Review: POC's New Otocon Full Face Helmet Is Packed With Tech

Mar 22, 2022 at 3:38
by Seb Stott  

The brand-new POC Otocon is an enduro-style full-face helmet in the same category as the Troy Lee Stage or Specialized Gambit. POC say it's "developed for the precise needs of enduro riders," but as with all of these lightweight full-face helmets, it's a good choice for any ride where you want more protection than an open-face but still want/need to pedal.

Like most helmets in this category, it meets the same lab-based safety standards as any downhill helmet. That doesn't necessarily mean it's just as safe as the heavier options made purely for descending, but in the case of the Otocon the relatively generous padding and a suite of safety features make it feel a little more reassuring when getting out of your depth than some of its ultra-light rivals.

POC Otocon Details

• DH-certified lightweight full-face helmet (ASTM F1952 )
• 'Race Lock' Adjustment mechanism
• Removable cheek pads and grill for hot weather
• Mips Integra liner
• twICEme NFC Medical ID & RECCO Reflector for emergency response
• Weight (size L): 860 g, actual
• Sizes: S, M, L
• Price: $270-350 USD
pocsports.com

The twICEme symbol indicates the position of the integrated, battery-free hardware. This can be scanned with the NFC antenna of your smartphone to upload or download medical information.

SAFETY AND FEATURES

At 860g in its heaviest configuration (tested), it's not the absolute lightest of the lightweight full-faces, but it's packed with safety features. As you'd expect, it passes the ASTM F1952 safety standard for downhill helmets, but it also passes the new Dutch standard for Speed E-bikes (which offer assistance up to 45 km/h) called NTA8776, which is nice to know even if you don't intend to wear it on a derestricted e-bike.

The top-spec Otocon Race Mips gets a Mips Integra liner to reduce twisting forces in a crash; twICEme NFC Medical ID which can store your medical information and emergency contact details digitally on the helmet, which first responders can use by scanning it with a smartphone; RECCO Reflector which could make it easier for search and rescue teams to find you in the event of an accident (it's usually used in avalanche recovery), and a patented breakaway peak designed to protect your neck in a crash. Under the skin, there's an aramid layer under the polycarbonate outer shell, which is claimed to improve structural stability and penetration protection. Though not exactly a safety feature, it also comes with a clip-on transparent peak extender that offers extra splash protection for the foulest conditions - the perfect compliment to your wet-weather dungarees.

The standard Otocon (as opposed to the Otocon Race Mips) does without Mips Integra liner, twICEme medical ID, the aramid layer and the wet weather peak, but meets all the same safety testing standards. It costs $80 less and, according to POC, is about 70g lighter too.

The thumbwheel adjusts the fit much like with many open face helmets...
... it tensions the cradle inside the helmet.

FIT & ADJUSTMENTS

The Otocon is available in three sizes: S (51-54 cm), M (55-58 cm) and L (59-62 cm). Two sets of cheek pads are included to adjust the fit, along with what POC calls the 'Race Lock' system, which tensions an internal cradle to adjust the fit (similar to most open-face helmets) via an integrated thumbwheel at the back of the helmet. The chin strap uses a conventional plastic side-squeeze buckle.

To improve ventilation, or if you want to eat a banana in the most enduro-bro way possible, it is possible to remove the plastic grill on the chin-bar and pop it in your pocket for climbing. This is very fiddly and takes a lot of force, and to be honest I don't see much point. Similarly, POC suggests the cheek pads are easily removable for sweaty climbs between stages and that the helmet remains secure without them. But while all that is true, re-installing them is fiddly and probably isn't something you want to be fussing with just before a race stage.

The Otocon is available in a wide array of colours. POC chose to send me the purple version, presumably because it offers the greatest potential for insightful observations in the comments section.

WEIGHT

Of course, weight is important for an enduro full-face, but it's not as simple as a single headline number. Below are some claimed weights from POC; as you'd expect, larger sizes are heavier and the more feature-packed Race MIPS version weighs around 70 grams more. POC sent me the Otocon Race Mips in a size large, which weighed 860g - ten more than claimed. For comparison, a Troy Lee Stage helmet in its largest size weighs 768g.

Otocon Race Mips - XS = 590g, S = 680 g, M = 750g, L = 850g
Otocon - XS = 530g, S = 620gr, M = 680g, L = 780g

PRICE & AVAILABILITY

Otocon Race MIPS: $350 USD / $420 CAD / €329.95 / £300

Otocon: $270 USD / $310 CAD / €269.95 / £240

POC say the Otocon will be available from the end of March and the Otocon Race Mips will be available later in April online and in selected stores.



RIDE IMPRESSIONS

My head circumference is at the upper limit of the range POC recommends for the size large; as a result, I found it a little tight around my jaw even with the thinner cheek pads, but not to the point of being uncomfortable. Adjusting the fit with the thumbwheel is easy and effective, and I often increased the tightness for rough descents and loosened it off a click or two when climbing. My only complaint with fit would be that I found it sits a little low over my brow at the front and pushes some goggles down towards my nose slightly. It feels like there is more pressure on the crown of my head and less pressure further towards the forehead, making the helmet sit a touch low at the front. This could well be an issue just for me, though. I've had similar problems with a couple of helmets in the past, but not with other helmets in this category.

Ventilation is pretty impressive. You can feel airflow around your face and especially around the temples once moving with a bit of speed, but inevitably it does start to get sweaty when the speeds drop off on the steepest hills, mostly because there's a bit more padding in direct contact with your head than with something like a Troy Lee Stage and Fox Proframe. It's tough to say how the ventilation compares to either of those, both of which I've ridden a lot in the past, because it's impossible to ride them both in exactly the same conditions at the same time. But with my feet to the fire, I'd say the other two have a slight edge when it comes to staying cool even with the POC's grill removed. The slight extra weight (about 90g compared to the Stage) is noticeable too, particularly in a big compression or berm.

The field of view is excellent, with no hint of claustrophobia. There is just enough room to store goggles under the peak if that's your thing, but it restricts ventilation and field of view. For a long climb, it's better to store goggles on the back of the lid.

When descending at speed, including flat-out sections in the bike park, it always feels secure and solid, with plenty of padding against your head. Whereas some lightweight full-faces can feel overly airy at times, which can feel less reassuring when hurtling towards a jump face, it's easy to forget the Otocal isn't a full-fat downhill helmet.



Pros

+ Fully-certified, safe feeling yet pedal-friendly helmet
+ Packed with physical and electronic safety features
+ Well-ventilated (if not the coolest when climbing)

Cons

- There are lighter and airier alternatives
- Not cheap



Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesThe Otocon Race MIPS isn't the most impressive in terms of its price or weight when compared to other enduro lids, nor is it the most ventilated. But that's perhaps because it's designed to sit a little closer to the downhill end of the "enduro" spectrum. It's full of tech designed to improve safety, from the aramid reinforcement and Mips system to the digital safety features. Does that make it any safer than other DH-certified helmets in the real world? That's tough to say, but it certainly offers peace of mind when combined with the well-padded, secure feel on the trail. The internal shape didn't fit perfectly with my head shape, but that's no criticism of the helmet itself, just a reminder of why it's always a good idea to try on a helmet before buying. Seb Stott



137 Comments

  • 72 2
 "The internal shape didn't fit perfectly with my head shape, but that's no criticism of the helmet itself, just a reminder of why it's always a good idea to try on a helmet before buying"
Great point Seb. When I purchased a fullface helmet, I read all major reviews and user experiences and then ordered the three best ones. None of them fitted properly... I then went to a big German bicycle store (because I want to try them on and most Dutch stores have maybe 1 or 2 fullface options and usually the same ones), where exactly 1 model fitted properly. It was also the most expensive and hot one, meant for pure downhill riding. I ride both up and down, so went to three other stores before finding a helmet that was suitable for me.
Long story short: helmet reviews provide valuable insights, but everything is dependent on fit, and it's not an option to accept bad fit just for other improvements.
  • 29 1
 Wait, people buy helmets without trying them on?
That’s a cardinal sin of helmet purchasing, unless you just really enjoy returning things.
  • 14 0
 @nickfranko: I have to buy my helmets without trying them on because I live in Nebraska and there is nowhere for me to try before I buy. I haven't returned any of them either, I try to buy ones that come with a second set of pads to adjust the fit.
  • 12 0
 @nickfranko: agreed but it can be extremely difficult to actually get a chance to try a helmet on these days. Last summer I was trying to buy one and finding anything in stock locally was impossible.
  • 4 0
 ^^

This
  • 20 2
 @LenaLuthorMTB: Do you even need a helmet in Nebraska? Wink
  • 3 14
flag raisinbrandt (Mar 23, 2022 at 9:14) (Below Threshold)
  • 2 0
 @LenaLuthorMTB: Ouch. I forgot to add that caveat in my post about the people in the middle of nowhere, but it was too late.
I tried on around 15 helmets before I found one that fit like a glove. It was a pain, and I always recommend going to an LBS if you have one.
  • 3 2
 @LenaLuthorMTB: other words you just get lucky or have no clue what a proper fitting/ comfortable one feels like.

FYI, most mail order companies like Competitive Cyclist and Jenson USA, will happily return items with a free return label; credit you or a full refund + free shipping of the next item
  • 4 0
 @nickfranko: I've seen someone kicked out of motorcycle lessons because he bought a helmet that was so large, it could be spun on his head (I'm not joking...). He refused to buy another one, because this was a great deal on an Arai racing helmet and his MotoGP hero used the same one. The same guy already bought a second hand 1000cc sportsbike (GSX1000 or R1 I believe), while he still had to first get his beginner's license (25 kW power limit). Some people are just begging for a Darwin Award...
  • 4 0
 @Mac1987: original mips. Three sizes too big.
  • 2 0
 @Mac1987: did you see the guy that was racing, wasn’t expecting the guy in front of him to decelerate so hard, he crashed and hit the ground, and his helmet popped off?

Helmet sizing is super important, and the strap alone won’t keep it on, which some people don’t realize.
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: fair point but i travel a fair bit and i go fast and take chances
  • 1 0
 @nickfranko: our lbs carries road bikes only
  • 5 0
 Never met a Giro yet that wasn't a perfect fit first time....
  • 2 0
 @landscapeben: funny enough, it was actually a Giro (Giro Feature) that ended up fitting me. However, I did try on multiple Giro models prior to the Giro Feature.
  • 1 0
 @landscapeben: small sidenote: '...for your head shape'. I've tried all Giro fullface helmets and none fitted properly
  • 1 1
 @Mac1987: I guess I probably do have the basic model head shape rather than the upgraded model. But all of my friends also bought Giro and found the same as me. For most people it seems they fit real good.
  • 3 0
 @nickfranko: its also worth noting that if you are helmet shopping, first option is obviously to go to the shop and try it on. but one thing i've noticed that i don't do at shops that i do if i got the helmet delivered is try different pads and cage retention points. at the shop the helmet needs to fit right just by adjusting the turny thing at the back.

if id tried my TLD stage on at the shop i'd have been like "nope doesnt fit not comfortable" but because i gambled and got it online i messed around with the pads until it was super comfortable, now its great!

moral of the story is just because a helmet doesnt fit immediately, doesnt mean it cant be adjusted to fit in a way that doesnt compromise its safety.
  • 1 0
 @ididntknowhatomakemyusername: That sounds horrible
  • 2 0
 @nickfranko: To be fair if I find a helmet that works for my head and it is still being produced when it is time for a new one, I just try to find a deal on what I already like then.
  • 28 0
 Genuine question: Are there even any first responder units using RECCO locators outside winter season? I have serious doubts about the usefulness of RECCO in bike helmets. And I'm saying this as a RECCO-equipped POC helmet owner.
  • 26 0
 I used to do SAR in the Colorado Rockies. RECCO is used by flight crews in both the winter and summer. RECCO has been incorrectly reduced to usefulness in avalanche recovery, but it's just as effective in finding a downed biker in heavily wooded terrain.
  • 8 0
 I’ll bet non-winter RECCO prevalence is within 1% of winter RECCO prevalence and they’re both 0%.
  • 1 20
flag pacobolo (Mar 23, 2022 at 8:17) (Below Threshold)
 Personally I wouldn’t want a helmet with recco in avalanche terrain. Given that a helmet might get ripped off during a big slide, I want my rescuers digging me out not my helmet.
  • 13 0
 @owl-X: You'd be surprised. Almost every reputable winter apparel company started putting RECCO reflectors in the garments about 4 years ago. So whether it's someone up from Denver for the weekend, or a texan who landed their private jet at Eagle Regional and purchased the latest Arctery'x jacket for their three runs down a groomer at Vail that year, their jacket/pants will have a reflector sewn into them.

You find it in backpacks for summer backpacking and the RECCO sensor works in tandem with thermal imaging, so flight crews will pick up on a reflected signal very easily while using more effective summer search techniques. It's a win-win.
  • 12 0
 @pacobolo: chin strap
  • 1 1
 @fullendurbro: Why is it practically useless in avalanche recovery?
  • 7 1
 @vid1998: I believe you misunderstood what I was saying. I said people have reduced its usefulness to avalanche recovery, but it has a wider range of application. It's great for avalanche recovery among other things.
  • 7 1
 @vid1998: In an avalanche rescue situation you have a low number of minutes to be rescued before suffocating which in reality means that it's your companions and any other people who happen to be close by who could save the you. By the time the professional rescuers with Recco detectors get on scene the chances are that anyone who hasn't already been found is dead.
  • 31 0
 @korev: It's important to note the difference between recovery and rescue. RECCO reflectors are for avalanche recovery. Avalanche beacons are for rescue.
  • 3 0
 @fullendurbro: Thanks for the clarification.
  • 1 0
 @fullendurbro: Just saw I misread usefulness as useless. Thanks.
  • 1 0
 @fullendurbro: Wow, that's great, thanks for the insight!
  • 3 0
 @pacobolo: RECCO Implants! Shoot it into your arm. I'll work on a prototype tomorrow
  • 7 2
 @fullendurbro: surprise me, please. Not talking about which outerwear manufacturers are in on the pseudo safety scam, but who's actually using the antennas and rescuing people?

RECCO: Recovering Every Cold Corpse Occasionally
  • 8 0
 @owl-X: Not sure why you're so hostile about RECCO, but a quick google search can answer that question for you if you're interested in learning.

And yes, RECCO has recovered many bodies, which is great. Recovering a body is never a happy day, but it's much easier to tell families that we can give them a body to bury, rather than telling them their loved one's mangled corpse might be findable in the spring, or could be lost to the mountain forever.
  • 1 0
 @fullendurbro: I was helping with a recovery at a popular Washington ski resort several years ago. Ended up locating family member's body in the spring thankfully.
The patroller I talked to there was frustrated about how finnicky RECCO was to use and I got the impression he thought it wasn't a great. He showed me how to use the device with the practice chip and we practiced in an open lot. Can agree, was very finnicky.

After that I really agree with @owl-X about the "pseudo safety scam". Nothing keeps you safer than a trip plan and a good head on your shoulders. @owl-X s acronym seems pretty accurate to me, but just based on my anecdote. Maybe things were different with your SAR experience in the rockies.
  • 5 0
 @fullendurbro: I think their point is valid to be honest. From googling it, it appears that Recco has saved a total of four lives ever. That's about the same number I save every day, by not cooking for four other people.
  • 1 0
 @fullendurbro: I don't cut the RECCO reflectors out of my snow gear (like I do with powder skirts--a truly evil invention), but I've considered it. And yeah I've googled altavista'd AND I asked Jeeves a few times about RECCO's actual factual real life practicals...and it just is not used to make anyone safer. Zero point zero on snow, can't even come up with a situation where it'd work with bikes...cell phones satellite phones Dutch city coat collar airbags cushcore I can't even think of a product that's less worthwhile, safety-wise. I mean man it's just not a thing. Avy beacons barely end up being worth the collective dollars, in my estimation...

I have a way bigger problem with POC's insistence on printing their helmets' ingredients on the outside (what the f*ck even is that you strange Swedes?), and I'm not gonna refuse to wear a POC helmet if it has a RECCO reflector glued into it, but I'm definitely going to question anyone who claims it's safer.

Our tools are only as good as the user. NOBODY's using this thing (and, again, I struggle to even compose a hypothetical situation where a RECCO reflector helps a mountain biker).

It's the damn QR code of safety gear, they've been trying to make fetch happen for like 30 years with this clonk!

Dude how many times have you been stoked to find a lighter in your crumpled up jacket when snow season rolls around but it's just the stupid RECCO reflector? Ugh.

Still and yet: surprise me. I'm ready to be wrong about RECCO.

NOTE: still very down with the flying scotsman reeco wilson, the most handsome man in DH
  • 1 0
 @fullendurbro: just wanna say that my POC Tectal fits very well and the NFC chip in this Octomom is great and at the risk of being lumped in with any internet sov cit incel weirdos I have indeed found it funny that POC has finally started telling me that it stands for "piece of cake" after a few years of rich white nerds plastered with "POC" gear
  • 2 0
 @owl-X: I feel like something like the Spot or Garmin Inreach systems have far more potential if you are serious about being located or emergency extracted in the backcountry. I wouldn't go quite as far as you in my contempt for the RECCO but have generally never considered them a positive factor in a purchase decision as I don't really see them as that useful. Nicely designed internal pockets to quick stash some skins and comfy collar will sell me a jacket far quicker. With biking I really struggle to see how these will be that useful other than another marketing acronym on the box to help you associate it with safety.
  • 2 0
 @snl1200: Fair. I'm not anti-RECCO other than a completely unfounded feeling it may have taken opportunity away from a better system we'll never hear about. But given the response time, RECCO makes no sense for snow (I've heard an argument that the Alps have more helicopters more often, and maybe it makes more sense there?)...but as for backcountry rescues, phones and the satellite systems you mention are way more effective. If all RECCO is is body retrieval, well it ain't worth even one time that lil fun dip spoon bangs into my leg or tricks me into thinking I found a lighter. Of course, YMMV depending on your religion and/or family relationships. You'd better be in all red and sharing detailed route plans too, if that's the case...

Bear in mind that I truly think avy beacons are a bit of a racket too, and I've been riding solo (on weed) during the whole demmy. I may not have a rational risk management profile.

But seriously let's get to the real issue: what's your stance on powder skirts?
  • 1 0
 @snl1200: and i've been thoroughly entertaining myself all afternoon envisioning the scenario where RECCO saves me anything on a bike. The most plausible so far: I'm riding solo while talking on some in-helmet bluetooth speaker cell phone system...maybe it's a livestream youtuber situation, yeah, so there's someone who knows I'm out there as I go OTB, knocked out of consciousness AND cell service, and this other person is able to contact the RECCO-antenna-equipped helicopter crew that's on call in the valley or whatever, and they're like "yeah dude has RECCO and he's on XYZ trails but we're not sure how" and yeah so they come find me with that.

Is this all and Outside+ reverso false flag operation to get us to point out the garbatious nature of a RECCO rescue so they can show the GPS emergency feature on Trailforks to be superior? Cuz it is. Scandalous duplicity for real...

It's the people in the end. My main man Bulldog sat on the side of that goddamn Canadian mountain for FIVE HOURS with a broken goddamn back, they knew where was the whole time eff a RECCO amirite? Come find me with a French antenna looking for a chance to stand there and do nothing?

Bro.
  • 2 0
 @owl-X: Avy beacons definitely aren't a racket, they've saved a looooot of lives and I know a number of people they've saved personally.

Recco on the other hand is only good for avalanche recovery if you've got a way to survive under snow for at least 45 minutes (eg Avalung or something, or you just get lucky and your head is in a pocket of air or somehow). Even in the Alps where helicopters are frequently very nearby and able to scramble in a few minutes, getting even the best prepped people loaded, flying and searching is not a sub 15 minute job. And I agree, what good is it for a biker really? If you get hurt but managed to call for help somehow and someone got out in a heli AND thought to use a Recco scanner "just in case"... well you've already told them where you are? How else would they even know to come looking for you? What are you going to be buried under on a bike, that people could plausibly call for help knowing your location to within 100m but not be able to find you? Just adding features for the hell of it at this point.
  • 1 0
 @vid1998: It's only good to find your body. If you go off piste, you should be aiming to be with three at a minimum, all have transceivers, shovels, probes and if you have the cash, an airbag. Additionally, you should be trained to use your transceiver. In an avalanche, unless you hit a rock and die instantly, the recovery survival rate within the first 15 minutes is 95%. After that, it drops dramatically to 50%. After 45 minutes, there's little hope you'd be dug out alive. The Recco systems and equipment needed to retrieve someone makes it basically impossible to find someone within 45 minutes. I've had avalanche training and unfortunately been dug out once, thanks to my transceiver and trained partners. The worst thing is that the Recco system gives uninformed skiers a false sense of security. It should be forbidden from being advertised as something that can save your life in an avalanche.
  • 2 0
 @owl-X: Pro powder skirts and beacons. Where I live beacons in the hands of skilled users have saved the lives of a number of people I know and care about. That one is not even an arguing point for me. They save lives and it's my responsibility to have one and know how to use it as the lives I'm most responsible for are my friends. I, knock on wood, have yet to have to dig out a friend and hope I never have to but will always have one and regularly practice the skills. Of course a beacon is not going to make up for poor planning and a lack of understanding of snow science and avi risk. I believe powder skirts have saved my tender upper body from rogue snow and debris on a number of unintentional gymnastics routines due to poor skills and ability haha.
  • 26 0
 Purple.
  • 13 0
 rain?
  • 2 1
 Purple...
  • 18 0
 @dstroud70: Haze
  • 1 0
 Purple is so hot in the ski industry right now, makes sense that POC is coming to the table with a purple option
  • 9 0
 Kind of love it, kind of hate it. I would try it on in the store, then buy the black one. Ha!
  • 2 0
 @FuzzyL: They always make me chuckle. Color of the year, for what? (Important distinction to avoid creative catastrophe)
  • 2 0
 @Gregmurray50:
Agreed. Norco Sight, Knolly Fugitive, Revel Rascal....
  • 3 0
 ham is my favorite color
  • 1 0
 @nixgame22: rocky mountain altitude kind of
  • 3 0
 helmet...

c'mon no other Brits getting in on the Finbarr Saunders action here?
  • 2 0
 @danfromme: fnarr fnarr.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: nurple
  • 1 0
 @commental: and Herman Gelmet
  • 1 0
 …barney
  • 1 0
 I just built up a purple Revel Rascal. My mates might stop calling me if I add this helmet to the mix. There's a limit...
  • 9 0
 “ That doesn't necessarily mean it's just as safe as the heavier options made purely for descending,”

Equally it doesn’t mean it will be worse. There is no scientific evidence that a heavier helmet will give better protection. There is however scientific evidence from motorcycling that shows lighter helmets are better at protecting the head because the neck is better able to stop the head hitting the ground as hard in the first place. This is because the force you hit the ground with is mass x acceleration. If you make the helmets lighter then there is less force to deal with
  • 7 0
 "...if you want to eat a banana in the most enduro-bro way possible..."

Is that a bro-nana in your pocket or are you just happy to see me?
  • 8 0
 also key if you want to look like a lego policeman.
  • 1 0
 ...or Barney
  • 5 0
 I find that loosening the tension adjuster is rather sufficient for extra ventilation on the climbs. In my case, with an IXS Trigger helmet.
  • 12 0
 Absolutely increases airflow a lot. I also added a sticked to my bars saying: “Shock open - Helmet shut?” - Makes the first 100m of the trail way more fun Big Grin
  • 3 0
 He mentioned that the helmet pushed his goggles down on to his nose.. I have this problem with almost every helmet I have owned to the point I pretty much have given up on wearing goggles. I currently have a Proframe, and the goggles push down over my nose..
Does anyone know a helmet that is better to prevent this problem??
  • 2 0
 I wear a size small, and have the same problem. Currently riding a TLD D2 (I know...), ended up taking an angle grinder to the shell over the forehead to make more room. Also tried three different goggles. Angle grinder adaptation worked fairly well (took maybe 1.5" off the rim: don't try this at home kids!), but the first three goggles I tried (100% accuri, Bell Decender x2), made no difference. What did make a big difference was switching back to Oakley googles. Seriously recommend the Airbrake MX if you have this problem. Completely solved it for me. May even consider buying a new fullface to replace my frankenhelmet I have going now
  • 2 0
 I have a bigger than average nose and found out that's its googles fault. Most googles have too shallow nose opening which pushes them up. Just put them on in front of a mirror and notice were are your eyes in relation to the lens. I have found Giro goggles to have the best fit for me.
  • 2 0
 @manybrouce: Thanks, I'll check them out!
  • 5 0
 Funny they use a Dutch safety standard while nobody in the Netherlands wears a helmet (in traffic)
  • 3 0
 It's quite logical, since the standard you reference is for speed pedelecs, for which helmet usage is mandatory in the Netherlands.
  • 8 2
 Purple 'helmet', seriously ... no one?
  • 4 0
 damn dude you're right. gimme your venmo you deserve compensation
  • 3 0
 I would wear purple helmet.
But then again, I wear a baby unicorn and rainbow "we're all gonna die" t-shirt

However, the orange/black one is nice
  • 2 0
 I have a POC Tectal Race Spin helmet and it fits like a glove. Does anyone know if the fit is the same across the range of different helmets? Will this fit as well as my Tectal and be as comfy?

Obviously i need to try one, but would be interested to know if they run the same shape across all their helmets.
  • 2 0
 In my experience, POC does change fit a bit depending on the model. I have had helmets that fit great from them and helmets that have been less than ideal. I would definitely want to try this on.
  • 1 0
 @adrennan: cool, cheers for the feedback. i suspected i was being hopeful that they would all fit the same size/shape head.
  • 4 0
 Barney! I would have released a diff. colour for testing but that’s just me
  • 4 0
 Hey Seb, Barney called and said he's happy you like it but please give his helmet back.
  • 1 0
 POC only has the EPP on the back of the head and the chin piece? Otherwise it is single density EPS? In 2022 from a company that puts safety first???

POC continues to de-innovate their helmets. Sad for a company that gave us the groundbreaking Cortex DH MIPS...
  • 4 0
 Seb looking slick with the matchy matchy.
  • 2 0
 And this just happens to randomly appear while I'm thinking for a suitable full face for my purple Spire... Google mind-reading capabilities are just frightening!
  • 2 0
 I dig the colour and appearance of the helmet. Thanks for listing the actual sizes in numbers finally. Big Grin
  • 3 0
 I love you, you love me...."Barney Purple" gonna fly off the shelves
  • 3 0
 It's just perfect. Modern look, but not silly-futuristic. Love it!
  • 2 0
 Probably the best looking Poc helmet. They usually look like you are trying to storm a space station
  • 1 0
 So much tech, just packed with tech, more tech than you could ever imagine. Low tech, hi tech, medium tech, super tech. Tech.
  • 1 0
 Awesome, this will replace my old Tectal. I can't wait for the end of April.
  • 2 0
 I wonder if they all are equipped with a sesame seed
  • 1 0
 Make it green with reflective yellow visors and they could make more money selling a special edition to fanatical gamers
  • 2 0
 Edit: they apparently already sell an olive green one that has the whole Master Chief vibe going, so they just need the yellow reflective visors then
  • 3 0
 @Mac1987: I came here to type MASTER CHIEF!!
  • 5 7
 Lightweight enduro helmets are great for beginners looking for more protection and confidence, but I don't think these have any place in a proper enduro race. With enduro tracks becoming gnarlier and gnarlier and locations being remote with long distances between rangers, every semi-talented enduro rider should be wearing a downhill full face.
  • 3 0
 Do they conform to the same standards or do the full blown DH helmets have extra ones? The down side is geesh all that cloth or whatever padding etc is so damn hot as it encases your head.
  • 3 0
 Is this not a re-run of the old DH vs Moto helmet debate? A lighter, more crushable/deformable helmet (eg a lighter, enduro one) SHOULD be better for you for all crashes up until the point where it is overwhelmed and fails.
  • 2 1
 @Svinyard: The Bell Super DH is far advanced in safety compared to this POC helmet. It does weigh a few hundred grams more. But that weight is in EPS and EPP, not fabric and padding. It is not a hot helmet. This POC looks better the the Bell Super Dh though Smile

Now my Bell Carbon Full 9? That is a hot mother f $#$%# er
  • 1 1
 @Svinyard: They conform to the same standards, but it's no secret that the "standards" are complete crap and were developed long before Amaurry Pierron and the like were sending 29er downhill bikes down insane tracks at deadly speeds. A helmet engineered to the minimum standard is not a helmet I would want to wear. Almost every helmet (including this one) exceed the minimum requirements to meet the standard, but DH helmets are multiple times stronger.

@AyJayDoubleyou Yeah, I think that pretty much sums it up. The weight of a helmet creates a squared effect on the velocity at which your head will impact an object, so light is better until you really need more substantial materials. But I would argue that anyone racing an enduro at a professional level is going to crash in a major way. There's a point in the "incident yielding crash" graph where you become statistically more likely to only have a major crash.
  • 1 0
 How you gonna say it’s not as safe as another helmet that passed the same tests?
  • 1 0
 Have you ever pushed on the front of a Fox Proframe? It barely qualifies as face protection…
  • 1 0
 @DHhack: I have not.

Perhaps if these certifications are horseshit the real article should be about that. If they’re just Better Business Bureau JD Power Car and Driver Car of the Year 9 out of Ten Dentists Fake Yelp payola they shouldn’t be mentioned at all—except to blow them up.
Credulous hacks reporting drug seizures while completely ignoring the efficacy of the drug war type shit—is that what’s up with helmet certifications?
If so, eff any mention of safety until that’s cleared up!

I do know modern cars got way safer with crumple zones, which is counter-intuitive—so maybe a softer chin bar is safer? I dunno.
  • 1 0
 @owl-X: it’s not the certs, they are just a minimum requirement. 3rd party full face helmet testing is the real issue. Hopefully Virginia Tech will do some, but until then it’s pretty much find the best fit and hope you don’t need it.
  • 2 0
 @DHhack: okay. I got a new one and it fits way better than my last. No wiggle no jiggle.

Stay up.
  • 2 0
 Anyone else click this article thinking it was called Octon?
  • 2 0
 That looks like it came from a McDonalds happy meal. Grimace got robbed.
  • 1 2
 Only a Broped rider would do anything other than park laps with this on their head.

Safety on a bike is always a compromise, and trying to climb anything with this is also dangerous, unless you like getting heatstroke……
  • 2 1
 Aren't helmets the most overpriced NECESSITY?
  • 3 0
 What price would you put on keeping your brain safe?
  • 1 0
 @EvilBun: It must cost them around $50 to make that helmet (after R&D) then they sell it for $350
  • 1 0
 There are sturdy and safe relatively inexpensive helmets. This is a premium product. I'm glad they make nicer helmets as well as an affordable version, same as bikes.
  • 1 0
 @mtb-thetown: FWIW, I've owned a Tectal Race Spin and currently have a Kortal MIPS - their was a slight but noticeable deviation between the new Kortal from the Tectal, and I'm wondering if we're to assume another alteration to the dome shape of the helmet with this one... I know MIPS (i guess won a lawsuit against POC forcing them to use MIPS on the Kortal - maybe that is why it fits a bit different from the egg-sealant Tectal. Regardless, I'm in the market for a new full face and would consider another poc if I didn't have to look at all that foam. This helmet looks like the low end POC helmets with the premium price tag
  • 1 0
 @Dheieknens: Material cost is always a misnomer on value for money. If you think it's not worth the money buy a different brand that you think is.
  • 1 0
 looks like alien throwaway tech
  • 2 0
 Barney called and....
  • 2 0
 Snake! SNAAAAKE!!!
  • 1 0
 how did he find a matching jacket?
  • 1 0
 They probably sent it too
  • 1 0
 The size of that mans big, purple helmet.. impressive.
  • 1 0
 I love the look of POC helmets but they are just so damn narrow.
  • 1 4
 No one cares that it is “packed with tech” when it is not a comfortable helmet to wear. Come on. Make comfortable, safe helmets that also happen to have nifty design or tech advantages… so obvious…
  • 7 0
 everyones head is a dif shape
  • 5 0
 @NoahJ: Yup, for example... mine is a perfect cube.
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: Ibuy asian fit snow helmets because my head is circular
  • 1 3
 You have to appreciate a company that makes such nice stuff they can sell it with (despite) a big "POC" on the side.

I guess that applies to KIA autos...
  • 1 0
 Does it have Netflix?
  • 4 5
 Newest DECEPTICON since OMNICRON.
  • 2 0
 Otocons, roll out!
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