Pinkbike Poll: How Much Does Your Bike *Actually* Weigh?

Dec 9, 2021 at 2:55
by Seb Stott  
2022 Santa Cruz Bronson XO1 AXS Reserve Carbon CC MX

We've run polls before asking how much a bike should weigh and how much weight matters to you, but never a poll on how much the bikes(s) you own actually weigh.

While the importance of bike weight is often overstated, it definitely has an effect and most of us would make our bikes lighter if we could. But saving weight is insanely expensive - aside from a few extra bells and whistles, one of the main selling points of a $10,000 bike over a $3,000 bike is a few hundred grams difference in weight.

I weigh every bike I test, and I find that most bikes weigh a surprisingly similar amount. If you weigh a load of bikes at a similar price point, with the same intended use and frame size and (crucially) with the same tires, a lot of the variation goes away.

But when Matt Beer reviewed the 2022 Santa Cruz Bronson, a 150/160mm-travel bike that weighed 14.1 kg / 31 lbs, he described it as "relatively light". That seemed to get some commenters up in arms, "Since when did 30+ lbs become light lol?"

That got me thinking, how much do typical bikes actually weigh in each category?

If you own a bike in a category and you know accurately how much it weighs, let us know in the polls below. To make it comparable, tell us the weight without pedals or other accessories. If you only know how much it weighs with pedals, a pair of trail pedals typically weigh about 1 lb / 450 g.

How much does your XC bike weigh without pedals?

We're talking XC-race bikes (sub-120 mm travel).



How much does your downcountry bike weigh without pedals?

Typically 115-130 mm travel.



How much does your trail bike weigh without pedals?

Typically 130-150 mm travel.



How much does your enduro bike weigh without pedals?

Typically 150-180 mm travel.



How much does your downhill bike weigh without pedals?

200 mm+ travel, dual crown fork.




376 Comments

  • 761 3
 my bike has pedals on it
  • 71 8
 Yeah, same here. What's even the point of asking the weight of a bike without pedals? If crank weight is such a big deal then surely pedal weight matters even more?

Edit: Makes me wonder, should battery and (in case of Fazua or similar) the motor be included?
  • 104 9
 They should do how much does your bike weigh with everything but the rider on it. Pedals, Tools, Bottle, Fender.
  • 14 1
 My bike has a water bottle cage on it, a first aid kit, and multi tool on it, and a rider.
  • 6 1
 @Highgearcyclery: with water or something else in the bottle?
  • 18 13
 If you clip in, should you include the shoes too?
  • 10 3
 @Highgearcyclery: I think what's even more important to the bike industry is how much does your bike weigh including the rider weight
  • 3 1
 @devinkalt: ... including protection, backpack and soaked and muddy clothes. That's the number that actually matters.
  • 33 0
 Seriously...I was about to click...then read the no pedals. Who weights their bike without pedals? You need em to ride so count em in the damn weight. Also "pictures or it didn't happen". Claimed weights are bs, show a picture to prove it.
  • 14 1
 I'd really like to know how much my bike weighs without pedals....or tires.
  • 7 0
 I only have one bike that i use for all of the above. Only difference is it drops a pound when i put the xc tires on for the odd xc race. Rest of the time for trail/enduro/dh has light DH tires on.
  • 21 0
 I love bike
  • 10 0
 Clean or muddy?
  • 10 0
 @fautquecaswing: clean bwa ha ha, my bike gets cleaned when i ride through a creek.
  • 4 0
 @QuebecPoulin: You're just pointing at things and saying what you're pointing at.
  • 23 0
 My bikes weight depends on the season. After Thanksgiving and Christmas it generally weighs about 5-7lbs more.
  • 6 0
 Should I take the two beers out of my pack first?
  • 1 0
 @camcoz69: No...because those are shoes.
  • 4 0
 @geephlow: Only if your planning on drinking them
  • 2 0
 @devinkalt: Skinny kid at 5'7 vs. husky dad at 5'7. Same frame, shock, parts, everything but the air pressure. I wonder how they'd design differently.
  • 4 0
 Agreed. Shouldn’t ask the question in manufacturer’s terms, but in rider’s terms. That way the day would be useful to us. Oh wait. Never mind. My bad. I forgot.
  • 4 0
 this is my fav PB comment ever, i think.
  • 3 0
 It's like weightlifting - does the weight of the bar count?
  • 15 0
 Plot twist - how much does your pedals weigh without your bike on it?
  • 2 2
 There should be a selection for people who don't stress about weight and just want to enjoy riding what they got.
I ride a fat bike and go ahead, ask me if I give a fr£€^%¥# f@&$ about weight.
  • 10 0
 @vinay: no one. I repeat no one wants to know how much your e-bike, or your fat bike weighs.
  • 3 0
 @Mac1987: make sure it's your water bottle and not someone elses
  • 2 0
 @Jacquers: Yes always
  • 3 0
 @dan23dan23: I love bike
  • 2 3
 @vinay: Because someone's crankbros egg beaters are way lighter than some other guys steel flats. This is a preference item that creates a potentially 1-pound swing so it is best to eliminate it. I swap pedals all the time as well so it is nice to know the baseline.
  • 3 0
 In Enduro more about discounting pedals should be discounting tires and inserts
  • 1 0
 @silvbullit: sorry, dude my tire alone weight 1,45kg on my Enduro. IF something is punching weight it's tire's. So I have 3kg on tires and I know people ride with less then 2kg overall around. So what's more heavy weight? Your eggbeater Vs some incredible heavy 600g Pedals?
  • 1 0
 @camcoz69: Only if you're a triathlete
  • 1 0
 @camcoz69: yes, these are the important questions. And If your shoes have boa should you include the feet as well?
  • 1 0
 @silvbullit: Surely that's the same for all components? What about dropper posts? Tyres? Lots of 'preference' items on your bike that can cause big weight swings.
  • 1 0
 @pinkbike1000: ‘now, how much do your pedals weigh with bike installed?’
  • 1 0
 @Mac1987: Flask goes in the fanny pack(yes it's a fanny pack. not "Hippack")
  • 1 0
 @QuebecPoulin: You may want to lay low for a while...
  • 2 0
 @fabwizard: same here, decided to get another wheelset (xc tires with lighter rims vs dh tires and wt rims). basically setup for trailduro or downcountry Big Grin . it's insane how tires turn the bike into a different bike altogether.
  • 168 4
 You guys clearly missed the "I dont care" option.
  • 11 3
 I guess that goes with the "I don't know button". The question is, how are they (the numbers people) going to distinguish between "I don't know", "I don't own one" and "I don't care"? And if they don't care about you clicking that option, why is it even there?
  • 9 0
 @vinay: the last option completely misses the point of people not knowing.
  • 2 1
 this
  • 4 0
 @vinay: I would be quite interested in the reasoning of people who do know, but don't care. If they really don't care, why did they bother to find out? And there might also be a category of people who care, and know, but want to have a method to say to Outside: "I'm not going to tell you!"
  • 7 0
 What they missed is "Dangerholm's option"!
  • 4 0
 @vinay: they can't and so this pool will not provide any useful info especially considering that this is by far the most represented answer. Pure waste of time due to poor survey conception.
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: exactly 1 gram
  • 16 0
 I massively care. I take a dump, pick my nose and cry before every ride.
  • 1 0
 @Balgaroth: Well, they could just filter that one out and indeed see something like a bell curve. But there is still the uncertainty which puts it all off. Did people actually remove their pedals. Did people include or remove accessories like bottle mounts, computers, fenders, full or empty bottles. Which bikes had pedal assist (hence motor and removed or installed batteries, range extenders etc)?

A more interesting question would have been, "what is the center of mass of the complete bike with respect to the bottom bracket (positive ahead and above the bb)?" You'll still get loads of "I don't knows" but at least this is the stuff that matters. Oh and of course, measurements in imperial units. People who didn't do the measurements still need something to bitch about in the comment section.
  • 3 1
 @vinay: that option is there so people can see the results without clicking an option
  • 4 0
 @ak-77: I weighed my bikes because I was curious, but honestly I don't really care that much. It weighs what it weighs, and it is exactly the bike I want to ride regardless of the weight. Would I like it to be lighter? Only if it didn't compromise performance, reliability, or price. There is a reason I run heavy tires and inserts and accept the weight penalty. Interestingly, my burley steel-frame hardtail weights almost the same as my all-mountain fully (~32 pounds).
  • 3 1
 We should empathize... this is the end of the year, they don't know what to ask for their polls, and fatally they ask the most relative awkward question: the weight of our bikes (w/o pedals, ha ha). Merry Christmas PinkBike!
BTW: I do "care" more about MY weight and fitness than about my bikes's weight.
I'm 47y-o, I'm still sexy, smelly, tasty, and don't need neither want an e-bike yet. Everything's OK.
  • 3 4
 @danstonQ: Well said. As long as the wheels go round and you're having fun, who cares about the weight? Lighter bikes only help a bit when going uphill and who the hell times him or herself up hills?
  • 3 0
 At the very least "I don't know" should be separated from "I don't own one".

I'd think the majority of mountain bikers don't actually own a scale to accurately weight their bike. So other then the bathroom lift and subtract method who the hell knows for sure...?
  • 6 0
 @jaame:

Uh, me.

23.8 pound 120/115 dc bike with pedals, cage, flat fixing supplies, and a multitool.

Raced in 40-100 milers a dozen times per year.

It’d be In the 22 pound range without the stuff that I need/want to ride with, but I rounded up to 24.
  • 2 1
 @ak-77: yeah, frankly this is just gross corporate info-grubbing.

Get back to your roots, pinkbike (outside)
  • 1 0
 They don't care about those who don't care. They just needed a bike weight preference to sell it. Companies don't care about those who don't care either - there is much more money to make on people who care.
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: My kitchen scale goes up to 15kg. I don't know about the accuracy, but it displays weights in grams. It just seems annoying to balance my bike on such a small scale. I could probably fix the rear brake lever with a rubber band, put it on the rear wheel and lean it against the wall. The more vertical the bike, the smaller the influence of the wall. But maybe the bike is heavier than 15kg so it may be a lot of work for less than nothing.
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: that is if you own a body scale, I don't as it is the most pointless metric to assess your health. Fat percentage is the only interesting one and a scale doesn't help you with that (even those gimmicky body impedance ones). And kitchen scale don't go heavy enough.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: bathroom scale? Weigh yourself, then pick your bike up and calculate the difference. Or use a baggage scale.
  • 1 0
 @jaame: yep, the lift and subtract method. It's just that most bathroom scales are not that accurate anyway and not calibrated to weight something between 25 and 35 lbs. So it might tell you your bike is 28lbs, but it might still be 32 or vice versa...
  • 2 1
 @stiingya: weighing by difference doesn't require an accurate scale, only a precise one.

@ck1177: my pay-per-click impression of this and many other polls is that 53000+ souls have a Web connection and a device to access it. Advertisers may pay for double that, since we had to click on the article to get here. Don't care, don't know, don't own--beside the point
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: of which most bathroom scales are neither. Most people don't have an accurate way to weigh there bike. Some do, some get it weighted while at a shop. The vast majority don't really know what there bikes weight because they have no scale or the scales they have are not giving a good result. Go to Walmart and pull scales off the shelf and weigh yourself. Your gonna find several pounds difference between scales. Which one is right?
  • 3 0
 @stiingya: it doesn't matter which one is right, as long as it's consistent, since you're weighing yourself then yourself holding bike, and subtracting difference. The difference is accurate even if the scale is only precise. My cheap 2007 Sunbeam China scale gives the same result every time I stand on it, so is precise enough. But thank you, Walmart+

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accuracy_and_precision
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: i just use a luggage scale
  • 1 1
 @vinay: this doesn't work for my rig because the Enduro is more heavy then 15kg at least and I also have a scale like this. My guess is around 17kg.
But I it's overkill in robustness..
Better this way then walking home.

Anyone who still use the sentence 'Strong, light, cheap, pick two' is stupid. They should show me a light Enduro tire that can't get a flat. Impossibru..
Then show me rotors for 4 pods with max power at 223mm who are light. Sorry this flimsy 1,8mm thick disc is a piece of shit, nothing strong about it.
Reliable hydraulic hose who are exposed around the BB? Certainly not a Kevlar one. Goodridge or bust. Going for full coil suspension because it tracks just better is the next thing. There will be no light bike after all of this is done...
  • 1 0
 @Serpentras: I don’t think that’s a black and white rule. More a thoughtful musing.
  • 1 0
 @jaame: Some don't, some do. Weight makes a difference riding on the flat though, too. MTB involves lots of little accelerations, where extra mass takes extra effort to get back up to speed.
  • 1 0
 @olly76: Actually, the accelleration part is very limited. I did extensive calculations on that and it turns out the most clear effect of the accelleration part of energy use is when you are on a long shallow smooth downhill and pedaling to get extra speed. On the flat, even with frequent braking, the effect of extra mass is more noticable in the increased rolling resistance (which scales with mass too). The feel and the stopwatch say something quite different. Which one you find more important is up to you though.
  • 2 0
 @ceecee:Taking a differential measurement (which is what you do when subtracting the difference) will correct for offsets but not for non-linearity or gain errors. Doing the measurement with a known weight will tell you something.
Or you just go and ride your bike.
  • 2 0
 @olly76: it's true, but it's still proportional to biker+bike mass difference, and a1kg heavier bike is typically around ~1%. So whatever you do, 1% mass difference will give you 1% more power needed or 1% slower. You may argue about wheels, since they accumulate like 2x energy. Still, for racing this is very important, for casual use, not really, but of course it's your money and If you enjoy a lighter bike no one should argue with that.
  • 1 0
 @ak-77: nice guns, AK. Maybe when @vinay [photo not detected] climbs off the wall and puts his rubber band down, he'll come investigate them
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: Uh, what? The only guns in my house are my son's Nerf guns. Interestingly, they use very light bullets which go much slower than the heavy lead ones from real guns. And that is true even if they are fired uphill....
  • 1 0
 @ak-77: the only guns in my house are the ones on the fronts of my arms
  • 1 0
 @ak-77: armsless here as well but for the machetes and boiling oil. A failed riff on guns, biceps, AK-47, 'weird flex but ok,' and the likelihood that it's a stretch to include nonlinearity and gain errors weighing a bike on a bathroom scale--not that I'm familiar with them. I knew weight but forgot, but would rather foot-steer a nice carbon rim and race cassette around the baseball-sized rock in the landing zone. I saw photo of Bronson.4 at article top--good luck to Outside+ if they can do something with that, but they get paid when I hit submit
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: LOL, if your "consistent" lift and subtract weight comes out with 32lbs every time and you start throwing money at it to reduce weight, BUT because your scale isn't accurate and your bike was already 28lbs then it kind of matters to most people...
  • 1 0
 @mior: Same problem, cheap ones aren't that accurate. Most people don't have expensive luggage scales? Some do for sure...
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: I guess there will be a small percentage of people who have really expensive bathroom scale or really expensive luggage scale and so they could be getting good weights...

Be interesting to test that against a real bike scale and see though? Smile
  • 3 0
 @ceecee: ak are my initials and 77 is my year of birth. No gun reference.
  • 158 0
 It is now clear to me that the majority of PBers don't own any type of bike.
  • 28 1
 They are probably on Ebikes these days.
  • 4 0
 Good observation or PB missed out on a new category...........or everybody rides e-bikes nowadays Wink
  • 6 0
 Free Outside+ subscription for life as long as you own a gravel bike
  • 2 0
 I think the whole poll was an elaborate ruse to find out what kind of bikes people own and ride. Clearly trail and enduro based on the "don't own one" figures.
  • 1 0
 Unless most respondents own a bike in each category (and care to measure the weight), most of the answers are bound to be in that category. Plus of course it is completely lacking the dirt jump and 4X bike options. Most bikes with pedal assist already fall under the mentioned categories so these were probably counted. Plus they were easy to measure as they're in the heaviest category. Chances are most of them were XC bikes, considering the numbers.
  • 1 0
 @JDFF: Exactly. They primarily do lift access and shuttle runs. It doesn't matter how much their bike weighs when they don't actually ride it.
  • 3 0
 @vinay: Get out of here with your logic and reason - I'll be having none of that thank you.
  • 65 0
 all I know is I saved weight by going tubeless and then gained it back with inserts...
  • 7 0
 Hah- I saved weight going tubless but now I gained it back carrying a spare tire - too much beer!
  • 1 0
 @chrsei: either too much or not enough. It's definitely one or the other.
  • 1 0
 I didn't remove to the tube but did add inserts. (Currently Tannus Armour in the rear, ProCore in the front though I'll probably go back to ProCore front and rear again.) Pretty sure I didn't save weight.
  • 3 0
 yeah but ur wheels work better
  • 66 4
 My Stumpjumper weighed 39 pounds then I forgot I left two 7.5 pound dumbbells in the SWAT comparment I put in there on my ride to Crossfit.
  • 5 1
 That'll be your Downtubecrossfitcountry compartment.
  • 2 0
 This is very funny
  • 54 1
 Weigh your dick and pick your nose about it.
  • 34 0
 Pick a Pound and be a Dick about it.
  • 11 7
 can you please be more gender inclusive?
  • 5 1
 @hirvi: Comment of the year. The perfect comment for its place and time.
  • 19 0
 @chrsei: weigh your tits and be a twat about it.
  • 1 1
 @chrsei: Don't be a TERF. It's 2021, anyone can have a dick if he wants.
  • 46 5
 DON'T WEIGH YOUR BIKE! If you don't care, why would you? If you DO care, however, it'll weigh on your mind when you're having an off day. Then you'll waste money making it lighter – because studies have shown that (within reason) it doesn't really matter.

Heavy parts don't make a bike slow, bad parts do. Unless they're bad brakes, they don't slow you down.
  • 42 0
 you solved it! removing the brakes all together is the answer
  • 4 0
 @Jolinwood: they only slow you down after all
  • 3 0
 @Jolinwood: Yep! It's lighter that way.
  • 8 1
 @Jolinwood: I prefer to remove breaks. Well, not have breaks.
  • 19 0
 Can't I be curious what my bike weighs while at the same time not care what the weight is?

Like if someone asks me my height, I know the answer because I have checked, but at the same time I don't really care what my height is. I'm not loosing sleep thinking I'm too short or too tall. I just accept what it is.
  • 18 1
 I have a 35.5lb enduro bike and a 30.5lb trail bike. Same brand, same size, similar geo. That 5lbs makes a huge difference on longer rides. It’s not as noticeable on shorter more intense rides where you hammer everything, but on long rides where you want to cruise at 70% there is a significant difference. It simply takes less effort to pedal and maneuver, and can ride all day without getting tired on the lighter one.
  • 4 0
 @dthomp325: What are some of the other differences on the two the bikes? I'm assuming the enduro bike has more travel? What about tires?
  • 2 2
 As long as it has light wheels and tires nothing else matters
  • 7 0
 @Noeserd: maybe not 'nothing', but it's definitely the most important factor. I bought a 160mm 13kg Enduro bike with stock Rock Razor/Hans Dampf tires (700-800g a piece). Compared to my older 150mm 15kg AM bike with 800g Der Baron tires, it seemed to fly. I thought it was the weight difference of the bike itself. I then installed Magic Mary SG for a trip to Austria. Grip improved enormously, but so did rolling resistance. Tires are by far the most important, together with suspension kinematics when climbing.
  • 14 2
 When you're dog tired after 3 hours on your enduro sled, jump on your buddy's 26 lb. xc bike and see if you still think weight is irrelevant.
  • 3 0
 @Mac1987: Yes indeed. Rolling resistance is the king of factors slowing you down on a mountainbike (flat or uphill) . Unless you count the rider of course Smile )
  • 5 0
 I know what my bike weighs but I also ride with a 14 pound backpack all the time. Being concerned about bike weight is pointless.
  • 4 0
 @gtill9000 I think the difference you'd feel there is going from an enduro bike to an XC bike. That's geometry, parts, rolling resistance, etc, not just weight.
  • 2 1
 @dthomp325: Similar for me. Except it is XC vs Trail Setup. And it is 22.5lb and 27lbs.
  • 2 1
 @Mac1987: recently rulezman made a test with both xc and enduro wheels on a 12.7kg bike, the time difference between 2 wheels was 40 minutes (enduro wheels 2h45m, xc wheels 2h3m) [maybe xc tires too i'm not sure]
  • 3 0
 @Noeserd: If it was the same tires that would be a test I don't trust. We're talking 35% increase in time here at the same total weight. I know the physics of this pretty well, and I call bullshit on that. For purely the difference between rotating and non-rotating weight the difference in time is below a percent in almost any situation. Even with different sets of tires I find it a large difference, but perhaps not impossible.
  • 5 0
 But I want to brag about how I've gotten my 140mm travel trail bike to weigh as much as some DH bikes
  • 1 0
 @ak-77: It might have been with thicker and thinner casing tires too, the stories are timed out and deleted so i can't confirm
  • 1 0
 I do look at weight-a little. Only thing slower than a heavy bike is pushing a broken bike-so for where I ride that means cushcore in the rear DD casing tire. A bashguard. 4 pot brakes on 203 rotors.
  • 1 0
 @dthomp325: Is that by feel or backed up with data? Just curious, I would have swore on a stack of bibles my Titan was slower on average terrain then my Phantom. But so far actually timing it's a wash, one or the other might be slightly faster or slower on a particular day or ride. But averaged out on average trail rides it doesn't matter.
  • 1 1
 @stiingya: feel and strava data
  • 1 0
 @sino428: it’s interesting that people would think other properties like suspension travel are more important than weight. Watts/kg is generally regarded as the determinator of your pedaling efficiency.

I’ve personally never seen any data showing that suspension movement reduces power output. In fact if you search the internets tests show it has no effect on power output. I’m not a engineer, but I don’t see how the weight movements that cause suspension compression would be transformed to forward acceleration on a rigid bike.

The bikes do have different tires, which is a big chunk of the weight difference, 950gram single ply vs 1200gram dual-ply, both the same width.
  • 4 2
 After decades of the bike industry selling us on more expensive bikes/ parts just to save weight, I’m glad so many people are finally waking up to the reality that it doesn’t really matter unless you are at the pointy end of XC races and a few seconds at the end of a 90 min race would matter.

Generally, the only difference most people can really tell between a $6k bike and a $10k version of the same bike is weight. I’m psyched that there’s $3.5k aluminum bikes that are only fractionally different than the $10k high zoot carbon bike version that weighs 1.5kg less. You want to go faster uphill, put on lighter/ faster tires, you just risk flats going down. Nothing makes me laugh more than someone bragging about how responsive their carbon wheels are when they put in Cush cores and run DH tires: talk about the placebo effect of snake oil. (Yes, carbon wheels can be more durable, I’ll give people that)
  • 1 1
 @stiingya @dthomp325
My XC bike is 5lbs lighter than my trail/ enduro bike. I’ve tried some tests on a good 2.5 mile rolling trail section with two climbs and two descents and about 500 vertical total climbing. The XC bike is around 45-60 seconds faster in my tests at XC race pace. I attribute most of that time to the tires as they have faster tread and are at least 2lbs lighter overall. 2lbs of rotational weight when accelerating out of corners while climbing is a huge difference. I’d love to do the tests with the same XC tires on my enduro bike but I honestly am too lazy to deal with swapping the rubber and the XC bike is pre-boost hubs so I can’t just swap wheels.
  • 2 0
 @dthomp325: I don’t know how much of an effect it has but I’m sure it does. The power output of the rider will stay the same, but how that power is transferred will change. The forward acceleration of the bike is produced mostly by the downward force the rider applies to the pedals, which spins the chainring, etc. So if the suspension is compressing while pedaling, some of that energy output of the rider used to compress the suspension, and is not transferred through the drivetrain to ultimately spin the wheel and accelerate the bike.

And with tires I would say the most important factor would be tread and compound. A big chunky tread with soft rubber will roll way slower than and lighter tread and firmer compound.
  • 2 1
 @whambat: only difference you can tell is weight?!?! High end, expensive bikes not required to have fun by any means, but there’s a lot of difference up until around maybe $8K. No jump from performance elite to factory on Fox suspension and the like, but lots of difference up to that point.
  • 1 1
 @dancingwithmyself: I said most people. I would suspect you are not most people. Most people don’t read or comment on Pinkbike. From working at shops, back in the day, where I can tell you most people buying the high end bikes would have been just as happy with the cheaper bike and couldn’t tell much difference between But, as a salesperson, I was happy to sell something more expensive.

And there are plenty high end of bikes at the $6k point that have either Fox factory or performance elite suspension. Ibis and Alchemy to name two. While my first upgrade for either of those brands at that price point would be brakes, most people couldn’t tell the difference between a G2 R and Code RSCs.
  • 1 0
 @whambat: As for suspension forks, ease of service is a big consideration too. Sometimes I read those articles about fancy new suspension forks on here and wonder if I'll ever be able to service those properly. Lower leg service probably never changes, but once you get into the stanchions it seems like a whole different story. To me it seems like a plunge to invest in something that fancy and then wonder "how on earth am I going to take proper care of that?"
  • 1 0
 @sino428: but on a ht wouldn't that downward force just be used to flex the frame. The movement will be very small for the same force that would compress the suspension on a FS.
  • 1 0
 @kevinturner12: Work/energy is the product of force and distance (measured parallel to the force) so if the force is the same and the movement is smaller then that's less energy. That said, as a hardtail rider I am very aware that full suspension riders can easily keep pedaling in sections where I need to time my pedal strokes in order to not lose traction or bump my feet off the pedals. Plus if the (upper part of the chain) force varies wildly, it isn't always easy to keep pedaling steadily. I don't mind, I take it as part of the challenge to have something to work on whilst pedaling rather than just smashing pedals knowing it will always be transferred to the ground. As for very smooth sections, sure a hardtail may or may not be more efficient. But then again, I hope we don't base our buying decision on how well it works on super smooth terrain.
  • 1 0
 @Jolinwood: Yes! Remove the coward levers!
  • 1 0
 @kevinturner12: that would depend on how rigid the HT frame is. But in practical terms I’d say no, your pedal forces are not going to flex a HT frame too much. Some power will always be lost, but there will be a very efficient transfer of power from rider through the drivetrain on a hard tail. More efficient than a full suspension bike if it’s bouncing up and down while pedaling.
  • 1 0
 @sino428: it wouldn't depend on how rigid the frame was. That would just affect the amount of flex not the amount of energy needed to cause the flex. I can see how changes in geometry pedalling a FS could affect efficiency.
  • 1 1
 @kevinturner12: on a ht you will get a bit of that power back when the frame flexes and responds. On a full sus, well, damping is where you lose power. It turns you're efforts into heat.
  • 1 0
 @littleskull99 how does torsional frame flex transfer any energy back into a drivetrain?
  • 1 0
 @kevinturner12: yes it would. The stiffness of the frame would work the same way as say firming up your shock or fork. If you stiffen it up to reduce the suspension bobbing up and down then more of your power will transfer to the drivetrain and not be lost by the suspension compressing. The job of your suspension is to absorb and then dissipate energy. So if you are riding abs the suspension is bobbing up abs down, energy is being lost.
  • 1 0
 @sino428: what if it’s just the movement of your body that causes the suspension to react and not necessarily energy being siphoned from the drivetrain by the damper?
  • 1 0
 @hllclmbr: but why would you be moving your body in the first place? if you are moving your body it’s because you are trying to generate more power in some way by leaning or shifting your weight, etc.

It’s very true that the more steady you are pedaling the less effect the suspension will have. That’s why there is much less bobbing when pedaling in the seat vs standing. But the bottom line is if the suspension is moving energy is being lost somewhere. How much energy, and how much each individual rider will notice will vary, but the energy is being used.
  • 1 1
 Heavy parts don't make a bike slow... ... slow riders do.
  • 1 0
 @sino428:

Some people don’t have a still upper body, and their herky jerky action definitely doesn’t translate into power going through the drivetrain, but will make shock actuate.

That motion would never go into forward momentum via a drivetrain, hardtail or not.

Also, is this 2002, where we’re trying to decide which is faster around a course?

It’s almost always the one with shock in the rear.

What’s your argument?
  • 1 0
 @hllclmbr: you’d have to read the entire thread of comments to see what the conversation is about. My original comment was to a poster who found his trail bike to be significantly easier to ride than his very similar enduro bike that was 5lbs heavier. He was attributing it mostly to the extra weight, and I was saying that it could be many other factors such as more suspension travel, type or tires, etc.
  • 1 0
 @whambat: that’s fair as applied to “most people”. I’d also say their main perception of the weight difference is loading and unloading the bike from a hitch rack.
  • 1 0
 If the weight matters, you're either riding the wrong bike, or racing. Ballpark 37 lbs here. PB reviewed it at 37.8 tubeless with DD casings same frame size. I went EXO casings tubeless. The weight doesn't matter as much as the smile on my face when riding it.
  • 2 0
 Most people would be just fine with mid range bikes in the 3k-4k range. Most upgrades beyond that are minimal and your average rider would not know the difference. People care more about fashion over function.
  • 1 0
 @stumphumper92: I've always thought that about many suspension upgrades. Often a higher price just means greater adjustability and more knobs to play with. I know for me personally (and probably alot of riders) these adjustments aren't necessary. As just a regular recreational rider my riding itself just isn't consistent enough to ever properly evaluate minor changes to all those settings.
  • 1 0
 @stumphumper92: If I go for the more expensive option, it is because I know I can get spares and/or repairs for the product. It pains me when a product is a total loss because some silly spare is unavailable or prohibitively expensive. So I totally get it when people invest products from Hope. If you get their brakes or hubs, you can probably keep them going for as long as you want.
  • 1 0
 @sino428: Exactly. When i bought my last bike I upgraded to a high end fork with LSC and HSC and i've no clue or care to play around with it. My new bike just has LSC and rebound making it easy to set and forget and that's all i need.
  • 1 0
 @stumphumper92: yeah, and the Grip 1 damper is actually really good. When it came out, it was better performing and required less maintenance than the FiT4 that was on all the Fox Factory forks. Grip2 is amazing, but without taking the time to set it up with someone who knows what they are doing, many people will end up with a worse performing fork with all those settings. Besides you can always upgrade to the Grip 2 down the line for much cheaper than the upgraded model bike that gets stocked with it.
Even “lower” end suspension is so good these days. Take a $3500 Ripmo AF for example: the stock DVO suspension is really pretty good (albeit a little heavy), pretty reliable and easy to work on, and is used by EWS level pros. Couple that with a Deore groupo that actually performs really well, you have a great bike that costs $2500 less than a marginally better bike that only weighs 1kg less. I may know a shop rat or two that have that bike as their daily driver fun bike, while they have ultra light XC bikes for racing.
  • 2 0
 @whambat: This! Less dials, more dialed. I love the wife's Zeb R. Butter smooth, 1 rebound control, Sag, Token. Simple. It just RIPS.
  • 1 0
 @tankthegladiator: Yea air pressure/spring rate, low speed compressions, and rebound is probably plenty of adjustment for alot of riders.
  • 25 1
 How do I know if my bike is XC or downcountry? I have long forms on a hardtail arrrggghhhhh
  • 3 0
 It's obviously downcountry.
  • 2 0
 What about my upcountry bike?
  • 3 1
 @danielfloyd: My hardtail has a 120mm travel fork and a 63deg head angle.
  • 5 0
 No mention of upduro either. SO SAD!
  • 2 0
 @JibbyTheScout: or my Crosshill!
  • 1 0
 @JibbyTheScout: is that a gravel bike?
  • 9 0
 my hardtail has 150mm of rear travel. Is that downcountry?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: what frame is that? Sounds like a wicked bike!
  • 1 0
 @hardtailpunter: BTR Ranger 26" wheels. Head angle drops half a degree per wheelsize (so 63.5deg and 64deg for 27.5" and 29" respectively). Yep, I like the bike. See pictures shortly after the build in my pictures. I actually keep the saddle nearly slammed, it was just this high for the bicycle workstand to clamp the seatpost. Some parts have changes (tires, cranks) but otherwise it is how I still ride it.
  • 2 0
 Yep. They should have split into hardtail/full rigid and full suspension. I also consider bike weight how much it weighs ready to go, so pedals, water bottle cages, gps, tool kit mounted on bike. I ride with it, so why would I consider how much it weighs without items that go on every ride?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: before sag?
  • 2 0
 @stiingya: Yep, this is geometry without sag. Head tube is 150mm long so with the 120mm travel fork unsprung geometry is comparable to that of a hardtail with 160mm travel and a 110mm headtube. Their philosophy is that you don't want a steep head angle with the suspension bottomed out so it has less travel (so it bottoms out higher) and a relatively slack head angle to start with. Not many brands give you the geometry of the bike at (recommended) sag. Only Cotic comes to mind.
  • 1 0
 That‘s the idea behind the poll - when it’s over you’ll be able to tell in which category your bike falls by weighing it.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: pipedream too but their explanation of the geochart is hard to read imo.
  • 20 0
 All I have to say is weighing a bike without pedals is dumb. Who rides without pedals? I know the argument is people ride different models of pedals, but that’s total bs because everyone swaps their tires too, but we don’t weigh without tires. Tire weight varies A LOT more than pedal weight too.
  • 3 1
 because the cheap shimano SPD pedals weigh over 2 pounds each.
  • 2 1
 Because 99.9% of bikes are sold without pedals so what would they be weighing...?
  • 5 0
 It kinda makes sense when a bike is sold without them, for the manufacturer to tell you the weight as sold. But to answer the question of "what does YOUR bike weight", yeah, include the fuken pedals unless you ride without any.
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: Are 99.9% of bikes even sold as complete bikes in the first place? After my first mtb over 20 years ago, I only replaced parts including frames. Probably goes for a good few others too. So in that context it is kind of silly to include everything you bolt to the bike but exclude the pedals. Plus I'm pretty sure I bought my first mtb with pedals too, otherwise I would never have made it back home Wink . Back when I worked in a shop, sure some bikes arrived without pedals but quite a few came with basic Shimano SPD pedals with small plastic platforms clipped to them (so they had plastic cleat-shapes underneath). Is that different nowadays? Oh, I bought a complete Specialized P1 in 2006 too. It definitely came with Specialized platform pedals.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: go in to any bike shop and count full mountain bikes VS frames. Overwhelmingly the majority will be complete bikes. Sure you might find old frames collecting dust, but new frames VS new complete bikes its mostly complete. Now start going through mountain bike specs for any large mountain bike company. Sure, you will find the option to ADD pedals when your buying it. But the bike specs overwhelmingly do not include pedals.... Sure shops throw on cheap pedals now and then so bikes can get test rode, and sometimes throw them in on a sale. But they didn't come with the bike. They were not in the box very often. Now direct to consumer bikes will sometimes come with pedals. But very often its added cost to the sale of the bike and not part of the bike spec.

What brand of bikes are you saying came with Shimano SPD's? What bike shop, when and where did you work and how long ago was it....??? What country?
  • 21 1
 I'm not removing my pedals to weigh my bikes. You'll get weights with pedals.
  • 2 1
 Or you could just do the math in your head. Most pedal sets weigh about 1lb (flats) or .5-.75lbs (clipless).
  • 1 0
 @ungod: I had no idea what pedals weigh. But I still think the weights should be with pedals. They are a component choice that effects weight, just the same as any other part. I don’t see why weight would be evaluated without them.
  • 16 2
 I answered 29lb for all because I use one bike for everything. I identify as someone who doesn't care to identify as anything other than a human, and therefore my bike feels the same way - its just a bike.
  • 9 15
flag DoubleCrownAddict (Dec 10, 2021 at 12:23) (Below Threshold)
 I answered 50 lb for everything since I use my e bike for everything. It's also just a bike.
  • 18 0
 ah yes, bike fluidity, so 2022 of you Smile
  • 13 0
 I stopped weighing my bikes about 10 years ago when I discovered my bike was a couple of pounds heavier than I thought/hoped. Dream killer.
  • 6 0
 I feel your pain, ignorance is bliss.
  • 14 0
 I'd like to see some pics of the sub 27lbs downhill bikes that are apparently out there please!
  • 10 1
 Hats off to all the riders out there answering shite just to skew the data Big Grin
  • 13 0
 My kitchen scale only goes to 11llbs.
  • 9 0
 Might need to weigh it three times or more to get an accurate weight then
  • 1 0
 Mine goes to 15kg. It's called the Soehnle page profi.
  • 7 0
 My summer bike weighs in at ~27.5lb with pedals on, but its an 11 year old 26" wheeled Cannondale that I'm limping along as best I can until fortune returns my way and I can afford a new bike. My winter fatbike weighs in at a porky 36-37 lb, and that's without any kind of suspension - but I bought it used for $1k and ride it as much in the winter as I do my summer bike. I believe that I've gotten all the money out of both of my bikes!
  • 6 0
 I have no idea....don't own a scale and I'm pretty sure Giant spends a crazy amount of money scrubbing weight claims from the internet. That said, I'm honestly curious if anyone has a weight for the 2020 Giant Anthem (aluminum)....I'm guessing 27-28lbs?
  • 4 0
 At least 42 pounds maybe more, a lot more.
  • 4 0
 My theory on Giant hiding bike weight is that their carbon frames are not particularly lighter than their alloy frames.
  • 1 0
 @PhillipJ: 500-800 grams.

I’m actually not sure why Giant doesn’t post weights. On a carbon Reign-32 pounds with a DD rear tire (with a cushcore in it) mostly XT build. Seems par for the course.
  • 1 0
 @wyorider: What size frame? A medium megatower CC with carbon rims and bars and a XO build with cushcore and a DD in the rear would be 33lbs.... and the top of the line reign comes with much heavier parts.
  • 1 0
 @jlizard: medium. Aluminum wheels. Mostly XT 12. Aside from a carbon bar, pretty plain-jane build. I go for reliable and affordable.
  • 1 0
 @wyorider: At 32lbs that would mean the the giant frame is ~1.5lbs lighter than the Santa Cruz CC frame. I'm positive that is not the case. Maybe your scale is out of calibration or something. Sounds like a fun bike!
  • 9 1
 A whole week without an e-bike story/review and now they're not even included in the poll? Isn't anyone concerned about e-bike inclusivity?
  • 3 0
 shhhh.....don't draw any attention to it, I'm liking the trend
  • 1 2
 But they *are* included. The "more than X lb / Y kg" option is there obviously for e-bike inclusivity and industry compliance.
  • 3 0
 Weighed a friend's Norco Sight VLT last week - 58 lbs w. XTR trail pedals and nothing else.
  • 8 1
 Who has a 33lb enduro bike?!?! Between DHF rubber, the rear coil and the fox 38 and cush core inserts, none of which I would give up for my terrain, even dentist level carbon frames are going to come in with 35lb bikes.
  • 1 0
 My friend's 'base' 21 Rocky Mountain Altitude C50 has all of that and is just under 32lbs on the scale, so yeah, he does apparently.
  • 1 0
 @bctrailblazer68: What size frame?
  • 1 0
 36, air shock, not cushcore. Got ya some pounds. Yw
  • 2 1
 I do.

Rocky Mountain Instinct C70 BC Edition, 160mm Fox 36 front, 155mm Fox Float X2 rear (not coil, but amazing, no stranger to EWS), no cushcore, 2.5" EXO+ Assegai front @25psi, 2.3" DD DHR-II rear @28psi. Handles absolutely everything I ask it to.

With an enduro roll and pump, 33.1lbs.
  • 2 1
 nope. Mondraker foxy carbon, carbon wheels, bars, cranks(carbon everything that can be reasonably made from it), DHF/Assegai, etc. 29.55lbs w/o pedals.
  • 3 5
 I think the answer is that a lot of people who "ride enduro" are riding in areas that don't really need an enduro bike, so they run XC parts and think that they're on a full enduro bike.

For example: the Fox 36 is a trail fork, not an enduro fork. But sure, you can "ride enduro" on it.
  • 1 0
 @ungod: Yea - they should split it into "enduro race bike" and " freeride bike". I can totally see a sub 33lb enduro race bike, but not for a freeride bike, unless it's a XS or maybe S size.
  • 7 0
 @ungod: what about a 2019 Fox 36, was that an enduro fork because the 38 didn't exist yet?
  • 2 1
 @ungod: No

XC: Fox 32 SC and SID SL
DC: Fox 34 SC and SID
Trail: Fox 34 and Pike
AM: Fox 36 and Lyrik
Enduro: Fox 38 and ZEB
DH: Fox 40 and BoXXer

The 36 was an enduro fork but now is an AM or trail/enduro fork. You don’t need something that beefy for trail, and most people would prefer something beefier for enduro. Personally if I could only use one fork on any bike it would probably be a Lyrik (which is in the same category as the 36).

Also if you ride enduro, that’s enduro racing.

Enduro bikes are just very capable bikes and can be used for almost anything from XC to DH.
  • 2 0
 @AndrewHornor: At the time the 36 was considered somewhat of an enduro fork, and bikes at the time hadn't quite gotten as aggressive as they are now so it was good enough. But it was always known to be lacking in stiffness compared to the RS 35mm chassis.

Even in 2017-2019 something with a 65-66* head angle would have been an aggressive bike. Now my enduro bike (Canfield Lithium) has a "conservative" head angle of 64.5" while other bikes in the genre are running 63-64* head angles.
  • 1 1
 @louiefriesen: the re-issue of the pike was classified an enduro fork when it dropped in 2014. by now, its a capable downcountry/light trail fork...
  • 1 0
 @nullzwo: The Pike was an enduro(ish) fork and the heavy duty single crown was the Lyrik, now the Pike is a trail fork, and the Lyrik is a stiff trail and all mountain fork, and the ZEB is the new enduro fork.

The Pike is noticeably stiffer than the 34, which I'd classify as a light trail fork. The Pike is essentially a lower travel Lyrik.
  • 10 1
 My bike actually weighs 34lb because it has pedals.
  • 10 0
 Scientific research has shown that the extra grip that pedals give you wrt trying to push the bare cranks around, by far makes up for the weight of the pedals. So good for you!
  • 10 4
 to be as honest as possible, I went out to the garage and weighed my $12,000 enduro bike, as well as my $7000 enduro bike. they were 29.5 and 31.5 respectively.


please do not ask me if the 2lbs is worth $5k. lol
  • 1 0
 I wish there was a way to invest in bike weight
  • 29 0
 Have you weighed your dental instruments?
  • 5 0
 The results of the trail bike poll are funny. There's a pretty clear split between the people running Exo tires and the people running DD / DH tires.
  • 3 0
 Through the years I gained about 20Kgs and I rare check my weight... But many times I check my bike's weight and I'm spending money to make it even ligher... And I'm a cheater... my Ti flat pedals weight 272gr.... ...so I count 450 less grams for my bike... next step, to save 200grams from it... Better on climps, makes you feel beter as the old days.
  • 4 0
 Asking someone (who cares) how much their bike weighs is like asking someone what their #vanlife sprinter cost to build. No one really knows and the answer will be embellished.
  • 4 0
 no hardtail category? Mine was 28 with lighter tires, but now probably closer to 30. Aluminum spire build is 37lbs with Fox 38, alloy wheels, Michelin enduro tires and cushcore.
  • 1 0
 Hardtail could be any of them, couldn't it? There are hardtails in every discipline though they may usually be a bit more versatile so harder to pin in a single category.
  • 3 0
 I guess I am old school but the weight still matters to me. At a time year after year bikes were becoming lighter but nowadays weight is becoming uncontrollable. Who really pedals toward a high mountain pass with a 16kg bike? Who f**g needs a 38mm f..g fork? Everything is designed for bike parks or even motorbikes. Please bring me a modern light all mountain bike.
  • 1 0
 Many recent examples of modern, light short travel trail bikes (aka Downcountry).

Transition Spur, Ibis Ripley, (new) Rocky Mountain Element, lots more to come.
  • 1 0
 You know, back in my day, forks weighed 3lbs. My Rock Shox Mag21 had a long travel kit on it and was cutting edge for the time.

And you know what? It sucked having a wet noodle for a fork. I'll push a 5lb fork uphill all day long if it means I don't have to worry about my teeth on the downhill.
  • 3 0
 A better question would be what percentage of your weight is your bike. I ride a 37lbs aluminum bike but it's also an xl and I'm 220lbs and tend to break things that are much lighter. If I was 160 I would be much less inclined to heave around such a big bike all the time.
  • 3 0
 Since I regularly go on rides where I'm more than 50 miles away from home/car I usually have at least 15 to 20 pounds of tools/spare tubes/food/drinks/clothing with me. Some of it is carried on my bike, the rest in my backpack. My bikes have varied over the years from a very light 26" hardtail to my current 29" full suspension. I also have always liked heavier tires since I live in an area that typically has very sharp rocks over much of the terrain, so my bike feels like it weighs a ton.
I've never actually weighed it though, because in the long run it just doesn't matter what it weighs. What matters is that it very seldom has any mechanical issues or flats. Being able to ride for 12 hours or more without having to worry about anything going wrong. How much does my bike weigh? Enough to do the job!
  • 1 1
 50 miles in 12 hours? Is that one way or round trip? I like the reasoning you present, but your data doesn't seem to add up. 80-100 miles in 12 hours seems more like it. Do you really ride for 12 hours? Or do your adventures take 12 hours with 6 hours pedaling?
  • 3 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: Yeah, often between 80 and 100 miles round trip. I'm not very fast anymore ( I'm 63 with some health issues) but I can still put in some pretty good rides. I like riding at night for the adventure and the solitude. A couple of weeks ago I left Sunday afternoon getting to the trailhead at sundown. I rode singletrack all night and got back about 10 Monday morning. I logged more than 80 miles and almost 11000 feet of climbing. It was a great time. I try to do something like that every week if my health allows.
  • 4 0
 @danger13: that is bad ass, you are inspiring
  • 2 0
 @bradwalton: Definitely not bad ass, lol! When I was younger almost no one ever passed me, now everyone does. I still have a lot of fun though, and that's what really matters.
  • 1 0
 @danger13: That is burly. You don't give yourself enough credit...pretty much anyone planning to ride that long is going to get passed by everyone who goes out for only a few hours.
  • 1 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: Yeah, I try telling myself that but it's not really true. The truth is that I'm slow no matter the length of the ride. My consolation is that I'll still be out having fun long after those people passing me are back at home.

I know it shouldn't really matter to me but I was a very competitive racer till I was almost 40 and somehow it's a hard thing to let go of.
  • 1 0
 @danger13: not many people have ever solo ridden singletrack from dusk til dawn. That’s bad ass! Sorry you’re having a hard time with it. I had a hard time with turning 40 this year. So you’re telling me it gets worse…
  • 7 0
 Way more than your bike
  • 1 1
 "bigger than yours, *****!"
  • 4 0
 So many people haven't actually weighed their bike and think its lighter than it is... Or they think their 140mm/130mm of travel Is an enduro bike
  • 1 0
 A 140 bike can be an Enduro bike if you're light weight and pick good lines better than most!
  • 2 0
 My 2 cents are: If your going to buy a so-called 'trail' bike that weights 30+ pounds, why in the world wouldn't you just buy a bike with more travel that weights the same? Then you ride anywhere you want to go.

Even better, buy a gearbox bike and be done with it. That's what I'm waiting for. So SICK of working on and having to replace archaic drivetrains.
  • 2 0
 Funny facts:
My 26“ XC bike weighs 8.5kg - same as my current road bike does. But it is made for heavy terrain.
The wheels of my 27.5“ inch enduro bike have about the same wheel size compared to my 700c/32m gravel bike (the wheel size of the gravel is a little. it smaller).
A sub 13kg enduro bike was quite easy to build with sub 29“ wheels. Heavy 20“ bricks entered the mtb industry and destroy the old school mountain biking and nature. They only belong into bike parks.

Actually gravel bikes bring back the joy and fun of lightweight mountainbiking and bikepacking. They also bring back 142/100mm axles, lightweight tires and smaller wheels (since the tire size is so much smaller).

Mountainbiking today feels much like downhill biking a few years ago.

Given the fact that those beasts are heavy as hell and made to shred and „braab“ - most bikes you see during an uphill are eMtbs. Climbing with 16+kg and 2,6inch tires is possible, but it is no fun at all.

29“ killed the mtb …
  • 2 0
 Really surprised that different bikes aren't produced for different physical builds. I weigh a bit over 150lbs and love my 11.5kg Spark Plus, and reckon I can ride it on most stuff with 2.8" tyres and 130mm up front and 120mm at the back. The equivalent bike per lb for a 220lb rider weighs 17kg, which is pretty much a downhill bike.
  • 5 0
 Missing a dirt jumper category (mine is 23lb/10.5kg)
  • 1 0
 28.2 lbs / 12.8 kg here. I didn't realize I was riding a brick. Can I blame my bike for the fact that I suck at jumping?
  • 1 0
 My longer travel bike weighs more than my shorter travel bike - mostly because it has bigger wheels and all the weight compromises that come with that. The 'trail' shorter travel bike, being a 26er and nearly 10 years old is 25lbs with pedals and is way more fun than the compromised bike.
  • 1 0
 I found something similar. I weighed my bikes and found that my 120mm 29" trailbike weighs the exact same amount (33.3 lb) as my 170mm 26" park bike. Both aluminum frame with similar types of components.
  • 4 0
 It gained a couple pounds over Thanksgiving but I didn't want to say anything.
  • 1 0
 I'm curious how an enduro bike can have 14 kgs.. the current leader in the pole for the weights in enduro category. Even with XC wheels and tires I could not get it to that weight.. as it is already has plenty of carbon in/on it, beside the frame.
  • 13 0
 You just have to lie.
  • 4 1
 I propose a new category to describe these light bikes. Not downcountry (which implies a mildly overforked XC bike with sturdy tires).

Flatcountry. For all the folks in booooring places like the Midwest who love slack seat angles and don’t understand the purpose of having a 65 head tube angle, sturdy tires, tire inserts, 210 droppers, 4 pot brakes on 200 rotors and pretty much every other rad (but weight adding) feature that makes mountain biking IN THE MOUNTAINS more awesome.

You saw it here first-flatcountry.
  • 1 0
 My AL Trek Remedy was around 14kg with 900g tyres and w/o pedals. Carbon ones can be built around 13-13,5kg with fancy components.
The question is, do you consider it as enduro bike? (160/150mm travel) Some might say it is enduro, some might say it is a trail bike. (myself would put it into trail category)
  • 1 0
 @elsorichard:

hi man..it is a trail bike with slightly longer travel. That geometry is not what we consider enduro.. at least not in 2021-22.
also, 900gr tires are not tires enough for racing or for wild gnarly terrain. My front xc tire(with protection, of course) had 720 grams. My rear one had over 840 gr, also with protection.
An 2.5" exo+ is above 1100 grams. You cannot go lower than exo+ on a real enduro bike. In fact, I might add that you even should not go lower than DDs.. which is at least 100 extra grams.
Enduro bikes are less about the travel and more about designation and racing capability. Your light Remedy would probably go flat after traversing a rockgarden "in anger". A modern enduro bike is a DH bike with a SC(not to mention that many of them are DC compatible) ...at least, that's my definition about them.
  • 1 0
 @eugenux: Just wanted to give a possible answer how those numbers get into this poll Smile People may be confused where to put their bike.
Yes, I agree, Remedy is a trail bike, yet back in the days when MY17 came out a few people were using it for enduro racing... then some might say yeah "my rig is an enduro bike".
Also agree, below exo+ or supergravity it is just asking for flats on rocky, or even on rooty sections, no tire under this protection level is suitable for enduro riding.
  • 1 0
 Scott quotes 13.9kg for the Ransom 900
  • 1 0
 13.2kg yt capra - no dropper and single speed. Ally frame.
  • 2 0
 @boozed:
my brand new giga is 16.3 kgs, with pedals and sealant(no tire insert); light carbon cockpit for its designation, wheels around 1800gr, normal weight for 180mm dropper and drivetrain.. and it still is 16.3 kgs. Those DDs for sure count but, they don't add up to 2 kgs.
I have a friend that has a carbon cube stereo 150, with a 160mm fox 36, newmen wide alu wheels, carbon cranks and cockpit, proper-ish tires.. 14 kgs on the scale. My former Sanction, obviously alu, had 16.2 kgs.. and that was "in its time", a pseudo DH bike. How a brand new carbon bike can weight more than a similarily build alu one, begs belief.
  • 1 0
 @littleskull99: yeah man.. you have a dirt jumper full suspension with waay too much travel; joking aside, that's not an enduro bike..although it was born as one. Smile
  • 1 0
 @wyorider: Flatcountry is a pretty good translation of the name of the country I live in... For a bike category, I think it exist and they call it "gravel" .
  • 1 0
 I've had three different Norco Sights over the past couple'a years...

2020 C1 29er w/ TR36 wheels, 36.9 lbs
2021 AXS 29er w/ WAO wheels, 36.6 lbs
2021 AXS 27.5 w/ DT carbons, 34.00 lbs

By far and above all other bikes I've ridden, my current 27.5 AXS Sight trucks SO MUCH HARDER than any other bike I've ridden.

Onto a Range next Big Grin
  • 5 0
 My banshee prime is 135mm travel but it identifies as enduro.
  • 5 0
 A lot of "Enduro Bikes" that are very light...
  • 5 0
 Flatcountry
  • 1 0
 My full carbon (frame, wheels, bars) enduro bike weighs 7 pounds more than advertised by the manufacturer (38.5 vs 31.5lbs) because:
-pedals...
-DH casing front and back
-inserts front and back
-oneUp EDC tool
-complete wrap
-pump, tire plugs and snacks in frame
  • 3 0
 You should have seperated, the "I don't know" and "I don't own one". Those are 2 very different selections that tell very different stories.
  • 2 0
 I removed my pedals to weigh my bike and filled my water bottle with helium. When i looked away to grab the scale...theres goes the bike, floating away in the sky towards a beautiful double rainbow!
  • 4 0
 So nobody cares what my dirt jumper weighs? Oh PB, how you have lost your way….
  • 5 0
 Sub 30 lb without tires, the ride is a bit harsh though.
  • 1 0
 There were not enough categories, i have 10 bikes. XC, downcountry, downcountry trail, trail, trail enduro, enduro, enduro dh, dh, dh downcontry, enduro downcontry, gravel, gravel country, road race country fat tires bike. Sorry it was 13 Big Grin
  • 1 0
 My XL Transition Patrol comes in at 15.92kg with edc pump, spare tube and strap, full water bottle, pedals and a bunch of dirt. What's the point with weighing it without some stuff if the main question is "how much it actually weighs"???
(Moving to a 17kg Spire soon.. I sometimes wonder what I'm doing with my life)
  • 1 0
 Don’t worry, I have a 37.5 lb carbon spire. It’s great
  • 1 0
 2016 XL Orbea Occam TR 29c with big Maxxis tires is at 25# with pedals. 2018 XL Yeti SB 5.5 27.5#. Nothing crazy on them and I didn't spend a ton. You can build up great lighter bikes without using dangerous stuff or spending a lot.
  • 1 0
 2021 Kona Hei Hei of mine weighs between 22.7lbs and 24lbs. Depends on what setup I'm running, XC or Enduro? I can switch the fork from 120mm in 5mns to a 140mm for Enduro racing along with Minions and it weights about 24.8lbs with pedals. Goes from xc hta of 67.5 to a 66.5. Not the most sought after hta or travel for Enduro but it comes down to learning how to control the bike in order to take advantage of the speed capability of the lighter setup and pedaling efficiency.
  • 1 0
 I want a light bike. I’ve paid real money for lighter parts. My trail bike has a coil shock and heavy tires. I don’t own any type of scale and have no idea what my bikes weigh- never weighed any of them . I just assume they’re lighter than average. Maybe the real answer is I just want my bike to be lighter than your bike.
  • 3 0
 Whatever my bike weighs, I know exactly where I can potentially shave off 15 lbs...
  • 1 0
 2020 Stumpy Alloy 29 (160f/150r in current setup) with pedals, spare tube, tire levers, strap, and a Fidlock base comes in at 35.8lbs. But I've lost like 20lbs since summer, so that makes up for any heft that the bike has.
  • 1 1
 2021 Commencal Meta Power 29 Cush Core, coil, 180mm airshaft, pedals*, with a full charge** weighs 58 Lbs (26.308kg). Feels so light compared to my CRF 450!

*Unless you ride without pedals, they are unequivocally part of the weight of the bike.

**This is a lame joke. My understanding is that the extra electrons or whatever don’t weigh that much.
  • 2 1
 Mopeds are chuuunky
  • 2 1
 @wyorider: but so so fun!!! Just like my GF!
  • 1 0
 Another poll that proves the PB comments section is full of shit! All these commenters saying over 32pound bike is unridable yet here we are… majority of trail/enduro bikes being 32+ pounds.
  • 1 0
 My Giant Reign 27.5 started at 32.8lb. I've since put a Cascade Components link, coil fork, wider wheelset, Rimpact inserts, 4-pot brakes, and 11-speed drivetrain. The bike is now 36lb and rides better than ever.
  • 3 0
 Funny, the article mentions that most people spend alot of money to make their bikes lighter. Congrats for bucking the trend!
  • 1 0
 So if I have more than one bike in a given category, do you want to know about the newest one? The oldest? The one I ride most? The most expensive? Or weigh all and take the average?
  • 1 0
 My bike is marketed as an all mountain bike, 160mm front and 140mm rear. Is it trail or enduro? I used to ride a Specialized Enduro, but now I don’t know what kind of bike I ride!!
  • 1 0
 Bike weight is so relative to rider, riding style and trails. It's kinda moot comparing the weight of a bike ridden by a 55kg, nervous rider on flow trails to a 130kg monster shredding the gnar on the rowdiest of rowdies....
  • 1 0
 I did actually weigh my Oiz H10 TR recently and was surprised that it clocks in over 31lbs with pedals. Given Orbea claim weights in the mid-20s for the carbon version I wasn’t expecting the aluminium to be over 30.
  • 3 0
 My downhill bike weighs less than my everything else bike.
  • 3 0
 i own a 2020 vitus sommet (alloy) and that thing waighs sooo much
  • 4 0
 Waight, what!?!?
  • 2 0
 No waigh!
  • 1 0
 @seraph: no waigh hans raigh
  • 1 0
 the 2021 (carbon) is a bit of a porker too
  • 2 0
 My Optic C2 is about 31 or 32lbs, if I recall. A family member's Fluid FS1 seems about 34 or 35lbs. It's too heavy
  • 1 0
 XL, alu, 29” Slayer with a 650lb spring and a Zeb. Pretty confident I’m over 40lbs, but couldn’t care less actually finding out.
  • 2 0
 Recently weighed my xl aluminum transition spire with a coil shock. 40lb with the pedals.
  • 2 0
 I only have one bike, so it is an XC race/downcountry/trail/enduro/downhill machine. It weighs 29 lbs thanks.
  • 2 0
 I thought my bike weighed 30lb. Turns out it weights 31.5lbs. I wish I wouldn’t have put it on the scales honestly.
  • 1 2
 I only have one trail/enduro bike, weight is right around 32 pounds. Since it’s used for everything from long XC rides to park laps, I guess all my bikes weigh 32 pounds. My survey responses reflect that.

Except I have a Farley, and that fat bastard is 34 pounds but so much fun (overgrown BMX on snow) I don’t care.
  • 2 0
 I don't know how much it weighs, I just know the sound it makes as it tomahawks through the woods after I crash.
  • 2 0
 Geez, if you are so upset about your bikes weight skip the poll and save everyone else your agonizing whining
  • 1 0
 So according to your definition, my Norco Optic is apparently a "downcountry" bike. Not gonna lie, that's a bit of a weird take.
  • 2 0
 Clearly the most important take away from this survey is that a whole lot more people need to get a DH bike.
  • 1 0
 2001 Schwinn Straight 8 = 43lbs
2012 Canfield Jedi = 42lbs
Both made with 7005 series Aluminum

1999 Schwinn Homegrown 4Banger = 32lbs
2016 Canfield Balance = 32lbs
  • 1 0
 My old sensor was about 34 pounds. With fast rolling tires and slightly stiffer rear spring it was a rather sprite ride dispite its porkiness. Aggros are good tires
  • 5 2
 Downcountry is so stupid. Categorizing bikes is stupid.
  • 2 0
 AFAIK, anything with 120mm rear or more now falls into trail bike category. Soon we’ll have “down duro” because pb wants to segment the market even more and get more $$ out of making more field tests and stuff
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer, your bikes all weigh a lb less than ours because your seat has a big hole in it so your rocket isn't smashed!
  • 2 0
 I saved a bunch of weight going 1X, but gained it all back with an all steel 11-51 cassette. Yay me!
  • 2 1
 I run cushcore in the summer (lots of lift time) and not in the winter……..
  • 4 2
 My bike weighs 400 freedom units.
  • 2 0
 my 2020 TR patrol weighs 41 pounds, wheres the freeride section
  • 2 1
 The only scale I have at home is a kitchen scale. So the bike is more than 3 kilos, that's all I can say
  • 2 0
 Just weigh in increments and add up the total.
  • 2 0
 @kingbike2: Yes, that's possible. Pretty hilarious. But possible. If I cared enough about the weight of my bike to do that.. I'd probably just buy a bigger scale.
  • 2 0
 I answered 30 lbs for each category. One bike does it all
  • 1 0
 You missed the new Off Road Cycle category from @henryquinney. Apparently these weigh more than they should...
  • 3 0
 No fatbike category?
  • 2 0
 Pinkbike Poll: How Much Does Your Bike *Actually* Weigh?

But not really.
  • 1 1
 How much does your hardtail, which your ride on XC and enduro and DH alike, weigh? My Banshee Paradox V3, built up for under $2k weighs in just right.
  • 2 0
 Don't know should be replaced with "don't care".
  • 1 0
 I put helium in my tires, it weighs .001 grams less, I freakin got it figured out.
  • 1 0
 Do that with a fat bike and it would float away!
  • 1 0
 I don't care about bike weight. What I do care about is how big of a dump can I take before the ride. Cheap weight savings.
  • 2 0
 A lot more than the manufacturer said it would.
  • 1 0
 Umm.. I don't own every type of bike on this poll and the ones I own I don't know the weight. So...
  • 1 0
 My xc/trail bike is 25lbs. My enduro is 37..... I get quite the working when I decide to lug that thing around the woods.
  • 1 0
 There are apparently more than 100 Dangerholms out there and that's a scary thought
  • 2 0
 I don’t know nor do I care….

Cause I have an eBike! Brraaapppp!
  • 2 0
 I was hoping I could give my bike weight without cranks too
  • 2 0
 The amount of people who dont own a dh bike is disgusting
  • 1 0
 My bike is 34lb but I’m a 220lb fat c*nt so it doesn’t matter. Ya get me ?
  • 3 2
 Where is the button of, "I don't know/I don't care" ?
  • 1 0
 My bike weighs 10 pounds more after boxing day.
  • 1 0
 What, no option for my DH Gravel/City touring commuter?
  • 1 0
 Frame size is important in this question. Not included in poll.
  • 2 1
 Yeti SB150 14.06kg with pedals
  • 2 1
 My Tallboy V4 is 35lbs hahahah
  • 1 0
 Barely lighter than my 29er V10
  • 2 1
 2021 Tallboy with pedals 29.7lbs
  • 1 0
 As long as my bike rides well, i don't f**king care how heavy it is...
  • 1 1
 No option for how much does my e-gravel bike weigh? (I'm trying to gain favor with our new Outside Plus overlords)
  • 1 0
 By the looks of it nobody here actually owns a bike
  • 1 0
 Actually, none of them care about weight.
  • 1 0
 My bike is weigh too fast for me
  • 1 0
 Dangerholm has at least 61 buddies at the time of this comment............
  • 1 0
 People don't weigh their biked
  • 1 0
 Just give e'm the damn serial number
and be a dick about it Smile
  • 2 0
 Less than me?
  • 1 0
 Chapeau! Top comment so far!
  • 2 0
 34 pound aluminum scout
  • 1 0
 So, most pinkbikers don't own a bike.
  • 3 0
 Or a bathroom scale
  • 1 0
 @boozed: Why shave 10+ lbs weight through exercise/diet when you can just pay to lose it at $1k per lb lost!
  • 1 0
 A lot of people here don’t own bikes!
  • 1 0
 And... where is the fat bike poll ?
  • 1 0
 Where's the "Don't Know / Don't Care" option?
  • 1 0
 According to the polls most us don’t even own bikes, so no worries.
  • 1 0
 How about the option I don't care how much it weighs
  • 1 0
 Where is the love for us hardtail riders and single speed nerds!
  • 1 0
 Be right back, just going to take all the pedals off my bikes
  • 1 0
 My imaginary xc bike weighs 0lbs.
  • 2 1
 My gravel bike is 9.7kg Smile
  • 1 0
 lesson: light pedals are a waste of dough. Egg beaters, beat it
  • 1 0
 I have a carbon fiber kickstand.
  • 1 0
 Is your heavy bike slowing you down or is your fitness slowing you down?
  • 1 0
 My BMX race bike is right around 18.5-19 lbs with platform pedals.
  • 1 0
 How much does your Ebike weigh?
  • 1 0
 My bike is 19lbs without wheels post and fork …. Super light and nimble
  • 1 0
 E Bike and I actually don't give a shit.
  • 1 0
 Needs a category for “weight of my pile of pedals”
  • 1 0
 Why without pedals? I typically ride with them.
  • 2 1
 Lol my bronson is 36lbs
  • 1 0
 Need ebike category
  • 1 0
 My DH bike weighs 56lbs
  • 1 0
 what about e bike?





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