Are Shimano & SRAM Developing Brakes For Headset Cable Routing?

Dec 7, 2022 at 3:58
by Seb Stott  
photo


Shimano and SRAM have both filed patents that show a brake lever with a hose that attaches close to the handlebar. It seems likely that this is related to the current trend for bike manufacturers to run cables and hoses through the upper headset bearing. These levers would allow the hoses to run from the headset to the brake lever in close contact with the handlebar, potentially getting rid of the loose loops of brake hose which normally run in front of the head tube. The hoses could even be run through the handlebar and stem. In combination with wireless shifting, this could create a visually cable-free bike.

photo

Perhaps the brakes have been developed in response to manufacturers putting cables through the headset, or perhaps bike manufacturers, who know what's coming from component manufacturers years before we do, have already been designing bikes to take advantage of these brakes. This possibility was hinted at by Merida when we asked various manufacturers about their thinking behind this style of cable routing:

bigquotesParticularly in view of the brakes that might be introduced soon, which will route the cables much closer to the handlebars, we expect that headset cable routing will become more common among brands.Merida



photo

In the case of Shimano's design, the master cylinder is offset from the hose port and a hole perpendicular to the handlebar connects the two, allowing hydraulic fluid to flow from the master cylinder into the hose. While most brakes work by directly pushing the master piston when you pull the lever blade, which in turn forces hydraulic fluid through the hose into the caliper, this design appears to work by pulling the piston towards the lever blade, which then forces fluid down the hole, then into the hose. For this reason, the architecture of the lever body is quite different, with the master cylinder further away from the bar and not aligned with the hose.

photo
Shimano's current design for comparison.
photo



photo

In SRAM's design, the basic lever architecture is similar to their current offerings, but the lever body now sits flush with the handlebar. The hose port is angled at around 45 degrees towards the handlebar, such that the hose bends to follow parallel to the handlebar close to the lever body. This design might be well-suited to handlebars with internal hose routing, as the hose could easily enter a slot in the bar near where it enters the lever. Indeed, one of the drawings (figure 14) shows the hose running through the handlebar. The patent shows many different embodiments (forms) of the design but all have the hose port close to the handlebar.

SRAM Code brakes
SRAM's current design for comparison.
photo

photo
One drawing shows the hose running through the handlebar until it reaches the brake lever.

Although these designs could be used with internally routed handlebars and/or through-headset cable routing, there's also no reason why you couldn't use them with conventional cable routing.

Author Info:
seb-stott avatar

Member since Dec 29, 2014
306 articles

346 Comments
  • 1083 7
 I'd like to make a suggestion on where SRAM and Shimano can route their hoses.
  • 97 7
 Deff I would rather have that routing with mineral oil
  • 10 12
 @hamncheez: Sram has mineral Fluid now DB 8 brake
  • 22 0
 I'd seen the SRAM brakes on Vital, but this is the first I've seen of the Shimano design.

I'm trying to visualize if the close to handlebar hose routing would be worse for normal cable routing. And I'm thinking for brakes, it is probably ok-ish, but for anything with actual cables inside (dropper, derailleur) to be routed along side it, you're looking at a lot tighter bends, and more friction/wear.

But IMO both of these point to headset cable routing getting worse (more common), before it gets better.
  • 34 1
 @hamncheez: Go one step further and put the reservoir inside the handlebar....
  • 54 1
 @ocnlogan: SRAM's design also makes it more difficult to run other controls (shifting, dropper, even e-bike controls) anywhere except either outboard or on the same clamp.

I like to run my shifter and dropper farther inside than my brakes, and SRAM's design makes that much more difficult.

I like the idea of keeping things closer to the bar in case of crashing, but don't like the reduction in choice that it enforces on your controls.
Also, death to headset cable routing Smile
  • 156 4
 #ifnoonebuysheadsetcableroutedbikestheywillfadeintoobscurityasanotherdumbideathatcamefromourshavedleggedbretheren.
  • 12 0
 @Lookinforit: That's a good point, and call me cynical, but this may be by design in an attempt to grab greater market share in cockpit componentry by making these core items (shifters/brake level) less cross-manufacture compatible.
  • 17 0
 @ocnlogan: Anyone who has ridden an old dirtbike will understand that tight cable routing WILL pull that internal cable and floor it in a tight turn. This is a bad idea industry leaders.
  • 1 0
 @waffleShirt: Yeah, if the other brands would use similar connectors a large part of the complaint (that it would be hard to service bearings and fork) would already be sorted. Not sure why they wouldn't. In the past, Magura often on existing medical technology so no proprietary stuff the other brands can't use.
  • 3 0
 The irony of internal routing is not lost on me.
  • 1 0
 @dmackyaheard: you could bleed the brakes with a bleed port on the end of the bars so you'd never have to fiddle around with lever placement for a bleed ever again! Actually brilliant because you could inject fluid at the reservoir with bike in nose down position in stand, with bars turned, then evacuate bubbles out of the caliper.
  • 6 0
 @hamncheez: Definitely lubricates the headset better when getting leaky.
  • 9 0
 It would be heartening if either design included a no-bleed tool-free connector of some kind. That'd actually address a major issue w headset routing instead of just focusing on aesthetics. As is the new SRAM lever wouldn't fit on the riser bar depicted with the old Code lever in the photo. Compatibility headaches w no performance benefit FTW.
  • 2 0
 @Drew-O: Yeah, but as I said that's what Magura is doing already. I'd suspect other brands would do this as well if they're going this route.
  • 7 0
 We are all missing the best solution: Single piece, cold forged carbon, brake-capliper-handlebars-stem. All in one. Unibody. The brake lever cylinder body is a unipiece with the bars, which of course are already integrated with the "stem". The brake lines are tube-in-tube molded into the bars, like cable routing, and the hoses from the brake calipers connect to the base of the "stem".

The next step after that is a solid, single piece brake/bar/stem/steerer/fork combo, where you actually have to remove 4 bolts and have the front of the head tube come off to swap/install the brake/bars/stem/steerer/fork combo!
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: See "trust fork" for an example of this at work.
  • 2 0
 @dmackyaheard: Scott is way ahead of you
  • 4 0
 Fucking typical. Make the new parts so they wont work with the old. Why i QUIT building
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: lolz!
  • 1 0
 @dmackyaheard As it has been pointed out it was already done, but let’s raise the bar (no pun intended) and go to automatic braking based on a preset speed you can set up and then tracking your location on GPS. Never have to worry about braking too early or too late.
  • 1 0
 @Lookinforit: I’m usually not against headset routing, but you make a good point here. Looks like sram is making you use the matchmaker system with those brakes. Which sucks. To be fair, you can always run the left side match maker on the right and vis-a-verca, which does a lot. But I can see how that design would cause some issues. Good thing I never run sram or Shimano
  • 1 1
 I have a suggestion. Buy these levers and route them along the bar with stuck-on frame routing thingies, and then DJ style twirl them around the headset spacer and into the normal internal routing or external routing. Do the same with the shifters that will be coming out soon and. Barspins and sleekness on a normal MTB with little or no more maintenance. Boom.
  • 9 0
 @fartymarty: anyone looking for a translation, here it is:
#if no one buys headset cable-routed bikes they will fade into obscurity as another dumb idea that came from our shaved-legged bretheren.
  • 1 0
 They can design it but they can’t make the aftermarket buy it.
  • 1 0
 @egan-carter: thanks. That's the one.
  • 1 0
 @mt-outlaw: The last picture on that site perfectly describes the kind of customers who buy this crap
  • 1 0
 So instead of fixing real problems with their brakes......but it's very simple => just make your own brakes (Shigura). If money is not an issue then buy Trickstuff. I want QUALITY TIME. Not spending hours cleaning the inside of a frame. For me this is a KO point and bike companies will be forced to change it back in the the long run (as was the case with threaded BB).
  • 1 0
 @criscoe: did a ride with the new DB8 brakes, and they were remarkably similar to Codes, I didn’t expect any differences, and other than noting that “hey, these are the mineral oil Sram brakes” it was completely gone from memory for the entire ride. In fairness, I’ve never sweat so much in my entire life, and was battling that much more than the brake feel, but they were pretty good
  • 1 0
 @dmackyaheard: Scott/Bold bikes is making notes of your brilliant idea
  • 1 0
 Come on let’s be fair ,…..we all have internally routed hoses with just the extension on the outside..
  • 1 0
 @golefty: Ehm, how do you mean? If my cables and hoses are externally routed, they're externally routed aren't they? Is this some trick question where there still is an internally routed part that goes for all of us?
  • 1 0
 @Lookinforit: these are not design drawings
  • 1 0
 @vinay: the part all our shit comes out of
  • 147 2
 Mechanic's standpoint: honestly if frame manufacturing companies were willing to make tubes-in-tubes systems for every internally-routed brake and derailleur/dropper cable/housing, this wouldn't really be an issue. At the moment, for point of reference, in order to install a new rear brake on a Transition Repeater one has to remove the battery, motor, fork, and rear shock. All of that hardship could be avoided with some simple tubes.
  • 336 0
 agreed, TITS make everything better always
  • 27 0
 Do not let the paper tiger critics create about headset routing fool you. Almost anyone would be fine with internally routed cables through the headset or handlebars or however they decide if done in a way that in order to do maintenance you dont have to create more work for yourself. As long as you do not have to bleed brakes or cut a bunch of cables to make a simple change then what is the issue. Buuuuut if you have to add 3 jobs to change a headset bearing or stem spacer then why would anyone want that?
  • 7 1
 @rickybobby18: DAMMIT RICKY!
  • 3 0
 Holy shit, that's crazy!
  • 19 8
 “Do you know what the f*ck you can do with some aluminum tubes?” -Black George W. Bush
  • 36 9
 All that hardship could be avoided by not riding an eBike too
  • 8 6
 @kokofosho: But how often do you change your headset bearing? Also, most of the new headset routing I have seen doesn't affect the stem spacers. The stem spacers are totally independent and you can customize them without having to mess with the cables.
  • 16 2
 Wait a minute…what’s the battery for?
  • 16 0
 @tacklingdummy: as long as manufacturers keep speccing FSA headsets, very often
  • 1 0
 @grizwald: Cadence sensor.
  • 4 3
 @drakefan705: that sram design may actually allow you to slide HS bearings and thin spacers over the brake lever. If I were designing I'd make sure to design as such. 40mm stack on a stem might be pushing it, but through stem routing is too asinine to warrant any justification.
  • 1 0
 @drakefan705: You mean, once, quickly after purchase, and then not for a long time because you replaced it with a decent one?
  • 1 0
 @grizwald: The Repeater is an eBike.
  • 3 5
 @JSTootell: Yo Toots, re your "Everybody's idea of fun is different" soliloquy, exactly....E is another tool in the shed...and they are fun, for those that like them. Ironic you're opining against your own diatribe.
  • 6 6
 @JSTootell: I'm a mechanic at a shop that sells eBikes. And we sell a lot of them. It's best to just adapt to working on them.
  • 5 0
 @JSTootell: or by riding a horse
  • 9 0
 Mechanic's advice to other mechanics. Charge by the hour.
  • 3 0
 @theredbike: we probably will going forward. But we didn't brief the customer on such a charge this time so we can only charge $70 per brake.
  • 2 2
 @drakefan705: stop power washing your bike. I just cleaned and regreased my headset after months of riding nearly every day and the grease on the upper bearing looked like I just put it in. Didn’t even touch it, much less replace it. Only lower bearings take a beating if you treat your bike right.
If you clean and regrease your bearings every time you do a lowers service you shouldn’t have to change an upper bearing for years. If that’s a problem for you, or if you don’t service your suspension, then I don’t want to hear your complaints about bike work.
  • 4 0
 @olafthemoose: Doesn't it also depend on the loads? My bike has a 150mm headtube, ZS44/EC44 Hope headset, 120mm travel fork with a 26" front wheel (so short fork, basically). Those bearings have an easy life. But bikes with big front wheels, longer travel forks and 100mm headtubes are common nowadays and I can imagine their headset bearings see a load that might easily be twice as much as mine under the same riding conditions.
  • 1 0
 Maybe universal rooting such as Jagwire could be usefull then ? Change your brake, then just change the end adapter.
Not sure Sram and Shimano would like it anyway...
  • 1 0
 @jpnbrider: normally the first thing that needs replacement is the hose...
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: you will more often with holes in the upper headset cup
  • 1 0
 @vinay: sure, but it’s mainly the lower bearing that takes that beating. Out of the last 4 bikes I’ve had, all forks have been at least 160mm, 3/4 have had a 29” front wheel, head tube angles haven’t been over 65* and have been as low as 63*. Current bike, the one I referenced above, has a 180mm 29” fork. I ride bike park every weekend and pretty rough stuff all week. Haven’t had to change an upper bearing once, but I do clean and regrease them regularly. I’ve done that job with headset routing and it’s really not bad
  • 1 0
 @jpnbrider: I imagine you'd have to be very careful to fully purge the hose of the old fluid assuming you're switching from mineral oil to Dot, or vise versa.
  • 1 0
 @JohSch: Perhaps some people will, but I live in dry California, so probably not. .
  • 1 0
 @seraph: fair enough, sometimes you have to work on shit you don't want to.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: from another post. this looks like designed to fail.
www.instagram.com/p/Cl8t3VRMvc-
  • 1 0
 @olafthemoose: From another post. This bearing is designed to fail.
www.instagram.com/p/Cl8t3VRMvc-
  • 1 0
 @fruitsd79: don’t power wash your bike
  • 2 0
 @olafthemoose: I'll try to keep that in mind
  • 103 1
 It won't matter, but to be clear: bike companies-- As a guy who does his own work and tries to ride whenever I can between work and family (time in the garage is time I'm not riding), I will not consider your bikes if you're using routing through the headset. Period. If this means I'm down to custom builders and NOS frames in a couple of years, so be it.
  • 12 0
 same same
  • 20 0
 It's stressful enough dividing my precious time... but also, my family rides and I do all our maintenance. I was just replacing headsets on two bikes last week. If I also had to then f*ck with their brakes at the same time??? No, just no, no, no, no. No thank you, good day sir!
  • 13 0
 Headset cable routing removes any bike from my purchasing decisions. Period.
  • 87 0
 Seems irresponsible to work on this when we haven't even gotten Boost spaced saddle rails yet.
  • 41 0
 Bike companies: "Write that down, WRITE THAT DOWN!"
  • 3 0
 BOOST!
  • 3 0
 Wait, did you say...BOOST
  • 6 0
 Waiting on Sram's martketing department to tell me how my ass will enjoy the increased stifness
  • 60 1
 Next up, a subscription service to unlock better performance! Seriously, though. I know we pushed back on progress when it came to hub spacing and wheel sizes, but eventually we all realized there were some real benefits to be gained. I don't see the point of this. It's purely aesthetic and I gain no meaningful performance. What I do gain is a giant headache when I need to maintain my bike!
  • 11 8
 I think you're underestimating how much people care about aesthetics, just look at how many people complain about the looks of Pole or Orange bikes.
  • 17 2
 @ajaxwalker: Majority of customers aren't hardcore nerds like many Pinkers. Most people just walk into a bike shop and buy what looks cool. Even though I am an external routing nerd I can't deny how clean some bikes look with internal cables.
  • 4 0
 Isnt that called peloton or gym membership
  • 1 0
 @WalrusRider: hits nail on head with precision
  • 3 0
 @ajaxwalker: aesthetics do matter when you are spending a ton of money on your dream bike. If an internal cable system can be developed with no extra maintenance or time needed to service then that's OK with me. We aren't there yet though.
  • 2 1
 @ajaxwalker:
The difference is,
having a good looking bike ruined by internal headset routing VS having an extremly ugly bike right from the start
  • 3 1
 @ajaxwalker: What’s wrong with Orange bikes?
  • 1 1
 @fattyheadshok: Absolutely nothing. I was just pointing out that not everyone likes the look of them.
  • 2 0
 No, the reason that we grudgingly accepted useless changes in hub seizing was that the problems they created were relatively minor or could be resolved with limited effort.

Headset cable routing creates Problems on a completely different scale. And those can't even be glossed over by marketing with promises of "increased performance".
  • 55 3
 Are Shimano & SRAM Developing Brakes That Will Instantly Be Removed From Any Bike And Replaced By Hayes, Formula, Magura, Hope or TRP?
  • 8 0
 My thought as well, since switching to TRPs its hard for me to think i'll run SRAM again. I guess they might as well lean into this if they aren't going to try to compete on performance.
  • 9 1
 If you buy a frame with these brakes on it, it's probably not compatible with much else.
  • 51 1
 Com'on...this post doesn't need another comment :-) but I can't resist because one day, working on our bike will give us the gynaecologist feeling!
WE DON'T NEED HIDDEN SHOCKS OR HOSES....WE NEED AFFORDABLE BIKE
  • 47 1
 This is what happens when marketing managers are let out of their cubicles. Electronic handbrakes in cars is another example of marketing-led "it looks nicer" idiotic engineering. Utterly pointless and worse, impractical and wasteful.
  • 12 1
 Yeah the electric handbrakes are the absolute worst
  • 2 1
 That is not why electronic handbrakes are being used. Electronic handbrakes are cheaper and easier to package, nothing to do with "it looks nicer". I mean I don't like them either but looks have little to do with why they are being used.
  • 2 0
 @93EXCivic: How do electronic handbrakes work then? I can't see how something electronic could possibly be cheaper and easier than a simple mechanical handbrake. Fly by wire in a big airliner may be different because of the huge distance, deformation, wear and expansion effects between cockpit and control surfaces. But the handbrake in a passenger car?
  • 13 0
 This is the worst! We have a manual transmission Outback, and since it has an electric parking brake, if your battery dies, you can’t roll start it because you cannot disengage the brake. So stupid.
  • 6 0
 @vinay: it’s a standardized module that works either directly on the rear brake caliper or as a discrete mini caliper on the rear brake disk so Continental or ATE or Akebono or whoever stamps out a billion of them and it ends up costing manufacturers very little to add. Mechanical ratcheting units either use a drum-in-hat design that requires an entire drum brake sub-assembly as well as the physical handbrake in the cabin and a cable that needs periodic adjustment or a ratcheting piston in the rear caliper that requires a special tool to retract them when performing a pad replacement.

I’m off to go do e-brake slides in the snow now, thanks
  • 4 0
 few things piss me off more than when i get in a car at work to move it or fix it or whatever and it has a dumb little button e brake on the left of the steering wheel panel and then when you put it in park it auto engages the effing brake. its not as bad as headset cable routing tho...
  • 4 1
 I agree 100%. Electric handbrakes are useless in an actual emergency where you’d need a handbrake. Can’t even believe they’re legal. They totally suck. This new trend with the hoses in the headset and inside handlebars is totally gonna be a nightmare on many levels. Hoses will tear inside handlebars or headsets in a crash that spins the bars. This is such a stupid idea. But they’re off to the races with this and it’s gonna be forced down our throats. I ride an older bike and I’m ok with that.
  • 3 0
 @vinay: The solenoid that engages the ebrake in an electronic system will wear out long before your arm does. That being said, the racheting star system in most rear drums (Cough TACOMA Cough) is also a CF. Honda had an amazing system back in the 70's where you turned a nut on the rear brake backing plate which in turn turned a cone that pushed out your rear pads. You tightened the nut, threading the cone outward while rotating the rear wheel, and when you felt friction, you turned it back a 1/2 turn. Brilliant system. Part number 12 in this dia.
images.cmsnl.com/img/partslists/honda-civic-1975-2dr1200-ka-rear-brake-shoe_big00026315B__20_25da.gif
Round analogue gauges, round headlights, keyed ignitions and no "infotainment" system (replaceable head double DIn sets make way more sense), please.
  • 2 0
 @woofer2609: come give a lecture at my shop please. you know what you're talking about!
  • 2 0
 @NateO14: Thanks! I was well into my 30's before i spent more money on a car than a bike, so ended up repairing a lot of different cars. I enjoyed it (still do...most of the time) and saw lots of different approaches to solving the same problem.
  • 1 0
 @93EXCivic: "Electronic handbrakes are cheaper and easier to package, nothing to do with "it looks nicer". "

I scrapped a car last year because buying a replacement [£550] for the very slightly faulty electronic handbrake was more than car was worth. It needed testing to even know there was a problem. It was binding slightly. It would have been a quick cable tension on an old skool handbrake. A shame as car was great for carrying bikes and even kayaks inside.
  • 39 4
 Looks like I'm here first so here we go... headset cable routing BAD
  • 6 0
 for some reason i read that in a caveman voice
  • 30 3
 Bikes do not need to be really serviceable anyways aside from changing tires and brake pads. Once cable housings, headset bearings need to start being changed out, its the responsibility of the bike industry to guide the consumer towards a brand new bike, lest they begin to fall behind on minor performance gains and thus lose satisfaction with the sport.

Further clean design and performance orientated improvements could be achieved by having the rims, spokes and hubs be fully integrated with the freewheel and cassette to reduce weight, and derailleur permanently integrated into the bike frame to reduce the weight of the hanger, mounting bolt, and ensure alignment is near perfect until the frame is due to be replaced.

Of course, the bicycles will be manufactured with carbon and metals from green certified companies, and a frame recycling program turning the disposed frames into city artwork will be implemented, so we can advertise that the environmental impacts of the new approach are negligible.

(I am available for senior leadership positions at major bike brands, contact me with offers).
  • 25 1
 Oh F&*^, please no. Our shop has basically stopped selling high end road bikes to avoid the clusterf(*(^ frustration of internal stem/headset cable routing. For those people seeking the cleaner appearance, go wireless. A practical downside of doing brake lines internally is the inevitable crash causing bars to spin around - I'd prefer not having leaking brake fluid in my headset or frame.
  • 6 0
 Except you hit the nail on the head. They are making wired systems annoying to push people the upsell of wireless. Then to ensure the mandatory wires or cables are hidden to justify the wireless look
  • 1 0
 Wireless brakes on a mountain bike? I don't see that happening for at least another ten years.
  • 23 1
 Why oh why?? Another mechanic's POV: Unnecessary addition of friction (gear lines) with tight bend points. May not be evident with a new setup but give it time and there will be problems. This is amplified in today's tighter tolerance 12spd systems. If it ain't broke, don't fix it!
  • 14 0
 Companies aren't worried about it working fine now. They're concerned with having a new product to sell that's essentially the same thing but will sell more of because it's new.
  • 7 0
 I’m surprised this hasn’t been emphasized more.

Bend radius and number of turns matter a lot. Ask any electrician that’s pulled wire through conduit.
  • 1 0
 No no, if it ain't broke, fix it til it is. Didn't you get the memo.
  • 22 0
 When I saw the headline I thought this article was going to be about new brakes that make bikes with headset cable routing easier to work on… not new brakes that make bikes with headset cable routing more prevalent.
  • 3 0
 Keep hope alive!
  • 1 1
 I made a comment above about this, but maybe the levers will be low profile enough to slide HS components over? Let's be honest, probably at the expense of a reasonably sized master cylinder.
  • 20 0
 As a bikepacker, I’d be psyched on brake hoses that exit the master cylinder closer and more parallel to the bars. Headset routing on the other hand, f*ck that.
  • 2 1
 Not just bikepackers - it'll be much tidier to attach race numbers too. I've been looking down at my levers recently wondering why the hoses and cables need to go so far forwards
  • 2 0
 @mountainsofsussex: it's so you have enough spare to not rip your hoses off in a crash (where the bars spin).
  • 2 1
 @benpinnick: I understand that, but I'm pretty sure you could have enough spare with this design too. Reckon it's less of an issue as stems have got shorter
  • 18 1
 my BB7s are still good
  • 25 3
 Free advice: Don't ever try hydraulic brakes.



#thelessyouknow
  • 4 1
 I'm on the same set of BB7s I bought in 2003 on my old 26er. It's odd hearing all the time how they don't work, given that they do. They're a bit less smooth than hydraulic brakes and I have to turn a few dials every three or four rides, but that takes less than thirty seconds. It's certainly less twiddling than that required by, say, 12-speed drivetrains. My newer bike has Paul Klampers, even better.
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: lol i run BB7s on my home made overpowered ebike.
  • 3 0
 TRP spykes are great too
  • 2 0
 Another advantage of the brakes I already have is that I already paid for them almost two decades ago. Works fine, less money, less environmental impact.
  • 14 0
 MAKE IT STOOOOOOOOPPPPPPP!!!!!!! Sincerely, A mechanic
  • 11 0
 Bottom brackets cut in half from bad cable routing is a thing, are steer tubes the next thing?
  • 9 0
 next thing? ha! that's already happening in the road world
  • 8 0
 why would shimano even bother when they already filed a patent for wireless brakes. In the future, we will all laugh about how we argued about cables.
  • 4 2
 Wireless brakes? Lmao, imagine some hiker trudging up the trail with his bluetooth headphones on and not only is he oblivious to your approach, the wireless headphone signal interferes with your brakes and you can’t stop.
  • 4 0
 So we have than both? Wandering bite point from the fluid and the delay from wireless transfer? Brilliant!!!
  • 2 0
 @OneTrustMan: Shimano will build in wandering bite point to their wireless system, don't worry.
  • 1 0
 @Lylat: Or you get the dubstep remix in your brakes
  • 6 0
 As a pogie/barmitt user in the winter... Sealing the area by the handlebar and cables are always seems more difficult then it should be. Having the brakes run near the bar sounds awesome for this use.

However I don't want my cables to go into my headset...
  • 8 0
 The picture of the SRAM brake highlights at least one problem. You have the master cylinder nice and flush and then it may hit the bend in the bars.
  • 5 0
 I'm glad to be an old dude with a nice quiver that will hopefully last me 15+ years. 275 bikes with no knock blocks, headset cable routing, steering controllers, or things that need batteries. Stocked up on tires and brake pads for years too. Outside of maybe a very adjustable geo frame, I don't think I'll be missing much bowing out of the upgrade cycle at this point. Maybe I'll buy an ebike when I'm 70...
  • 1 0
 you have 275 bikes? Seems a bit overkill
  • 8 1
 asides from the horrible headset routing, this seems like a nice way to not torch my lever bodies on nasty bails
  • 4 0
 I like the idea of protecting the hoses and lever bodies but hate the idea of headset/stem routing. I’m torn!
  • 1 0
 It just looks like we are gonnajget tighter cable bends resulting in knicks.
  • 8 0
 PB are you trying to incite a online riot?
  • 9 0
 FUCK!
  • 5 0
 THE
  • 8 1
 Police
  • 2 0
 Coming straight from the underground
  • 1 0
 @ak-77: No takers on the next line? Some serious cancellation risk here...
  • 1 0
 @jimbug: Not worth it I guess. But maybe someone could do a good bike-themed version of "a 100 miles & runnin"?
  • 7 0
 Now my brakes will be incompatible with certain frames when I inevitably move parts between bikes. Perfect.
  • 6 6
 Why would they be incompatible? There's no reason that having the housing run closer to the bars means it can't be used on bikes with 'regular' cable routing.
  • 12 0
 @mikekazimer: Maybe incompatible is a stretch but definitely a bad fit.

The rear hose would get to stem then make a huge loop off to the side of the bars to make it back to the frame. Instead of the loop making a nice tucked shape in front of your bike you would have huge hoops sticking off to the side.
  • 2 0
 @howejohn: No - I'm pretty sure, still leaving enough slack for a full 180 turn of front wheel, that you'd just be able to have a slightly shorter brake hose (unless you are doing bar spins) which is a win in my book. Your hose is just closer to the handlebars - the "huge loop" is what we currently have with brakes that send the hose out front of the bike.
  • 5 1
 Leave it to the S's to somehow make their awfull brakes even worse. Good thing my hope brakes and G1 will last longer than this trend will and i wont be affected by it. Gosspeed ye obedient comsumers of manufactured obsolesence.
  • 5 0
 C'mon people. Let's play this out. Brake hose gets closer to the bars. Master cylinder gets closer to the bars. SRAM makes a handlebar with integrated brakes. Gotta pull the bottom bracket to bleed the brakes.
  • 5 0
 My 1970 Honda CB350 had all of it’s handlebar control wiring inside the sweet chrome plated riser bar. What a PITA. Noome does that any more. This can’t last. I’ll wait it out.
  • 1 1
 No one does that anymore? Have a look at a road bike. It's not suprising that shimano + sram are working on these since they already make them on the other side.
  • 2 0
 @tacopop: nope. Name one motorcycle with wires inside it’s handlebar. Cant think of any built in the last 40 years…
  • 2 0
 @tacopop: and dont count harleys. They havent evolved in 40 years.
  • 1 1
 @Ferd: road bike as in BICYCLE that rides on the road. Been a while since you've seen one of those?
  • 3 0
 @tacopop: dude Im talking motorcycles in my post… the damn paragraph I wrote starts with “my 1970 cb350”. I take it you dont read much.
  • 1 1
 @Ferd: I'm fully aware you mentioned a 50 year old baby motorcycle. You're the one who missed the meaning of road-bike so didn't follow that my comment was refocusing on the topic we're actually discussing here. Is an old motorcycle more relevant to what Shimano and SRAM are doing with mountain BICYCLE brakes than what those exact companies already are producing for road BICYCLES?
  • 3 0
 @tacopop: Isn't the point that this internal routing thing was tried in the motorcycle world decades ago and abandoned because it didn't work well enough? Now the idea is being recycled in the bicycle world.
  • 5 0
 when bikes will all be with headset routing and stupid electronic suspensions, I'll gladly pay for an old school boutique bike with external routing and hydraulic suspension !!!!
  • 7 0
 Well, I'm sure this comment section is going to be civil......
  • 7 0
 Can we use gorilla tape with this?
  • 27 0
 I'm going to wrap my entire bike in Gorilla tape then everything will be internal.
  • 6 1
 Bring it on ASAP! Existing Codes are already super discounted, when these new ones come out the current ones will get even cheaper and I'll keep buying em.
  • 3 0
 Eh if done right it won’t really matter but seems a lot for just a visual improvement and not even sure it’s an improvement since that stem is ugly and now well have some bulky front face plates instead of nice clean cnc’d or two piece clamps. The front hose is still going to have to go all the way down to the caliper outside the suspension fork so it’ll never be as clean as a road bike with internal routing and really it’s an MTB so it doesn’t need to be. Losing my dropper cable for a wireless one would be more important to me then you just have two brake hoses that never touch anyway so no noise.
  • 8 0
 FUCK THAT SHIT!
  • 3 0
 Maybe slight confusion and possibly not reading the article as well...but could someone clarify: in most of these headset routed bikes you have to do a whole godd*mn brake bleed for a simple stack height/spacer adjustment? F*CK?!
  • 1 0
 I think so... Until somebody starts selling headset spacers with a slot cut in them, making a small fortune in the process.
  • 4 0
 Two piece spacers- boom. problem invented, problem solved.
  • 1 0
 There are two versions of headset routing. One is through the stem. That requires a brake bleed anytime you want to add or remove a spacer. The other version is more common and more reasonable. It goes through a special hole in the headset and you only need to bleed if you change the upper bearing.
  • 7 0
 oh hell no
  • 6 0
 I like the design close to the handlebar. I don't like internal routing.
  • 7 0
 TRP!!! STAY STRONG!!!
  • 6 0
 A solution to a problem no one had.
  • 2 0
 But see, it'll create new problems for which they can release new solutions afterwards!
  • 1 0
 If it ain't broke, fix it til it is.
  • 5 0
 NO!
And NO!
Also, NO!
I think I forgot something... What was it again?... O! I remember!

NOOOOOO!
  • 7 2
 Sram should worry about making brakes that actually work instead of this bullshit
  • 2 0
 I’m a moment of ironical anticipated clarity, I was just shopping for some cura4 brakes last night….
Lets the big brands do big brands things. And all is pink bike purists can buy reebs, bionicons, and geometrons.
Which, when you think about it, is kinda the way it went with moto too. Weird shitty big brands made weird shitty big brand shit so normal (Yamaha? Honda?) . And the offshoot little guys went and won mad races (ktm). Then they were the weird big brands doing offshoot little guys stuff : ahem, 350 4 strokes. That riders everywhere rode a ton. And all worked out.
  • 1 0
 Still waiting for a WR350R....c'mon Yamaha.
  • 2 0
 Omg this is so much better! THIS IS THE FUTURE!
Its being rammed down our throats so it HAS to be an improvement.
Everyone knows your levers should never move on the bar. Not for bleeding the brake, not even during a wreck. What could go wrong?! Can we make it so I can't get to the flare nut without removing the lever from the bar? Can we integrate all the bar controls so the have to come off in a group? And then we can run a $90 single use, hard to obtain during covid hydraulic hose through a $10 pair of chinese bearings on a critical joint so it all needs to be replaced for the first service in 90 days? Can there be proprietary, dealer only tools for the headset? Any why doesn't sram have a proprietary double the cost brake oil yet?
Man that would be AMAZING
*gets progressively louder*
AND WOULD SURELY FOSTER BETTER ACCESS TO THE SPORT FOR EVERYONE ACROSS THE INDUSTRY!!!!
  • 2 0
 Dear Sram and shimano. Both of you make bars. Just jump in and put the cylinder in the bar. Run electronics to a contact patch on the bar and just have a digital lever to provide the input. In this battery economy, what is one more electrical connection?!
  • 1 0
 Isn't there additional mechanical advantage provided to the master-cylinder with a "lever"? For example; 1N of force with your finger to 5N of force pushing the cylinder.
  • 1 0
 I feel like E brakes are an inevitable concept but, how would lever feed back be controlled? I imagine batteries an motors would just end really heavy
  • 1 0
 @mosierman: every Prius is brake by wire with redundant failure backup. Not a concern.
  • 1 0
 @usedbikestuff: your comment didn't address my point at all
  • 2 0
 Is brake hose routing even patentable? All I see is a hose coming out differently. Same mechanism inside. What’s actually new? And of course, running hoses and cables through the headset does not improve anything other than looks. Or so we are told.
  • 3 0
 Advertises headset cable routing as a means of avoiding stress risers in the frame from cable entry ports, designs brakes with the idea of putting the cables through cable entry ports in the bar. Dicks
  • 2 0
 i like quick access to my parts. Internal seat post cables are my nightmare for my winter touring co. Every time I change the seat post hight a few times over a week I have issues with slack when the cable point inside gets out of position. Flying with a few bikes is another issue all together Every season after 7 months in storage I get one brake that needs replacing due to seizing up. I understand the upside of internal gear cables but the brakes and seat need to be on the outside.
  • 2 1
 Awesome, this should definitely be the number one priority for these manufacturers! Can’t live without it!
Next up, handlebar manufacturers making their products suitable for these new levers and headset cable routing.
Hope this innovation will save our planet!
  • 1 0
 I usually have to replace 2 or 3 ferrules at the master cylinder per year on MTB's from the hose getting crimped right at that spot, so revising the levers so the hose exits closer to the bars would be welcome. For the front hose, I don't see it going through the stem on an MTB ever - the hose needs a big loop to allow for the front travel, so the through-the-stem thing looks to be rear brake only. It might be okay there, but it really would screw up headset maintenance. I think the true nightmare might be dropper post routing, all those tight bends through the stem area would make routing it tough, wear out the housing faster, and create a cursing party when trying to remove the dropper for regular service. Brake hoses don't need to be moved nearly as often.
  • 2 0
 Have the front hose drop down inside the steerer and exit at the bottom of the crown
  • 1 0
 @chrismac70: Then go down the fork leg, through the front axle, up the other leg, back into the crown, down the down tube, up the seat tube, down the non-drive-side seatstay, through the axle, to the rear mech. Easy.
  • 1 0
 Might look great having a super clean cockpit. And running hoses or cables through the stem on a roadbike, no problem. But for those that want to access their headset bearings regularly on their mtb which is common. I'd say this is a bad idea for them. Functionality before looks.
  • 1 0
 Fine, but they better cover the cost of boxing, shipping, and handling when I send my whole bike to them for a brake bleed. And they better replace the rusted headset bearings from the open hole allowing water and mud to seep in.
  • 6 0
 Make it go away
  • 5 4
 why not just build the brakes into the frame? why do the master cylinders need to be on the handle bars? Put a big master cylinder inside the frame, more oil volume, and itll probably be easier to do ABS that way too. Its like bikes are just a collection of parts thrown together. I hope they grow up and get everything integrated, internal and one piece soon.
  • 1 0
 This is an interesting idea. Where would you put it though? It still has to be above the brake. Maybe top tube or down tube near the head tube? And how would it be actuated? Cable?
  • 2 0
 @mrosie: Does it have to be close to lever? Why not the chainstay and on the fork? Or maybe in the top tube running both front and rear. Make it front and rear adjustable, system sort of like a car with a master cylinder?
  • 1 0
 Pretty sure some custom builders have done this before I’ve certainly
Seen it
  • 1 0
 @mrosie: there's allready cable actuated hydraulic calipers,
  • 4 0
 Standby the the patented 3d printed handlebar brake hose vibration prevention kits!
  • 4 0
 my printer is already on and ready
  • 3 0
 @RockyFish: I'm printing something out RIGHT NOW
  • 5 0
 Stop posting stuff like this and maybe it’ll
Happen less
  • 2 1
 Pay more money and make your bike harder to work on in order to not be able to adjust your brake angle as much. Same goes with integrated stem/bar combos and stem cable routing. I don't understand the point other than to make your bike look more expensive.
  • 1 0
 If I wanted to worry about how cables looked on my bike I’d be a roadie or gravel guy (roadie who secretly wants to ride MTBs). My bike gets muddy and wet in the winter, covered in dust all summer. I never give cables a second thought into maintenance time and then it’s a quick job replacing them because they are on the outside of my bike.
  • 3 0
 I'm more interested in the Shimano patents for a new type of derailleur,with 3 pulleys and low profile...Bike Rumor has the juice on that.
  • 4 0
 Just wait till they figure out a way to route the front brake through the fork
  • 5 0
 Why? Why??? WHYYYYYY??? No one asked for this. Stop punishing us.
  • 5 0
 I just threw up in my mouth.
  • 2 1
 Hoses and cables closer to the bars would make it easier to mount a number plate, and less likely to damage a line in crash, less likely to get caught on stuff. I don't want headset or handlebar routing but them not sticking out so much is good.
  • 2 0
 What if your lever rotates in a crash, when the hose enters in a small hole just next to the break ?
  • 1 0
 So what are they going to do for the front brake? Do they also put that reservoir close to the bar to match the other side, then send it down to the front caliper without routing through anything anyway? If so, I think this means that these brakes won't change much for all of us who refuse to buy headtube routing. It'll just look different.

I hate headtube routing more than anybody - and I'll fight for that title. But I'll hold judgement on this until I see it actually show up and demonstrate that it's worse than the layout of today. We might get lucky and be just fine.
  • 3 0
 Don’t worry, I’m sure SRAM is working on AXS brakes to go completely wireless as we comment. This way NO HEADSET ROUTING required!
  • 4 0
 Well they give me plenty of reasons not to buy new kit and keep my XT 4 pot brakes going until I die.
  • 1 0
 when I was younger.. I was told that the length of the hoses and the little extra loop out of the frame was a fundamental component to help dissipate the heat generated by the pads and disk contact.. which probably today is compensated by bigger disks and better materials.. but again.. it seems more a move to keep consumers very bonded to their bike mechanics.. which is good and bad.. good for the market, bad to swallow for the real riders.. as usual..
  • 1 1
 If any significant heat is making it up that high, you have issues.
  • 1 0
 @MaplePanda: the brakes work thanks to the fluids circulation, the heat won't reach the top of the system exactly because the fluid oil is continuously circulating once the calipers start to heat. my wonder is more if they have also calculated the inevitable extra heat which will be created by sealing into the frame that natural part of the brakes cooling system.. bigger hosed and thicker disks play the same benefits on the braking feeling.. and if you have ever tried those.. you might wonder as I am doing.. cheers!
  • 2 0
 Cables? Internal? Screw that. What the people really want are AXS brakes. There's nothing quite like the exhilarating factor of a red blinking light on your brake levers when you're about to drop into the steeps.
  • 1 0
 Brake levers gets "revised", so cables run parallel or closer to the handlebars. That's not a bad thing, I think, as you can still route the cables the traditional way external or internal around the head tube into the downtube. Or if you like, through the headset and/or stem/headset - the last thing i would ever do.
So while this "innovation" is only driven to archive a "clean look" here's a question:
Do we get revised shifters for derailleurs, dropper-posts and lock-outs as well? So these cables run parallel or closer to the handlebars, too?
Otherwise an almost cable-free look is not really possible, isn't it?
And NO(!) - I´m team hydraulic/mechanic (the real K.eep I.t S.imple) and don't plan to get any electronic devices for shifting or dropper. Apart from light or navigation no batteries for me.
  • 1 0
 Really like the idead of keeping the levers and hose tucked in neat to the bar BUT there's only one way i would accept headset routing along with it, if they can make the levers slim enough (with detachable clamp maybe) and or the headset bearing big enough that a new bearing can fit over the lever and down the hose to avoid a rebleed every time you replace the bearing.
  • 3 0
 Please don't. This is a non-problem. No mountain biker has ever been concerned with brake and shifter cable loops.
  • 3 0
 Damn, this makes impossible to place your shifter behind the brakes on extra clamp
  • 4 4
 I'm probably the only one, but I don't mind the headset cable routing and this SRAM brake design with headset cable routing. It looks really sleek and clean. Although I never have owned a bike with headset cable routing, I rarely change the headset bearings, so it does not seem like a big issue. I also like internal cabling as well. Lol. Makes bikes also looks sleek, clean, with no cable rub.
  • 3 1
 I change bike parts sometimes more than my underwear. So I'd have to bleed my brakes every time I do a stem or bar swap?
Hard pass
  • 2 0
 I like the integrated designs, but I do think they should develop universal hose connectors so you can swap the caliper and levers without needing to replace the hoses.
  • 1 0
 Like Formula
  • 1 0
 @bok-CZ: Yes. Or SRAM with the reverb. Those connectors are bigger than the hoses though, so you need a bigger hole.
  • 2 0
 FFS just make everything bluetooth if you want it to look better. I take the risk of my battery dying as I drop into a rock slab.
  • 4 0
 BICYCLE ENGINEERS. PLESE STOP CREATING NON EXISTENT PROBLEMS TO FIX.
  • 3 0
 Oh goody. Now I'll get to wonder if my brakes will fit with the bend and taper of my handlebars.
  • 1 0
 There will have to be a point where hard lines with quick connects on either end are part of a frames design/manufacture. Trying to run lines through stuff after the fact is a terrible way to do this.
  • 1 0
 I can’t see how routing the hoses through the bars would work. Where would you put the hole given the amount of length you can trim off bars. A recessed channel is more likely
  • 1 0
 This Brit runs his brakes with his front on the right (aka Moto style). The routing on many bikes is already fugly when you run your front on the right side; won't this just make it even worse?
  • 1 0
 No it will make it better as all the cables and disappear into the stem or headset. It makes it much better for us that the mess you get from sucking a house in a hole on the left hand side of the frame
  • 2 2
 Most people bash internal cable routing. I can see the “hassle” of having it passing inside the headset bearing. But this “hassle” is not that big. If you service your bearings regularly and they are good quality they will probably outlast the brake. I got some cane creeks running on miserable conditions on my stumpy since 2011. Yes, 26 and externally routed. My enduro is running fine on stock headset too (summer and winter in tropical countries, it rains a lot).
Not to mention brake bleeds are way more often than bearing changes.
I’m probably getting downvoted but to me some people are just miserable and want to find something to bash.
I, myself can’t wait for this new stuff come out along with inside handlebar cable routing. Clutter free bike. Form and function.
Now bring your torches and pitchforks.
  • 2 0
 No one wants to see cables when your are spending big cash on a bike. Some of these bikes look like Walmart Rat nests of cables.…bravo to SRAM and Shimano.
  • 1 0
 Russian roulette axs style. Little hydraulic slave. Voila. No hose and just some good reliable electrical sensors. We’ve had remote control around for decades. It should work…..
  • 3 1
 "we expect that headset cable routing will become more common among brands".—Merida. Thankfully Merida make absolutely nothing worth buying anyway. Awful bikes.
  • 1 0
 Are these going to play nice with everyone's riser bars? Seems like they require the bar to have a longer straight section from the grips, no?
  • 3 0
 hide the cables under the tape then
  • 2 0
 Why not integrate the reservoir into the handlebars? Go all the way, won’t you!?
  • 1 0
 Why not just have a pivot at the clamp and increase lever sweep/adjustability to enable settings the angle out from the bar to where you want it?
This should have always been the way.
  • 2 0
 Have fun getting a flare nut wrench on either lever design to tighten or loosen a compression nut.
  • 3 0
 Doesn't matter. You'll have to disassemble the whole bike anyway to change a cable or headset spacer.
  • 2 0
 Right?
I love how SRAM already found a way to build in a flaw to the design. Line going straight into the reservoir? Nah, let's make it bend right at the fitting!
  • 1 0
 @CarbonShmarbon: gotta have something to fix that makes people buy the next version
  • 2 0
 Mechanics everywhere immediately update their resumes and stock up on whiskey....
  • 1 0
 Couldn't care less about where they wanna point the hose, but what's up with pulling the piston in the Shimano drawing? Is there more @seb-stott?
  • 4 0
 Simple answer: NO
  • 1 0
 @fattyheadshok: note that would be awesome if they can make it work once you have chopped your bars down to your preferred width
  • 1 0
 just like car brake line, copper fitting bend around to port. soon to have master brake cylinder. man you can have hydraulic gear shifters tied into this
  • 3 0
 Headset routing or not this looks cleaner.
  • 1 0
 I hate this for a lot of reasons, but the most obvious one is pretty basic. This really limits where you can mount a shifter or a dropper lever on a separate clamp.
  • 1 0
 Doesn’t bother me if sram is doing this.
Wouldn’t buy that stuff no matter where the hose is.
I guess I jus don’t enjoy bleeding breaks…
  • 3 0
 Ugh..
  • 3 0
 No Thanks
  • 2 3
 Please give me eBrakes for my eBike. My hands are so tired after all the 10 hr rides I can now do and eBrakes would allow me to still be able to brake like normal brakes without the effort.
  • 2 0
 Why do they submit patents for moving things about a bit?
  • 3 1
 What about wireless breakes instead lol
  • 9 0
 One time a disgruntled ex-girlfriend started text me hateful things which I was trying to ignore, and one day she texted me something like "I hope your breaks go out and your nasty spandex wearing a$$.... yadda yadda yadda" (this was a long time ago; don't judge me for spandex wearing) and so I replied "lol ps it's brakes not breaks.... I'm just imagining a person doing the robot and freezing up" It didn't go over well.... actually I guess it did, because I never heard from her again.
  • 4 0
 @deez-nucks: I come to Pinkbike comment section for stories like that. Lol.
  • 3 0
 "puke emoji"
  • 2 0
 The puke emoji is unavailable at the moment. It called in sick after reading this story.
  • 1 0
 Why not have a rigid pressure line integrated in the bars and frame and connect it with short arts of hose?
  • 1 0
 I'm still trying to bleed my back brake successfully from having to route it through the frame. Ugh.
  • 2 0
 Came here for the comments.
  • 1 0
 My investment in Paul Components Klamper brakes is looking smarter and smarter.
  • 2 0
 I'm never putting this shit on my bike
  • 1 0
 Are SRAM aware they are infringing on sharks? The shark people will be furious.
  • 2 0
 Aero cables and baggy clothes. Awesome.
  • 1 0
 Those SRAM brakes are already out and about as Prototypes. Pictures knocking about in the Vital Tech Rumors thread page 307.
  • 2 0
 It’s official…. The bike industry has no problems to solve.
  • 2 0
 That plastic cap looks like S#@T
  • 2 0
 Please put a brake on this project !
  • 1 0
 Why? Electronic breaking and titanium 3D printed callipers and the big next.
  • 1 0
 Designed by engineers who don't actually have to work on the bikes in question every day. Thank guys.
  • 1 0
 Here is why FIG.4 sucks; you can't clamp any accessories next to your brakes.
  • 1 0
 So my $20.upper headset bearing replacement is going to include an hours labour now?
  • 1 0
 can we just have brake by wire at this point.. axs works good enough already for deraileurs
  • 1 0
 In that first pic the stem looks like a robot eating spaghetti.
  • 1 0
 YEESS! Bring it on! I’ve been waiting for this for decades.
  • 2 0
 Cue the outrage
  • 1 0
 You're a bit late...
  • 3 2
 Get used to it bros, it'll be on every bike within a year
  • 1 0
 Waiting for Wheelbased...
  • 1 0
 Now we have to get the right match maker
  • 4 3
 Just make brakes wireless already
  • 1 0
 I can't imagine that ever happening.
  • 1 0
 @93EXCivic: it would be a stupid development, and that's exactly why it might happen
  • 2 1
 What happen to wireless brakes?
  • 1 0
 The Rooster came first, actually.
  • 1 0
 The one thing the industry does NOT need.
  • 1 0
 Dangerholm. Look what you've done. Wink
  • 2 0
 piss flaps
  • 2 0
 ryanreynoldsbutwhy.gif
  • 2 0
 gross
  • 1 1
 They'll need to include a second cable in the package so the mechanic can hang himself if it goes wrong.
  • 1 0
 Thank god I’ve just got a bike with zero proprietary bullshit.
  • 1 0
 TRP: "Thier losing thier minds, and we will reep all of the profits"
  • 1 0
 The world is going to end soon
  • 1 0
 I have a headache already.
  • 1 0
 You're asking me? OK; yes.
  • 1 0
 magura wireless brakes is the way to go ●
  • 1 0
 This eliminates all the bar space I mount my shifter and dropper lever on.
  • 1 0
 Look....All we want is wireless breaking, ok
  • 1 0
 (After a long Bong inhaile):

Shhhh____t!!!!.........
  • 1 0
 Oh no!
  • 1 0
 Dear God, no!
  • 1 0
 I hope not.
  • 1 0
 Wireless breaks or STFU!
  • 1 0
 This sucks
  • 1 0
 Thanks, I hate it.
  • 1 0
 Nope
  • 1 0
 LAME
  • 1 0
 Bad
  • 1 0
 WHY ?!
  • 1 0
 NOOOO
  • 1 0
 Please NO!!!!!!!!
  • 2 3
 Old stuff will always be better than the new, great good old times.
  • 4 6
 Come on, at least credit where you got the information from
  • 12 3
 It's from here: www.uspto.gov/patents/search. I stumbled on the Shimano brakes the other day and passed the info on to Seb to write about.
  • 2 1
 @mikekazimer: Solid find
  • 2 4
 yeah, it's as if we've already seen this, for atleast two months, on a website that's usually even more specialized in sneak peeks and proto stuff
  • 10 0
 @mikekazimer: was there a patent for a non-wandering bite point?
  • 5 1
 @tgr9, the SRAM patent has been out for a while, but the Shimano one just came out last week.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: The fifth seal of the Apocalypse has been revealed...
Below threshold threads are hidden







Copyright © 2000 - 2024. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.055574
Mobile Version of Website