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Five Things We (Sometimes) Miss About Older Bikes

Jan 12, 2023 at 8:12
by Seb Stott  
X-Fusion Suspension is OE Spec on this years Specialized Enduro EVO

There's no doubt that bikes have got a lot better over the last few years. I don't want to go back to fixed seatposts, sketchy geometry, inadequate brakes, and carrying five spare inner tubes on every ride. But there are a few features that have inexplicably gone out of fashion and that I'd like back - at least sometimes.



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Was this so awful?

External cable routing

While brands like Raaw are still fighting the good fight, it's getting increasingly difficult to find bikes with external cable routing. Long before manufacturers decided it was a good idea to start putting cables through the headset, aesthetics had been edging out serviceability for years as brands went fully internal.

It's really the external rear brake lines that I miss. Being able to upgrade or swap a brake over was once a matter of minutes but now involves a re-bleed at a minimum. Even if threading the hose through the frame is as painless as possible (which it rarely is), it's the re-bleed that makes it a fuss. Sure, most people rarely swap brakes, but when you do it's so nice to be able to simply bolt a new one on. When one of my brakes failed on the first day of a riding holiday in the Alps, I was able to swap to a spare set in minutes.



photo
The Trek Rail 9.9 has six non-rechargeable batteries and two rechargeable AXS batteries controlling the suspension, shifting, dropper, and tire pressure sensors. Oh, and there's a pretty big one in the downtube, too.

Not having to charge anything

A bicycle is fundamentally a simple, mechanical device, and that's a big part of its appeal for many of us. While electronic gears and droppers have considerable advantages over cable-operated versions (the lack of cables being the most obvious one) there's something about having to connect your smartphone to make adjustments or check that the batteries are charged before you can go out riding that doesn't sit well with the simplicity of cycling.

Sure, replacing frayed or rusted cables and adjusting cable tension may take more time to maintain in the long run, but at least you know your derailleur's not going to need to be recharged if you forget to plug in the batteries after the last ride.



photo

Travel-adjustable forks

Let me be clear: I'm not talking about the forks with two travel settings like Fox's Talas and RockShox Dual Position Air. They were basically a workaround to help bikes with unnecessarily slack seat tubes climb a bit better. In that role, they worked a treat, but have since become redundant thanks to improved climbing geometry.

Instead, I'm talking about the forks that could be travel-adjusted in small increments. This allowed you to tinker with the geometry and handling of the bike by trying out different travel settings, much like you can with a dual-crown fork by sliding the stanchions up and down in the crowns. If you wanted a slacker and more DH-focussed bike, increasing the travel by 10 mm was a very effective way to achieve this.

While some modern forks from the likes of DVO offer internal travel adjustment, with the big two manufacturers that most of us ride, you'll need to hand over a considerable amount of cash for a whole new spring assembly (a Fox 38 air spring costs £160). While this isn't the end of the world if you're switching frames, it's a pretty big hurdle if you just want to see how it affects the handling.

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Maximum tavel
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Minimum travel (image credit: ctd07)

Back in the day, the 2015-2016 Fox NA air spring made it easier to try out different travel settings without having to buy any expensive parts (it was quite a big job though).

Before that, the RockShox coil U-turn system offered on-the-fly travel adjustment: anywhere from 95-140 mm on the original RockShox Pike. It was a beautifully simple solution where turning the dial wound the spring shaft up the coil, effectively making the spring shorter. This not only reduced the ride height but also made the spring proportionally stiffer - because a shorter spring has a higher spring rate. That meant the fork would have the same percentage sag wherever it was set in the travel. It was so quick and easy that you could legitimately change the travel to suit different trails while out riding.

In a world where we're comparing clicks of high-speed rebound damping or boasting about pressure-relief buttons that do a job that could be done with a zip tie, it seems like losing the ability to easily adjust travel (one of the most fundamental suspension parameters) is a relatively big loss.



photo

Derailleur guards

These were never common, but I had a 2011 Lapierre Spicy with a derailleur protector and it was probably the best thing about it. Sure, it didn't make the derailleur invulnerable, but it definitely reduced the chances of damage as evidenced by the many scratches it accumulated over the years. I also had a compact Shimano Zee derailleur tucked behind there that lasted for years. Since then, derailleurs have only got bigger and more expensive, so maybe it's time for a comeback.



MRP SXg review test

Bash guards & skid plates

These haven't gone away altogether, but now it's surprisingly rare to see any form of chainring protection even on gravity-focussed bikes. Personally, I've bent chainrings and broken chains multiple times as a result, and they only weigh around 100 g more than a minimal top guide. If nothing else, it's just a good excuse to have a go at some cheeky trials moves that you might otherwise deem not worth the risk.



What do you think? Have we missed anything? Or are modern bikes better in every way? Let us know in the comments.

Author Info:
seb-stott avatar

Member since Dec 29, 2014
314 articles

497 Comments
  • 1072 4
 1. Being able to afford them.
  • 118 3
 I remember when high-end MTB was like $3500 CAD. Ahh the good ole days
  • 19 7
 @dv8416: Was this the 90s? My 2008 stumpy evo with low-mid range stuff was 3k. 90s rigid bikes were amazing around 2k.
  • 31 8
 @jesse-effing-edwards: it's a specialized, what do you expect?
  • 80 1
 @dv8416: Yup back when a dime bag cost a dime
  • 64 9
 Hmm, yeah we do expensive sport. But is it really that bad? 20-25 years ago, top of line Marzocchi Z1 cost me what todays is top of line RS Lyrik Ultimate. But you were definitely not making that same money. 20-25 years ago one Hayes Purple DH brake cost $500... today you get pair of XTR brakes for that. Yes, some bikes are in a ridiculous price range attacking moto or even car segment and you start questioning the value. But I think the range that is available today and how capable bikes / components are, is not that bad.

Just to make it clear, I was born and lived majority of my life in eastern Europe so I know very well the money struggle...
  • 48 1
 @dv8416: found an old Cannondale catalog in my parents house from 2003 a few months back, the top of the line Volvo Cannondale Scalpel was $5000 USD, as was the Saeco team issue road bike. Google tells me that’s ~$7700 in today’s money.
  • 25 1
 @kusa: you bring up a good point. Mountain bikes have never been cheap, and you can argue the value consumers that get for their spend is far greater than it used to be. I'm not saying there isn't overpriced gear out there, but if you look at it from the perspective of the quality of the gear that's being produced it's hard to say that consumers have gotten the shaft.
  • 3 0
 @dv8416: It still is, they just give you a much higher price point now too, if you want / need it?
  • 14 1
 @dv8416: The 2005 top spec Specialized Enduro was $7700 CAD.
A Norco A-line was about $5k CAD top spec.

All of these are inflation adjusted of course. I remember while I had covid I was bored and modeled bike prices since 2000 inflation adjusted and determined that the low end was slightly more expensive, but minimal, and the high end was cheaper if we ignore anything wireless... including AXS and live valve etc... makes todays top tier bikes way more.

I was a bit of an eye opener, and we are proabbly all remembering some sick deal we got at the shop that one time as the status quo of bikes. Or we were all pining over an XT deraileur instaed of an Ohlins 38....
  • 2 5
 My first full suspension bike was a 3599 CAD bike with two or three levels down from the top brakes, drivetrain, and suspension, ballpark 160mm of travel, and even a dropper post. The same level of stuff is like 6k now.
  • 10 3
 @j-t-g: But that's not true - the 'same level' is now lower down the range, the 'top end' stuff you used back then is more comparable to a 2.5k bike than the current higher end stuff.
  • 5 1
 @justanotherusername: Not really. It's somewhere in between. The top end stuff is better now, but it was certainly better than the stuff you see on a 2.5k full suspension bike - I've had to service a bunch of those entry level full suspension bikes and the suspension feel is worse when fresh, gets really bad a lot faster of proper riding, and the reliability simply isn't there.

You can tell me its rose tinted glasses, but I still own that bike among the others, so I can go check the suspension feel whenever I like.
  • 3 0
 Yeah, every bike I've owned since 2011 was ~$3500 new. I've only splurged on the last one at $3500 for the frame, but I've built up my parts list throughout the years.
  • 1 0
 On top, they have created too many wheel standards that you are not able to find anything. Talking about a QR wheelset is probably before something obsolete.
  • 4 0
 My rigid frame Kuwahara Sierra Grande XT was on sale for $1,050 when I bought it in Jan 1988. That's $2,236.51 CDN in 2022 dollars. A new bike now for that cost would be far superior in every way, but the economies of scale weren't there yet.

That bike frame was still made in Japan too.
  • 7 1
 @SangamonTaylor: compare that $7700 Scalpel to a $7700 2022 Scalpel and tell me which one is the better bike.
  • 1 0
 @SangamonTaylor: In 2006 I got a brand new Cannondale Rush for $1300, wow!
  • 4 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: 2k in the 90s was a lot of money dude.
  • 16 1
 Its what people are willing to pay.

For $2500-$3000 (today's dollars), I can build a rig that would smoke any bike form 10-15 years ago... and compete within the margin of error with todays $10000 bikes.

But people are convinced that spending $7000-$10000 is necessary now.
  • 1 1
 @Baller7756: I’d say 3-4 k if you want to buy from a major brand that supports pro riders etc. But I totally agree that that the market is much more affordable now then ever. Even more so with the current pandemic overstock for both new and used bikes.
  • 2 0
 @bulletbassman: I was thinking some bargain shopping and some like new preowned items would be necessary to get in under $3000. But again... most people would rather buy new. After a couple rides... new isn't new anymore.
  • 2 2
 @SangamonTaylor: lol. you think in 20 years there has only been 50% inflation? that google number likely doesn't take into account the last two years of 12-15%(conservatively) annual inflation.
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: that’s not true at all. If you take a bike from like 15 years ago say the original session 8 (Fox 40, Deemax, X01) that cost around £4k at the time and the parts are as every bit as good as today and some things haven’t really changed much quality wise like the white 40 on the front of that session is identical to the current 40/49, different internals but built to the same standard.
  • 10 0
 I’ve been mountain biking since ‘90 and didn’t spend over $3,000 on a bike until 2019. I have pretty strong opinions about who “needs” a $7k.
  • 3 0
 Built a bomb proof Santa cruz heckler in 2007 for under $2000. The good old days indeed
  • 2 0
 arent all these things still available on ebay?
  • 2 0
 @Struggleteam: you know how much a condom used to cost?
  • 4 0
 @BigHerm: less than any of us did.
  • 1 0
 @danielfloyd: What i'm sayn
  • 1 0
 @j-t-g: But much more better!
  • 3 0
 @dv8416: that is before MTBing became the new Golf for the big hitters...
  • 3 1
 I bought a GT Aggressor in 1997, it had Alivio components, no suspension, and cost AU$700 and was a lot of fun.
A 2022 GT Aggressor also costs AU$700, has disc brakes and a suspension fork.
  • 9 13
flag vinay FL (Jan 12, 2023 at 23:42) (Below Threshold)
 This article was just complaining for complainings' sake. You may like to bitch about what's available now and if you really like that, go ahead. But everything else is still there too if you aren't of the "I complain therefore I am" kind.

1. You can always route your hoses and cables externally. Only exception I can think of is when you choose to run a dropper post (or want a proper long travel one) that has the cable/hose connector at the bottom of the post (hence inside the seattube).

2. You don't need batteries to ride a bike.

3. Can't you adjust the travel of most air spring forks? Just add a bumper in the negative air spring and the fork will extend a little less. Some very available and good (as in WC competitive good) easily allow you to adjust travel across a sensible range. Suntour comes to mind but I think you'd actually be trying harder to find forks that can't have their travel adjusted (without spending a lot) than those that can.

4. Derailleur guards were never common on higher end bikes. If you're looking for one as hard as you were looking for it back then, you'll be just as likely to come across an option.

5. Bash guards and skid plates. I run one from On One and don't dare to tell me you have never heard of them. Superstarcomponents have affordable ones too. Lots of them. If it isn't on a bike, someone didn't install it. If someone wants one, he or she can. Or is it you miss seeing it on others' bikes which you have no control over?
  • 5 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Going back 10 or so yrs the RRP of a session 8 was $4800:
www.bicyclebluebook.com/value-guide/2012%20Trek%20Session%208

Adjust for inflation that’s $6204 - RRP for a session now is $6400-$6999

Not far off, is it, and it’s better now.
  • 5 0
 @vinay: erm chill out bro
  • 1 2
 @browner: Yeah, meant to say that goes for the article actually.
  • 2 2
 @justanotherusername: does it have the same level of components though? My biggest gripe is that bike are pricey, but the worst thing is low value. Nothing like $6k Santa Cruz with some basic suspension, drivetrain and brakes ... Bike rides better because geometry is better and there is general advance in technology, but overall you get relatively less for the same money (In relation to current market segmentation). And you do not have to go 10 years back, in 2019 you could buy a decent enduro bike for 4k EUR, today the same level of bike is at least 4,5k if not 5k and it is not better in any way.
  • 1 1
 Spot on, everything cost so much, it's mad.
  • 1 0
 @lkubica: Looks pretty similar yes, boxxer ultimate, X01 drive train.

Plus a current mid tier part is likely better than the top tier from 10 years ago.

And since 2019 there has been a global pandemic and inflation of 15-20% which accounts for your extra 500 EUR in 4 yrs.
  • 4 0
 @lkubica: Put it this way, how much is a piece of wood now compared to 2019? The wood is the same but hugely more expensive now.
  • 2 0
 Oh yeah sorry, meant to respond to the "too expensive" part too but I forgot that after responding to the article itself. As for the price, I'd say getting a bike with a suspension fork with hydraulic damping (that works through a decent range of temperatures), hydraulic brakes (that work reliably and consistently) and a drivetrain that doesn't drop a chain every other bump is has come down a lot the past twenty years. I consider that the base level of bike to have some fun when out in the dirt. You may have been lucky if you could get that for 750 euros back then. I think you can get that now for over 100 euro less.
  • 2 0
 @kusa: It's probably more the gap between what is top of the line, mid-tear, and entry level seems to be much greater than in the past. One thing to note is that prices always increase at a rate higher than our earnings.
  • 1 0
 @maestroman21: wish I was ever that bored....
  • 3 0
 @JSTootell: yes and no. I just bought a retro 90's bike with lx parts and you can tell the difference in material quality in seconds. From rubber to forged aluminum....maybe today's inferior material quality is enough for today's low product's programmed life and of course engineering and processes are far superior now. But, attending to all factors: bikes were cheaper back in the day with a much higher workers/production ratio and real materials.
  • 1 1
 @justanotherusername: it now costs £7500 with a worse spec. The frame is almost identical to the original session but instead of getting deemax wheels and fox 40 you’re getting Bontrager parts and wheels and rockshox forks and shocks. So we’re paying significantly more for essentially the same bike with a worse spec.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Well, looks to be £7300 now, not £7500.

And 'worse spec' is subjective - A boxxer is on a par with the 40 and Bontrager parts have been used since 2010 - In 2008 sure they had deemax wheels but thats 15 years ago now, so another 2-3 years of inflation added vs the 2010 model I looked at which closes the cost gap further.

So you may be paying a little more (not as significant as you think - calculate the inflation) for what you consider a worse spec, but its not significant and I almost guarantee the 2013 bike works better, is faster and none of the parts would prevent you putting a WC qualifying run down.

I am not denying there has been some specification dilution over the years but its not as clear cut as you and many try to make out.
  • 2 1
 Bikes are cheaper, adjusted for inflation, currently. If someone can actually argue against this let’s hear it, guy.
  • 1 0
 @dv8416: I remember when a high-end full size pickup was $35k, now its at least $50k.
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: Yes, but kind of an I’ll logical argument, though. You could make the same case about computers or practically anything tech oriented. If these companies could sell old technology, and make money from it, they might still be doing it.
  • 5 1
 @daroob: Yeah, but how else would you compare the change of prices. One could say the price of rice has come up because people need to pay the more for the same mass of rice. One could even say the price has come up even more because there may be less and less nutritional value (like actual nutrition, not just calories) in the same mass of rice. Either way, it is irrelevant whether someone else developed some super fancy and expensive food that didn't exist before. Just because something expensive is available that wasn't available before doesn't imply things got more expensive.

How would we compare the cost of a mountainbike? You can't just look at what's available, calculate the average and go by that. What you can do is say, what do you need to ride this piece of trail with this skillset with this kind of speed and confidence (the latter helped by component reliability)? I'd definitely say that what you could ride on a 2000$ bike twenty years ago, you can ride on a cheaper bike now. Especially when accounted for inflation. Just because you can get something even better now for even more money doesn't really matter. Only if you go "I always want one step below top level for every single component on my bike" then yeah, you're in trouble.
  • 5 1
 @VtVolk: what you are doing, consciously or not, is assigning your own value of money to others. Which is a bit foolish. The only person that can assess if a $7k(or $16k for that matter) bike is needed or worth it, is the person buying the bike.

some people might need to save every penny for a year or more to buy a $7k bike. others, it might equate to half a mortgage payment.
  • 1 0
 @Mtbdialed: 1000 to 2000 is 100% inflation.
  • 1 0
 @kevinturner12: correct. and 5000-7700 is a bit over 50%
  • 1 0
 @saladdodger: @saladdodger: quarantine does some weird things.
  • 4 2
 Your kidding right? Compare the best 2k bike back then vs now. One can get more performance for 2k now than a 6k bike from 10-15 years ago.
  • 1 0
 @yupstate: If you are old enough you could probably remember when one was $10k too, it’s called inflation.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: it’s not subjective when it comes to spending cash and fox suspension and deemax wheels costs more than rockshox and in house brands so yeah performance is subjective but you’re definitely paying more for a cheaper specification.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Boxxer ultimate and fox 40 RRP are £1850ish vs £1950ish - they are literally the same price.
  • 1 0
 @Mtbdialed: You cant account for every individual, but you can use average or median income and expense data to make a value statement.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: That's about the best way of simplifying the situation that I've ever read.
  • 1 0
 @dv8416: not ever in my time! Started riding in 01 and working in shops in 05
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: i would say high end stuff now is better then high end stuff of then. But how many bikes even come speced out with top of the line components. A 8k bike probably has x01 not xx
  • 2 0
 @bulletbassman: im not so sure on that. I help with a NICA program and see new bikes kida are getting for 1500-2500 range and while it is a bike. They are complete junk. The 1500 range bike may not even have a taper headtube or through axels front and back. The shifting seems very marginal and the things weigh 30-34 pounds.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: sure technology has advanced but in the old bike your probably get top of the line stuff for several of components, everything else is one level down. Now your getting second level suspension along with most everything else with some 3rd tier stuff spinkled in
  • 3 0
 @Y12Sentinel: no way, 2k bikes now are just about junk. If you dont think so put 1500 miles on one and get back to me. I have a carbon 26" giant anthem, it is the fastest bike i have ever owned. Sure really rough trails are not its bread and butter, but smooth fast i cant beat it. I help with a NICA program and everyone is buying $2k pieces of crap. They literally weigh 7 pounds more with suspension and components that are several levals down, after a few hundred miles nothing works as good as when new. It seems like every kid has shifting issues and brake issues in the first year and they only put a few hundred miles a season. Granted i did upgrade to 11 speed over the years.
  • 1 0
 @bikewcm: Exactly, 2k full sus is a crap or will ride like crap after one season. It's not made to last and is much less valu than a 3k bike. For hardtail anything below 1-1.2k is the same. The real bike which will last a few seasons is at least 2x more than that. It's like this with everything, lots of affordable stuff which is great till it works, then you throw it away.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: really a £900 fork as opposed to the £1500 fork you was getting previously.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Are you stoned?

As I said: : “Boxxer ultimate and fox 40 RRP are £1850ish vs £1950ish - they are literally the same price”

The RRP for both the boxxer and 40 is within £100 of each other, what fork is £900 and £1500?
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: I’ll say it even slowly this time and hope you get it. Boxxer costs £900. Fox 49 costs £1500. That’s a £600 difference in value between the two specifications. There’s no point mentioning RRP prices if one model has never been sold for anywhere near that price. That’s the real price of the fork and if your local bike shop can afford to almost half the RRP of a boxxer when they have to sell fox at almost full retail what prices are trek getting? So yes you’re paying more for a cheaper specification.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: you are a complete moron, probably a stoned moron.
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: sram never had any intention of selling boxxer at full retail but didn’t want to look like a second rate brand in comparison to its competitors even though they’ve never been in sale for anything near full recommended. This is standard practice in many industries. The fox has always been close to not bang on full retail. It’s a more expensive fork. Agin you’re paying more and getting less in return.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: what a fantastic made up story, did you come up with that all by yourself, or are you friends with someone at rockshox?

Funny shit.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: you just keep telling yourself that a fork that’s never cost more than £1200, now sub £900 is as good value as one that’s always cost around £1600 because of a recommended retail price that’s never been a factor at the checkout. That’s enough pinkbike for this week.
  • 2 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: 2k from 1995 is around 4k today, and that’s for a fully rigid bike. 3500 in 2008 is around 5000 today. There are a lot of bikes with better components than low-mid for 5000. I think people forget about inflation. Sure there are $14000 bikes out there but 5k gets you something great.
  • 1 0
 @maestroman21: yup. People also have to remember bikes weren’t carbon. It’s actually hard to find an aluminum bike that costs as much as that specialized enduro.
  • 2 0
 @olafthemoose: Don't focus too much on the means, focus on the goals. It doesn't matter too much what the bike is made of, it matters how it performs. If the carbon bike performs the same as the aluminium variation, it isn't worth the surcharge. And by "performance" I mean in the widest sense (strength, durability etc over weight etc). As for costs, I'm not really comparing prices as I'm happy with what I have already, don't need anything new. But it seems to me an aluminium Nicolai can be pricy too.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: wait.....you cannot just discount weight nearly entirely, unless you are narrowly defining your criteria to Freeride bikes and the like.

if you are looking for a XC race bike, a trail bike to ride epics on, or anything around these two disciplines, weight is a major factor in it's "performance".
  • 1 0
 @Mtbdialed: Oh no, I was discounting it. I meant to say the strength and durability in relation to the weight. It is always a trade-off so in many cases you want to optimize (maximize, minimize) several parameters with respect to each other.
  • 2 0
 1.1 Being able to afford new tyres before you have completely worn out your existing set.
  • 254 3
 I still have exactly zero batteries on my mountainbikes and intend to keep it that way.
  • 24 1
 Amen
  • 12 0
 The only thing I've ever charged for my mountain bike is my phone, camera (in the past), and GPS watch.
  • 18 1
 @hamncheez: no lights? You Amish?
  • 34 2
 @usedbikestuff: Exactly! Nothing beats mini glass lanterns with real candles for night riding clamped to the bars! They just aren't in the know...
  • 5 0
 Same here. I hope the new SRAM stuff coming in that article posted recently has mechanical counterparts.
  • 1 0
 Yep
  • 1 4
 Do you wear a watch or carry a phone when you ride?
  • 1 1
 Good for you.
  • 5 1
 Axs dropper has been a godsend for my arthritis in my thumb bäst on long descents. Fight me!
  • 5 1
 @suspended-flesh: Yes, but also when I don't ride. They are not on my bike.
  • 1 5
flag daroob (Jan 13, 2023 at 9:20) (Below Threshold)
 Good for you. And I do love the feel of my wired shifter bike. Meanwhile, there are several things I check before my ride. Batteries happens to be one for my new bike. It’s ironic that so many here do jumps, etc. that I would never attempt, but are afraid they’re going to forget to charge a battery. ‍♂️
  • 1 0
 @daroob: I showed up to a race with a dead battery, it died enroute. Luckily I had time to charge it before the race.

Had a battery show green before a ride. At some point I noticed it was red when shifting, I later got a low battery alert on my Garmin. Battery didn't last nearly as long from green to dead as Sram says. It died before getting back to my van (but just barely).

I have AXS on both of my MTB's. I don't blame anyone for not wanting it for themselves. I am still not sure I am keeping it on my trail bike, I might just swap back. But I am not sure yet.
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: not a great record for batteries in your case for sure. I suppose there are bad batteries, and that they only last a certain amount of charges. Somebody out there has probably had a cable come loose or snap as well. I have AXS on one and cable on another. At this point, I am an older more casual rider and can see benefits of both. I can completely understand wanting the tactile feel of the shift on a trials bike… as much as anyone who doesn’t do that kind of thing could :-)
  • 200 5
 I miss having winners of recent constests announced in a (sometimes) timely manner.
  • 13 0
 I've checked my messages and email multiple times daily, they still have yet to tell me what I've won. They're not waiting on me.
  • 4 0
 Similar thought, top rated comments from previous year posted as well
  • 18 9
 It's hilarious how every post has someone complaining that they haven't gotten your free shit yet.
  • 7 3
 @541freeride: username checks out
  • 152 19
 When they didn't have motors.
  • 159 8
 mountain bikes still don't have motors.
  • 104 13
 @toast2266: correct, otherwise they’re a moped.
  • 6 1
 Asdfgjk@#$_&!

Good point.
  • 3 36
flag rismtb (Jan 12, 2023 at 16:16) (Below Threshold)
 @toast2266: an e bike does not have a motor????
  • 34 1
 @rismtb: I think you answered your own question.
  • 86 7
 Sub 30 lb. builds.
  • 2 1
 This. My riot was 31lbs no carbon. Albeit eewings. But still
  • 4 2
 Paging Santa Cruz Tallboy to the overweight bike aisle.
  • 5 1
 There was a time when most ews builds were under 30lbs. Now you’d be lucky to find one under 35.
  • 10 0
 @bridgermurray: won't that time be the same where frames, rims and tires tended to fall apart at an alarming rate ?
  • 1 0
 sure...and bikes that exploded when you blew on them. i've ridden 34#, one bike to rule them all bikes for the past 15 years. they've only gotten more durable and better feeling.
  • 3 0
 @Arierep: In elite racing conditions, yeah. In average-rider conditions probably not.
  • 2 0
 @dlford: And the SB100, 115 and 120
  • 70 5
 My Spire has external routing where it counts, no batteries, and minimalist chain guide and guard. @TransitionBikeCompany does a pretty good job of keeping what works and implementing changes that actually improve the experience.
  • 4 4
 Never had any drawback from internal rear brake cable routing. But, to be fair, also no issue with external routing other than visual aspects.
Love my wife's carbon Scouty Smile
  • 7 11
flag usedbikestuff (Jan 12, 2023 at 14:19) (Below Threshold)
 They peaked with cock and balls. Since then they’ve lost their edge and become an ebike brand
  • 12 0
 is this a Henry Quinny covert account?
  • 1 0
 Except I snapped one of those external routing points in a crash. Bike is ok just have to run it with tape around the frame.
  • 3 2
 @usedbikestuff: I was sad to see the e-bikes from transition but I’m afraid it was inevitable. One day we won’t be able to buy a bike without a motor, but it will be light enough you can ride it without, just like a “normal” bike. And when that day comes, I’ll get an ebike.
  • 2 0
 There are some great hardtails that do a good job at this too. External routing everywhere, internal routing for the dropper only. The spot rocker and the Ragley hardtails do this. There are others. It's a great way to make a serviceable bike.
  • 2 1
 @BiNARYBiKE: Not true. 90% of emtbike riders are transitional, they'll move back to golf or paintball. The 10% that will remain are truly older and disabled. Real bike riders still get satisfaction out of doing it themselves and that will never go away.
  • 1 1
 @OnTheRivet: we’ll see. I’m completely anti ebike but I still bet the day comes that pretty much every bike has a motor whether you want it or not, except for maybe boutique manufacturers who choose to specialize in traditional bikes. And if it weighed the same, why not? You wouldn’t have to use it unless you wanted to. I can assure you that their are plenty of “real” bikers adopting e-bikes that are not “transitional”.
  • 2 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: Believe it or not some people like challenges, not everything has to be easy. This instant gratification without work is a sad aspect of modern life.
  • 2 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: an ebike will always weigh more than a traditional bike, but I agree there will come a time when we bike riders are outnumbered by the electric moped people.
  • 2 1
 @OnTheRivet: As I said, I'm anti e-bike. I ride tens of thousands of vertical every year and backcountry ski even more vertical in the winter. You don't have to convince me. I love type-two fun. I still have very few doubts about where the future will lead. For example, vinyl records have enjoyed a resurgence in popularity and yes they provide a much more meaningful music-consuming experience for those who really care. But steaming service users are always going to blow vinyl collectors out of the water because once something becomes easier and more convenient, very few people intentionally move in the opposite direction. I'm trying to think of any technological advancement that proves an exception. And no, I don't think this human tendency is always for the better. (See the animated film Wall-E for the sort of depressing future I imagine if we're not careful!)
  • 73 8
 I miss literally nothing about old bikes aside from the memories they bought
  • 9 0
 Riding a rigid frame MTB is a young man's sport - back in the 80's it was mostly young men riding too.
  • 2 0
 I don't necessarily miss it because my Zeb is amazing, but my Dual Position Pike was so good on my 2014 Norco Sight.
  • 3 0
 I'm old but dig new tech (aside from mopeds) but I miss having a crazy light XC singlespeed, Those bikes were so fun, the instant feedback is addicting, also making it down a trail involved skill, not the close your eyes and hold on of modern long travel bikes.
  • 45 2
 Changing gear cable and housing makes a massive difference to performance. Why would you make that more difficult to do? The other day I finally went to change cables after putting it off for months. The m3 bolt that holds the little cover on the frame rounded off. Obviously this was my fault, but that little cover and bolt shouldn't even exist, let alone be a barrier to changing cables. Two hours later, after getting the bolt out, I could finally start the process of fishing cables through small holes in the frame. Now it's done my gears work amazingly. It's so nice. It makes me think I should change cables regularly. But I won't. Because it takes ages and I don't have enough time to ride my bike as it is.
  • 23 2
 Ditto, change mine out regularly. Bike previous took 45 minutes just for the chainstays each time. Somebody should be kicked in the shins for this.
  • 11 0
 @50percentsure: OMFG the chainstays arrrgghhh
  • 20 2
 Just pull the new ones through with the old ones.
  • 3 0
 @50percentsure: While I believe all internal routing should be tube in tube, for the bikes that are not, Park Tool makes a great kit for internal routing that actually makes it trivial on sensibly designed frames. It's unreasonably priced though. Must have for a shop but I don't see many home mechanics paying $100 for a piece of cable.
  • 1 0
 Like MartinKS said: Always use the old cable as fish tape. The most efficient way to do that depends on the specific cabling arrangement on your bike. Once i accepted this as a mechanic internal cable jobs never really took much more time than external cable jobs with the exception of aero road bikes and tri bikes with internal bar routing and other "features" designed to handicap their practical use.
  • 3 0
 @MrDuck: I’ve got the park tool kit and it is awesome. My stumpies have tube in tube through the down tube but when the dropper goes up the seat tube, it makes quite a turn. The wire/magnet jammy had it done in seconds. Well worth the price even for my (infrequent) usage
  • 4 1
 Swapping a derailleur cable with tube in tube internal routing is noticeably quicker than any external setup. No tiny Allens or wasteful single use zip ties needed.
  • 1 0
 Buy an 3m long clutch cable for motorbikes and pull the new cable in on it. I do the Same on my old Vespas which are a huge pain to change the cables as you cant see Whats going on. Now its a 5 min job
  • 2 0
 @MartinKS: I normally put the end of the old inner cable into the new outer before taping them together, so there's less reliance on the tape. Then I think where people go wrong, especially with oily brake hoses, is to just pull through and expect the tape to hold it. Needs a bit of push from one end, pull from the other to avoid the tape coming loose. Doesn't work for new builds of course. And the less said about the 90 degree angle under the bb for the crappy straw holding the inner cable on my road bike the better!
  • 3 0
 @MartinKS: I learned a neat trick. Find an old broken spoke that still has the threads. They thread nicely into shift housing (or brake hose)Cut the threads off and twist new housing onto the exposed 1/2 of those spoke threads. Be gentle as you guide the new hose through frame pushing as you go.
  • 3 0
 @MrDuck: Except for designers like Norco who put external aesthetics over ease of maintenance with an abrupt weld 'ledge' just before the cable hole that always catches the new cable outer.
And why should we need a new tool when external routing uses a 3mm hex (that every home mechanic already has) or zip ties.
  • 2 0
 @andrewbikeguide: /\This is someone who has actually done the job.

Ditto with olders Giants and many others. Doesn't really matter which common-sense trick you're doing when the routing is a hidden maze.
  • 1 0
 @andrewbikeguide: Well that's why I said "sensibly designed". There sure are examples (looking at trek and the zip tie inside bottom tube for instance) where you'd be better off wrapping the housing under pink electric tape than routing it inside. But we don't buy such frames, do we?..
  • 2 2
 All these people spending hours to change cables and housing - are you just shoving the thing through the frame and praying? I hate internal routing too but it's really not that difficult.

$10 magnet, dollar store dental picks, and some electrical tape. Problem solved. Or get the nice Park tool set for more $$$ but still worth it if the alternative is hours of frustration.
  • 4 0
 @dilfman1234: Now try the procedure on a few dozen different models of bikes. Some really are a snap, but many are very problematic.
  • 2 1
 Never had a problem on 10+ different brands when using the correct tools. Kfccoleslaw posted a $13 kit on amazon that will pay for itself after the first use. It's just like working on cars - the correct tools make the job 100% easier.
  • 2 0
 I did have an idea.... those little port covers could be replaced with 3D printed bolt on cable/hose guides.....
  • 44 1
 My first mountain bike was a specialized Rockhopper Comp in grabber green. It had an 80mm elastomer Manitou fork and 26" wheels. You could go over the bars by hitting a drinking straw. The square taper cranks went oval and fell off 3 months in in the middle of a rocky climb at Gambrills state park. I have friends who were seriously injured because of things like fork stanchions snapping in half and quick release failures. I miss absolutely nothing about old bikes, they were terrible, anyone 6 feet or taller was basically a circus monkey on a unicycle waiting to smash their teeth the minute a twig looked at them funny. New bikes are amazing and the money spent by dentists on the twenty years of R&D that got us here is something we should all be grateful for.
The best thing about old bikes is they're mostly aluminum so we can melt them down into something useful.
  • 5 0
 Hmm, you're not wrong. I had a whole box full of spare square taper cranks.
  • 2 0
 @50percentsure: I rode with a unbrako hexkey in my pocket for much of my youth because of square cranks. Funny to think about now, not so much fun back then.
  • 1 0
 Soo many broken square bb’s. When the Judy DH first came out I couldn’t wait….then I proceeded to brake lowers and braces a lot! And having too carry multiple tubes bc you’d know you’d have to use them, ugh. Love the memories but not the bikes
  • 3 0
 Yeah but I bet that thing weighed less than 30 lbs. who cares how bad it rode.
  • 5 0
 Got into MTB in 2008, it shocks me how little people tend to recognise how much old bikes sucked. The tires were made of paper for lightness's sake, rims and frames would crack frequently, tubeless sometimes worked, the drivetrains were a mess, FS frames would only pedal well with a load of shock wizardry. Brakes were alright, I think, or we just went much slower back then. Also, I see folks complaining constantly about how many categories and niches MTB has right now, but fail to realise how much more versatile bikes are nowadays. 12 years ago a XC bike was essentially a roadie with some squish and an AM bike would be a pig to pedal. Today you can pick a downcountry bike and have fun at an enduro track
  • 1 4
 Sounds like none of you used to maintain your bikes right? I raced DH on a 26" second hand rig with bits from this website in 2011 including square taper cranks. Difference was I bought strong ones and I actually tightened them up?
  • 2 0
 @browner: no, we just used them
  • 1 0
 @Arierep: 2008 old times? Kids..
  • 41 4
 I am actually upset that 26 inch wheels. Isn’t the top comment right now Really Mad
  • 10 7
 I’m afraid most of us don’t miss them!
  • 4 0
 That’s because they’re alive and well my man! DJ for life!
  • 4 0
 I AM STILL ON 26" AND I LOVE IT !!! 2013 GT enduro , SO SO so fun !!! www.vitalmtb.com/product/guide/Bikes,3/GT/Force-LE,11760
  • 6 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: I'm a shorter rider. I really dig 27.5". But part of me would love to build up a 27.5/26 mullet park shredder
  • 4 1
 @yoimaninja: I’m the opposite and for the first time ever bikes are finally big enough.
  • 2 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: some brands are good enough to offer their small sizes in 27.5. I had a small 29er once and hated it. but I'm sure for someone 6'+ it feels fine.
  • 1 0
 death to 27.5, bring back 26", everyone hold onto your 2012 transition bottle rockets before they become collectors items
  • 2 0
 I don't miss 26". They're on my bike.
  • 1 0
 @yoimaninja: 26/27 will be the next big thing
  • 2 0
 @yoimaninja: I have and it is awesome fun to ride. I can't say that i have taken it through and super steep and chunky stuff, but the conversion has given and old favourite bike another lease of life!!
  • 33 0
 I loved my RockShox Pike Coil Uturn. Had it on my do it all Norco 125 hardtail growing up. 90mm for dirt jumps, 140mm for downhill, 110mm for street . Was such a blast !
  • 8 0
 I still have a lyrik with U-turn. I mostly keep it around bc I like the feature.
  • 4 0
 I miss my Psylo as well, such a wonderfully noodly fork.
  • 3 0
 Loved all my travel adjust forks like the flower loves the sun. But when things got low long slack enough, the BB would end up on the ground when the fork travel was adjusted down.
  • 13 0
 I run a Pike U-turn on my beater bike 2008 Cove Stiffee, it's like going back in time. and you know what? It is just as fun. Bikes are fun. Old or new.
  • 1 0
 I still run a Pike U-turn coil on an old play bike (Morewood Ndiza). With a few turns, it can go from dirt jumper to mini-DH bike. A brilliant design! Sadly, I'm too old for such riding without tons of travel, so it will probably be the next bike to leave the stable (coming soon to PB BuySell).
  • 1 0
 My Stanton Switchback 160 FS has a Lyric RCT3 Dual Position 180-150. Climbs like a goat and descends like a demon.
  • 2 0
 I had a pike and a boxxer u-turn, both were fantastic. I never did like the feel of the talas system but I’ve always preferred RS over Fox
  • 1 0
 Best fork ever
  • 33 0
 When did bash guards go away? I see them constantly and still run one. For the expense of very little weight, I will take that to not destroying things.
  • 2 3
 Plenty of bikes around that only have 2 ISCG tabs, pretty much making a bash guard a no-go
  • 5 0
 @mashrv1: my 2018 E29 has two tabs only.

But I've been running a bash guard on it for years without problem. That is probably my one and only complaint about this bike.
  • 2 0
 I have seen some stories online of companies refusing to warranty a frame that had the tabs break due to a big bashguard hit. The companies said it was for a guide only, so maybe the companies themselves are speccing bikes without a guard to prevent having to deal with that warranty. They certainly don't care if you bend your chainring.
  • 1 0
 It also makes sliding over stuff much easier. My new frame only has 2 of the 3 tabs, wtf is that for?
  • 2 0
 @mashrv1: how do you think we did it before iscg was a thing, man?
  • 2 0
 @brass-munky: Trying to clamp it with the BB was always a poor work around
  • 2 0
 You should see my face when I discovered that my Stumpjumper Evo doesn't take a bash guard,as it's 2 bolts ISCG 05. Why!
  • 1 0
 When 1x drivetrains became a thing (a good one!) and everyone wanted direct mount chainrings without the easy option to add a bash ring? I don't know what happened first. Sill running old 104 mm cranksets for exactly that reason.
  • 1 0
 @martn: Yeah, running 104BCD too (Shimano Zee currently). But just because there is direct mount doesn't mean everyone should get that, right? My frame does have the ISCG2005 mounts so I'm using a top guide and slider (One Up) but I've happily been using bash rings in the past.
  • 1 0
 Wolf Tooth Camo helped get a bash guard on my stumpy! Got to sacrifice the chain guide though.
  • 33 7
 White rims.
  • 34 1
 I see your white rims, and I raise you raw alloy rims.
  • 15 1
 and purple anodized parts?
  • 9 0
 Camo Sun rims. But not really.
  • 2 0
 @Sanderson22: I always wanted a set of the green ano spank rims, its a shame they don't make all their rims in a full spectrum of ano colors for all wheelsizes anymore
  • 8 0
 @mahargetan: I see your raw alloy and raise you polished alloy. It's a shame Velocity rims are made of cheese.
  • 2 1
 White camo rims
  • 11 0
 White fox lowers with kashima
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: Yesss, that's more accurately what I was picturing in my head. I'm building some wheels atm with no trouble finding polished spokes, nipples, and even hubs in polished finish. Rims, on the other hand...
  • 1 0
 @mahargetan: I do not understand why you dont see many raw aluminum wheels. Better yet would be chrome wheels
  • 2 0
 Silver rims!!! My good old Slayer SXC had a pair of silver Spank Subrosa . They were sexy AF
  • 3 1
 @slimjimminnies: chrome plating flakes off pretty quick and adds a non-zero amount of mass. Polished ally is also bit of work and still needs a coating otherwise it gets ratty too.
  • 1 0
 @NoahColorado: max camp rims
  • 1 0
 @NoahColorado: MTX camo rims*
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: :,( used to be an Aussie brand, made in oz too from what I recall.
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: are they really? i found those and was directly thinking how sweet they'd go with a mirror polished frame next year. EX511s have been so painless I'm reluctant to take a chance on anything questionable.

i miss NS Bikes having neon and gold graffiti rims and the set of Spank wheels I had with red ano rims on them.
  • 3 0
 White rims, white handlebars, a few tribal graphics here and there and a jersey 2 sizes too big I think we are in a better place right now
  • 1 0
 @Sweatypants: I think you'd be downgrading with almost anything else moving from an EX511.
  • 1 0
 @mattg95: the old bronze ish gray stanchions that where super common before the black stanchions popularized
  • 1 0
 @mahargetan: mavic grey,with ceramic brake surface
  • 23 3
 I think the biggest point here is #2

I DO NOT WANT BATTERIES ON MY GODDAMN BIKE

and breathe...
  • 17 0
 Don't most new Manitous have internal travel adjustment?
  • 4 0
 Yup. Some of the mid to higher end Sun Tour forks do too!
  • 3 0
 MRP Ribbon as well. And it comes with the spacers to adjust it.
  • 2 0
 DVO forks do too.
  • 19 0
 Most magazines and sites pretend suspension is either made by Fox or by Rock Shox
  • 3 0
 @schu2470: Indeed. It takes less than 10 minutes to change the travel of my Auron RC2 (and there's no oil in the lowers; that's a clean and easy job)
  • 2 0
 Talas and I-turn were on the fly adjustment.
  • 1 0
 @usedbikestuff: true. I even turned out to have some advanced experimental version of a Fox 32 TALAS RL, that automatically changed travel during hard riding without you needing to turn any knobs. Never figured out why it thought having less travel when riding hard was beneficial though. It probably thought I wasn't riding fast enough...
  • 1 0
 @usedbikestuff: manitou had an on the fly adjustment as well. Can’t remember what it was called but my Manitou Black from early 2000’s had it. Now that I’m thinking of it Marzocchi had TST which offered same thing
  • 1 0
 @Mac1987: that sounds like many talas air springs: faulty. They lose the seal in the top air chamber, so they drop to the lower travel and only come back up when lifted (which, with a slack seat angle, could happen when riding along), and only stay there until you hit a bump.
  • 1 0
 Indeed, the service guides even lay out how to configure the spacers to reach a certain travel.
  • 1 0
 Cane Creek Helm II and Formula Selvas also offer similar systems. I talked with a Rockshox/Fox servicing business in WA and they preferred the "fixed internal travel systems" ie Fox and Rockshox, over the internally adjustable (spacer) systems.
  • 1 0
 @iwhizz: Of course that's what Fox/RS prefer, adding that adjustability into every product costs more, and they have enough market presence that they don't need to include useful features like that.
  • 1 0
 They also include the spacers in the box if you want to shorten the travel - forget about buying an air spring or tokens
  • 2 0
 Funny bit about the Dorado air spring: You can set it to max travel and then adjust the travel with your shock pump. Just attach the pump so it registers your pressure, push down on the fork to your desired ride height/travel, and take the pump off. I got the idea when stuffing my bike in a van that needed a wee bit more clearance for it to fit. Attached the pump and pushed it down all the way and it stayed there. Light bulb moment. It doesn't rely on an equalization channel in the stanchions the way Fox, RS and near every other fork mfr does. Removed the necessary travel spacers to set it 150mm for rowdy, drop it back to 140 for most everything else, and will set it at 130 for a bikepacking trip this summer. It's worked a peach so far.
  • 9 0
 New bikes are so good. My mid tier trail bike has twice the downhill capability as the yeti 575 I cut my teeth on. And it climbs very very well, and I can take it apart with some very basic tools, and it’s pretty lite, and tubeless, and long ass dropper posts, and killer brakes, and drivetrains you don’t have to think about. 2003 was not that long ago and bikes have evolved so well. I’m grateful for the bike technology we have today. You don’t need to ride a super bike to get super performance. Bikes rule!
  • 11 3
 1. I like internal more if it is done well. Big IF.
2. LOL, still the case. Not planning on changing.
3. Had a 36 TALAS, don't miss it. Would rather spend the weight + engineering $$ on performance.
4. Bring these BACK!
5. These went out of style?? I still smash the bash plate many times a season, and have run top guides on all my bikes. Why bash a chainring? Makes no sense.
  • 1 0
 To your talas comment, they were not referencing that, they were stating how with maybe $5 in parts you could adjust the travel internally, yea $40 for an air spring isn't bad but it's not great.
  • 1 0
 I really like the way a few companies do the cable routing with a panel on the downtube. Canyon does it on some bikes like the Neuron, I think there's a few other companies as well but I can't think of them off the top of my head.
  • 1 0
 Have you tried ditching your top guide tho?? My last dropped chain was in 2012 (sounds like yesterday, but was in fact 10 years ago) with the very first iteration of eagle. Even that setup only dropped the chain once all season and it was in a very hectic moab rock garden. Never touched a top guard since never lost a chain, everything from XC to DH. Not that it hurts to have it sitting their either... but just one more thing to potentially get misaligned and make obnoxious noises mid-ride.
  • 1 0
 @BenWarsaw: Guerilla Gravity is another.
  • 11 0
 Still waiting for Truvative Hammerschmidt cranks to make a modern comeback.
  • 4 0
 It migrated to the hub of some gravel bikes.
I hear there is an mtb one coming…
  • 1 0
 Same.
  • 7 1
 120mm Gooseneck stem
Grip Shift
2.1" WTB tires
Quick Release....EVERYTHING
Unquestioned faith in Chromoly to last longer then my short life here on earth

...Also forgetting everything is quick release until air born...oops...yeOUCH!!!
  • 6 0
 As far as the price of bikes goes, a quality ride was expensive even in the 1980s. I had Tom Ritchey make a custom frame for me in 1983, I think. I was an employee at a shop that sold Ritchey so I got a pro deal, which as I recall was 15% below wholesale. Even with the deal, I remember paying $2400 to the UPS driver for a bare frame and rigid fork. By the time I built it up with XTR drivetrain components, Chris King/Mavic wheels, Salsa stem, titanium bar, lots of anodized and titanium bolts, it was over $5000. And I'm pretty sure I only made $7000 or $8000 bucks a year.

That said, it was a great bike! I rode it until the start of the pandemic, at which time I bought a used full suspension Niner. I rolled up more than 150,000 miles on my Ritchey. Of course, almost none of the original components survived. I went through quite a few wheelsets, cranks, bottom brackets, etc... Put the original Marzocchi Bomber coil spring fork on at some point. I only stopped riding it because I needed a new rear rim and realized that the market had gone away from 26". I bought a set of XTR wheels for it off ebay but came to the realization that I was going to have to go a different way for the long run.

My road bike from the 1980s was also a $5000 purchase, so I think people grousing about prices in this range now are being unrealistic. Considering what you get now compared to then, and relatively higher salaries now, bikes aren't really more unaffordable in the present compared to the past.

In the past what you paid for was custom sizing, tubesets, and somebody making it just the way you wanted it. Now you pay for a level of performance (suspension and componentry) that we couldn't imagine in the 1980s. I don't know if my Niner will last 150,000 miles, and I'm old enough now that I'll never find out, but the whole time it lasts it will outperform my Ritchey by having suspension and hydraulic disc brakes. It also takes bigger tire sizes, which all by itself is a big performance upgrade.

I can't speak to bikes that cost more than my Triumph Tiger, but bikes in the $5000 to $7000 range are just about the same price that a quality bike has cost for my whole life.
  • 1 6
flag browner (Jan 13, 2023 at 0:09) (Below Threshold)
 Dude your anecdote is so old that are essentially talking about the actual brick sized phones only wall street traders could afford in the 90s, whereas everyone on here is talking about their Nokia which came out a few years later, did way more and cost thousands less.
  • 5 0
 I miss the travel battles! Demo 9, V10. A Demo9 was $5500cad. brand new. The "technology" was state of the art back then. So todays state of the art shouldn't be worth double. I hope with Specialized laying off 8% of it's staff they'll come down in price haha
  • 2 1
 with cost of materials, shipping and wages, bikes not going to be cheaper.
  • 1 0
 Reminder that $5,500 in 2004 is $8,500 with inflation now. You can buy a Demo Expert today for $7,800 CAD that is infinitely better than the 2004 Demo9.
  • 7 1
 I am still running a chain guide and bash guard combo on my DH bike and my enduro bike. People who say the clutch system in the derailleur is enough to keep the chain on are just plain wrong.
  • 6 0
 I miss Totem with 20mm axle, Nokian Gazzolodi in 3.0, simple single pivot like orange 222, shimano airlines. Rock Solid Intense tires, Tioga disc wheels, Tioga seat, Balfa, brooklyn machine works, superco bikes ..
  • 9 3
 I miss the graphics. I'm getting really tired of solid colours. I want aggressive lines, and sleek stripes back.
  • 8 0
 seems like you want an Intense.
  • 3 0
 I want the name of the frame brand in a minimum of 10 places. Bonus points for more than one font.
  • 4 1
 I definitely do NOT miss all the ridiculously tall seat tubes and top tubes. Being 5'10, I was always forced to chose a bike that actually fit me (usually a large) and a bike that I could ride the way I wanted to ride (usually a medium)
I hope tall seat tubes and top tubes become eliminated on all types of bike.
  • 3 0
 Smaller wheels, higher BB, narrower bars were a lot easier on narrow trails. There are some old trails and features I ride in Tahoe that were clearly built with the dimensions of a Specialized Big Hit in mind. I only ride a medium and some of the long travel 29ers these days dont even fit on some old tight tracks and crevasses. Cant imagine an XL.
  • 4 2
 Wait.. sliding the stanchions on a dual crown fork doesn't change travel. The fork will still want to compress 200mm... if you slide the fork up, the wheel will just hit the lower crown/downtube before you get full travel (and I don't think you want that to happen).
  • 8 1
 They weren't saying sliding the stanchions increases travel, just that you can slide the stanchions up or down to steepen or slacken the head angle on a DH bike. On older adjustable travel forks, you could add/subtract 10mm in travel to slacken or steepen the head angle and get the same result. Something modern forks don't allow on the fly.
  • 1 0
 There is a maximum insertion limit on dual crown stanchions for this reason. If you put the crown below that line your wheel will hit your frame at bottom out but the stanchions are intentionally longer than needed to allow you to adjust the bike's head angle.
  • 1 0
 @millsr4: They're mostly longer than needed to accomodate different head tube lengths.
I'd love to hear from someone from RS/Fox (@fluidfunction?) how's it meant to be. Boxxer manual for the previous chassis said 156mm +-2mm I believe. But I've certainly seen more extension on some pros' bikes so I wonder how big a deal it is? I imagine it's about stanchion wall thicknes and all that being clamped properly.
  • 5 2
 I owned a Maverick ML-7, bought it second hand.
Those went for $5k back at the turn of the millennium.
That bike is worthless compared to anything in the $2k range today, including hardtails!
  • 2 0
 That’s because it’s a maverick with a duc on it right? That company has long been out of business contributes. Hence why most people got rid of their iron horse Sunday.
  • 1 0
 @usedbikestuff:
Mine had a “modern” fork on it, but when it came time to sell, I couldn’t give it away.
$10k for a bicycle is ridiculous, but what you get for much less these days is still amazing.
  • 1 0
 @usedbikestuff: maverick was a brand, iron horse had a bike model maverick. ML-7 was the model.
  • 1 0
 I had a Maverick Matic with both the sc32 and duc32
  • 1 0
 @LaXcarp:
..coolness
I kicked ass on my ML-7!
  • 1 0
 @joelsman: I’ve overwritten the part of my brain I wasted on remembering that brand in detail.
  • 1 0
 @usedbikestuff:
..good idea
  • 7 2
 To be fair it's generally necessary to trim and bleed the hose when installing a brake on a bike with external routing.
  • 2 0
 Not if you ride a large or an XL and can tolerate the factory bleed like i've been doing for several years.
  • 6 0
 Being 20 years younger while I rode them.
  • 2 0
 Just saw that EXACT Enduro on Craigslist for $1800. The ad is hilarious. 'Isnt outdated compared to what they make now' 'bring your mountain bike I guarantee this one is lighter'

fresno.craigslist.org/bik/d/clovis-2011-specialized-works-enduro/7565158508.html

Not gonna lie though my previous daily driver was that same generation Enduro and it's a beauty of a bike. But light years off from modern bikes
  • 2 0
 Someone tell that guy his bike is worth about $400
  • 2 0
 @dsciulli19: are you kidding, the front derailleur, 142x12 hub on 26" wheel, and external dropper alone are worth that much
  • 1 0
 My bad that's an s works, only the Evo had the weird wheel
  • 2 0
 I don't ever remember Derailleur guards!!???

I think the thing I miss about older bikes were there were set standards - you could chop and change parts from any bike!

I also miss having to pay only about £50 for a high end cassette - when youre talking £180 for a midrange cassette these days!

Also I've not given in to the ebike thing yet and my next bike is likely going to be a non ebike Atherton duro!
  • 1 0
 Had those guards on a couple of Lapierres myself, would happily have them again now.
  • 1 0
 @chakaping: Did they stick out much further than the mech?
  • 2 0
 @adzrees: yes a bit, never noticed any problems though
  • 2 0
 Some great picks there @seb-stott - I wonder if you're testing the Bird Aeris 9? It's got a really neat solution allowing internal or external routing (I've chosen external obvs).
I was just saying to a pal recently that I'd happily buy a modern U-turn fork. They would be very useful again now that so many bikes have flip chips and for geometry, mulleting etc.
  • 2 0
 I bought my first nice full suspension bike in 2001. It was a Foes FXR. Full XTR dual control Kit, Ti Curnutt Coil, Fox Talas fork, with hand built King/Mavic 717 wheels shod with 2.4” tires set up tubeless with electrical tape, a modified presta valve stem that I cut off an old tube, and Stan’s sealant. It also had gravity dropper seat post. It cost me $4100.00 dollars. Bro deal! Full retail would have been over $6500. Nice bikes have always been expensive. Unfortunately the bro deals aren’t nearly as good as they used to be. It weighed just over 28 pounds it looked way heavier than it was. So many people didn’t get the bike. It wasn’t XC, it wasn’t DH, and it wasn’t Freeride. Pretty much everyone of them thought the dropper post was stupid. Stans sealant was so new most of the local shops didn’t even know what it was or how to set it up. Again most people thought it would never catch on. The increase in traction and speed was immediately noticeable. I went from getting flats all the time to maybe 1or 2 a season. The Curnutt coil was way ahead of its time. The Fox Talas worked well for me. I never had any issues with the couple I owned. But winding the travel up and down was a pain in the ass. The dropper post was the real game changer for me though. I quickly went from mid pack on the downs to leading the downs. I also quickly blew up the light Mavic 717s and replaced them with 823s. Night and day difference. They where much heavier but I could push the bike so much harder. They where also a tubeless ready rim so setting tire up tubeless was much easier. The XTR brakes where good at the time but definitely lacked power. Unfortunately there really wasn’t many options for powerful brakes back then. I was dropping chains constantly so I built a chain tensioner to keep the chain in check. Man did that get looks and questions. Those that laughed at my build starting asking questions. What kind of training was I doing to improve so much so fast. I just laughed. I wasn’t training or riding any more than they where. I had mechanical advantages they where too ignorant to try. I loved that bike and a friend of mine is still riding it.
I miss aluminum frames with anodized finishes that you could crash and they didn’t look like you crashed. The paint on todays bikes chips and scratches so easily. I miss fast handling bikes that required you to have skill to ride fast. Riding one of todays enduro bikes is like driving a Baja race truck. There is an enormous amount of room for error. I don’t miss front derailleurs or triple ring drivetrains. Under powered brakes. Narrow bars or long stems. Tires with side walls so thin they took over a cup of Stan’s to finally seal. I definitely don’t miss needing to buy a DH wheel set to get a wheel set that was stiff enough and had rims wide enough to actually support a tire. I don’t miss aluminum wheels at all.
My current bike is an Ibis Ripmo. The internal cable routing is tube in tube. It works great for me no complaints. Even swapping out the rear brake isn’t that big of a deal. It takes less than 10 minutes to bleed SRAM Codes, Formulas or any Shimano brake. That being said running cables through the headset just isn’t very practical for most people. I still run a One Up bash guard. Ironically without a chain guide. I haven’t switched to electric and probably won’t until I don’t have a choice. I have barely had to touch an adjuster on my XX and now XX1 drivetrains since they came out many years ago. Ever since I switched to SRAM XX in 2009 then to a 1x10 drivetrain in 2012 all my drivetrain issues pretty much went away. Then when XX1 came out I ditched the chain guide and suddenly have more gears than I need. Todays 1x drivetrains are so good. I switched to big rotors and dh level brakes years ago. Never going back. I love my carbon wheels. I doubt I will ever go back to aluminum wheels. I have only cracked two carbon rims in the 12 plus years I have been riding them. Everyone thought I was insane when I spent $2000 on a set of Edge now ENVE AM wheels. That was 2009. I rode them for 5 years and then sold them for $1500 dollars. Still laughing!
  • 2 0
 26 inch wheels. You used to be able to race DH and learn tricks on dirt jumps on the same bike. Most people these days are just riding boring enduro trails and slack, flattened out jumps with racing being the pinnacle of the sport in their eyes so its understandable why most people want wagon wheels
  • 2 0
 - purple anodized everything, sorry oil slick
- narrow bars that had plenty of room when the trail was originally built
- saddles with leather covers instead of plastic
- swapping tires in 5 minutes with no mess
- Klein paint jobs
- fewer pedal strikes
- cheaper wear items (looking at you $300 cassette)
  • 1 0
 I missed being able to pedal without bashing cranks on everything. Fortunately, I was able to squeeze a longer rear shock on my Ripmo that makes it a MUCH better bike. But seriously bike industry. People pedal. On trails. With rocks and roots and stuff.
  • 1 0
 Agreed Seb! Obviously very few people are going to argue that the bikes were better overall, but we do seem to have lost a few things along the way. It's especially a shame when the loss seems needless, and having the thing came with no downside!

I'd agree with everything on your list. I'd also like to submit a few additions.

1 - Schrader valves (or something similar) Loads easier to use, minimal penalties. I have scars on the top of my hand from smacking a cassette after releasing a tight pump head from a presta! Last piece of our roadie heritage, needs an upgrade.

2 - I - Beam. Doesn't have to be I Beam. Just not the mega faffy system we currently have, especially now we have droppers and we need access to the air valve. I Beam was just better all round, the stiffness could have been worked around.

3 - Being able to fit/swap/fix tyres without co2/compressor/levers/crying. Now, I'm all for tubeless. Good tubeless. But we don't have it yet. So close, UST, so close.

4 - Shiny things. Okay okay, this isn't functional and I'm just showing my age, but anodising in all the colours of the acid trip and ball burnishing/ultra polished metal/powder coating looked cool to me. Also, bikes very quickly became 1 offs after a few upgrades. Nowadays you can usually get a 'stealth' (dull) matte black/grey or a 'lairy' fluoro job. Neither look great to me. But then I'm clearly not sick AF, bro.

5 - Rapid Rise. Ok, now I'm being a little bit twatty. But hey, I could have said Dual Control (please, please stay dead!). Rapid rise made sense to me - spring assist when I needed it whilst exerting on a climb, and push to upshift into a descent. I'm not going to the mat on this one, just seemed a little better.

6 - Sizing. Modern geometry is, on the whole, better. Done. However, it has created a shift in the sizing paradigm whereby the important measurements (reach/RAD and stack/standover) can be wildly different between brands and sizes. You can probably get a size L with a reach of 450mm or 500+mm. That's particularly difficult for newcomers to allow for. I'm sure this will resolve, but this is potentially a big problem for those who aren't fully clued up, and needs to be sorted quickly.


Ok. Time for a sit down and watch of DIRT for old time's sake, hey?!
  • 1 0
 Massive yes on the schrader. Got them on my Warden, it's incredibly superior to presta for everything from adding sealant to seating tires, attaching the pump.. Let's end this presta nonsense
  • 5 1
 A virtually universal mounting standard for cassettes (although on this point, F-you Campagnolo).
  • 3 6
 I feel like XD could have been that, but Shimano decided to just make up another new one to do the same job.
  • 6 0
 older bike prices
  • 2 0
 I don't know about missing them, since they were so ugly and could trap debris, but a new breed of fork stanchion guards. Personally haven't dinged them up, but have seen plenty of forks with scratches or worse on them.
  • 1 0
 Pretty sure Lizard Skins still sells their neoprene fork boots…
  • 4 1
 2. You still don't have to charge anything. Today, you have the choice of adding something to your bike that needs charging.
  • 2 0
 Old soggy Bombers Big Grin
95% of the time, they're crap. But sometimes, juuuust sometimes, that straight line rock garden could do with an under sprung, under damped magic carpet comfort machine
  • 1 0
 maybe it was that they were the only forks with bushings done right so were stictionless. stiction will beat your arms up in the gnar worse than stiffness. hell, probably no one ever would complain about 40s being too stiff if they had no stiction.
  • 1 0
 The external cable routing and derailleur cover was good. The sprocket guard still exists and is a good thing. Although I don't have one. Pitch adjustment is a misguided fad. The electrics on the bike are up to you. On the one hand a cool thing, but it has a lot of downsides
  • 7 6
 I'm the only person I know who misses 3x9 gearing. I seem to have a fixed cadence and narrow gaps between gears made me a lot faster. I also sometimes do longer loops linked with road sections and a big ring with a range of gears was great in those cases
  • 1 0
 That granny grear will save your butt in a pinch!
  • 5 0
 Yes you are. I haven't had a front derailleur on a bike since my 98 GT LTS.
  • 7 0
 Seriously could not be happier with the death of front derailleurs. Although if I had my preference, my cassette would have 6 speeds with the same range but fewer options between.
  • 1 0
 Yup - my sram xo-r rear shifted better than anything— big ring crampon was great for logs.
  • 3 0
 Riding around on something no one had ever seen before... "Where's the motor", "It cost how much?, I could buy a car!" "Do a wheelie"

haha
  • 1 0
 My old RS Psylo had adjustable travel via a very long screwdriver down the leg from 80mm-125 with one through forty-three turns of the driver so you could custom your travel to fit your needs. I had it set to 125 for my '01 Superlight
  • 1 0
 I do like that you mentioned the whole “jib/trials” thing with bash guards, as I feel like none of the options today are capable of taking much. I’d be all over an option that didnt seem like it would snap if I looked at it wrong
  • 1 0
 Only thing I miss of my first enduro bike is how light it was. 26 inch wheels and tires where light. I do not miss carrying a backpack of tubes for 1 downhill each time I worked as trail guide. Some days were hilarious,a flat every minute in a 10 min long trail with 8 or more riders...I was always in Dh tires while working and people looked at me like I was crazy hehehe.
  • 2 0
 Not trolling, just curious. Did you run slime in your tubes? I remember 2.2 ikons going months on rough trails with no flats with tubes and slime
  • 1 0
 @HughBonero: I had some of those but most incidents where more like snakebite kind of flat.So no slime could seal those bites. My boss had boxes full of tubes in the van,nothing fancy,just cheap tubes cos it would last only a few rides anyway.
I had tubeless in my enduro wheels with DH Minion front and rear,I learned quickly what would work and what not. I do not had too many flats but tons of broken wheels.I managed to broke a few times a rim by the weld,split in half hehehe.
Big wheels had less problems with square edge hits and snake bites.
  • 1 0
 @homerjm: if you're breaking that many wheels definitely riding harder than I ever did! I switched to tubeless minions about 5 years ago definite improvement. But the tubed slimed ikons I remember being fun also. Cheers
  • 1 0
 @HughBonero: seems to me people are sissies not to go 2+ bar in the tires for "pointier" trails. can't 1,6 if there's a ton of sharp rocks. deal with it.
  • 1 0
 "Before that, the RockShox coil U-turn system offered on-the-fly travel adjustment: anywhere from 95-140 mm on the original RockShox Pike. It was a beautifully simple solution where turning the dial wound the spring shaft up the coil, effectively making the spring shorter. This not only reduced the ride height but also made the spring proportionally stiffer - because a shorter spring has a higher spring rate."
Early TALAS forks had 3mm travel adjustment 20 years ago...
  • 1 0
 As a guy with a steel hardtail with external routing and a coil fork with adjustable travel. Oh, and a bashguard because the bb drop is insane. I literally have no idea what you are chatting about. I was expecting 70 degree head angles on flat xc loops.
  • 1 0
 I miss not knowing or caring about wheel size, frame geometry, incremental suspension improvements, people pissed off about e-bikes, having the right frame size, rim width, strava…basically I miss being a beginner and just enjoying the ride for what it is. Riding solo without my phone or riding ridged singlespeed have helped me relive that the best. The basics are what drew me to the sport and what being me back.
  • 1 0
 @seb-stott
Please, how can a shorter coil have higher spring rate? Coil UTurn is maybe the most insane and beautiful solutions RockShox have EVER made. With UTurn, you only shorten the free-length of the coil. The shorter travel is not made by compressing the fork, but by shortening the distance between the ends of the coil.

I was using Lyrik Coil UTurn MissionControl MY2009 converted from 160mm to 170mm of travel by 10mm spacer under the UTurn shaft. Aside from huge bushings play and actually not working damper by design it was a serious piece of chassis that I could always depend on and several time saved my ash.
  • 1 0
 Well imagine if you took it to the extreme and shortened the spring to 5cm. Full length spring would take little force to compress by 3cm, whereas if your overall length is 5cm, assuming that leves about 3cm of travel, it'd take a bit of force to get all the travel out of the spring compared to a much longer spring of the same rate.
  • 1 0
 @MrDuck: while the rate is different, so is the maximum energy taken to compress the spring fully. you wouldn't bottom out the longer spring while you would the short one with the same amount of enery absorbed.

this is where confusion comes from, shorter spring is "softer" in the end of the day. now if you'll pay attention, the u turn spring is differently wound over the part that u turn works on, that's their trick to try and eqalize how much it takes to bottom it out from shortest to full travel. i had one and it was INDEED "softer" in the shorter travel setting.
  • 1 0
 While I applaud the technology involved to make AXS wireless and clean in that respect, the battery thing and the extra cost seem unnecessary for e-bikes especially but going forward, normal bikes as well... why are they not just running internally routed electrical wires that all connect to a single/e-bike battery?

electronic wires would be much easier to route and silence compared to cables...

Can we please standardize on electronics and get collaboration between manufacturers here?

I mean fighter jets use special threads in the carbon fiber hulls to run like conductive wires, the same could be done in carbon frames surely?
  • 1 0
 I have my Manitou Minute 3 w/ IT sitting on my shelf next to my Trek Liquid frame with its TALAS rear shock. It was awesome an awesome thing to have.

Oh, and I have an e13 bash guard on my Devinci. They never went away. In fact, if bikes get any lower, some geographical areas, like my mid Atlantic rocks and roots (which is why I installed one), are going to need one.
  • 1 0
 Me twenty years ago - "I can fit my tiny Kona Hardtail into the boot of my tiny Peugeot GTi hatchback."

Me now - "I need to completely dissasemble my LLS 29er in order to just about cram it into my absolutely huge E-class estate."


I miss that!
  • 1 0
 Been riding and racing MTBs since 1990. I've owned too many bikes over the years to remember each iterations personal experience of a new fork, frame material..etc. But I can say, I can feel the technology enhancements on my 2022 Supercaliber! That thing straight up rips!
  • 1 0
 Original Mullet bikes 26"x24" Atomlab or MAG 40s indestructible in the day... but on super slow hardtails.
Balfa - I miss my 50lb + BB7 for nostalgic squishy reasons only
Bike Videos that were 1/3 Bikes, Partying and Moto.
Roach
Trying to ride sketchy lines with V-Brakes

How did we survive ?
  • 1 0
 I'm building up a '22 Process 153 AL DL and it's honestly a treat. Fully external routing on the top of the downtube. Holders on the pivots for the rear brake line like Brian Park's 3D printed clip for the Madonna. ISCG tabs for a bashguard (OneUp thank you very much), and most obviously the water bottle bosses inside the triangle. The painted surfaces are not garbage, and headset and bottom bracket pressed in easily. Not much more one can ask for...
  • 1 0
 Love external brake routing. It’s a big reason why I own a sentinel. External brake routing with axs dropper and drive train. Can fully dismantle bike and put back together with out having to bleed/ route cables ect. Never going back to internally routing
  • 1 0
 pretty confusing.

internal cable routing is fine.

i don't have to charge my bike. its a 2023

adjusting stuff on the fly sucks make your bike set up for how you are riding.

derailleur guards are dumb. lets bring back bars with bolt on cross bars too.

I have a bash guard taco and upper chain guide. ONEUP? light and quiet.
  • 1 0
 going down to Jamaica for my Season in Jah sun a little late this year sometimes life gets in the way..... BUT.... I get to ride my 26ers for 3 months. I have an Ibis Mojo, SC Nomad and a Transition Bandit that are my remaining 26" rides for the tours only. That said Westjet and others have rejected oversized items RANDOMLY and some riding buds have been denied at the airport. This leaves them in awkward positions having to figure out what the F to do some do not have friends and family at the beckoned call to come and get the bike and then store it until they return.
So I am taking down fresh rubber, droppers and drive trains so the 26" bikes might be my only choice this year. I have to admit they feel like kids bikes after riding 650 and 29ers at home here in the 6 but my only drawback is keeping up with the larger hoops as I ride the last choice rides on tours.
Things I have changed on those old bikes ..... better shocks, 11 speed SLX drivetrains, Brand X droppers, WIDE bars[lol] and they have always been tubeless as I stopped using tubes in 2002.
Anyone in Negril the next few months gimme a shout out....... you can ride the 27.5!!!
seriously I still love riding them on tight and twisty stuff and they lift up so easily and are so flickable.
  • 1 0
 I wonder why Manitou's Mezzer is so ignored, I barely see them anywhere and it wasn't even mentioned here when it offers travel adjustment via internal spacers, or even without opening the fork by just removing all the air, putting it in the desired extended position and pumping back again.
  • 1 0
 Unpopular but correct opinions on what I miss below:
1. All of the above
2. 20mm axles
3. 10 speed being widely used
4. Small cassettes that didn't weigh a tonne
5. Compact derailleurs that weren't weak, long and exposed
6. Thicker chains that were tough and reliable (ie 10 speed)
7. No boost
8. 26" wheels (rear especially)
9. SDG I-beam
10. Full top and bottom chain guides
11. Appropriate length reach/bikes

Oh wait, I miss none of these, I'm still using them all (note have tried all modern alternatives for long periods).
Off back to my man-cave now where I am hoarding all the above.

Bottomless tokens and dropper posts are ok!
  • 1 0
 Could also do the ''Things We don't Miss About Older Bikes''
-fixed seat posts
-Double derailleurs with 3x8 gears
-Narrow rims with 1.75'' tires
-3' stems Smile
-Elastomer forks
-Cantilever breaks

What else?
  • 3 1
 It's pretty easy to change the air spring in my Lyrik. I did it at the same time as the first lower leg service. Must have taken an extra 10 minutes. Wink
  • 3 0
 Had that Enduro back in the day...it was so sick...looks hilariously goofy now.
  • 1 1
 What do I miss?
- 26" wheels, really?
- no dropper post? man no way to miss that.
- 2x 10 drivetrain? I don't give away my 1x 12 setup!
And the specs or performance of a fork, brakes or anything else is incredible....

The only thing I also start to question is; is a carbon frame really gives that extra thing which the others do?
  • 4 0
 Why isn't "Tires $100/each" at the top of this list??
  • 1 0
 For some reason my "less than" symbol doesn't show up.
  • 3 0
 I miss all the friends I would be riding with if bikes didn't cost 4 grand.
  • 3 0
 i dont miss any of it all my bikes are 2012 still 26 still all far more capable than i will ever be and hey still kick ass!
  • 2 0
 Whenever I smash my crank arm into a rock I miss the old high bottom brackets.
Then I go through corners and I don’t miss them so much…
  • 2 2
 Just buy the bikes from two years ago. Technically top notch but very good value for the money. Problem solved, except for the wow-buddy-cool-new-bike-with-all-the-fancy-stuff-i-just-read-about-on-pinbike-factor. I just got the Specialized Levo SL S-Works vom 2020 for 6000€ new. Prize was 13000€ then. Ok, 11 speed, but thats more of a plus? All the fancy parts on it. Great bike. Thank you bike store for giving it away for that price. But nobody else wanted it, because it wasnt the newest stuff they could rant about because soooo expensive. Crazy wolrd Smile
  • 1 1
 No batteries on a bicycle is something you "miss about older bikes"? Lol. Laying the industry narrative thick. Plenty of modern bikes have zero batteries. Also, bash guards haven’t gone anywhere. If anything, more bikes have ISCG tabs than in the past, especially in shorter travel categories.
  • 1 0
 You are right about the tabs, but I think Seb's right that people are forgetting/not bothering to fit bashguards. Most just have a chain keeper bit.
  • 1 0
 hmm, I have a guerrilla Gravity Gnarvana with:
1. external cable routing
2. Manitou Mezzer (which can be adjusted from 140 to 180)
3. bash guard
4. no batteries

No derailleur guard tho...
  • 1 0
 My current daily has 3/5; external routing, a bash guard and adjustable travel in the front from 100-150 by resetting the chambers with the pump and 127-140 in the rear by changing the shock mounting on the linkage.
  • 1 0
 Bikes we don't need to ride in anger, to have "fun". Or to avoid just more anger. Steeper head angles. Shorter reaches. Shorter wheelbases. BB shells not dragging on the ground. Lack of ebike diapers on my LBS's shelves.
  • 1 0
 Have a couple older rigs, 1-2 sizes up with reduced rear travel and love the way they ride. ….Getting frame, wheel and fork parts when needed is another story however.
  • 2 0
 I never thought about forks with travel adjust until I got a new frame and had to find a new Pike air shaft.
  • 6 3
 I miss Roskopp being at Sc.
  • 1 0
 I sometimes miss the quick turning of my 26ers. Definitely don’t miss the sketch in the fast and rough but it’s really really good in some tight Sedona trails
  • 3 0
 idk if anyone has truly tried so can say but i think the sketchiness of old bikes was due to them being plain too short, both reach and chainstay. yeah sure a bigger wheel rolls over better but it's got more inertia and 29 is way too big for manuals if you're short
  • 4 0
 @baca262: my friend has a very late generation Intense Uzzi with 26" wheels and 180mm travel. We swapped bikes for an evening ride and the only difference (accounting for things like bar width, weight, etc) was the way the 26" turned vs the 29" roll over.

We both agreed that we liked our own bikes better at the end. Neither of us having anything bad to say about each other's bike.
  • 1 0
 @baca262: I agree! What would happen if a proper 26er frame was built with modern geometry?! Probably still a bit sketchy but just as much fun can happen at a slightly lower speed, not all of us are KOM hunters
  • 2 0
 That Specialized Enduro 2006 - still have it. 26" - Made it 1x11 instead of 2x9..
  • 2 0
 I miss more options for 27.5 jibb and/or do-it-all bikes. Other than that, never looked back.
  • 4 1
 Rasta headsets and top caps.
  • 2 0
 Whistler mate. Pretty sure you'll find that at bikeco
  • 1 0
 Cultural appropriation!! Lol
  • 2 0
 I miss tubes and getting pinch flats or thorns all the time it was good cross training changing tubes
  • 3 0
 Remember the bottle opener on the SC Heckler? Pepperidge Farm remembers.
  • 1 0
 I feel like I'd rather bend a chain ring or break a chain than risk damaging the frame from a heavy impact on the "bash" guard.
  • 4 1
 I miss trail bikes that didn't weigh 35 lbs.
  • 4 0
 You mean "All Mountain"...
  • 1 0
 The only one of those 5 things missing from my Geometron G1 with Manitou Mezzers is the derailleur guard.

I don’t miss that, or the other 4 things.
  • 3 2
 Rear shocks that didn't shit the bed every 3 months. I have a Fox Alps from 1997 on a bike here that has NEVER been serviced, working like new still lol.
  • 1 0
 Here here…shocks used to last YEARS of use before totally needing a service. Performance would decline, but they would still work. Now they just blow a seal and shoot oil everywhere after half a season.
  • 1 0
 That's probably because it barely worked when new... But yeah if Fox could figure out how to make the Float X2 not shit itself every second day that would be cool. Rockshox are relatively reliable.
  • 1 1
 @notthatfast: it's the same thing with a frame (i don't remember which one) that uses proprietary, shit bearings you can obtain only from the manufacturer.

everyone does it, everyone sells shit while pushing "green" agenda. how green is to constantly produce and throw away pos products? and the money wasted as well, someone busted their ass for it, you stole it off them and flushed it down the toilet.

that's not how's it gonna work out, son.
  • 1 0
 I miss the playfulness of a shorter bike. I'm thinking of trying a 26 inch back wheel on my clash. I'm still running a zee mech too.
  • 3 0
 Anodised bar ends on 600 riser bars with gripshift...
  • 2 0
 My singlespeed steel hardtail is scoring very well on this. My Levo isn’t (OMFG why would you rout the cables there?!!)
  • 1 0
 High bb ,no stiff frames, 20mm axles ,slow rebound rubber tires ,short reach ,and slacker seat tube angles in terms of a comfort ride
  • 1 0
 Man that photo just tickles me so - my first bike (that I picked out and bought with my own money) was a 2010 Specialized Enduro with a u-turn fork - so many good memories!
  • 4 4
 I miss 68 degree headtube angles. All these low, slack disasters handle like crap on fun, tight and twisty trails. They're really only good for strait descents. "More capable" is just another term for "handicap."
  • 1 0
 You're missing the point.
  • 1 0
 hmmm, so THAT'S why people gap serpentines where they can
  • 3 0
 Price, genuinely consistent standards, and bombproof Northshore designs
  • 2 0
 I miss the promise and hope of better suspension layouts that make my life better in every way.
  • 4 0
 20mm thru axle.
  • 1 0
 I'm totally IN for a derailleur guard! Already killed 2 in 2 years...and it's never stopping. So please bring the guards back! The OLD GUARD.
  • 1 0
 I miss super short chainstays. They haven't disappeared from the market completely but I much prefer playful bikes that need lots of rider input.
  • 2 0
 20mm Axles!!!! I liked being able to take a wheel from one bike to another in a bind. I don't like, twisted lowers.....
  • 1 0
 Good you haven't pick the Spesh to show nicely done external cabling, because that one was a joke.
  • 7 4
 the hammerschmidt!!!
  • 2 0
 had one for 2 rides... had to get rid of it for the weight and drag.
  • 3 0
 The LBS that sold them.
  • 9 11
 1. If I’m swapping brakes the line will be cut to match shifter cable, routing it through the frame adds 0 time to a brake swap. A bleed takes 3 min. If you don’t have time or tools in an emergency just tape the brake line to the frame. If you can’t figure out how to fish a cable through a frame then maybe don’t service your own bike. It’s easy and often faster than applying ugly zip ties anyway.

2. Don’t buy electronics if you don’t like them. I’ve never charged anything on my bike.

3. I see your point, but forks are so good now that I don’t miss anything from the past. Plus pb buy sell has old forks if you want them.

4. I haven’t broke a derailleur since 2011, and that one was caused by a stick in the spokes. So… no to whatever that is.

5. I see bash guards everywhere all the time, they didn’t go away.
  • 4 3
 travel adjust forks also have way more seals so more stiction.
  • 1 0
 Saved me from having to type that much 2. Just put AXS on my trail bike after the mechanical shifter died on me during a ride. It is absolutely fantastic. Still not sure I prefer it though. My van wouldn't start this morning so I had to make a last minute swap to my Jeep and if I would have forgotten my AXS battery, it would have been very disappointing.
  • 2 0
 @jaydawg69: do they? My Pike U-turn say no..
  • 1 0
 @jaydawg69: I'd want a coil one though
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: come on, there is some irony with having a battery issue in your van.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: I didn't think of that, good point. I just think of it as 30 year old vehicle issues.

I need a bike rack on my horse.
  • 2 0
 Built In Bottle Openers...
  • 1 0
 Bottles…
  • 1 0
 Man i miss the smell of a brand new v-braked full squish bike that can run a serious 26x1.95 mud tire.
  • 1 0
 Good one.
  • 1 0
 Instead of missing these things, I just have a new bike that has all of these features (minus the derailleur guard).
  • 2 0
 I always run a bash guard. Why wouldn't you
  • 3 0
 Standards
  • 1 2
 Travel adjust forks can eat a bag of d!cks. U-Turn was clunky Talas was overly complicated and unreliable. Marzocchi ETA was useful only if you didn't actually mtb with your mtb.
  • 1 0
 My bike is 2017, and while I don't have a derailleur guard, I've got everything else Smile
  • 1 0
 I always run a full chain guide/bash ring (Shimano), don't see a reason not to.
  • 3 0
 26" free ride bikes
  • 1 0
 Guerrilla Gravity still has external routing behind a removable plate thankfully!
  • 2 0
 Who travels with a spare brake set on holiday?
  • 2 1
 This is basically a "journalists are out of touch" list. Guess what? All these things still exist for us plebs.
  • 2 4
 Mmmm, I take issue with most of this list.

Internal is way better when done right. I cried about having to bleed the rear brakes the first couple times, then learned how to bleed brakes and haven't cared since. It's nice to get a fresh bleed anyway. And for the shift cable it is without a doubt faster to swap in a good internal frame. Just one push through vs. playing with all kinds of clips and tiny screws. Oh... and 99% of the time you need to shorten the hose anyway on new brakes so what are you even talking about you always have to bleed them.

Ok the charging I do agree with, even as an ebike-participant, I admit having to charge your bike or its components is lame.

Swapping air springs is still a pretty viable and easy option... and given the INSANE progress in how good the forks (and shocks) are nowadays it seems a little silly to shake your stick at a pretty unnecessary feature. Most bikes have a chip or a headset cup you can flip to experiment with geo. And 5-10mm difference can also easily be achieved adjusting air pressure, a factor people always seem to ignore.

Remember that derailleur guards existed because derailleur hangers were made of tin foil? And in those days we had to carry spare hangers on us while riding they were so prone to failure? Don't miss anything about that.

If you want to mount up a bash guard and chain guide be my guest, but since the dawn of 1x I haven't run either. Dropped one chain in 2012 none in the past 10 years, have "bashed" my ring on exactly 0 objects.

You're free to miss whatever you miss... but this feels like a fluff article written to fulfill a prompt, not a story you felt strongly about and had to share with the world. I would've been bummed too if my boss gave me this prompt to write about because I just racked my brain and there's honestly nothing I miss about old bikes. I loved the h*ll out of them all over the years, but my god they just keep getting better. Lack of standardization would be my only gripe, but that was, is, and always will be a problem so oh well.
  • 1 0
 Contrary Mary.
  • 1 0
 Yep,miss is just miss.
  • 3 5
 Im happy to see less bash guards, Frames these days cant handle the stress in that area and its super common to see cracked tabs.
Id rather ruin a chainring than crack a frame....

external needs to make a come back 100%
batteries dont phase me and neither do motors.(your jelly or whatever sour puss if your against it)

Everything else can stay in the past(except off topic, Social media can f off, done nothing but cause issues)
  • 1 0
 5'10s that lasted forever. Actually I don't miss them, I still my 2012s, holes in the bottom and all.
  • 2 0
 Marzocchi ads with pornstars
  • 1 0
 What a bad review.... My Norco Aurum HSP for 2021 came with a bashguard and external cabling...
  • 1 0
 Those arent as old as that... i still ride a 99 Sintesi Bazooka with Monsters, so thats modern stuff to me!
  • 2 0
 Compatibility and lack of new standards!!!
  • 1 0
 I hate nearly everything about the current bikes. I wouldn't ride one if you gave it to me!
  • 2 0
 The idea of motors in bikes being looked on as ridiculous
  • 1 0
 This list is impressively well reasoned. I have nothing to whine about, damnit.
  • 1 0
 Stull use a bash guard on my 2018 Altitude. I like riding my bike, not pushing it.
  • 3 0
 My youth
  • 1 0
 Maybe it's been said but Suntour forks are ridiculously easy to adjust the travel on.
  • 1 0
 Coil and oil,this air suspension is dog poo
We make our suspension worse then put storage in our bikes,it’s insane.
  • 1 0
 Love my wife's carbon Scouty
  • 1 0
 this all of this except maybe the travel adjust
  • 12 10
 26 inch dh bikes
  • 3 2
 got one, can't find tires. everyone sissied out.
  • 1 0
 @zoobab2: yes there are tires but no one locally sells them, have to order from abroad. this is very weird since the locals are pisspoor and there's a boatload of useful 26" bikes they still have
  • 1 0
 @baca262: Oh have better bikes? My 27.5 DH bikes is light years better than every single DH bike I had in the past going back to 1994. I can go bigger, harder etc and it won't explode. If you have a 26 and keep it running, more power to you. However, 'sissied' has nothing to do with it.
  • 4 2
 @bman33: is your solution to this persons relative poverty “get nicer stuff”?

Interesting, I wonder if they have thought of that before.
  • 2 1
 @dirtyburger: Not a single place did a say or infrer that. My comment was intended for @baca262's comment on 'sissied out' as I note in my commen, not the comment regading the 'pisspoor' locals. I also note 'If you have a 26...." No intention of talking down to a less foturnate country.
  • 1 0
 @bman33: :thumbs up: apologies for the bad faith interpretation
  • 1 0
 @zoobab2: So does Schwalbe
  • 2 1
 They were 8 inch travel full suspensiondirt jumpers that you could trust no matter how big you went. Now they are just limousines meant to race and can't get through a set of tight jumps the same way.
  • 1 1
 @luckynugget: Why are you trying to use an big trail bike or enduro/DH bike to ride tight dirt jumps or park with? Right tool right job... use a DJ bike for that applicaiton or at minimum get a small framed 'freeride' bike. Bikes are without question better than they ever have been in most ways and there are correct bikes for the correct application...
  • 2 1
 @bman33: because I come from a place where steep jumps are built for big bikes too. These modern freeride bikes are great and I own one, as well as a dirt jumper but they are comprised by being designed around climbing uphill. No matter how much you customize it, it's still a frame that was designed around climbing uphill. DH bikes had none of that compromise. A small sized 26" DH bike had a similar feel to dirt jumpers back then but with 8 inches of travel front and rear. The modern idea of needing 5 different bike for each application is f*cking rediculus. Modern enduro/downhill bikes are focused on racing and not jumping and thats what I miss.
  • 1 0
 @luckynugget: pity a dh bike you cannot bunny hop
  • 1 0
 @baca262: why not? Especially a 27.5 bike with more playful (older) geo? Barely heavier than an enduro or trail 29’er
  • 2 0
 Lighter
  • 1 0
 You can still run a bash guide. I do.
  • 2 0
 Coil sprung forks.
  • 1 0
 My Mezzer Pro is travel adjustable by just hooking up the air pump.....
  • 1 0
 It also included the correct travel spacers in case you want to do it properly, too!
  • 1 0
 Oh man I loved my RS psylo u-turn.
  • 2 0
 I loved mine for about a week untill it started leaking from the seals and the U-turn function stopped working but the anticipation of riding a 'long travel' fork with those naked stanchions instead of the rubber accordion boots made me lie to myself and say how amazing it was. I got that thing for like $129 at Jenson haha
  • 2 0
 @mrgonzo: oh what a bummer! I found mine on the narrow pricepoint print catalog and called in my order haha.
  • 2 0
 @borisimobike: pricepoint! Supergo! Man those catalogs got me through some rough times on the shitter in the early 2000s
  • 1 0
 Can you run a chain guide / guard with a oval chainring?
  • 1 0
 I have
  • 1 0
 I do. Propain Tyee AL 29er witha Nukeproof Guide and Guard over a 32 Oval Wolftooth dropstop chainring. Runs a dream with no issues.
  • 2 0
 No electric
  • 1 0
 i miss the original 2.5" 26" specialized butcher sx tires. Best ever,
  • 1 0
 That excessively hard rubber with the bead protection that lasted longer than the 3 swingarms on my 06 sxt?
  • 1 0
 also miss cheapo coil rockshox domains
  • 1 0
 I loved my Rockshox 2-Step. Jk.
  • 1 0
 I miss having one standard... Especially with hubs.
  • 2 0
 I miss 26" so much
  • 1 0
 a derailleur guard made of carbon fiber is just comical
  • 1 0
 my brand new bike has all these except a derailleur guard
  • 2 0
 26 FOR LIFE.!!!
  • 1 0
 Oh man adjustable travel was amazing...
  • 1 0
 Hardcore hardtails like my old 24Bicycles LeToy3
  • 1 0
 Still got all but the mech guard. They never took off.
  • 1 0
 Simpler times. Cheaper too!
  • 1 0
 On the gear side: - Kneeshin guards
  • 1 1
 I miss old bikes about as much as I miss black & white television sets. They belong in the past. Ebikes are the future.
  • 1 0
 I miss Shawn Palmer laying pipe to all the top pros.
  • 1 0
 "Derailleur guards" it's already 1st of April?
  • 2 0
 26" wheels
  • 1 0
 U-Turn was around before the original pike. Had a psylo that was U-turn.
  • 1 0
 always hated external routing chaffing on the frame. miss ground clearance
  • 1 0
 RC's writing on this website. Hope the guy is doing well and riding happy!
  • 1 0
 ....still have a bash guard with a skid plate
  • 1 0
 Stealth grey components. Like mavic cd grey rims, and shimano xtr m950
  • 1 0
 Bash guards 100%.
  • 2 2
 2015 era reach numbers were perfect
  • 1 0
 Bash guards
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