Pinkbike Poll: How Reliable Are Modern Mountain Bikes?

Jan 18, 2022 at 10:37
by Seb Stott  
Rocky Mountain Slayer 2020
We all know it happens sometimes, but how often do bikes fail these days and why?

Recently a petition was launched to "end the manufacture and sale of built-to-fail budget bicycles". The idea was to clamp down on those bottom-end bikes that aren't serviceable, durable, or even safe.

Needless to say, the comments on the article about it got pretty heated. On the one hand, there's a lot to be said for cracking down on planned obsolescence where it exists or discouraging bikes that are so unreliable and hard to repair that they offer unwitting buyers poor value for money despite the low sticker price. On the other hand, people vote with their wallets and there is clearly a market for bikes that cost less than $200. Some commenters were concerned that imposing minimum standards would raise prices to the point where some couldn't afford a bike at all.

This is all very interesting but, despite what some commenters seemed to think, the petition really wasn't about the kind of bikes most Pinkbike readers ride. Not to sound snobbish, but most people who answered the Pinkbike Community Survey said they spent between $2,000 and $6,000 on their current primary mountain bike, whereas the petition was about sub-$200 bikes with non-replaceable chainrings, poor welds and plastic derailleurs.

Nevertheless, reliability could be a lot better at every price point. Even on high-end bikes, derailleurs break, bearings wear out (and aren't exactly easy to replace), rims dent, tires puncture, shocks fail, forks creak and so on.

More money, more problems? It often seems that way.

In fact if anything, reliability seems to get worse at higher price points beyond mid-level bikes. Bontrager's maxim famously states, "cheap, light, strong: pick two", but it seems that with high-end mountain bikes you only get to pick one.

It's easy to point the finger at the bike brands, and I think there is something to be said for that and a lot more they could be doing. But like with those budget bikes, customers vote with their wallets, and for the keen rider, lightness sells. Most of us want high-performance bikes which are as close as possible to those being raced at the top level. It's almost like using a Formula One car as a daily driver. Put that way, it's perhaps not too surprising things don't always last too well.

I've argued before that realistic weight savings create a tiny benefit, but they're probably still worth pursuing if you're a pro racer where every second counts and your bike is meticulously checked over after every race and any damaged parts are replaced. For the rest of us, shouldn't our priorities be a little different?

Yeti SB150
For a few thousand dollars you can buy something very similar to what the world's best are racing, but if you want your bike to last many years with minimal maintenance, shouldn't we have something more durable?

Our buying decisions say no. Here's a concrete example: RaceFace offer a steel chainring which costs just $20 and lasts longer than their $79.99 aluminum chainring. But with a weight penalty of 89g, the steel version is much less popular than aluminum. Similarly, many long-travel enduro bikes still come with lightweight (e.g. EXO casing) tires, presumably because manufacturers and retailers know they'll sell more bikes if they weigh less. I know a review isn't
complete without a weigh-in and bikes above a certain threshold will get a hard time in the comments. At the end of the day, brands are making the bikes people want to buy.

What do you think?
At one quarter the price, with superior durability and an imperceptible weight penalty, steel chainrings should be on most bikes, right? Apparently not.


How satisfied are you with the reliability of your bike?



Which components have let you down in the last couple of years?

Tick all that apply



Who is mostly to blame for your most recent mechanical problem?






444 Comments

  • 320 3
 It's not just the reliability that matters, but the ease of servicing. With many frames, OEM parts such as hubs, even a lot of forks, getting spares is almost impossible. Stuff is just binned and replaced.
  • 65 16
 Completely correct. I had a perfectly good undamaged Shimano SLX 1x11 shifter that the inside just came loose and stopped shifting on. Absolutely impossible to refit the spring without 5 tiny hands to hold all the parts down while tightening the screws so any reusable bits went in the spare parts bin and I got an XT shifter instead. Shimano is the worst for spares.
  • 74 4
 A big factor for me! A good example being a DT Swiss ratchet system. Ease of maintenance was my main decider there. Sure not as many engagement points as a hydra or onyx, but don’t gotta worry about blowing a pawl.
  • 47 5
 @Heywood165: from what you write it's obvious it's not a matter of spares availability. Now a shifter is litteraly a Pandora's box. No big surprise you could not fix it. Have you tried to fix a watch by yourself?
  • 9 2
 @mangochaos: Maybe, but it can be nearly impossible to get the ring gear out to replace the inner bearing, if you run it in a wet place where you get a tiny bit of corrosion internally. I recently had to bin a 240s hub because the ring gear wouldn't come out without tearing the spoke holes out of the flange Frown
This wasn't a rusted out hunk either, it was periodically cleaned out and greased, and looked fine internally.
  • 82 3
 @mangochaos: definitely don't want to blow a Paul
  • 49 3
 @EnduroManiac: Alright, better example. Shimano pistons on brake calipers.
  • 17 1
 @Heywood165: pshh if you haven't had to refit a Shimano shifter spring are you even a mountain biker?
  • 12 6
 @EnduroManiac: Can't fully agree. Sram shifters are fixable depending on the issue.
  • 14 7
 @enki: Chris king... This is the way.
  • 20 0
 @EnduroManiac: Okay, I guess the more appropriate thing to have said would be, Shimano don't seem to want people to be able to fix broken parts.
  • 1 0
 @makripper: I've been successful on older models, think I fixed a mates Altus front shifter in the last couple of years.
  • 92 12
 @Heywood165: Do you realize what it would cost for Shimano to manage outside sales of all those parts? Did you like that a new SLX shifter costs $42? Because in order for you and the 2 other people who want to rebuild a shifter, Shimano's going to have to foot the bill for keeping parts in stock (outside of their own assembly line stock), managing sales and distribution of those parts, and extra customer for support for all the folks who try the rebuild with only 4 tiny hands and end up with a still/further busted shifter. That cost has to come from somewhere, and most likely it will be that an SLX shifter ends up priced significantly more than just $42 bucks.

Yeah, I hate throwing things away too, but sometimes it's just economics. Maybe you would rather Shimano increased prices _and_ took up space in shipping containers to transport a bunch of rarely needed internal parts around the world, but most of us would rather keep getting $42 12-speed shifters.

(In nearly three decades of riding and at least a dozen (maybe 20 considering fronts too) index shifters, I can only remember one just randomly breaking internally, and it was not new when it happened.)
  • 4 0
 @enki: did the holes actually break?
  • 3 1
 @jomacba: the only way!
  • 14 4
 @mangochaos: Just having a different system than pawls is not the same as ease of maintenance. A modern quality-made pawl system is no harder to maintain than a Ratchet system, consider most have tool-free freehub access nowadays. If you abuse (as in not maintain) a pawl system enough to start breaking pawls, the same abuse is going to take its toll on a Ratchet system as well, especially with the 52t setup (which is still so far from the engagement of the best pawl systems but very quick to wear out without very regular maintenance). Shit, with the newer one-sided Ratchet systems, they're even more touchy to the lube type, quality, and amount, so that's not exactly ease of maintenance.
  • 4 3
 @jomacba: this is the way
  • 3 0
 @jomacba: Agree with that. I have a Campagnolo record groupset that is now 13 years old and never had an issue with it. Cost me £1,000 back in 2009 which was a lot then but worked out fantastic value for money and the only cost has been new chain stores and new brake pads. From a bike parts manufacturer though I’m probably their nightmare client as they want you to replace that £300 Eagle cassette every year, and the chainring and the crank and the chain and the…….
  • 11 0
 This is truth. We sell Yeti and they recently went to Novatec hubs on some of their builds and were excited about the better engagement than a basic 3 pawl DT hubs they previously used. We immediately mentioned to our rep that better engagement is worthless when your hub fails and getting parts from a company is a total nightmare. Our rep seemed to be unaware of this though and actually seemed to understand the point we made. Maybe things will change? We sell a lot of hand built 350's to people with broken Novatec hubs...
  • 4 0
 @sdaly: maybe like a Peter is more up your alley? queue the drums
  • 7 1
 @mangochaos: all my wheels are now DT swiss (used to be i9). Crazy reliability, decent engagement, good performance. 'nuff said.
  • 22 3
 @mangochaos:

My Hydra hubs are 100% easily serviced at home with every part available to maintain or repair them.

Full exploded diagrams with detailed service instructions and videos from I9.

Freehub can be pulled with zero tools or need to even remove the cassette to access drive ring and pawls.

A well designed pawl system is reliable and easy to work on.
  • 4 2
 @FrankS29: The difference from I9 to King is that you service King bearings, not replace. I9 needs replacing. I have had two Hydra wheelsets myself.

King does require specialty tools and knowledge. Those tools are not cheap whatsoever.
  • 4 1
 @sdaly: Well you say that, but if his banter was good enough...
  • 2 2
 @sherbet: I can usually service a King hub without the special tools. They are really only needed for a full teardown, you can take them down far enough for a typical clean and lube with basic tools.
  • 4 3
 @Heywood165: Shimano is great for spares,but like you say,most shifters and derraliers are impossible to work on unless you have 10 hands,i opened the same slx shifter and stuff just shot out,so not only built in obsolescence, but if you buy the spares kit,that goes in your spares box unused,and you buy the whole thing again,Win win shimano
  • 2 0
 @jomacba: agreed. 12 year old bb still on the same bearings. I used to go through a shimano bb every 6 months and I was a poor student so I ran them longer than I really should have.
  • 5 0
 @sherbet: Or master cylinders. Or shifters. Or cassettes. Or cranks
  • 4 0
 @Heywood165: it is possible to repair these! My 10spd slx went "ka-boom!" but there is a Russian video on YT that explains how to reassemble. It takes about 30mins, but is possible. I actually couldn't believe it worked, but did.
  • 4 10
flag jomacba (Jan 21, 2022 at 18:02) (Below Threshold)
 @sherbet: I would say the only similarities between king and I9 is they bother come in many colors, and they bother are... well... hubs.
Kings are absolutely superior to every other hub on the market in every way (except that you need their proprietary tools to fully disassemble). You don't need the tools to do a service however. The tool is simply to remove the bearings, which can be serviced without removal.
  • 2 0
 @EnduroManiac: the flag matches the example ;-)
  • 2 2
 @drjonnywonderboy: what level Shimano? Any made in Japan Shimano part is pretty much a forever part and won't wear out IMO. The lower level Deore and below will wear out. I have noticed this specifically with BB's.
  • 5 3
 @justinfoil: I much prefer buying brakes from SRAM (American company Wink ). They are fully serviceable, cheap, and I can buy all the parts for brakes that are 15 years old.
  • 1 3
 @justinfoil: perfect analysis. Buy something nice and spend the money. Buy something cheap, don’t complain.
  • 1 1
 @Heywood165: A counterpoint are the Shimano XT click pedals. I had used Time pedals for around 20 years but finally moved to the Shimano pedals exactly because I could get spare parts for them.
  • 8 0
 Shimano brakes - while they're good they're essentially disposable as you can't get spares.
  • 9 0
 @justinfoil: I still run hope pro 2 hubs, the ratchet couldn't be easier to service. They only have 36 p.o.e but I used them 25 years ago riding trials and now have them on my bike today. I have never had a hope freewheel slip on me in all that time and service very rarely. Bearing changes are easy for a small cost of the specific hope tools and they can be modified for different axles.
Quality made, simple kit from the old skool that may not be as high performance as others made today, tbf I've not tried any, but a) I still ride 26 b) I'm happy with what I'm running so there's no provocation to change
  • 8 1
 @justinfoil: maybe if Shimano make less shifters - say XT and XTR and stop changing mounts every 2 seconds...
  • 2 0
 Just bought a OneUp dropper post in part because they sell all the small parts and it should be easily home serviceable. I'd like to see more pedals having serviceability built into the design, many say that they are but then don't offer the small parts or tools or information as to how to do it. I'd guess that most people just buy a new set every time which is pretty wasteful really.
  • 2 0
 @motdrawde: ditto Burgtecs - spares are easy to get and service and made in UK
  • 6 0
 @murphy82: Hopes are great for servicing and upgradeability. I can run the same rear hub on 135, 142 and 148 rear ends.
  • 4 0
 @enki: Had the same thing happen to me just a few weeks ago with my rear wheel (EX1501, so also a 240s hub). I wanted to renew the rim and spokes and service the hub together with a friend wo has the proper tool for removing the ring gear.
Since we already removed the rim and spokes he bolted on an old brake disc and clamped it in a vice. The ring was so seized up that even the big torque wrench (which we used out of curiosity) clicked at maximum torque (250 Nm).
The ring became loose eventually, but we twisted the whole hub body by mutliple degrees in the process...
On the plus side: I called DT Swiss and even though the wheel was over 5 years old and I'm not the first owner (bought it as "used like new" from someone who took it out of a brand new bike) they offered to replace the hub body on a goodwill basis and rebuild my wheel if I pay for the other parts (rim, spokes, bearings). In the end I got an almost new wheel (they only reused the axle) for a really fair price, far lower than the standard retail price.
  • 2 0
 @Heywood165: 100% agree
  • 3 0
 @justinfoil: I do agree to a certain extend. But I recently had to throw away a 2014 SLX brakelever because the lever snapped. It's a € 12,- part but 1) difficult to find the correct partnumber and 2) nowhere to be found. Shimano should 1) spec partnumbers in the manual and 2) support spares for 10 y or so.
  • 5 1
 @EnduroManiac: Have you tried to fix a watch by yourself? LMAO!!! Hitting the the nail right on head there.
  • 1 0
 @willdabeast410: I know exactly what you mean. I blew out a Novatec rear hub that came stock on my Norco and had a heck of a time getting parts. Ended up building a new wheel.
  • 5 4
 @justinfoil: a lot of shops have random Shimano small parts from the last 2 decades...they never get used or sold. Left over from when some guy ordered the wrong part or bailed on a special order due to unmet delivery expectations(typically the shops fault not distributors). Shimano actually offers a ridiculous amount of small parts for parts up to about 8-10years old. Technicians abilities to order the right one or install it is the problem. I suspect there might be even more waste or antiquated parts disposed of than are needed already. Our culture and our shops are just not proficient at actually fixing technical things. So we replace them. It's faster, easier, and honestly like you said probably cheaper too.
  • 3 2
 @takeiteasyridehard: So it's the mechanic's fault they can't order small parts from Shimano, specifically ones Shimano doesn't offer aftermarket? You're throwing a lot of shade while commenting with a lot of ignorance. I very literally cannot get replacement pistons. There were issues for years getting band clamps for shifters when you swap brakes and no longer have I-Spec. Canada has had stock issues for over a decade when it comes to small parts.

But yeah, definitely the shop's fault for, uh, lemme check my notes... not supplying parts in a timely fashion that literally do not exist as an SKU or have been out of stock since product release. Cool to know!
  • 5 4
 @sherbet: Not offering/not having a sku, and not being in stock are completely different things. Shimano North America has an impressive amount of small parts in their catalog for almost everything they make. Were you the person looking directly on their b2b? Or did someone at the shop, or the internet, tell you they didn't have them? I'm only basing my initial comment off working in shops from 2003-2021...they were not assumptions, they were specific and common examples, at least where I live. Also, there are plenty of other manufacturers that have now and over the last decade had non Shimano branded offerings for the parts you cried about in stock.
  • 2 1
 @sherbet: you forgot to mention how much more drag king hubs have...
  • 1 0
 @willdabeast410: Have you thanked your rep for upping wheel sales? (:
  • 1 0
 @bertimusmaximus: This is the whole point. Buy something that is fit for your purpose and then look after it.
  • 4 0
 There should be a wider question about cost of replacement / service Vs sustainability? We currently live in a throwaway society where it’s too easy to replace what should be a serviceable part, or often it’s too expensive to service.

I was once quoted £69 and 6 week delivery for 4 SRAM brake piston seals. The Hope equivalent seals were £2 and available next day. How can anyone justify that price difference?
Shimano as reliable as they are don’t appear to want their parts to serviceable, in time this may change if and when sustainability becomes an increased factor when deciding what to buy.
  • 4 1
 @takeiteasyridehard: I'm literally a bike mechanic, and I am literally telling you there are aftermarket parts shimano does not offer in any capacity.

Find me XT pistons. Go a f*ckin' head.
  • 1 0
 @leeroySilk: I'm really torn on giving props to Hope on this sort of thing. Our national distro doesn't always carry the parts needed in stock. I recall on one occassion we had ordered Hope parts, waited 6 months for delivery, and were told "whoops we didn't order those, you can order them 6 months from now on our next big order!" We needed it in a tighter timeframe than that, so reached out to Hope directly. Got a very canned robot response of "we have those in stock and your local distributor can order them from us!" We explained what happened and how we couldn't get those on order, and very literally got the same copy pasted email.

Was extremely disappointed to encounter that. I feel Hope is likely great for anyone on that island, but it isn't always amazing elsewhere.
  • 1 0
 @mangochaos: and with a hub like dt, you dont get the pedal kick-back associated with higher engagement hubs. Maybe there's a sweet spot in there
  • 1 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: I think every bike shop from the 90s had a shimano branded wall board with every size of hg sprocket so customers could tune and replace individual ones. But I'd never seen it done. They just gathered dust
  • 5 5
 @sherbet: as a bike mechanic, you should know how to do that for yourself. Learn how to use their parts database(shimano not a distributor), find a schematic on your brake, look at the part number, see if it is available(in stock). I wouldn't be surprised if it isn't. In which case you could search for a compatible one from almost any of their other brakes. If those aren't either, there are Chinese knock offs in stock at Amazon. I don't know why you are so angry, there are options. I am guessing you're just too close minded to either learn how to use the resources available to you as a bike mechanic, or the resources available via other manufacturers. Learn how to do your job is basically what I am saying. Your response only reaffirms what I originally said about many bike mechanics struggling with technical abilities that should be associated with being a professional bike mechanic.
  • 4 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: Sorry, I have to interject here. I partially agree with your statement in that alot of bike mechanics struggle with technical abilities, however alot of them are young and starting in the industry, as the average pay is not sustainable for anybody looking for a career, there there's an obvious gap.
In regards to the rest if your statement, that is wrong on ao many levels.
1st. It is not the bike shops responsibility to ensure ease of navigation for service parts. It's the manufacturers, this is also a key to sustaining market share, which Shimano has done a terrible job doing.
2nd. You cannot just throw any part in from another manufacturer without customer concent.
3rd. If the customer agrees, the bike shop is now ordering parts at retail prices to sell retail. This obviously provides no profit, and given the bike shop is a business, their goal is to make money.
4th. Time is money. Bike mechanics work for the bike shop. Their job is to fix and repair bicycles in an effective and efficient manner. If they are spending time tracking parts through many resources, this can get costly, and either eats away at the companies profit, or potentially trickles down to the customers.
5th. Seasonal demand. Through the summer time or prime time service shops often back backlogged with a laundry list of bikes to repair. This goes back to effective and efficient. The more time each bike takes to repair the longer it takes to repair all bikes and in turn creates more down time for people looking to get out and ride, and in return can deture customers from giving business to your local bike shops.
I can keep going, biy I feel I've hit some heavy points as to why what your saying is just all around bad business practices.
Learn how to fix your own bike is basically easy I'm saying, or be thankful that there are people out there trying to drive a more effective and efficient way to do their jobs to provide better services to the consumer basis, especially given the increasing cost and scarcity of parts.
  • 1 1
 @jomacba: In the event it was for a customer, you're right, most circumstances don't allow or condone the recommendation of retail purchases for repairs. I would say there are special circumstances where you promote loyal customers by pointing them in the right direction though...often they will bring the stuff to you for install, and you still get that part(labor), which is where the margin is anywaym. However, in this specific case of sherbet, he was whining about his own brake, and told me to find him one in stock.
  • 1 0
 @Heywood165: that's not the norm. I've never had a Shimano shifter fail and I successfully converted a 2x shifter to a dropper post lever in the past, which entails taking the mechanism apart. What's a bigger problem are OEM parts on cheaper builds, like low end Roval wheels and hubs for instance. Utter rubbish.
  • 1 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: Fair enough if your referring to an an individual.
Once again, I will agree a large amount of mechanics don't know. It does however need to be treated as a trade, and in doing so knowing that apprentices and journeymen are expected to have a different level of expertise and knowledge.
I've been in and out of the industry for nearly 23 years. With the ever changing standards and fads that come and go, it's difficult to know it all. A good mechanic will do their best to source parts and remedy situations, but I've also seen the best mechanics struggle with certain situations simply because the industry doesn't make it easy.
The solution unfortunately to offer limited options as a bike shop and stop supporting brands that don't support local bike shops. Eventually the brand dissapears, or changes their processes. Shimano is a bit of a unique brand in that they have successfully developed and offered rather good products with little to no support to local bike shops.
CRC used to sell their products for cheaper than wholesale here in Canada.
This led to local bike shops not being able to compete, and ultimately dropped the brand.
Eventually sram took advantage of the opening and gained a large market share.
They still control the majority of the OEM market.
Shimano can catch up, but they need something special.
  • 2 1
 @headshot: I think what's worse is low end parts like Roval on high end builds. Infuriating!!
  • 1 0
 @Heywood165: my XTR did the same
  • 4 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: It's actually incredible how ignorantly you're acting, yet still talking down to others.

I have a Shimano B2B account. It is easy to navigate. They do not sell brake pistons aftermarket. This isn't an issue with my skill, this is now an issue with your reading comprehension. I am telling you, as an individual who has access to Shimano's part's catalog, they do not offer them.

I do understand how to do my job, thank you very much.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: xtr shifter has the same problem
  • 1 0
 @lukabe: Dont Trust Swiss. You can keep that zinger
  • 1 1
 @sdaly: Paul begs to differ!
  • 1 0
 @murphy82: Here here Hope all the way and 26
  • 153 23
 9/10 its the rider, be real people.
  • 9 1
 Ayup ^^
  • 27 1
 Pfft, next you're going to try to tell us that not everyone's a perfect driver
  • 22 1
 Yup. There’s a reason “JRA” is such a common riff amongst bike service folks.
  • 34 2
 And everyone immediately thinks they're the 1/10 exception to this rule. Wink
  • 12 27
flag jayacheess (Jan 21, 2022 at 12:35) (Below Threshold)
 It really isn't, though. The most careful rider in the world will wear through alu cogs twice (or more) as fast as a steel.
  • 37 2
 @jayacheess: Then that's not product failure, it just has a short lifespan. Failure would be if it broke before it wore out.
  • 9 25
flag knutspeed (Jan 21, 2022 at 12:53) (Below Threshold)
 5/7 new Rockshox forks I've bought, on new bikes or just new forks, malfunctioned from day 1 requiring a rebuild - or as in these cases - a new fork via warranty.
  • 16 3
 If I would’ve ran more than 28 psi in my rear tire then maybe my E13 rim wouldn’t have failed when I went off that jump….that my stand rim never had a problem with…
  • 6 0
 I always knew I was the one!
  • 14 2
 9/10 it's a vague question that could be interpreted to make either answer correct. What constitutes normal riding conditions that the component should withstand? If a derailleur brushes against a rock in a corner and bends, is that the manufacturer's fault for making a derailleur that can't withstand an event that happens all the time? Or is it the rider's fault for cutting the corner too tight?
  • 5 1
 I think that's the whole issue through: how much rider abuse/lack of maintenance/bad choices is a product supposed to take and still keep functioning. Like I took a jump into a rock garden landing, dented a rim. Yeah, I could have chosen a better line. Would have been less challenging and fun though. Should rim have been able to take the abuse of the worse line? Should it be able to take a 1 ft drop into a rock? How about 3 ft drop? How about a 20 ft?
  • 9 3
 @unrooted: I'm under 145 lbs running 31+ psi and a tire insert. Apparently e13 rims don't stand a chance lol. Neither did dt swiss ex511's (PB's product of the year?).
  • 8 10
 @redrook: Splitting hairs a bit. The point is that parts aren't as robust as they could be. Whether that means they fail early or wear out early - it's ends up being about the same. If they were engineered with longevity in mind rather than weight savings, they would last longer.
  • 3 0
 My 1/10 example was lightweight wheels on a burly enduro bike. Replaced with proper enduro wheels, no more premature failure. Wheels still failed, but under conditions where I would expect them to fail.
  • 11 1
 @jayacheess: Not at all splitting hairs, you gave a specific example which wasn't a good example of product failure or reliability.

Yes parts aren't as robust as they could be, but some parts are designed for light weight as you say rather than durability, so you have to evaluate something based on its intended use. If you want durability there are steel cogs available. If you want light weight with less durability you can get alu ones. But you can't criticise a part for not doing something that it isn't intended to do.
  • 6 1
 @jayacheess: Nope not splitting hairs, that's like criticising an XC wheel for not surviving a DH race. You can have light weight or durability but rarely both without a very high cost. There have ALWAYS been things designed for light weight over durability and they absolutely have their place. If you want longevity you have options.
  • 4 0
 So I guess wtb i30 "tough", and raceface ar30 rims fit into the 1/10?
  • 4 1
 @ryanandrewrogers: yeah the last thing i broke was an e13 rim that dented, flat spotted, and needed re-tensioning after every ride. The EX471 replacement has been solid as hell, though. The part I broke before that was a derailleur I smashed on a rock, completely my fault, luck of the draw for a question on "most recent" damaged part.
  • 4 1
 @joshbm1 @komischon: JRA on trail bikes is way different that JRA on other bikes.

Shouldn't I expect my bike & parts to not explode because of a small off-line when smashing through a janky rock garden? That's "just riding along" in the MTB/trail context, and we should be able to reasonably expect the bikes to handle some amount of rider error.

The last question could have been rephrased to ask "Is it worth 2 pounds to make _any and all_ riding (and mistakes made during riding) be considered "just riding along"?
  • 5 2
 @joshbm1: I have beefs with other items but let's specifically discuss rear hubs... buy a bike for 5-6k and get a piece of junk back there. If you aren't failing "OEM special" rear hubs you shouldn't get to speak in this forum!
  • 2 1
 @redrook: Right, but it's really up to the bike brands to spec parts for durability instead of weight savings, and they rarely do that. And in some cases, they just don't have a durable option. Non-DH mountain bike drive trains were designed around XC for a long time - though that's finally changing.
  • 3 0
 @boozed: My mother in law is... just ask her.. haha
  • 5 6
 I'd say that 10/10 it's the rider. A bike that isn't ridden won't break. Manufacturers need to design more durable components to accommodate "user error" as much as they accommodate careful use.
  • 5 3
 @ryanandrewrogers:Yeah no, that’s 100% rider. Choose better lines
  • 3 3
 dropper posts are a excellent example of design flaw
  • 3 0
 @littermac: are, or used to be??? The new , cheap ($150) posts are quite reliable for me compared to $300+ posts from a few years ago.
  • 4 0
 Not with Reverbs it's not
  • 2 0
 Maybe I don't ride enough, I'm not heavy enough or ham fisted enough, but nothing on my MTB has actually gone wrong since my first reverb about 6 or so years ago. The only thing that's failed is the crappy Giant freehub on my road bike that's crappily sealed and impossible to repair - last one lasted about 6 months before grumbling and skipping. Certainly not the rider in my case
  • 2 0
 @ryanandrewrogers: you must be a f*ckin animal on the bike
  • 4 1
 I finally managed to get downvoted. To clear things up: my comment stands, as it is true. However, I am still running RS forks due to excellent service from RS and my LBS. And I like how they perform, and ease of maintenance.
  • 2 0
 @johannensc: You've never had an off? Never misjudged a gap and cased it a bit? Never come in too hot to a corner and smacked a big square rock near the exit? Even pros come up short sometimes. You gonna tell Jack Moir to "pick better lines" when he smacks a rock that rolled into the trail and smokes a wheel? f*ck off. Our bikes should have a decent amount of forgiveness built in, since we do intentionally ride them through nasty rough terrain. Mine certainly does, but would definitely be called "overbiked" by most idiots on the internet, and there aren't many being sold with a similar forgiveness specced in.
  • 117 1
 I began riding/racing MTB's in the early 90's, the reliability is LIGHT YEARS ahead of what we had just a few years prior. Room for improvement? Sure. I feel most of that room for improvement comes from ease of serviceability perspective.
  • 19 0
 This. Things can always be better. But they used to be a lot worse.
  • 18 0
 I feel like even 8-10 years ago someone was going to break something every ride without fail. Im just glad my crankarms don’t fall off anymore.
  • 2 0
 @McKai: True,but probably a bit longer than 10 years ago, "epic days out " were practically unheard of,cranks falling off,derailleurs jamming and getting ripped off,and punctures like you wouldnt believe, the only constant was,the day ending event,would always be as far away from the car as possible Smile Smile Smile
  • 3 0
 Agreed. Started mountain biking in the early 2000's, and even though the terrain I was riding was much more mellow than my current trails, my bike was continually out of whack. Shimano XT derailleur needed constant attention, cable driven disc brakes needed lots of tensioning and cables snapped regularly. And unless you had the money for Maxxis DeeMax rims, you were more or less riding XC-ish stuff made of soft alloys with 20mm ID.
  • 1 1
 Oh yes! With only occasional (and for todays standars ridiculously mellow) riding I managed to rip off the rear deraiilleur of my 2001 Stumpy at least twice in one year. Several broken spokes, a failing fork and broken shock and even a snapped sadde left me flat broke on a regular basis. Not to mention I had to get the drivetrain adjusted after every ride in the wet because mud got into the gear cables. And we did not have the convenience of video tutorials. Trial and (most often) error was the concept back then. Never owned a Spesh after that.
  • 9 1
 What annoys me most is when stuff actually becomes less reliable than previous versions. About ten years ago I rode a 1x10 drivetrain for 10.000 kms while basically changing the chain twice and the cassette once, without it giving me any trouble in that time at all.

My current 1x12 setup unfortunately is far from being on the same level of reliability. Fortunately I ride less these days…
  • 3 0
 @bman33 Truth. Back then when going deep we would always carry spare derailleurs, a full toolkit, and enough gear to not be miserable if we had to spend the night. The progress of bikes has been amazing.
  • 1 2
 @FuzzyL: I think anything beyond 1x10 is just asking for trouble. I actually prefer 2x10. But I’m a Ludditeosaur.
  • 1 1
 @FuzzyL: agreed. Although linkglide is a step in the right direction.
  • 98 9
 Anyone complaining about bikes these days was not around the industry and riding in the early 90's. Bikes today are sofa king good!!! (Just stay away from the battery powered stuff.)
  • 3 0
 Seriously
  • 47 0
 Ahh...the days when you'd hope your cantilever brakes might slow you down or your chain would stay on one of the 3 chainrings. All while bouncing down the trail with 35+ psi in your tubes to have a chance NOT to flat. Those were the days...
  • 35 7
 @ReformedRoadie: and the trails were uphill both ways and in the snow... kids these days
  • 23 0
 @ReformedRoadie: 35 PSI? you were living on the edge! We were ALWAYS 40 psi
  • 1 0
 For sure!
  • 6 1
 True, but I still believe derailleurs are a well-engineered bad idea.
  • 3 0
 My son uses my old 2007ish Scott hardtail to school. I rode it for many years, incl racing, before handing it down to my Mrs, who did likewise.
It's had it's chain replaced once, a few tires & tubes, brake rubber - and nothing else. It rides & looks like a shed now, but it was left unlocked outside the school for 3 days/nights without anybody stealing it!
  • 3 0
 Even the early 2000's I lost count how many Isis cranks sets or BB's I broke. Most brakes seemed to have issues every second ride, etc. You name it I broke it during that time. Now it's a whole season with zero issues.
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: did you even sand your pads and rims regularly and use Coca-Cola? Coke was also good for softening elastomers in forks
  • 5 0
 @ckcost: Never replaced chains with the same frequency in the 90's as I do now. Sure drivetrains shift significantly smother, have clutches, more range, and no stupid front derailleurs and chain drops, but they're nowhere near as tough a good old M950 8 speed XTR was with durability (excluding the XTR cassette that was titanium and wore pretty quick, but substituted for XT).
  • 1 0
 @freestyIAM: maybe not, but we definitely tried to ride them that way. Going down was effing terrifying.
  • 1 0
 @knutspeed: either thats one super safe area or one sad lonely ride
  • 4 0
 @ReformedRoadie: If kids these days really wanted to experience a rush, they'd go ride a nasty DH track with Canti's, no chainguide, and 40 PSI......in the mud and fully ridged.
  • 2 0
 'Sofa King'. Really need to remember this expression when I'm next in a client meeting.
  • 2 0
 @Jamminator: Maybe not chains, but 22t alloy granny gears every few weeks. Brake pads every couple of muddy rides. Tubes galore. Ect.

I will give you that some of the old shimano drivetrain parts were pretty rugged....but they sure as hell didnt work as well. Early grip shift on the other hand.....

How about der hangers?!?! Ya look at em the wrong way back then and would need to replace em. I cant remember the last time I needed to replace my hanger recently.
  • 3 0
 The petition is for literal garbage bikes... like under/around $200
  • 2 2
 @ckcost: Of course, but it's all a trade-off... Those rim brake pads also only took five seconds to pull out the pin out on the brake shoe and slide new pads in vs what we have to do with discs today. Or being able to quickly recable a bike with external cable bosses back then. Or headsets and BBs that didn't arbitrary squeak. Etc.

Bikes are definitely "better" now in performance, but that was also the era of brute simplicity which had its own benefits.
  • 8 0
 @edummann: hahaha I distinctly remember one time telling myself 15 years ago “hmm it’s pretty wet out, I think I’ll air down to 40psi”..
  • 1 0
 @cky78: yeah and they they will cost 1000$ and no one with less money will have access to bikes. This is a half baked idea. And yes I started on a 100$ Walmart bike when I was a kid. Rode it to pieces. Learned how to fix everything on it. Was the best thing to happen to me.
  • 5 0
 @Jamminator: you mean rim brake pads that were a faff to align to get good power and no squealing, that would need their angle adjusting as they wore down, as well as the barrel adjuster? Vs just pushing the old pads apart with a tyre lever, popping new ones in and your good to go after a quick brake down a hill to bed them in?
  • 2 0
 @mountainsofsussex: Oh man, disc brakes are sooo much better in every way.
  • 1 0
 Had a Sofa King steel hard tail frame many moons ago. @Abant2:
  • 49 0
 SID bushings looking around nervously
  • 11 0
 But its such an amaaaazing fork for the first 2 and a half hours of owning it.
  • 3 0
 RockShox has now determined some bushing play is within spec and won't fix it. So now it's not a problem! Smile
  • 2 0
 So what's the exact problem with SID? It developes play in the bushings? I actually like when it finally happens in a new Fox fork. The whole thing starts to have less friction.
  • 1 0
 @goroncy: feels like an extremely loose headset. So loose you can hear it clunking around while riding. Mines been with sram for 5 weeks and no eta on the fix.
  • 46 1
 My Kona forgot to pick me up from soccer practice 3 times last week week - so...unreliable. Probably too busy daydrinking with Kent ruminating about the good ol' days when you could get stoned in the warehouse.
  • 4 0
 I saved the packs of Kona branded rolling papers I got at one of the dealer shows, good old days indeed.
  • 2 0
 @corporaltedbronson: Ah yes - I think I have some of the spaceman papers laying around my house, too.
  • 1 0
 Yes, since my Juliana has been around the block with the guys from wethepeople she threw all the kashima away an barely is home at night any more.
  • 39 1
 Unfortunately 80% of people don't treat there high-performance race machines like what they are. If you have a moto of the same value, your doing oil change and valve adjust ever 25 hours. People scoff at having to do your minimum suspension service every 50-100. For how light and well everything performs, if its maintained it is plenty durage.

Except brakes, no one makes good brakes right now. Anyone over 180lbs should agree.
  • 3 1
 Spot on about the maintenance of our high-performance machines.

For brakes, Trick Stuff. Stupid $$, but absolutely ridiculous performance. My 200 lbs ex-pro buddy turned me onto them.
  • 3 0
 That’s why I hate my dirt bike!!!
  • 10 0
 I'm 220, I disagree. I will agree there is room for improvement, but there are good brakes out there.
  • 16 3
 See I love both sports and I see it backwards. My suspension on my dirtbike can go 150+ hrs without a problem, my airshock on my mtb can't make it even 30hrs without some issue. When someone tells me that is normal I get furious.
Don't get me started on the cost of a dirtbike tire that is 4X the material of an mtb tire for the same cost even though Maxxis easily makes 6X the volume of mtb tires compared to moto, those savings definitely are not passed on.
I think the difference is they design dirtbikes FOR the top tier rider so that "if it can withstand them, it withstand anyone" vs mtb where they kind of design things for "middle of the road rider, save money" so if you actually ride hard, shit breaks constantlyyyy. Exactly like the photo shown above, I won't ever ride carbon cranks again.
On a separate note, does anyone here remember the original Sram Codes? Those were the best darn brakes and they stopped making them. When I see riders like Kyle Strait somehow still running them, I get angry "see even your pro rider knows it, how do I get my hands on them again." I would gladly take the weight difference to keep running the old ones.
  • 3 3
 Part of the problem is that bike consumers typically consider weight too important in their purchasing decisions. Bike manufacturers will design what we will buy and if low weight is a selling point then durability will be compromised.
  • 9 6
 @bcroots: Your dirtbike fork is 17 pounds and a litre of oil, your rear air shock has 5ccs of lubrication oil. Not comparable
  • 5 1
 TRP brakes and Galfer rotors stop my DH bike just fine and they are cheap.
  • 5 1
 @suspended-flesh: I wouldn't consider TRP brakes "cheap"... but they do stop well
  • 4 1
 @chadtague1: True - compared to Trickstuff, pricewise.
  • 2 0
 The initial plushness after a fork service fades pretty fast, but what it fades to holds for another 200+ hours no problem. I’ve done 250 hour service intervals for two decades, the 50-100 is ideal for racers that need best possible performance with lowest possible expense, but for typical Tom save your money.
  • 3 1
 @DizzyNinja: 100 hours is a fair amount of time. Keep in mind that this is 100 hours of average active use.
Things that play a roll are the type of riding you do, and the conditions you ride in.
Overall, what I fail to understand is how people will spend every last penny on the highest end part they can afford, but refuse to spend the money to properly service it.
You wouldn't buy a Ferrari and skip the service intervals because they are too expensive.
  • 2 0
 @brandon-d: this, for real. That's how some of the old Marzocchi open bath forks were so indestructible, a metric sh!tload of oil. Then they started nickel coating them, because weight savings is a myth
  • 1 0
 @jomacba: Sure, but I’ve been doing this in all sorts of riding conditions, muddy north shore, dry desert heat of Okanagan, rough Rocky Mountains, roots, freezing temps and snow, with multiple forks from Rockshox, Fox, Manitou, etc. Like I said, the initial degradation is noticeable, within 20-30 hours, after that it stays quite consistent for a lot longer than “recommended” by the companies that want to sell consumable parts and oil.
  • 1 0
 @DizzyNinja: Honestly, the service intravals are based off of the degradation of the dust wipers and damping oil. More or less to prevent damage to the bushings and maintain consistent damping. With proper care and maintenance you can easily extend the time frame. I will typically do a tear down and replace the oils without replacing seals. This helps bring back the initial sensitivity, and prevents extended wear of friction points. I do all my own service, so ultimately through a season it might cost me between $100-$200. During race season I do a lower service after every other race. I use a bit of slickoleum on the dust wipers, and I massage Fox 20wt gold into the stanchions and wipe after every time I clean it. Allt of that degradation is the oils being pulled from the pouros surface of the stanchion and the dust wiper getting dry.
  • 3 1
 All-round great brakes:
- Hayes Dominion A4
- Formula Cura 4
- Any Trickstuff 4-pot

Good reliability and enough power for most:
- TRP 4-pots
- Hope 4-pots

I'm sure I missed a few. Just look further than the ubiquitous SRAM underpowered and Shimano wandering brakes.
  • 1 1
 Agree with the brakes. If its one thing the mountain bike industry still hasn't got right is brakes. I've never had a bike or upgraded to any brake where the brakes do everything I want in all weather's. It's something that needs sorting as I don't think they have every keep up with the increase in the bikes performance over the years
  • 2 0
 @Mac1987: I have hope E, V and Trials. SRAM Code RSC with Galfer pads are stronger than any of them. Even V.
  • 1 0
 @jomacba: it’s easy to keep dust wipers from getting dry, and I’ve never had bushings deteriorate any worse than someone doing recommended services. If you turn your fork upside down once in a while the oil can get to the other end of the fork.
  • 1 1
 @goroncy: they are strong enough for most. They are also the strongest brakes SRAM make, but still not as strong as Shimano Zees, Saints, SLX and XT 4-pots, Formula Curas, Magura MT5s and 7s, Hayes Dominion A4, Trickstuff Direttissima and probably some other brakes I forgot. For a gravity oriented brake, they have good modulation but average power at best. Dyno tests from several magazines also showed them at the lower end of the scale in absolute power.
  • 4 0
 With both shifting and brakes I've found that half the time the "high performance" offerings work worse than some of the budget/fleet options. If I'm spending $300 on a single brake or derailleur that sucker better work great with minimal B-S-ing. Some cheap 2 piston hydros work great forever and some 8 speed derailleurs are mint after getting run over by a bus.
  • 2 0
 I'd agree with you on service intervals but the kind of failures I've had, were not service related. Component failure due to poor manufacturing and below par spec on bikes made for enduro/AM. Most people don't ride their high performance machines nearly as hard or as often as pro racers do, and they still break. How many moto rider have hubs and rims failing on their 250's within a few hundred km. The thing is its easy for manufacturers to do better. There are many decent cheaper hubs that last forever and don't chew bearings but the manufacturers spec junk instead.
  • 42 7
 What fool said that they would rather not have 2 extra pounds over having perfect reliability?!?!
  • 27 1
 I get my 2 extra pounds from Chipotle rather than my bike so...
  • 9 0
 Complains about 2# for reliability, also complains if there is no water bottle holder
  • 48 5
 There's a lot of reliability that isn't weight related. It's just poor design or materials to save money. I don't think my 34lb trail bike needs to weigh 36lb for the CSU not to creak and the post to come up all the time.
  • 12 4
 Some person currently dressed head to toe in spandex.
  • 12 2
 I don't need to add that kind of weight to get the perfect reliability that I've been getting. As an experienced professional mechanic, I have a pretty good idea of what parts to avoid and how to continually maintain the kit that I have. I have a sub 27lb Pivot Trail 429 V3 with carbon hoops I built onto Onyx hubs that is dialed and reliable.

I have a personal list of "never will be on any bike I ride" parts and I stick to it.
  • 24 10
 I voted against the two extra pounds for perfect reliability, because it's a dumb question. There is no such thing as perfectly reliable. I've been riding bikes since the 1990s. Bikes today are reliable enough. I'm mechanically inclined, I'd rather have semi light and rebuildable than heavy and bombproof. All Mountain and Enduro style bikes have already gained a lot of weight in the last five years. They don't need to get any heavier. I'd much rather products have spare parts available than an infinite life span, because that won't happen. Also sometimes shit just breaks.
  • 2 0
 Someone who already runs cushcore in both tires???
  • 9 0
 @jobytapia: would you mind posting your Top 5 least favorite parts/brands???
  • 6 0
 most Enduros already have the weight penalty, but without the bulletproofness
  • 5 0
 I already add at least two extra pounds for better reliability. DH tires for all the bikes.
  • 3 0
 What does reliability even mean though? Does that mean a drivetrain that can take literally any abuse I can shell out? Or does that mean a drivetrain that will reliably shift as long as I never clip a rock or lay my bike down on the right side in a crash? Is reliability the same thing as durability?
  • 3 6
 @georgiamtbiker: has anyone ever told you that you take things a bit too literal???

Do you also think that just because people vote that they want bikes to be “perfectly reliable “ that they also think it will magically happen???
  • 5 0
 I thought of it in the reverse. My bike has been as reliable as I could possibly hope*. Failures have all been expected wear and tear in the past 3 years.

Would I give up a little bit of that to save two pounds? Not a chance in hell.

*Except the wheels that came with it, that I replaced with heavier and stronger wheels.
  • 3 0
 @NealWood: Except maybe it does. Designing within tight space, weight, and cost constraints does not mean poor design, it just means there are limits. So yeah it is to save money, but for us as well as the manufacturers. Sure, they could machine a dropper's internals to some insane tolerance and specify a tiny maintenance interval such that the mean time between failures is something huge like decades, but that has huge implications for cost and time for both manufacturer and customer. Maybe you really do want a $1600 Forever Post that needs to be cleaned and lubed once a month, but it seems pretty obvious the market won't support that right now.

Just using your examples: The CSU is handling a lot of force in a pretty small area, but making that area bigger means the stuff around it has to get bigger, and more of anything usually means more weight. Same with the seat-post: to more reliably enable 20cm of extension that can hold a couple hundred pounds of human, the whole thing should be bigger, like even bigger than 34.9mm around, but again more stuff equals more weight. Might not add up to 2.2 pounds just for those, but "perfect reliability" means _nothing_ will break in the normal course of trail riding, including a safety margin to handle the occasional crash or misjudgment. as a safety
  • 2 2
 @georgiamtbiker: "Perfect reliability" was definitely the wrong term. I think what they meant was good enough to handle years (decades?) of normal riding (including the occasional crash or case or off-line, because that's riding) without unexpected failures. Obviously a major huge crash will break stuff, I think they meant if a couple pounds means something like it's virtually impossible to break a wheel without a major case, then that's a win. A shock that got regular seasonal maintenance and lasted a decade of 90-days-a-seaon park riding but weighed twice as much at the same cost, that's probably the kind of reliability they're implying.
  • 5 0
 That would be this fool with an odd obsession with blasting up punchy climbs
  • 4 0
 @itsrainingdans: except that’s unfair because an hour after Chipotle you’ll end up leaving 4 pounds behind.
  • 1 0
 Personally I have sacrificed over 5 pounds for the sake of reliability and things still break or wear quickly. Two pounds would probably only account for my tires (which have in fact been perfectly reliable after adding about 2lbs of tire/insert).
  • 5 0
 My bike is plenty reliable enough, don’t need another kilo to make it 0.0004% more reliable
  • 2 0
 @toast2266: This was the question I have too--is the poll question implying that for a mere 2.2lb penalty that my bike effectively has a force field around it? That I can bail at 40mph and send the bike cartwheeling through the trees and it will still be "perfectly reliable" for the rest of the day? How much maintenance between rides is needed to keep this bike "perfectly reliable"?

It's an odd question, and what it's really asking is (since we all know these polls are to collect opinion data to sell to bike companies) "How much beefier can we make our bikes/components in the name of increased durability (and thus lower warranty instances) before the general riding public is no longer willing to purchase them?".
  • 3 2
 @georgiamtbiker: it was a hypothetical question..
  • 2 2
 @stumphumper92: too complex a concept for some apparently
  • 1 0
 @jobytapia: Any advices? What on top of your 'no bueno' list?
  • 2 0
 @georgiamtbiker: I voted against it too. Yeah I’d like the reliability of extra weight, but I buy mostly with my heart over my brain and just know I’d buy the part which is prettier, more expensive and just hope it lasts. There are brands I’d buy and some brands I wouldn’t touch.
  • 2 0
 Perfect reliability would ruin my bike-wrenching hobby! I need stuff to break once in a while so I have an excuse to maintain/fix it.
  • 1 0
 Me. Because they still won’t be any more reliable and I expect engineers to engineer good solutions not just throw more material at it. In every other sport weight is been driven out so why not trail and enduro bike’s
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: I disagree. Just throwing more material at it isn’t an engineering solution. It’s a lazy solution
  • 2 1
 @justinfoil: I don't mean to get into an engineering debate online. All in all bikes are way more reliable than they used to be but they are also a lot heavier than they used to be and on average they are probably ridden a lot harder than back when your average mountain bike weighed well less than 30lb. I have two current issues with one of my bikes that is about 6 months old. 1. Poor choice by me but I thought Fox had fixed the creaky CSU issue and clearly they haven't. The fact that there are lots of forks out there and many that are lighter (and face all the same constraints and loads you mention) that do not creak means it's not a bulk of material issue. Fox has a design or manufacturing issue. 2. My new fox post doesn't always come up when I press the lever. This isn't an issue that is likely solved by adding weight. There are lots of posts out there that work just fine again with all the same constraints. I guess my point is that sometimes poor design can be hidden by adding more material (weight) but it's at best a lazy solution and often you can add all the material you want if the design is a turd it's a turd. Back in the 90's there were all sorts of failures as a result of shaving grams. The issues we see today from my experience are more design or manufacturing problems on parts that aren't exactly shy on grams.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, that question was worded in a pretty biased way I feel. Of course anybody would be willing to sacrifice for *perfect* reliability, but there's no such thing. A more realistic question would have been, would you sacrifice 1 kg for +30% reliability?

Most likely, the kind of parts we're getting already reflect what customers want in terms of price vs weight vs reliability.
  • 2 1
 @p1ne: asking how much weight people would accept in exchange for theoretical perfect reliability does provide insight on how much value people place on reliability. Asking how much they would accept in exchange for a random percentage of extra reliability (besides having to define what 30% means) muddies the discussion, because a negative answer could mean that the percentage is far too low, just too low, or the answerer doesn't care about reliability.
  • 22 2
 Being able to rebuild my entire bike is important to me (looking at you Fox suspension with you custom tooling and vacuum pumps) and I'm happy to not use one product if I can't do it myself. Needless to say there is a lot or Rockshox in our house.
  • 16 0
 It sucks that complete bikes that have shimano almost always have fox suspension. I for one like RS suspension and shimano drivetrains.
  • 7 2
 @unrooted:
I am 100% in your camp on Rockshox suspension and shimano drivetrains.

I also only use shimano breaks as I like the feel and I find bleeding them easy. Plus mineral oil is a bit more friendly than Dot.
  • 9 0
 @IMeasureStuff: But you can get DoT fluid anywhere and there are Standards, unlike mineral oil.
  • 3 7
flag Bikesbecauserunningsucks (Jan 21, 2022 at 16:20) (Below Threshold)
 @suspended-flesh: True, but Dot fluid allows air in quicker and thus Sram recommends multiple (I think 2 or 3) bleeds a year. I only bleed my XTs every two years, and even then, it isn't because they feel terrible, just a little squishy. Mostly only pre-emptive service.
  • 5 0
 @Bikesbecauserunningsucks: not air, but H20. That said, DOT disperses any H20 absorbed (approx 2.5% per year depending on the system) evenly and doesn't let it pool, Mineral oil and water repel and therefore it can pool and be corrosive if not checked.
  • 1 0
 @unrooted: my new bike came with RS and shimano fortunately. Too bad it has a motor Bc the reliability factor just goes down the drain lol
  • 3 0
 Building my bikes is now just as important a part of the hobby for me as riding, if I'm being honest. I usually look up a service manual before buying anything to get a sense of what I'm getting myself into.
  • 3 1
 @suspended-flesh: they say that, but the DOT fluid they require is not something I have ever been able to find in an auto store.
  • 1 0
 You don't need vacuum for Grip2. So there is hope.
  • 1 0
 The vacuum pumps are not strictly necessary, but the custom tooling really sucks
  • 1 0
 @goroncy: It does not get any better in terms of reliability than the Grip cartridges, the problem with Fox is all the custom tools required for doing basic service on the X2.
  • 2 0
 @unrooted: Just shimano brakes for me really.. I don't care about the actual gears. Shimano and Sram both work well. I just prefer the Shimano brake feel vs. Sram. Honestly I like the Sram drivetrain for durability and weight.
  • 12 0
 I am very satisfied with my reliability because I have spent years figuring out what is reliable and not running the crap that reliably lets me down (pun intended, ha!)
  • 9 0
 1kg/2.2lbs relative to what though? If your bike is already 18kg/40lbs then it's already an absolute pig to get up hills, and adding more to it might be too much. And what does perfect reliability mean? Things never wear out? Or things never physically snap in half? It's a totally inadequate question to ask in the first place because it's so open. If my enduro bike weighed say 13kg/28lbs then sure I'd be ok with adding 1kg to it. But it doesn't, because I already made that 1kg reliability choice about 4 times over, and I still break things here and there. So if you use my 38lbs bike as a starting point then actually, no, I don't really want more weight. Partly because if you make it stronger, I'll just find a way to hit it harder until it does break.
  • 10 2
 Whenever I tell people about steel chainrings, they convert. The example is good, but not perfect. Aluminum chainrings are marketed more heavily. Presumably the return is better on aluminum.
  • 4 0
 My only issue with steel rings is there aren't many oval options, which I prefer. Wolftooth looks to make one, and it costs more than the aluminum oval I have. I don't go through THAT many chainrings to make the lifespan worth it.
  • 3 1
 I think a lot of us don't ride enough to be bothered with how fast an aluminum chainring wears out! As much as I'd like to be riding 3x/wk, it's not happening. It's sad but my chainring is two years old and looks like it could go another 2. Easy to forget a more durable option exists.
  • 2 1
 Is it really that bad? On my bikes when the aluminium chanring is done, so are the cassette and the chain - the second or third in rotation. So if I have to change everything anyway, why would I want a half-worn steel chainring hurting my new chain?
  • 1 0
 @Z1-AV69: I don't know how many km you ride,but with a good chain my steel chainring will last 3 chain/cassettes ,I've tried sram and AB alloy,they hold up 1 season,or the new chain will make noise. I love steel chainrings
  • 8 1
 Steel chain rings need to be the norm. They last FAR longer than the 4x pricier aluminum ones.

My failures:
- Giant dropper post wore through the anodization shockingly fast
- Formula hub pawl snapped in half
- Dropping chains due to Praxis narrow/half-wide chainring design and munching through an aluminum ring in 3 months ($70 ring, mind you, and only 0mm offset fits)
  • 2 0
 Agree - my drivetrain issue isn’t reliability but rather life. really should be getting more than a year out of a $1K or more DT.
  • 6 0
 Bikes are really good these days. Things break on occasion and that is ok. What really matters is how valid warranties are handled. PB poll on warranty experiences/brand specific would be awesome! And I'm talking valid warranty claims, original owner, proof of purchase, within warranty time frame, intended use, etc.
  • 6 0
 I bought a 2021 Trek Top Fuel 9.8 in the GX build. The trails I ride in Richmond, VA are not rocky or rough. Within two weeks of ownership, the front carbon wheel cracked. The wheel was covered by warranty. Given current supply chain issues, it took three months for the new wheel to arrive. Totally unacceptable. Tried to write a review warning people about the Bontrager Kovee Line Elite 30 wheels that came stock on the bike. Had pictures of product failure. Review does not show up on Trek website...
  • 5 0
 What does perfect reliability even mean? Replace parts vector they’re broken? Never come in contact with anything on the trail? Never ride when there’s moisture in the air?

Bikes are continuing to get heavier and stuff still keeps breaking and wearing out so…

Overall, my bikes take really good care of me. On the other hand, my local LBS is also very familiar with them too.
  • 1 0
 While trails continue to have bigger jumps and gnarlier tech sections….or everyone thinks they need to set a straps time every time they go on a ride???

There’s an infamous rocky section st mammoth that I’ve seen several people HAUL ass through and destroy very expensive rims on…and everyone knows that’s the section where people destroy rims on, yet they still have to show off their speed.
  • 1 0
 @unrooted:

Very true, I went thru a set of not expensive rims with the DH bike after a week at Whistler. Fair trade in my book. Replaced them with a good, not great set of Alu wheels from the LBS.
  • 5 0
 what gets me is the stupid shit that can't be fixed. Bottom brackets creaking like hell all the time because they weren't machined properly, creaky CSUs, fork bushings that cant be replaced, £250 brakes that can't be rebuilt with new seals
  • 1 0
 Creaky CSU and pool bottom brackets. Sooo annoying
  • 4 0
 A couple observations (#tldr; reliable =/= durable but Americans think it does and American adults think of bicycles as cheaper toys for children)

What most people consider to be “reliable” is more accurately described as “durable”, and particularly in America this seems to mean “tolerant of abuse and neglect”. A BMW can be as reliable as a Cavalier if you follow BMW’s maintenance schedule as prescribed and change out parts when they meet the end of their service life. A Cavalier will run on 3 cylinders and 2/4 functioning wheel bearings longer than most cars will run, period.

2) Americans by and large do not see bicycles as more than recreational equipment or last-ditch transportation for people with too many DUIs. Everyone I know in New England thinks skiing is an expensive sport to get into, until you start mentioning how you’re not getting a brand new mountain bike that can reliable handle an American-sized male riding it in off-road conditions for less than $1500, plus regular maintenance and repair of multi-hundred dollar components. Until the general public stops thinking of bicycles as cheap entertainment for children compared to a PlayStation or Xbox, they’re going to keep demanding $250 department store disposable bikes. Unfortunately, the parents are the ones that have to be taught this, and doubly unfortunate is the fact that buying multiple $750+ bikes for an average household income of about $60,000, multiple times as their children grow up, just isn’t financially sound.
  • 1 0
 Unfortunately BMW’s service life for many parts happens to be only a few months after it rolls off the lot. They’ve never been known for reliability. Most BMW owners just accept this.
  • 4 0
 10 years ago we would limited big backcountry rides to 4-5 riders as anymore than that and you risked cutting out half the ride because of mechanical issues. Someone was always breaking something. Everything is so much more reliable now that it isnt even a concern anymore.
  • 4 0
 Some people are just harder on components. I have successfully run extremely light components on my bikes (including downhill bikes) without issue, whilst friends have borked heavy duty parts on the same trails at the same speeds. Knowing what you can get away with and riding accordingly is a valid part of the puzzle
  • 4 0
 The poll asking "who's fault is it that your bike broke: the manufacturer for designing it poorly or the user/mechanic for setting it up wrong" is kind of what's wrong with this whole debate. Sometime stuff is going to break before you think it ought to, even if it is designed well, manufactured well, installed correctly, and serviced frequently. That's the reality of fatigue and the unpredictable nature of speeding down technical mountain trails.
  • 4 1
 The only consistent failure I've had in the last two years that points to a problem ripe for solving has been derailleur hangars. Sure, some of that is rider's fault, but sometimes when you're racing you just make a bad decision and commit to a line that snags your derailleur.

Most other failures have been predictable or rectified almost immediately (broken carbon wheels = warrantied, spoke failure, etc.). I think bikes are getting pretty great, especially if you take care of them.
  • 4 0
 But it sounds like the hanger did it’s job, no? As a racer I carry a spare hanger on race day… but I certainly don’t carry a spare derailleur. Generally anything that takes out your hanger, would have taken out your derailleur if the hanger didn’t go first.

But… from the rumour mill, supposedly, once this whole world wide shipping delay situation gets sorted and everyone catches up you can expect the bike co’s to start redesigning their frames around direct mount derailleurs that sit quite a bit more in and up out of the way. Will that solve the issue?? Who knows… will it keep people buying new bikes now that geo is sorted out, probably.

m.pinkbike.com/news/sram-granted-patent-for-drivetrain-with-a-direct-mount-derailleur.html
  • 3 0
 idk what you ride, but on my stumpy evo I was burning through hangers like crazy. They'd get slightly bent and cause shifting problems. I got a milled hanger from NorthShore Billet and all my problems have gone away.
  • 1 0
 @chadtague1: does NS sell that in there catalog? I just picked up a 2020 Stumpy Evo frame to try on 29" wheels. I don't usually have an issue with hangers, but nice to know just in case.
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: Hangar definitely did it's job, I'm just saying it would be nice if we could have a drivetrain system without derailleurs. I'll also note that last season I was on a high pivot bike that would become a useless potato as soon as the derailleur alignment was off by a fraction of a micron, so the problem was certainly magnified. I believe I went through 7 hangars last season, and I usually go with through a max of 1 per season.
  • 1 0
 @bman33: idk about catalog but it's on their website
  • 4 1
 Component manufacturers will never preference reliability over weight savings, though. Being able to advertise your bike/components as lighter + being able to sell replacement parts over and over again will always win when dealing with the average, low information buyer.

The best thing we can hope for is stronger right-to-repair regulation. The EU could implement this on its own and changes would likely filter out to the rest of the world.
  • 6 3
 I would like to answer that I'm mostly satisfied with the reliability of my bike, but that's only because I built it to be so. Marz Z1 coil, simple TRP quadiems, Microshift advent X, simple crankset. Aluminum Frame. Splurge on the wheels folks. Why people think they need carbon frames and cranks is beyond me. Also 12 gears is too many and too finicky. That's my rant.
  • 1 0
 Totally agree. Built my new rune v3 for exactly that. Mezzer pro fork (easy service lots of adjustments) microshift advent x 1.5 years nothing but a chain. Hope tech dh rims tough even for my 250+ clyde but. Shimano rear hub for easy greasing/service. Hope front hub that I will never have to touch. Bikes now are way better for beating on but some age better than others.

My 06 V10 with intense mag 30 rims coil fork and shock and old school saint brakes never needs anything. Haven't even checked the spoke tension in 8 years.But weighs more than 50 pounds.

The new bike tech is awesome for being light and somewhat reliable with all the droppers and adjustments and features. You cant ever have it all but we have it pretty good for sure.
  • 1 0
 I've been in it since 1991. My background is BMX, slalom, some downhill and XC. Always was a bit "husky". Blame those monster sprinters quads. Even at my best XC results, I tipped the scales at 216 lbs. Everything bent or broke. Frames at the BB from the torque, bars, a stem once. Rims last maybe a year. So, now that I'm older and even husky-er, I'm weight/strength aware. I ride hardtails, after 4 broken FS frames, I'm still leery. Deity bars, stem, a PNW dropper, still run XT and RaceFace Turbine cranks. And run XT, 1x10 speed. Bought a Sunrace 11-42 cassette and link. For rims, gone through a lot. But, I've had great success with Halo Vapour 35's and E*13 Enduro plus rims. 2 and 3 seasons, barely a touch up once a year. Laced to Hope hubs. Also, I use EXO casings. We don't have a many rocks on my daily trails. And I run a DVO Diamond. Not the cheapest, but with my huskyness, I can find the sweet spot with pressure and OTT and I get 3+ seasons before I need even consider freshing it up. My Fox, every season, can't find mid support without a sacrifice. They hit the scales at about 29 lbs, but 3000 miles and very few issues.
  • 5 0
 It's always the manufacturers fault. Never mine, with all my random ass wrenches and wild ideas about how things should be done..
  • 3 0
 If you have been riding less than 10 years then you have no idea what poor reliability actually is. bikes and parts are bomb proof these days comparatively. And when they arent its generally the dumbass riding the bike who does no maintenance. aka me.
  • 7 1
 SRAM and Fox forks are freaking at the sight of this poll.
  • 7 1
 Creaking too
  • 2 0
 Dps and DHx2's are all looking at their feet kicking the dirt right about now
  • 5 1
 Wheels.... Man they do not want to stay round under me.... 200lbs and heavy hitting but I would also hope to get more than a season out of some dt 511s...
  • 2 2
 511’s suck. 560’s are much better.
  • 6 0
 I'm 200lbs & stupid too - get FR560's
  • 6 0
 I dont know. I am constantly amazed how how my wheels hold up after punishing them. In the early 90's it was a non-stop battle of truing wheels. New wheels are waaay better
  • 4 0
 @edummann: I’m guessing you’ve never tried E.13 rims?
  • 3 1
 Just imagine the pain when a 511 only lasts a season, and I am 150 pounds! Took a risk and bought some high end carbon wheels. 511 weight still, but hopefully stronger than the aluminum wheels.
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: I hoped that would be the case when I upgraded to Nobl TR37 which are supposed to be strong enduro wheels, lasted 3 weeks before getting 2 big cracks on the same trail I've been riding the DT Swiss for the past year with no problems besides a few small dings. I'm trying 1 more time but if they blow up again I'm going back to aluminum
  • 1 0
 Delete
  • 1 0
 @mhogan1: it's not the aluminium; it a DT thing.
  • 1 0
 @Tambo: or shitty wheelbuilders? My 471s is rock solid,so was my 442..
  • 1 0
 @lenniDK: it's all important. But no level of wheel build will save the bead on a weak rim
  • 1 0
 @Tambo: it’s a 511 thing. I’m 240lb and ride 471’s and 560’s. They hold up so well that I haven’t replaced rims on either wheel set since I built them. The 511’s I previously owned lasted less than a season.

Before (Australian) winter I built a set of wheels for a friend (170lb) with 511’s on a set of 350 hubs. I encouraged him to use 560’s, but he insisted. They’re built with the same dt alpine 2 spokes and 14mm brass nipples as my personal wheels. One rim lasted four rides and the other lasted six. I rebuilt the wheels with 560’s and they’ve been strong and true for seven or eight months now.
  • 1 2
 @Afterschoolsports: Ever thought about using normal person spokes? How can the rim deflect when there's basically a bunch of girders holding it up?

100kg, 511s on competitions, schladming is my local. Not a whisper in 2 years.
  • 2 0
 @davidrobinsonphoto: spokes can't support the bead; that's always my problem with weak rims.
  • 1 1
 @davidrobinsonphoto: so the 511 wheels fail due to spokes being too strong? Yet wheels with 471 and 560 but are otherwise identical, don’t fail. Hahahahaha. Wow.
  • 3 0
 Compared to what we rode in the mid/late 90s, modern bikes are so reliable but then again, I spent much more $$$ on what I ride now. I can't remember the last significant technical issue I had on a bike while on a ride.
  • 3 1
 Not much stuff breaks really. I broke a pedal axle last year and just replaced that. When I sent pictures of the fracture surfaces, the manufacturer refunded the axle. One of my brake masters from 2006 started to suck air recently so I had to replace it (by a 2009 master). Other than that, stuff just works.

As for steel chainrings, I've been using steel 32t Deore 9sp middle rings for years. The granny was 22t and didn't really wear (wasn't used much either) and didn't use a big ring (just a bash guard). The 32t steel ring was 9 euros a piece so fairly acceptable. I couldn't understand why others would go for more expensive and shorter lasting aluminium rings. But for a 1x drivetrain, the tables have turned. I want an oval 34t ring with 104mm BCD (for Shimano Zee cranks). The ones from RaceFace don't fit, they use a different mount. Wolftooth makes them in steel but these are massively more expensive than aluminium. Understandable as I suppose these are machined, so tool wear is massive compared to machining aluminium rings. They don't stamp/punch them, like Shimano used to stamp my Deore rings. Yet at the same time, 1x rings don't skip as badly when worn like worn shift-rings do. Aluminium rings (from Superstarcomponents and Absolute Black) last long enough for me. I do use a chain guide though, which probably matters. Rear sprockets (steel) wear much, much faster.
  • 1 1
 I have the same Deore 9 spd 32t steel ring! I have worn one out in 10 years of riding, and they shift amazing! The 22t rings also last forever.
  • 2 0
 Interesting, this is currently 703/152 in favour of yes:

"Would you accept a one-kilogram (2.2 lb) weight penalty for perfect reliability?"

Rigid frame bikes from the 80's were overbuilt. The only issue I had was the brake mount on fork broke off on a Specialized stumpjumper.

And the only problem I've currently had is BB frame shell bushing worn oversize .4mm (.016") on a C2 Optic, but Norco will warranty this.
  • 2 1
 I played bike polo for like five years on an old ridged mountain bike. I broke that frame so many times! Broke the rear dropout, brake bridge, and seat stay where it connects to the seat tube. Was able to braze all those back together. Then both chainstays started cracking in multiple places. I deemed those unfixable without major surgery. I'd argue those bikes were way less durable, and that doesn't even get in to the bad design decisions, and I'm not talking geometry. That was obviously shit too. If you take an old bike and put parts on it that allow you to ride it anywhere close to as hard as we ride bikes now you'll quickly figure out those bikes were just shit!
  • 1 0
 I think this is a bit skewed by realists. I think all of us would make that sacrifice if it was possible, but no-one actually believes that we would get perfect reliability with 1kg.
  • 2 0
 @georgiamtbiker: Riders didn't send it as hard back then, and part of it is riding style too (I ride "lighter").
  • 2 0
 Modern parts, even light weight parts, are stronger then "DH" parts of the 90's. Aluminum DH bars lasted about 2 seasons before they broke, on a trail bike. Of course, our single multi use trail bikes were DH, slalom, DJ and XC bikes every weekend...
  • 5 0
 I would certainly give some weight in exchange for a CSU that doesn't creak.
  • 4 0
 This. How much beef do we need to add to long-travel single-crowns to shut them up? Probably not a ton.
But if only one manufacturer does it then all of a sudden reviews are going to complain that it's "100g heavier than the competition".
  • 1 0
 Loctite before fitting would likely not even register on the scales.
  • 2 0
 Bikes are pretty damn reliable compared to what we were riding 10-15 years ago.
With better geo and bigger wheels we're riding rougher terrain, faster than back then too.
Ironically my bike weight has stayed the same over 10 years at about the same reliability: 33 lbs
Tire weight increases and adding a dropper post have gobbled up weight savings from fork/frame/component improvements. (but it's a good trade)

Recent failures that come to mind:
- Fork crown creaking: $0 Warrantied (long-travel single-crown steerers need more beef to avoid creaking)
- Rear hub bearing: $9 fix (1 failure out of 10 seasons of riding so to be expected; have to have proper tools)
- A few rear rims: $75-100 ea (Al rims dent too much at 26-28psi without inserts)
- A rear triangle: Crash-replaced at $400 (design flaws according to the mfr)
- Pedal spindle: $25 f*ck Crankbros mallets
- Drivetrain parts: $misc - Smashed derailleurs aside, getting 4+ years out of a XG-1175 cassette isn't bad
  • 2 0
 Old mallets? I have 2 pairs of the "newer" ones and they've both handled thousands of miles of insane abuse from mudfests with no maintenance to 30mph rock strikes to desert freeride with one bearing failure and one slightly worn spindle (due to the bearing failure). This is with maybe 2 rebuilds between them.

Sidenote: I'd be very irritated if frame mfr admitted design flaw and still charged you.
  • 1 0
 @CobyCobie: Old mallets, yep! (probably 2013 ish). Glad to hear they've improved.
The frame was bought second hand, so it felt like a deal to only pay crash replacement price for the rear triangle.
  • 1 0
 @chrod: Oh yeah I've bent, snapped, or otherwise destroyed my fair share of the older crank bros spindles and wings.
  • 3 0
 Thank you SRAM for putting out the POS Guides that would fail in the heat. I had that happen with 2 sets and far from a SRAM authorized dealer. Out of pocket both times.Total lack of respect for the rider.
  • 2 0
 I've broken two aluminum direct mount raceface chainrings. I run a lower bashguard so the failures weren't from impacts, and both of them broke while I was climbing out of the saddle. In a separate incident (but also pedaling hard out of the saddle) I broke the sram eagle carbon crank they were previously attached to and am now on a shimano m8000 crank with a steel ring. I live in the Vancouver area and the climbing trails are challenging and steep.
  • 5 0
 Damn pinkbike throwing shade at rocky mountain for your own mistakes? That's a new low.
  • 2 0
 Bikes, in general, are more reliable than they were back in the day. The engineering is better, the materials are better, but as people want lighter (not as strong), and more (have you compared an 8 speed chain to a 12 speed chain lately) the improvements get diluted a bit. Combine that with the progression in trail design and the way people ride the new trails, and things are gonna break. I cannot imagine riding the trials I do now on my first hardtail from the early '90s, or my Worksman framed clunker from the '80s. I would die, no doubt about it.
  • 2 0
 2.2 LBS for perfect reliability? How perfect we talking? Can I just do whatever the hell I want to my bike and the suspension stays sweet, the wheels stay true, bearings stay smooth, brakes stay powerful and tyres stay inflated? I'd take a bigger weigh penalty than 2.2 Lbs for that.
  • 2 0
 1. I assume you can make a good bike for less that $200 dollars, It's a singlespeed, rigid fork, just-this-side-of-passable components. Thing is its probably pretty hard to sell to a consumer. I can see the ad copy now: "This bike has absolutely zero features but the build quality doesn't completely suck"

2. I haven't had a component "fail" in ages. The last one I can remember is when there was barbed wire on a trail and it got into my wheel and destroyed the wheel and shifter and I think I'll call that one rider error rather than blame sram for crappy parts :-) Stuff does wear out and I wish it lasted longer (looking at you cassettes, grips, and tires) but I've been pretty happy with my bike.
  • 1 0
 You can get a pretty solid fixed gear or BMX for around that price. I have a $300 fixie I used to ride to class in SF so I didn't have to worry about it getting stolen, although I've now replaced everything but the frame.
  • 2 0
 Let's face it; riding, running, throwing, whatever, if the sport involves "rocks of unusual sizes", the object striking against the rock will almost always be softer. I'm very jappy with how durable the gear i ride is. Can I break it? Heck yeah, i can probably destroy most components, but tbh, most parts are pretty good, especially mid to lower high end stuff.
  • 2 0
 I think it is not a question of reliability but more a question of too many standards and dumb ideas all trying to work together. I don't know who some of these people are who think of some of the shit we see in a bike workshop on a daily basis and combined with all the different standards, lack of stock also it's just a bit of a joke sometimes. The bikes are more than capable at doing there job it's just some of the ideas behind them that are at fault. I often think they must take some amazing drugs at these big cooperate work meetings......
  • 2 0
 I bought my first Mtn bike in 1993. Aside from the fork everything on that bike still works pretty good. Forks and shocks have been the most problematic parts for me over the years. That being said in the since I switched to RockShox I haven’t had a single suspension issue in over ten years. Smashed wheels have all been my bad. I switched to carbon wheels when Edge now ENVE started making wheels out of carbon. Since then I’ve only cracked two wheels. I’ve broken a couple derailleurs and snapped one chain. Again all rider error. Since switching to 1x drivetrains over ten years ago now I haven’t had a drivetrain issue that couldn’t be easily fixed with the barrel adjuster and some lube. The only frame I’ve broken was when I got hit by a car. So technically the car broke it. I started using dropper posts 20 years ago. Gravity dropper posts are bomb proof never had one fail. I moved on to KS and now BikeYoke. I had the KS serviced once in five years. The BikeYoke has been the best post I have ever used. I’ve never had a cockpit component fail in any way. Shimano pedals always work. I switched to SRAM drivetrains when the XO derailleur first came out and haven’t had a derailleur issue since. I rarely get flats any more. Tires have come a long way since I was setting up regular tires tubeless with duct tape and presta valves cut off of old tubes 20 years ago. The only bike part that still gives me issues is brakes. More specifically getting them to run true and not rub. If your still breaking lots of parts on your bike it’s most likely where you ride and the way you ride. If you ride DH and free ride your going to break your bike and probably yourself as well. If you race enduro or ride like your racing enduro your going to break stuff. If you ride lots of very technical trails your going to break stuff. When I say very technical I mean only the very skilled can ride whole trail. Horse thief bench in Loma for example only has two very technical sections. The drop in and the coffin. Which has been dumbed down so it’s not nearly as hard as it used to be. An intermediate should be able to easily ride the rest of that trail. Your skill level and riding style will also greatly affect how often you break parts. If you aren’t doing a lot of those three types of riding you shouldn’t be breaking anything on your bike these days. If you are the problems are skill, riding style and maintenance habits. Taking some skills clinics will greatly reduce the amount of damage you do to your bike and your body. Granted there will always be exceptions and sometimes things just don’t work the way they should. There are definitely parts that I refuse to use. Don’t be afraid to try different parts. Your friends and the guy at the bike shop might not be exactly like you.
  • 2 0
 . Best comment yet.
  • 3 0
 You're just being far too rational about this.
  • 2 0
 Took my first 50 mile ride as a third grader on a Stingray bike, you know, chopper handlebars/banana seat. Started keeping accurate track of how much I rode at 25 years old, closing in on 300,000 miles now at 63.

In reality, I have some bike parts from the 1980's that are still going strong, Suntour friction shifters, IRD seatpost, Chris King hubset. So not everything newer is better in terms of reliability, nor function for that matter.

I've been through a lot of parts over the years, and I know that nothing lasts forever, no matter how badly you want it to. It's a matter of buying the right tools for the job, really. I have 2 steel hardtail frames that each have more than 100,000 miles on them. They were made with the right tube sets, not the lightest, but light enough to be competitive in top level races. Now I ride an aluminum full suspension bike that I think will also be reliable for the long term for me and the kind of riding I do now.

I no longer race but I do lots of what I consider endurance riding, off road, 80 to 100+ mile rides. It's very important to me that my bike doesn't break as I'm usually riding solo. I don't even know what my bike weighs, nor do I care. I feel like there's a balance between weight and durability, and going too light for what you're doing is just asking for trouble.

Personally, the greatest factor increasing my bikes reliability is my age. The older I get, the fewer chances I take. It's made all the difference in the world.
  • 5 1
 Extremely reliable if you take care of them and ride like you have a brain.
  • 5 0
 i hate to point fingers, but... REVERB!
  • 1 0
 Having had to replace hub bearings, BB bearings, pivot bearings, and headset bearings all in one season, I'd appreciate some additional QC to ensure bearing alignment, superior bearing seals, and more robust bearings utilized. Especially for pressfit frame manufacturers, please actually respect the alignment required to not eat through bearings.
  • 1 0
 just a piece of mind on one of the previous polls about carbon vs. alloy broken cranks;

Everything seemed pretty balanced there, but there was no mention to the fact that every bike comes with alloy cranks decades ago, even crappy supermarket bikes, as opposed to carbon cranks, which are only found in high end builds or aftermarket.

So I wonder how many of those broken alloy cranks were XT, or Saint, or Turbine, or any other high end alloy cranks, to make the comparison a bit more apples to apples.
  • 1 0
 I took a weight penalty with my Zerode Katipo and it was 100% worth it! There are so many benefits but just having exact shifting and no derailleur to bang off rocks has been amazing! In order of importance I would say performance, reliability, customer service, and then weight.
  • 3 0
 I don’t know how people wouldn’t take 2.2lbs for more reliability. I eat 2.2lbs of food in a meal. So just… ride in the morning before breakfast!
  • 1 0
 11 speed was waaaaaaay less fussy than 12 speed. If I was building up a frame tomorrow I’d go back to 11 and deal with the harder low gear.

Rims tend to be kind of flimsy-except for EX511s. All rims should be that straight/true, easy to build and durable.

And…..I get part of this is big wheels on long travel bikes adding stress, but I’ve had a few rear shocks fail on me the last couple of years. 3 were Trek through-shaft (ick!!) but I also had the aircan blow off an almost brand new DVO.

On the positive side, SRAM and Shimano make good brakes these days, OneUp 210 dropper has been easy to live with, Deity Deftraps KILL IT if you rock flats!!
  • 1 0
 ive gone through quite a few frames. 2 bmx bikes, one was my fault and one was manufacturers, and 2 mtb frames, neither i know who to blame. as for components, ive had a set of old hayes brakes fail (nothing a rebuild couldnt fix), blew up multiple hubs (all qr, with non sealed bearings), and a few snapped chains. for 6 years of riding, im overall happy with the quality of bike parts thus far. the price keeps going up and things keep getting more and more complex, so we will see how it stands in the next 6 years
  • 1 0
 High end bikes have high end maintenance, I read an article here a couple year ago where a SRAM designer inted that of the 3 boxxers available, the world cup version, the most expensive, wasn't the most expensive to produce, but it did have the shortest maintenance intervals. I learned this lesson the hard way with a pair of Mavic wheels, know, if I can, I just try to get the best standard
  • 1 0
 It would have been fascinating to see how many of the failures were on complete bikes versus a custom bike. Aside from creaking CSU's, pretty easy to build up a relatively light and durable bike with smart decisions and enough money. Wheels are an excellent example.
  • 1 0
 A lot if it is simply bad design. Some of the bike industry job postings for engineers,etc and the pay and experience they are looking for is trash. These companies are getting kids out of school to design products and learn on the fly. Also, a lot of parts are designed to simply look fancy and have a gimmick the company can 'sell'. There is still some good stuff out there, but the big players can do a lot better making serviceable, reliable parts that don't have to be more expensive.
  • 1 0
 My lone recent failure was a QC/assembly issue. Part of fork damper came loose and dumped oil out, causing loss of damping. It only needed to be screwed back together and bled, a but I'd call it a failure because I lost riding time.
  • 1 0
 I got my new hardtail mtb for Christmas, I got it from an online bike dealer and they are supposed to give everything a good check over but when I got it the derailleur was broken and the the Chain was too. I then had to wait a week before I could ride it. Luckily my local bike repair shop did amazingly well and I got a better derailleur than the stock one.
  • 1 0
 Bikes for kids need a special mention here… My son had a Riprock 20” from the Big S… but this applies to most bikes for kids 20” & smaller, also to some of the bigger ones…

Square taper BB & cranks with press fit chainring.
With a busted chainring, you have to replace the whole setup, and that is if you can find parts. Not even talking about anything serviceable.
Fork - Should probably have been a rigid.
Shifter, derailleur & cassette…. Impossible to find replacements. Had to make old Shimano 8spd & 9spd components work on a wheel relaced to an old DT hub.
Original cable actuated disc brakes - unserviceable and crap. Ditched them for cheap Tektro hydraulics. More serviceable and still working like a charm for the next kid
  • 1 0
 A better question is "How reliable are modern mountain bike warranties?" A failing component isn't a big issue if it is well supported by manufacturers.

I've had great success with SRAM and Trek, whereas Fox and Yeti have been challenging at best.
  • 1 0
 I think about this stuff every day. BMX has kinda been to both ends of the spectrum - they went for ultimate durability but the bikes were just awful to ride. Then things swung back a little too far in the other direction and even 50kg kids were breaking frames. They’ve now got to a point where the bikes have evolved into a near perfect balance of durability vs performance. Of course mtb brings more complexity and variety but I think the idea is the same, we have to balance durability with performance. If we make the bikes indestructible they ride like crap so there has to be some compromise. However, one area things could improve and lessen the impact of that compromise is repairability and serviceability. If things do break or go wrong they should be more easily repairable. Reusable. Steel bikes are incredible for this…but a lot of the parts we use could definitely benefit from more repairability.
  • 1 0
 A good example of bad design is shimanos ceramic brake pistons, with totally different thermal expansion properties compared to the rest of the metallic caliper, inevitably leading to mineral oil leakage past the square gasket seals and onto the brake discs
  • 1 0
 What I love with my Hope brakes and Hubs is the reliability. It last forever and when you need to do a service on it, the apre parts are not very difficult to find, cheap and everything is explained how to service the product. So I'm happy to pay more to have this kind of reliability and easy service. I prefer RS suspension to Fox because it's not that hard to service your fork and shock. The parts are available and the service manual explains exactly how to do it. And you don,,'t need a lot os special tools which are impossible to find not expensive.
  • 1 0
 A bicycle can mostly be well maintained with a rag and a beer. What other aspect of your life works so good? Nobody has tried Linkglide yet but that might be the golden ticket. The universal derailleur hanger as well. Commuter and utility e bikes will drive the market for durable parts and lighter gearboxes.
  • 1 0
 Things that failed miserably in the last 2 years. Shimano mt501 levers after about a year after oil flush.(seized like your average avid/sram lever in the summer) Brand New Shimano mineral oil bottle, brand new syringes, (I've seen few other mt501 levers that grind). They were replaced under warranty.
Shimano m7000 rear derailleur, the spring was full with mud and rust. After that I learned to service it every 6 months at worst.
Cchainstay with broken weld, cracked seatstay at the PM. Great customer service, replaced under warranty.
DVO Jade, developed wear mark on the stantion after few months. Got my money back. (Bearings were new, bushings were new, harder was new-ish.)
2 destroyed rear wheels, because city riding sux.
I upgraded to m7100, and after 2 weeks, I lost one of the boys that keep the shifter from rotating.
New Shimano direct mount chainrings have 8 instead of 4 bolts that WILL get loose.
Fox DH X2 shocks get get cracked at the damper near the eyelet, and they leak. I've seen 5 in the last 2 years.
My colleague bent his crankarm after he layed down on the side with the bike. Really stupid. He is really disappointed with his Trek Slash, because he spends more money than he rides. About 2-3 USD per kilometer. Rims made of cheese, cracks made of cheese, gears never worked properly (GX). I tried it once, and shifting under load is shit.
RS forks have rattle noise caused by the rebound inside the damper. I guess RS could've fixed it by installing really small O ring. We install plastic straw as really quick solution.
  • 1 0
 I wonder how much of this supposed durability problem is due to the availability of materials like quality steel and other quality metals that are used in the manufacturing process. It would make sense that the availability of quality materials such as steel have prob diminished somewhat over the years in terms of purity and refinement. It definitely seems like older components made 15 yrs ago last longer than the same component made today.
  • 1 0
 Things that failed miserably in the last 2 years. Shimano mt501 levers after about a year after oil flush.(seized like your average avid/sram lever in the summer) Brand New Shimano mineral oil bottle, brand new syringes, (I've seen few other mt501 levers that grind). They were replaced under warranty.
Shimano m7000 rear derailleur, the spring was full with mud and rust. After that I learned to service it every 6 months at worst.
Cchainstay with broken weld, cracked seatstay at the PM. Great customer service, replaced under warranty.
DVO Jade, developed wear mark on the stantion after few months. Got my money back. (Bearings were new, bushings were new, hardware was new-ish.)
2 destroyed rear wheels, because city riding sux.
I upgraded to m7100, and after 2 weeks, I lost one of the boys that keep the shifter from rotating.
New Shimano direct mount chainrings have 8 instead of 4 bolts that WILL get loose.
Fox DH X2 shocks get get cracked at the damper near the eyelet, and they leak. I've seen 5 in the last 2 years.
My colleague bent his crankarm after he layed down on the side with the bike. Really stupid. He is really disappointed with his Trek Slash, because he spends more money than he rides. About 2-3 USD per kilometer. Rims made of cheese, cracks made of cheese, gears never worked properly (GX). I tried it once, and shifting under load is shit.
RS forks have rattle noise caused by the rebound inside the damper. I guess RS could've fixed it by installing really small O ring. We install plastic straw as really quick solution.
E13 dropper with broken top head.
Older SLX crankarms seem to snap in half. My colleague broke his, last year I sold mine after 1year on the shelf. Few months later the dude I sold them to sent me a picture with the crankarm broken in half.
Yesterday I opened fairly new RS Reba for lower leg service, there were metal shards inside from when they installed the bushings.
  • 1 0
 In the last 15 years the only thing that I've broken that was NOT my fault was a cracked Giant Anthem 29er. It failed at the top tube to the seat tube, but was a very common problem on those frames. Giant did however give me a replacement frame at no charge
  • 1 0
 drivetrains... omg, i wish i could afford a pinion, derailleurs are just not logical to me :-D its like a constant grinder (chain to chainring) mixed with grinding compound (sand)... the tip of the iceberg is a non aligned chain...
  • 1 0
 PRAXIS - I know nobody will read this but I just have to say WTF. Your Kenevo SL carbon cranks broke in the PB huck to flat so I swapped mine out for your alloy version. I have now BENT 3 sets of your alloy cranks. What an absolute crap product with currently zero aftermarket alternatives. Thank you so much Specialized.
  • 1 0
 First gripe, IGUS bushings. Only metal bearings should be used for pivots in bikes sold to the public. Period. Next is the durability per dollar for prebuilt wheel sets. I'm large, ride aggressively, and have yet to ride a pre built wheel set that lasts more than a season. Last gripe is dropper posts. I have yet to find a dropper that even comes close to a Specialized blacklite dropper. It's old tech, yet is somehow better than anything even close to its price point when it was released. Same goes for Hayes Stroker Ace brakes. I guess my actual last gripe would be a lack of parts available to the public. It's like companies make something great, then it's gone in a few years without any customer support.
  • 1 0
 I built my bike around reliability + the ability to next-day service parts (if not at the LBS). It's 16kg but the last time I had a mechanical (broken hanger) was 1.5 years ago. Not even a flat (thanks super gravity).

Still, i'd take another 500g so that I don't need to send my Zeb in for CSU replacement for the 5th time.
  • 1 0
 I was a DH racer for years! Rode hard and abused my bike to save seconds. I have ridden less and less travel bikes every time so get a new one. Now I’m in a Top Fuel. It’s amazing. It really capable riding DH… to a point. Landed several 6+foot drops and 10+ foot gaps. I did blow my fork improperly landing a small feature. My fault! I am truly impressed with what my little bike can do!
  • 1 0
 Manufacturing in the automotive (motorcycle) industry requires minimum quality standards, cycling does not have to follow those standards.
Look at the price of a motocross bike the amount engineering you get for the $$ vs a bicycle. We are getting robbed!
  • 2 1
 I ride an ancient 2012 Yeti SB66 (bought end of the season in February 2013) that's never failed me due to any manufacturing problem. My complacency has been the only thing that's caused any issues. I had to do a shifter and a dropper post and that's it, no bearing failures, no cracks, creaks, or crap ever. I clean / lube my bike 95% of the time when I get home from riding. If it weren't for the fact 26" wheels are dead, I'd not be looking at a new bike.
  • 2 0
 26 ain't dead. Still my favorite wheel size. Then again, I only care about hitting massive jumps and jibbing.
  • 1 0
 @Jonahn1234: I wish my old carcass were able to send it, those days are past for me.
  • 1 0
 totally disagree that the more money you spend, the more reliability you get. Case in point E13 and XTR. Both should last longer than cheaper spec, but both dont. Because of a mixture of design faults and the inability to repair things that are pinned together with stupid tolerances.

The stuff thats replaced it was slightly heavier, half the price and lasted way longer.

Oh and did I mention E13 stuff is made of cheese?
  • 1 0
 The aftermarket E13 cassette has been by far the biggest headache on my ride over the last 2 years: the top section split in half one season and then the bottom aluminum section had a bunch of cogs just randomly shear right off the next. To their credit, they did warranty it both times but overall I lost about 2 or 3 months of riding due to it, which is a big deal up in Canada where we have a shorter window to ride in decent weather. (Also my only MTB due to budget and space)
  • 1 0
 Not counting broken spokes or flats, I've never had a component failure but I did have a turquoise-colored frame replaced due to a crack in the seattube. Oh, I did get mega fade on a set of Magura's first carbotexture brakes and wasn't too sad when that bike was stolen.
My beef is with maintenance. By far the most time I spend on maintenance is linked to the drivetrain. My #1 request is an acceptable chainguard that keeps splashes and mud off my chain, and perhaps derailer. An article on Cyclingtips showed that a chain has the capacity to last indefinitely. The actual service life and maintenance needed to extend it is 100% due to exposure. Somebody, please sell a nice chainguard.
  • 1 0
 This poll needs to ask the age of the bike being ridden and referred to. Imho if a part doesn't last 2-3 times it's warranty period, then it's a faulty part. I'm riding a 11 year old dh bike and largely remains stock. I expect anything I buy to last that long at least.
  • 2 0
 8000 people said that it was their drivetrain that failed, and 14000 people said they'd take a 2.2lb hit for perfect reliability. Sounds like at least 8000 people should be riding on a Pinion gearbox.
  • 1 0
 I have ran both sram gx and shimano slx, i have ran gx for 1 month and have already had to re-tune it,
gx has no functional cluch, weighs 300g and costs £110
slx has a easy to use functional clutch weights 16g more and is £30 cheaper
i also have had no problems with my slx derailiure and have ran it on downhill,
loam, bikepark, and jumps for over a year.
  • 3 0
 This is why you should buy a bike that people complain about its weight (within reason).
  • 3 0
 I have two sets of wheels for my DH bike and none of the 4 wheels are a complete set...
  • 2 0
 I just can't believe when I wrecked a rear wheel last summer on my new retail $6500 (Canadian dollars) bike I was told it was to expected because I bought the cheap version!
  • 2 0
 Back in the 90s you had to give the bike an overhaul after every ride and we’re lucky if something didn’t break every few months.
  • 1 1
 Shimano vs Sram, Shimanos Rear derailleurs are terrible for reliability.. then even get close to touching something an they break off(12spd system) but they do shift nicer than Sram. Can pay for top XTR and its still just as unreliable as the Cheap ass deore one.

had 2 from manf frame issues that were apparent when new
broke a hub axle recently but was hugely taken care of from the other side of the world. props to them for sure.

other than that i tend not to have any issues at all.
  • 1 0
 You know what to do then; cheap deore derailleur, nice xt(r) shifter. But yeah, shouldn't have to do that!
  • 1 0
 Thefaslife the bikes today are 100x better than before, the old day bikes were not safe and didn’t have much suspension travel todays bikes just need to be looked after more.
  • 4 0
 E13 rims- stay away from them!
  • 3 0
 E13, Raceface, spank, sunringle, they all have "really durable rims" but ex511 is pretty much the strongest I've seen for now
  • 1 2
 Yes, but you can bend them back to semi-original shape without cracks
  • 1 0
 A few years ago when I was getting back into biking I rode a £250 full sus shed with Shimano drivetrain for two years on double blacks and it was faultless not even a single puncture. Now my £150 SRAM mech is shit
  • 1 0
 Dt swiss are so good, by the time they brake they don't make the parts anymore .......case in point, i have an old hayes/dt rear hub, the axle broke, too old, can't find the part anymore....
  • 1 1
 Having ridden the Shore for 42 years I will say this: on average the trails today are not NEARLY as taxing on bikes as they use to be. Smoother trails today don't remotely stress a bike like it used to. I have not seen a broken frame in a long time on the trails. Moreover, riders today are not really "pushing it" like they did 20 years ago. Yah, I get the drop to flat is long gone but every drop today has a nice tranny on the other side. Moreover, the rapid change in bike technology and standards means a lot of things get early retirement before the "cracks" appear. I have stems from 30 years ago that most likely would be still used today if the standards were the same.

I honestly don't think the riding and riders today, in general, are really pushing the limits of bike stress they used to. I hear of parts wearing out (think aluminium gears with only 3 rings used, grinding a chain/front ring since so few use a bashguard anymore) but that is a given. Shimano shifters have always been the bastion of disposability since early times (except the top mount thumb shifters which never broke). I can't recall how many XT pods I have been through in the past. Tried to fix them? Sure? Any luck? No.

I wonder what the real failure rate/mechanical breakdown rate of motors are. And not like that is going to be cheap, either.
  • 1 1
 More of the "weight doesn't matter" garbage being driven by manufacturers so they can sell heavy expensive shit. If we are talking about real bicycles (not mopeds) with humans pedaling with half the power of your margarita blender, saying weight doesn't matter is bullshit.
  • 1 0
 @seb-stott Hey, I recognize the joke about "cheap, light, strong: pick two", now being just pick one now... I made that joke about the specialized ebike w/ the broken praxis crank arm. If that inspired you, I'm glad.
  • 1 0
 I love those Raceface Steel NW Cinch rings. Perhaps the sell less because the things take more of a beating on rocks and logs? Perhaps the fact that the Shi12 NW 30T has been out of stock on raceface.com for a bit?
  • 3 0
 Exactly why I ride a Chromag HT no issues besides the norm wear n tear
  • 2 2
 No issues with my 2010 hardrock specialized that I no longer own. No issue with my Marin Rift Zone 27.5 2 that i've owned for last 11 months. I do have steel bits, ie chainring, cassette, but dont mind.
  • 3 0
 Would be very interesting to see manufacturers' warranty data.
  • 3 1
 This article... While they try to pitch us freaking flimsy "redesigned" (aka, polished turd) presta valves for $50.
  • 2 0
 i build my bikes for reliability. for me it comes down to frame material choice and component selection.
  • 3 0
 The 3000g carbon frames I'm riding on XC trails are darn reliable.
  • 2 0
 Reverb retaining ring rusting out is a prime example of cost cutting. Old reverbs had a thick circlip that was fine.
  • 1 0
 My 2010 hardrock Pro was reliable as nails...but modern geo and components change...no issues with my 21 marin rift z2 27.5 and has been reliable over 11 months of ownership.
  • 1 0
 Had two sets of Sram brakes with stuck levers and leaking pistons, a reverb that leaked all its oil into the frame, a fork where the damper exploded and a lot of fast wear
  • 1 0
 Ah and a dt swiss 370 3-pawl hub exploded as well
  • 1 0
 Can we all just agree that roval aluminium rims are absolute trash? The needs to change and the blck dmnd casing is also trash
  • 1 0
 I'm riding a bunch of bikes, one of which is a 20 YO Iron Horse Warrior Comp with 9spd XT and a Fox Talas. No major issues if you lube the foam o rings in the forks.
  • 3 0
 One more reason for a good Hardtail.
  • 1 1
 How reliable are modern bikes? Couldn't tell you, all my bikes an parts are older than 6 months an therefore completely obsolete by 'modern standards'
He'll! Imm even rocking parts from 2020!!!
  • 1 0
 Stoopid fone
  • 2 2
 Unpopular opinion: Any bike part that is light doesn't belong on a mountain bike. Leave that stuff to the roadies that only ever cycle a mile to the nearest coffee shop and back or pro racers.
  • 1 0
 Hope. I just serviced my rear Pro 4. 5 years old, still going strong and no special tools needed. It was also enjoyable to do, which is important.
  • 1 0
 Cheap, light strong pick 2 hasn’t been around for a while now. Nothing is cheap anymore and light seems to be going out of the window s as bikers get heavier and heavier
  • 1 0
 My SRAM GX mech will not stay tuned. I ride 10 miles out into middle of nowhere and it starts jumping all over the place. Ever ride
  • 1 0
 Offroad commuting in UK persuaded me to move to a single speed. More reliable, much less frequent drivetrain replacement, and it cost about GBP25 total! Best commute ever...
  • 1 0
 So far dropper posts are most unreliable part, basically i change them every other year, next will be snapped RD, other than that bikes are quite reliable now
  • 1 0
 The float x2 on my essentially new enduro with less than ten relatively short fair weather rides is a noisy cavitated pile of junk already.
  • 1 0
 It seems confusing to me why maintenance costs so much, relative to the cost of the part, in particular for brakes and suspension...
  • 2 0
 where's the button for bottom bracket?
  • 3 0
 Hope
  • 3 0
 @chrod: Hope or Wheels Manufacturing. I have one of each, several bikes/years old both and smooth as butter
  • 3 0
 What brand? I'm going to go out in a limb here and guess SRAM. Their bb's are shit. Killed one on the first ride one time. It was a 25 mile muddy ride, but still totally unacceptable. Switched cranks out immediately to Shimano after that. Much better and even cheaper and easier to find. Can usually get a couple years on a Shimano bb.
  • 2 0
 @georgiamtbiker: RaceFace BB's are shit as well. Shimano is great bang for the buck.
  • 3 0
 Why do people have so many BB issues?
  • 3 2
 @noideamtber: they don't, it's rare. but the ones that do yell about it, a lot and loudly. just like creaking CSUs and "wandering bite point" bullshit.

For example, I've put many thousands of hard (I'm 100 kilos without gear and ride smashy) miles of New England jank (like you _need_ a bash-ring/guard, and my bashrings are all beat up) on various RaceFace BBs with no problems. But also had good results with Shimano BBs. Also never had a CSU creak through 5 different Fox CSUs (including a 150mm Float 32!!) in 10 years. YMMV, but some people forget that and just like to yell.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: it's not rare. I'd get through at least one SRAM GXP BB per year before switching to hope 4y ago...and it's still good. The SRAM ones just ate bearings. Know plenty others with similar experience, though not limited to SRAM BBs failing
  • 3 0
 Hope , is def the shizz
Two Hope cranksets w/hope BB 3-4yrs
Two Hope headsets 3-4yrs
Pro 2 hubs 6 yr’s+
Pro 4 hubs 3-4 yrs+
Tech 3 brakes 3-4 yrs +
still smooth as butter and easily serviced
Good stuff ain’t cheap.
Cheap stuff ain’t good. @chrod:
  • 1 0
 @Crankhed: hope stuff isn't even that expensive, IMO
  • 1 0
 Nope, and most of their component parts can be
purchased separately/individually which makes buying used another decent option Wink @Tambo:
  • 1 0
 @Crankhed: I think they make a point of keeping stock of spares for everything they've ever made...could be wrong. Certainly spares are generally easy to get!
  • 2 2
 That last questions is great. Based on current answers I’d expect a lot more gearbox driven bikes appearing on wish lists soon
  • 1 0
 I'd take the kg, but not alongside drag and issues shifting under load and even more £££. I want gearboxes to be a thing, but the derailleur is so much better still...if only what we had were made well so the pivots didn't go all baggy in a year of riding (already a but of slop when new!), etc.
  • 3 0
 I'm saving for Zerode Taniwha now, and I might have the money in 2 years. Something I don't like is the 3 year warranty. That kinda sucks. My bird have lifetime warranty and that's great, because I use it..
  • 2 0
 @Tambo: fair enough, hear why you’re saying. I ride a taniwha and don’t notice the drag, or the shifting under load. I’ve never shifted under load on my derailleur bikes either tho…kinda figure it’s bad for them. Pivots are fine on the zerode too eh…
I dunno…I’m biased, but after 3 or 4 years on a Taniwha I won’t go back to a traditional drivetrain. All that time spent fiddling, tuning, tweaking…I can’t be f*cked.
  • 1 0
 @m0nss7erKill: you won’t regret it, best riding decision I ever made. It’s expensive tho I hear ya. I found a secondhand frame with a broken in gearbox…really was a perfect deal.
  • 5 3
 I break a deriailuer every third ride
  • 27 0
 Good grief you broke it so hard it jumbled up all the letters!
  • 5 0
 Bro, do you even set limit screws and b-tension? LOL
  • 3 0
 Check your chain length in the biggest cog at bottom out.
  • 1 0
 shimano by chance?
  • 1 0
 Thats an easy fix
Just take two long rides instead of three lol
  • 2 0
 I actually find it kinda hard to get how people brake so much derailleurs and hangers. The only mech I broke was m7000, because it had alot of play and the spring was rusty and sticky. I have my bike for 4 years, I replaced one hanger because I got my dead-ish derailleur in the spokes just after I snapped spoke. It catches on the Snape's spoke and yea, that happened. 2nd hanger I got hit in the back by my colleague on the way to work. And I run my 3rd now. I check it every once in a while. Also have my 3rd derailleur on my bike. Bike came with 10spd, then I upgraded to 11 And now I run 12spd.
  • 2 0
 @focofox37: no point - they don't last long enough to bother lol
  • 1 0
 Git gud and avoid en rocks
  • 7 6
 Bikes have already gotten 3-4lb heavier and reliability hasn't changed. Do better.
  • 3 0
 The weight increase has mostly been due to bigger (and better) tires/wheels, but which one would you rather ride?

2010 Santa Cruz Carbon Nomad 26" (M): 30 lbs (XTR, Enve/King) $6900 MSRP
2021 Santa Cruz Carbon C Nomad 27.5" (M): 33 lbs (XT, RF/DT350) $6800 MSRP
  • 1 0
 @chrod: bump the 2010 up a couple of sizes and add an Angleset and I would rather take that! (I have an '09 and a '19- the '09 is still great and so much fun!)
  • 1 0
 I'd accept the 1 kg weight penalty for some things, but not others. Fork? Yes. Wheels? No.
  • 1 0
 OR you buy a Starling steel frame and the only thing you need to protect are the rocks you crush when you hit 'em :-)
  • 2 0
 I still ride a GT Ruckus 3.0 with Fox Talas-R fork...
  • 1 0
 Bring the Ruckus, bring the mother f'in rukus
  • 2 0
 Carbon cranks should have a special slot here
  • 1 0
 Weight wheenies probably get more experience with parts that aren't reliable, as riders that don't care about it.
  • 1 0
 Wheels and tires don't count. Sadly, they're consumables. I'm tired of breaking frames once a year.
  • 1 0
 I agree usually it is the rider not the bike, but working at a yeti dealer, some bike are just not that good...
  • 1 0
 Is it just me or did most of us just get called our if answering the last 2 honestly?
  • 2 0
 Hadley Hubs the most reliable hubs I have ever owned and made in America
  • 2 0
 Never ever had an issue with hub reliability. I've replaced bearings, but £5 for the new ones and half an hour of work for another 5y of riding doesn't fuss me at all
  • 1 0
 @Tambo: agree, even cheap formulas last , never had issues with hubs as such, just bearing replacement
  • 1 0
 Reliability is only an issue if you ride a Rocky with sram and rockshox parts
  • 3 0
 Reverb, am I right????
  • 1 0
 I actually had pretty positive experience with the reverb. When we don't count the 2 really dead that I bought, and the "not working in cold" issue. But now I use Putoline HPX R 2.5 and it works fine even In -7°c
  • 1 3
 So not impressed with my $900 Devinci. Not 2 months in to owning it I went over a drop, taco'd both rims. The same drop I'd hit 1000 times before on a $120 bike from Canadian Tire without issue. Derailleur hanger has been bent twice now just biking through snow, Supercycle no hangar no problem. Its a stupid design if you ask me. Put a bash cage over the derailleur no need for a hangar. My $120 Supercycle seems a whole lot stronger than the Devinci too, like its made more solid. You'd think at $500 more I'd be more impressed and it wouldnt have broke so easily.
  • 1 0
 A old mechanic told me some good advice years ago.."ride aggressively light"..
  • 1 0
 what about saving wasted old saving parts for a while, you will always have a friend looking for the screw taht you have.
  • 1 0
 The bike I built with my own hands has been incredibly reliable. Exo tires on the other hand..
  • 1 1
 I think a lot frame failure is due to shock not setup with too much sag. If you are hucking big drops to flat, setting up with 30% is probably not going to cut the mustard.
  • 1 0
 I've never been more impressed by the durability in bikes and parts. Price and availability on the other hand....
  • 3 1
 Not enough for the price
  • 1 0
 some couldn't afford a bike at all
  • 2 0
 Orange Bikes
  • 1 0
 Chuffing fox x2, about as reliable as Boris not being at a garden party.
  • 1 0
 Have to tighten that axle bud
  • 1 0
 @seb-stott always writes the best articles, another gem here.
  • 2 1
 SRAM and their plastic, non serviceable parts
  • 2 0
 Fox, looking at you.
  • 1 0
 Just ride a NICOLAI and be a dick about it
  • 1 0
 Wheels and derailleurs. Always rider error though.
  • 1 0
 I rode slower in the 90's and a lot easier on equipment than now.
  • 1 0
 Single speed steel frame, steel drive train + reliability and long life.
  • 1 0
 Ex471 rims cheap and reliable
  • 1 0
 I would assume anyone riding for more than 10 years is very satisfied.
  • 1 0
 MTB are designed to fail. Parts subscription service!!!!
  • 1 0
 Other=carbon cranks
  • 1 0
 Better bearings please.
  • 2 4
 MTBs have gotten better in almost every way...except for chain and cassette wear. Modern chains just stretch so damn quick.
  • 6 1
 All empirical data indicates chains get better with every generation.
  • 3 0
 Or maybe you ride more now that everything else isn’t breaking every other ride? Because actual testing shows modern chains have incredible wear life.
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