MRP's New Weight-Specific Lift Damper Fits Fox, RockShox & New MRP Forks

Apr 9, 2024 at 9:34
by Seb Stott  
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Aftermarket fork upgrades must be a tough market to crack given suspension manufacturers spend a lot of time and money trying to get it right in the first place. But most fork dampers are one-size-fits-all: the same damper is expected to work for riders under 50 kg and over 100 kg and everyone in between. MRP think there's a better way.

The usual approach is to make high- and low-speed damping adjustable to suit the rider, but this is only an option for high-end dampers and it adds complexity to the setup process - if a fork is designed to cater to a wide range of riders there's arguably more room to get lost in the setting windows.

MRP Lift Details

• Five weight-specific damping tunes
• Adjustments: Low-speed compression and rebound
• Fits Fox, Marzocchi, MRP & RockShox 35, 36 & 38 mm forks
• 200-hour service interval
• User-serviceable and retrofittable
• Available on revamped MRP forks
• Price:$399.95 USD
• More info: mrpbike.com
MRP have a new damper called Lift, which can slot into Fox and RockShox forks as well as their own. It has five damping tunes to suit riders in five distinct weight categories. This allows MRP to make do with two adjusters (low-speed compression and low-speed rebound) and narrow the adjustment window to a usable range. It also allows them to use shim-based valving rather than a separate preloaded high-speed circuit, which MRP say delivers "a seamless crossover from the low to high-speed circuits and provides a predictable and responsive terrain-hugging ride."

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The five color-coded compression damping curves for the Lift are shown with compression adjustment fully open.

The five weight-based daming tunes are as follows: White (110-150 lbs. / 50-68 kgs.), Yellow (140-180 lbs. / 64-82 kgs.), Green (170-210 lbs. / 77-95 kgs.), Blue (200-240 lbs. / 91 -109 kgs.), and Red (230-270 lbs. / 105-123 kgs.). The low-speed compression adjuster still allows a useful amount of tuning to the low-speed damping force, as shown in the graph below.

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The damper internals are made in-house and include IGUS bearing material in the seal head and PTFE in the prison to minimise friction. Each damper is dyno-tested as part of quality control. The recommended service interval is generous, at 200 hours. MRP says that no special tools are needed for servicing or installation.

There are five fitment options available for most 35, 36, and 38mm fork models from Fox and RockShox, as well as earlier MRP Ribbon and Raven forks. All cost $399.95 USD - that's similar to Fox's latest Grip X2 damper ( $380-450 USD) but more than the Grip X ($320-340 USD). Here's the full compatibility breakdown:

Lift Damper Upgrade Kit RockShox 35mm
• RockShox Pike, Lyrik, Yari, & Revelation
• Base, R, RC, Select, Select +, & Ultimate models
Lift Damper Upgrade Kit RockShox 38mm
• RockShox Zeb
• R, RC, Select, Select +, & Ultimate models
Lift Damper Upgrade Kit Fox 36
• Fox 36, 36 Rhythm, and Marzocchi Z1
• Performance, Performance Elite, Factory, Air, & Coil
models
Lift Damper Upgrade Kit Fox 38
• Fox 38
• Performance, Performance Elite, & Factory models
Lift Damper Upgrade Kit MRP
• Ribbon, Ribbon Coil, & Raven



Four questions with MRP Vice President, Noah Sears

Can you re-tune the damper post-purchase?

Yes, an experienced shim-stacker will be able to tune. No specialty tools are required (other than a shaft clamp, if that's considered a specialty tool). A 13mm wrench provides access to the shims on the base (compression) and mid-valves (rebound). But we spent considerable time developing these tunes, which included around three dozen revisions, over a thousand test runs on our high-end linear actuator dyno, and, of course, feedback from our test riders.

Can you modify it to fit a different fork?

That's something we could do for a customer – and it would be less than a new damper – but not something we intend users to do. Changing fitments requires different top caps, rebound assembly parts, and rod lengths (in some cases).

Is the rebound tune different between the five tunes or just compression?

Yes, both compression and rebound stacks are different across the tunes.

If fitting it to a Grip fork, which lower leg oil should be used?

We advise riders to use the bath oil recommended by their fork manufacturer. For Fox, this varies in the damper side depending if you have a FIT4 or Grip/Grip2 damper. In this case, we recommend the FIT4 damper bath oil spec, which conveniently makes the bath oil the same in both legs.



New forks

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Automatic fart buttons out back.

The Lift Damper is one of several updates to the new Ribbon LT (140-170 mm) and LT Coil (150-170 mm) forks. Along wit the weight-specific damper, MRP has a new ACV (Automatic Casting Vent) system that relieves excess pressure in the lower legs (to restore beginning-stroke sensitivity) without requiring you to press a bleed valve.

The Ribbon LT also has an updated air spring called FullFill 2. This spring allows you (or requires you) to set positive and negative air pressure independently, and also features adjustable negative chamber volume. This is in addition to MRP's Ramp Control technology, which allows the end-stroke progression to be adjusted on the fly. MRP say all this adjustability "provides full control over the shape of the spring curve."

The Ribbon LT and Ribbon LT Coil go for $1,249.95. This includes a weight-specific damper tune if purchased directly from MRP or special-ordered through a dealer or distributor. MRP also offer custom paint options in 19 colors for an additional $100 (lowers only) or $150 (lowers and crown).

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Author Info:
seb-stott avatar

Member since Dec 29, 2014
306 articles

138 Comments
  • 47 0
 As a light, but tall guy, this is great. There´s too much stuff just for average persons
  • 27 0
 As a tall, less light guy, agreed.
  • 23 0
 As a short, light guy, agreed.
  • 79 1
 @mashrv1: short heavy guy here, just wanting to get in on this thread
  • 10 0
 As a not so light, average hight guy. I agree.
  • 10 0
 As a tall, but heavy guy, I'd give it a shot.
  • 15 1
 I don't identify as tall or short.
  • 14 1
 As someone who identifies as neither a guy, nor even a human, I think this makes a lot of sense.
  • 16 0
 As an endless eldritch horror, I agree.
  • 10 0
 If I'm understanding the skinny here, as a tall short king, light on brains, I'm heavily inclined to agree.
  • 14 0
 I'm not even a guy. As a computer program I don't know what any of this means but I also agree
  • 7 2
 As an average Canadian (anorexic American) I don't know where I fit in, but I like it
  • 10 0
 Being an overheavily high guy here, I'll take 3
  • 6 0
 As a lightbulb this is not relevant to me at all.
  • 3 0
 Motorcyclers fault
  • 6 0
 As an average height average weight guy I’m relieved to finally have something tailored for me
  • 15 0
 As a dude, playing a dude, disguised as another dude, I too agree.
  • 5 0
 @poleczechy: Never go full dude.
  • 7 0
 Extra medium people are always left aside.
  • 2 0
 As a mountain biker that has already spent too much of their income on mountain bikes I’m going to have to pass on this one
  • 3 0
 Speaking as Thanos, I'm simply delighted to read this article and shall look forward immensely to further reviews.
  • 2 0
 @poleczechy: then mark it zero
  • 2 1
 I don't know how to set up my fork as it is. I just ride it at medium rebound and all other dials halfway through their clicks.
  • 3 0
 " As a mountain biker that has already spent too much of their income on mountain bikes "

@devinkalt: Ding ! Ding ! We've found the AI Bot. Only a mountain biker's significant other would say that.
  • 1 0
 Wouldn't a tall light guy be the same weight as a average guy?
  • 2 0
 Got anything for extra hairy guys?
  • 12 1
 This is the first suspension product I've seen in a while that may actually simplify the setup process. Too many suspension companies are focused on building solutions that are looking for problems. More dials, stiffer, inverted yadda yadda. Just give me something that feels good and doesn't take a lot of riding to figure out.
  • 5 1
 $400 buckaroos yeeeehaw! What kind of damper is this? Bladder? Open bath? Semi Open Bath?

Aside from that, I'm happy to see the Ribbon lives on relatively unchanged. Good news for those of us hanging onto one of the few "mostly" Made-in-USA forks on the market.
  • 16 0
 Sealed cartridge with coil-backed IFP. Cheers
  • 1 5
flag PHeller (Apr 11, 2024 at 12:48) (Below Threshold)
 @NoahColorado: if it's essentially the same thing as what Fox is offering in the GRIP X and X2, and roughly the same price, why would I choose the MRP LIFT over the original manufacturer's upgrade option?
  • 17 0
 @PHeller: I suppose the answer would be weight specific tunes...
  • 2 1
 @PHeller: This is what I was thinking, for less cost, you could get your existinmg Fox or RockShox damper tuned for your weight....
  • 1 0
 @Dicko22: Where do you go to get a VVC Grip2 tuned?
  • 4 0
 @Dicko22: you could get a custom tune on your stock damper for a bit less money i imagine, but that means you will need to send the damper in and wait for service and return. This mrp option is probably appealing to a lot of people since you can just order it, swap it out and ride, no down time. Also I dealt briefly with MRP needing parts for an older used fork some years ago and was very impressed with customer service and product support. Had it been a Fox or RS product it would have been obsolete given it's age. MRP had all the parts needed and upgrades available.
  • 1 0
 @somebody-else: Thanks, it figures that Shockcraft would be all over it but I wonder if there's anywhere that doesn't require dealing with customs. As far as I can tell the major third party tuners here don't seem to touch the VVC models.
  • 2 0
 @boozed: from what I’ve heard no two vvc dampers end up being quite the same from the factory (and why they got rid of it on the brand new stuff). Doesn’t seem to be much modifying here in the US either.
  • 1 0
 @shami: Good points. While I'm not stoked on the price of the Lift damper upgrade, the fact that it exists and is more tunable than the EssenTTial damper puts MRP back up to the top in terms of customer service and support availability. It's a shame my Ribbon Coil doesn't have a frame to go on, because I'd seriously consider the Lift damper.
  • 9 3
 Speed measurement in inches per second. Tell me you're American without saying you're American...
  • 41 0
 I don't thing people who use "stone" as a measurement should be casting shade
  • 6 0
 @Genewich: Stone him, pound him to death!
  • 16 0
 You guys don't use seconds across the pond?
  • 11 0
 I can do the "stones per pint" conversion for you, if you want.
  • 16 0
 @RonSauce: We now measure time in "Liz Truss Premiership Intervals". They're like seconds, only smaller.
  • 2 0
 @Corinthian: I think that's a time unit we can all Truss...
  • 2 0
 @Corinthian: LMAO. It's traditional here for current and previous Prime Ministers to attend remembrance day at the Cenotaph. If Liz Truss lives to 95 she will have spent more days there than she did as PM.
  • 5 0
 It'd be cool if they made shim stack kits available. As a dumbass amateur damper dabbler, it'd be nice to have a go-to source of shims for a damper like this.
  • 3 1
 Too much support required for a lower cost product, and many customers would still goof it up and talk smack about it. Suspension tuning is a steep learning curve. Formula and the pre-loaded cartridges is as close as we're going to get
  • 3 0
 @Vikingdude: That's kinda what I mean though. Like it'd be nice to get a kit of shims to go from their blue to red tune. Not developing my own tune but just installing another pre-tuned stack.
  • 22 0
 We'll have shim kits available.
  • 7 0
 @NoahColorado: Hell yeah! Nice work on this Noah and gang.
  • 3 0
 That's basically the same as Formula do with their CTS System. CTS is just easier and marketed towards people who want to tinker and tune, not weight specific, but it can have literally the same use case.
Just installed a Selva on my GFs (sub 50kg) Bike, with the appropriate CTS and its the first time she ever saw a need to dial in a bit of compression.
But it's really great to see it as an aftermarket option for other manufacturers forks. Sending your existing fork to a tuner and have it reshimmed, is about 200€ though and might work even better, so I don't know who it's really for. I mean I like the option but well
  • 4 0
 As a heavy dude, I run a heavy spring which often overpowers the rebound in shocks and forks, even at the slowest settings. This is a totally welcome development for me
  • 7 6
 "and it adds complexity to the setup process"

I think you mean it "it ALLOWS the setup process". Less dials isn't simpler, because to make tuning adjustments not allowed by the dials you have to go internal, and that's definitely not simpler.
  • 15 0
 But if those additional dials are just getting you to high-speed damping suitable for you vs. high-speed damping already being suitable for you (internally), is that a "win"? Seems like the former just puts more of the setup process (time) on you.
  • 11 0
 @NoahColorado: Correct me if I'm wrong Noah, but running different high speed compression and rebound shims inside a damper is going to deliver a completely different ride characteristic than running a high speed compression and rebound adjustment knob on the outside of the fork. Typically, knobs preload a shim or use a needle, which creates a digressive damping curve (not-ideal). My understanding is that it's not apples to apples.
  • 17 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: That's correct – and I just want to say for the record that I, for one, welcome our new robot overlords.

How a damper achieves externally adjustable high-speed damping differs between specific dampers, but it is often done through preloading the shim stack. And preloading does not have the same effect as changing the the stack. Also, adjustments made in this way also affect low-speed damping – which we see as a trade-off.
  • 2 3
 @NoahColorado: That's assuming it's dialed out of the box. That's a big ask, even with 5 whole tunes with a whopping 40 lbs weight range.

Though credit must be given for making the ranges overlap. Some of the recommendation charts I've seen don't even abut, let alone overlap: 180-200 lbs: 86-96 psi, then 200-220 lbs: 100-114 psi. I guess 98 psi is not recommended for that one...

Yes, external adjustments sometimes have different effects than internal adjustments would, but it's not always the case, and in fact it might be good in that the midvalve (often frame/ride-style specific) can be set up to give an overall feeling and an externally adjustable base valve can be used to tune things the mid-valve doesn't handle.

One, or even two, extra dials in "the setup process" is not so bad. It's the setup process, you really only do it once, maybe twice if you're second guessing or changing things a lot. It can still be "set & forget" no matter how many dials there are.

I'm not saying this concept of the presets isn't good, just that calling it "simpler" is not accurate in my mind. It's just different. Is it simpler to order Red because you're a heavy charger only to realize it's way too harsh because you don't charge as hard as you thought and then have to deal with getting it replaced or retuned to Blue or Green specs?
  • 3 2
 @TEAM-ROBOT: Definitely not apples to apples, but also not always apples to oranges.

For example, Fox seems to have tried to make VVC act more like actually changing the stiffness of shims as opposed to just adding more preload to a stack already partially preloaded with ring-shims. Seemingly in the goal of creating more consistent and linear force overall, instead of just more force to crack the preload and then getting that digressive curve. And RVS doesn't preload the base valve shims themselves, but instead the adjustment preloads a spring that allows the whole stack to move to increase oil flow while still letting the stack flex normally and control a portion of the the flow. (Wow, I only know Fox's acronyms, I guess, haha!)

But many stacks that are only tunable internally effectively do the same thing as external preload: thicker or more ring shims for more internal preload, or taking out the rings for a more linear curve that takes less force to crack open but perhaps provides more force after opening. Except this is all generalizing, and of course some internal changes are very different stacks.

My point is that less knobs is not simpler, and could be considered more complex to actually get dialed, because actually making any kind of significant change _requires_ going inside. And although having external adjustments doesn't mean you'll never have to go inside, because as you said, the possible adjustments are not always the same between external and internal, it's definitely more likely you'll be able to find an ideal without going internal, if you have more knobs, making it often _less complex_.
  • 9 0
 @justinfoil: I appreciate your interest and comments! I really do, it's helping prepare me for Sea Otter. You seem very knowledgable. A couple points:

I do think tuning via two adjustments is objectively "simpler" than three or four. But you could debate about which is "better."

Yeah, we made the weight ranges overlap because at the edges, factors like primary terrain, bike weight, travel, and overall user preference should be considered. I need to create a guide explaining that, for sure.
  • 1 2
 @NoahColorado: simple dials and an "optimized for average riding on average bike by average rider" stock tuning are the easiest way to get acceptable to good performance. This product is not for those situations.
More complex suspension (like separate positive/negative pressure, HSR and HSC adjustment) makes it more complex to reach average to good performance, but easier (or possible at all) to reach good to great performance.

My Fox 34 GRIP is very to get acceptable performance out of. My Manitou Mattoc Pro is harder to get good performance out of, but can reach performance that the Fox can't at all.
  • 2 1
 @NoahColorado: Dials are a bit faster to setup though. The idea of shimstacks for weight is an oversimplification, you should try at least 2 settings to get proper setup. I do not believe that you can choose this only based on weight, the weight you put through the fork is not only a function of your mass, but also weight distribution on the bike, rear shock settings, head angle and the trails you ride. so ....
  • 9 0
 @lkubica: Dials are great, if you know what you're doing. But if changing HSC also changes LSC, it's a game of whack-a-mole. That's one reason why so many people reach a point in fork adjustments where they just have to start all over.

Weight is not perfect, but it's better than a one-size-fits-all solution. And the recommended ranges are broad enough and adjacent tunes are close enough that it's not like if you don't get it exactly right the fork is unridable. Which basically IS the case for people with stock forks who maybe weigh 110 lbs or 270lbs, ask them how much all that external adjustability is for them.

And if you are a tuner and sensitive enough to feel how "weight distribution on the bike, rear shock settings, head angle and the trails you ride" change your damping needs, you can very easily get inside the Lift damper and try different shim stacks (they're available to buy if you want to mix compression and rebound tunes, for instance).
  • 7 0
 @NoahColorado: I think you're ready for the Otter
  • 1 1
 @Mac1987: But why is the Mattoc harder to get good? Assuming we're talking about very similar dampers, just one with less dials and thus fixed configurations for some settings, there is no reason you can't get the one with more dials set up very close, and in fact, I would assume that following the recommended or default settings would do just that. Yes there are differences in the damper layout with more or less dials, that might affect the tuning range and style, but in general you should be able to get close.

If it's harder to get a "good" setup with the dials, I would blame that on the recommendations/defaults rather than the fact that there are more knobs. IE: on damper with HSR and HSC dials, leaving them in the "middle" (whether the physical middle actually matches the other damper's preset is an open question) and matching the rest should not give a drastically different feel than similar a damper without HSR and HSC dials.
  • 1 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: @NoahColorado: I concur! Good stuff.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: because there's more stuff influencing performance that need to get adjusted for your weight, bike and riding style. For example, with the Fox, you set air pressure according to the guide, and lower a bit of it's too stiff, or increase if there's not enough support.
With the Mattoc, only adjusting the main air pressure results in imbalance with the IRT chamber. It's therefore easier to mess things up, but at the same time, there's far more potential to get things just right.
  • 1 0
 @Mac1987: Yet Manitou also has recommendations for IRT settings. Just like Fox and others have default volume reducers for different travel settings. It's just another setting, and leaving it at the default or following the recommendations _should_ leave you no worse off than if the setting was not adjustable.

Yes, more external settings means more to screw up, but you do not have to touch/tweak them, so basic setup does not have to be any more complex. However, less external settings means you _cannot_ touch them, so getting a truly dialed setup is _always_ more complex because you have to go internal to make those changes.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: except it does when experimenting away from recommendations. You shouldn't just increase the air pressure and lower compression damping for more support on a Mattoc with IRT, like you would on a Fox 34 GRIP. You should adjust high speed with low speed compression (because the one affects the other), and IRT with main air pressure. This makes setup more complicated, but also far more powerful.
  • 1 0
 @Mac1987: Except you can make those samechanges on a 34 GRIP, it just takes internal adjustments. So more complex.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: you don't have to, because it has only one positive air chamber. IRT and tokens are two different things. On the damper side, I kind of get what you're pointing at, but then there's still no HBO, although I would agree that you don't have to mess with that if you don't want to
  • 1 0
 correct me if i'm wrong. this is supposed to make the fox 36 elite a better form if you're a lighter rider, but in the article, it also says if you have a fit2 dampener and know how to adjust high and low speed rebound and compression, then you don't need this.

i was looking to upgrade to a fit2, my fiance has a fit2 on her bike but has zero idea how to adjust it. it sounds like this piece of equipment would better suit her as a set it and forget it, and then i can take her fit2 and slap it on my fork since i'm more of the tinkerer?

am i understanding this correctly?
  • 1 0
 This is interesting. Avalanche and I believe PUSH as well, match to compression to the leverage (for the rear) and how aggressive the rider is. The rebound gets tuned to weight. This is similar in automotive suspension, ie. Koni Sports where you have adjustable rebound for various spring rates (stock vs stiffer for lowering or track applications) but the compression is fixed.
  • 2 0
 I really like the idea of this project, but wouldn’t a custom damper tune be more practical? Altering the shin stack is a simple procedure usually.
  • 3 0
 Yeah this is the lost cost effective way of solving problems related to an over- or under-damped fork, although I do think offering different factory tunes for forks could be a great idea if executed correctly, as Rockshox and Fox already offer it on shocks for frames with different leverage ratios for example
  • 4 2
 Tried the Ribbon Air and Ribbon Coil. Completely underwhelming compared to the 36, Lyrik, and Mezzer. Very skeptical of the performance of this damper.
  • 4 0
 In their defense, the Ribbon was the 2017 Pinkbike Suspension Product of the Year. It's just really long in the tooth compared to everything else these days. In the last seven years, Fox has released 3x updated 36 spring/damper combos plus a brand new chassis, Rockshox with a similar amount of updates to the Lyrik.
  • 3 1
 Their twin-tube EssenTTial damper wasn't that great. It seemed good at being supple, but overwhelmed in high-speed hits. It was also filled with oil, making it heavy, and had no shims, making it difficult to tune. I haven't ridden GRIP2, X or X2, or Charger 3, but until recently Manitou seemed like the only damper that actually felt like it was working and for which the knobs made noticeable changes.
  • 1 1
 @GTscoob: I rode them all between 2018-19. There is no way the Ribbon should have won suspension product of the year.
  • 2 0
 @funkendrenchman: I thought the ribbon was amazing after the chocoluxe and bushings upgrade, especially the coil. Pretty unpredictable and spiky before it though. I wonder how many people got rid of the fork rather than try the upgrade?
  • 1 0
 @bobpretend: I liked the upgrade, and I think I might like the Ribbon on a different bike, but the Ribbon just couldn't cut it as an enduro fork. It was massively outperformed by even a base model Mezzer. The airspring never felt consistent and had to be re setup every ride, the chassis wasn't stiff enough for a gravity focused sled, and the damper developed a really nasty knock. Hell, even after the upgraded bushings I still had issues with binding.
  • 1 0
 Why does the "Damper Tunes Compression OPEN" graph look just like the "Green Tune [LSC] CLOSED" graph, and not the "Green Tune [LSC] OPEN" graph? What compression is "open" on that multi-color chart?
  • 2 0
 Because the green tune graph is zoomed-in. Low-speed compression is open on the multi-color chart.
  • 2 3
 @NoahColorado: I get it's zoomed in, but only halfway, and none of the multi-color curves resemble the Green Open curve at all. They all go distinctly steep to less steep with an inflection around 20-25 in/s. While Green Open starts less steep with an inflection to steeper around 35 in/s and another milder inflection to mid-steep around 70 in/s. Green Closed though has that steep start with inflection around 20 in/s to less steep, like the multis, and as expected for LSC closed.

Not saying the data is off, but there is something with the labels and/or colors.
  • 3 0
 Pretty sure Ozempic is a cheaper way to get into the ideal weight range for your fork
  • 1 2
 "that relieves excess pressure in the lower legs (to restore beginning-stroke sensitivity)"

Aren't the vents usually about preventing excess ramp up? A couple extra PSI in the large volume of the extended lowers isn't going to really hurt plushness off the top, but could create some unwanted progression as that volume rapidly shrinks with the intrusion of the stanchions and everything in them into the lowers.

Or the very opposite, where lower pressure inside the legs causes the the fork to hold down very slightly, reducing positive travel slightly but actually making it quite plush off the top since it's acting like a very large volume negative spring.
  • 3 0
 Yeah, those are Seb's words. Technically, pressure built up in the lowers adds to the total effective spring rate. You would feel the greatest effect deeper in stroke. That's actually how we feature Ramp Control in the Ribbon LT Coil – by controlling the flow of air from the lower into the stanchion.
  • 1 0
 @NoahColorado: That is _cool_!
  • 1 2
 "It also allows them to use shim-based valving rather than a separate preloaded high-speed circuit,"

So it's not separate? Or it's not preloaded? Or both?

All or part of a shim stack can be preloaded with ring shims or such; but having none of those isn't anything special, it's just a way tuning, usually for digressive force curves. Or do they mean not externally preloaded, which is quite normal for non-adjustable high-speed circuits.
  • 2 0
 you are wrong here - its quite the opposite: preload or ring shims create a digressive damping curve. The digressive „knee“ of the curve is caused by the oil pressure overcomming the preload…
  • 1 0
 @VerticalDynamics: um, yeah, I said that: "a shim stack can be preloaded with ring shims... for digressive force curves.
  • 6 6
 If your going to spend that much on a damper do yourself a favor and drop in an avalanche open bath cartridge for 100$ more .
  • 3 0
 But wait months and months and months and it will still cost more. No shaming Avalanche good product but you got to pony up some cash and be ready to wait.
  • 13 1
 Or buy a Mezzer for $650.
  • 1 0
 @funkendrenchman: for real.

Honestly at $400 you could probably have a Manitou damper modified to work in your MRP.
  • 1 0
 yup, Just installed that and a smashpot into a 36. I know, lots of money, but its just in a different league compared to stock, plus, the cartridge will probably last me many bikes.
  • 1 0
 @funkendrenchman: thats what I think, want an MRP damper? maybe just sell your stuff and buy an mrp...
  • 6 0
 @KingPooPing: Wait months and months plus hours and hours on the phone with a psycho.
  • 2 0
 Stoked! About to get on a MRP Ribbon
  • 2 0
 awesome! will try this one on my 2025 fox that comes with grip x2
  • 2 0
 Why doesn't this support the Ribbon SL? Anyone know?
  • 3 0
 Because of the bottom-out assembly in the SL – it would contact the damper in compression. We'll have a solution soon. Thanks!
  • 2 0
 @NoahColorado: Appreciate the response. Looking forward to seeing this, although I do like the practicality of the open bath damper on my current SL! Smile
  • 1 0
 What if I am a yellow tune in the summer and a green tune in the winter? Am I out $800??
  • 3 0
 You could just get the shims and convert it.
  • 2 0
 Man, there are so many forking exciting releases lately!!!
  • 1 0
 Noah, will this be a prize at the Abajo enduro in the e-bike category? Asking for a friend…
  • 12 0
 A prize for winning? There are no winners when it comes to e-bike racing. Just kidding!
  • 1 0
 man, I loved my Ribbon Air and am going to be running it on my next build but now I have Fork FOMO.
  • 2 0
 Does it fit the 35 Wink ?
  • 3 1
 Did you even read?
  • 3 0
 @Andrew-Dockrey: it actually doesn't say anything about the 35, just higher end stuff.
  • 1 0
 The 35 is unfortunately not 35 enough Frown
  • 1 2
 @j-t-g: "There are five fitment options available for most **35**, 36, and 38mm fork models from Fox and RockShox, as well as earlier MRP Ribbon and Raven forks."

What's that then?
  • 1 0
 The article may have been changed since originally posted, but it very clearly states that there are 35mm stanchion fork options for this damper
  • 1 0
 @Andrew-Dockrey:
Sure I did :
"Fits Fox, Marzocchi, MRP & RockShox 35"
But yes I know, and no one would do that Smile
  • 1 0
 Can’t find installation instructions
  • 1 0
 Towards the bottom left of the product pages.
  • 2 0
 MRP stepping up!
  • 1 0
 Hey @NoahColorado , is this going in an updated Bartlett?
  • 3 0
 Yes, just not quite yet. Unfortunately we had to limit the fork model updates and Lift upgrade fitments in order to do each one justice (design time, ride and dyno testing, etc.). But other forks and fitments are on the table.
  • 1 0
 MRP locked up the PTFE. Panopticon acheived! Might be a typo though.
  • 1 0
 -You Fat-Shaming me MRP?????
  • 2 0
 No, quite the opposite!
  • 1 0
 @NoahColorado: serious big guy question here: why still 35mm stanchions? On a 170mm fork, I’m skeptical as a Clydesdale.
  • 1 0
 Thanks Noah and MRP for all the great products you make
  • 1 0
 What about Butter Cups?
  • 6 0
 They're attached to the damper rod on Charger 3 dampers – which you'd be removing to install this. You'd still have the Butter Cups on your spring side. But no, you can add them onto the Lift damper rod.

We did a lot to minimize friction in the Lift Damper, including reducing the number of major dynamic seals to just one, using a PTFE-infused material in the IFP, and a smooth sliding Igus slide bearing in the seal head.

I work for MRP, FYI.
  • 1 0
 @NoahColorado: I was starting to wonder if you were the best troll ever, also, Fox 34 coming? Asking for a friend
  • 2 0
 @DizzyNinja: We'll take a look at the 34. We haven't yet, but we will!
  • 2 0
 I realize now I said "you can add" Butter Cups, but I meant to say you CAN'T. Sorry for the confusion!
  • 1 0
 @way2manyhobbies2keep: Not as good as his response to the question about ebike racing though.
  • 1 0
 Deleted it myself
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