'm over the speed cutout threshold.
Offroad on single track climbs I find full noise is just way too fast for the trails around here as most climbing trails have been designed and built around non ebikes.
I did laugh at the original tire selection though, and am now running the Vee Flowsnap WCE Gravity 2.5 on the front and moved the 2.4 EXO+ Disscetor on the rear..... the Dissector is lasting longer than I thought it would???
  • 1 1
 just YES, I like the concept and the price point!
  • 1 1
 Top shelf
  • 1 1
 34 on an ebike????
  • 1 0
 On a lighter Ebike like this or the SL, it is perfect unless you're on the larger/heavier side. I'd say upgrade to a 36 if you're like 180lbs+ kitted out.
  • 6 0
 @Chuckolicious: I raced an Enduro at 200lbs on a SC 34. Sure, it flexed a bit, but it also easily out handled my 36 (on the same bike) on anything tight and twisty. People put way to much emphasis on having the burly builds, when they aren't pushing their bikes anywhere near the limits of the lighter gear.
  • 3 0
 @SprSonik: lol this so much - the majority of riders (who actually go buy new bikes in shops, not pinkbike brodawgs) would poop their pants on any trail where you could actually feel the stiffness difference between 34 and 36 (unless they're clydesdales)

On that note, the whole DD/DH tires circlejerk is nuts, yes some riders and locations need them but for most it's a strong disadvantage.
  • 1 0
 @dontcoast: I think on the tire front, the stronger casing really does make a difference if you're riding hard in rocky terrain. I've had a LOT of pinch flats this year with EXO casing. I kind of agree on the 34 vs 36 though. I swapped the 34 for a 36 on my Levo SL and I kind of regret it. That 34 worked really well!
  • 1 0
 @SprSonik: I don't disagree. I guess the one plus to bigger forks is bigger air chamber for a smoother ride, as a rule. But even then that's model specific.
  • 1 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: For pinch flats I'd recommend something like the Vittoria Airliner rather than DD casings. You'd get basically no pinch flats, could ride lower pressure, and have run-flat capabilities if needed. DD casings are really about sidewall slashes.
  • 2 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: key point being "riding hard in rocky terrain" and in many
(most?) markets, most riders don't.

Also recommend inserts over heavy casings unless you're cutting your sidewalls on pointy rocks
  • 1 0
 @dontcoast: I mean something like 60 million people live in the northeast alone and our shit us rocky! I've tried EXO casing with an insert and still got pinch flats (I'm a dumbass granted). Not saying you need dh casing, but a 45 pound bike and aggressive riding needs tougher tires.
  • 2 0
 Two years with a 34 sr suntour. No problems ibb.co/8chZBBC
  • 1 0
 26 kg by the way
  • 10 11
 This site should change to E-pinkbike.com
  • 13 7
 That would be cool, E-Bikes for life!
  • 1 1
 Pinkebike!
  • 3 1
 Start your own site and cover what you want. Most of us love Pink Bike as it is.
  • 2 2
 I only love PB for the comment thread, I don't even read the articles anymore. Unless it's another new eMTB of course. That sh** is important. Wink
  • 1 2
 Your still so limited..I guess people just don't do big rides anymore..
  • 1 2
 Interesting timing...
  • 5 1
 why
  • 3 6
 Unfortunately the Rise frame is known to crack easily, and Orbea refuses to warranty in many cases I know of.
  • 5 0
 you already know that the aluminium frame cracks? amazing! what are next weeks lotto numbers?
  • 1 0
 Bulljive. Only one or two I found with cracks were damaged in transit
  • 1 0
 according to the orbea website the frame is life time guarantee.

Post a Comment



You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2022. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.018173
Mobile Version of Website