First Ride: Canyon & Liteville Debut 'KIS' Self-Centering Steering Technoloy - Tech Week 2023

Oct 21, 2022 at 9:38
by Seb Stott  

This demonstrator had the spring system on the outside to see it working, but for production, it's fully internal.

Syntace, Liteville and Canyon are together launching a concept they call KIS (Keep It Stable), which uses a spring to "stabilise" the bike's steering by applying a carefully designed force which acts to pull the front wheel towards the straight-ahead position. This is designed to counter a force called wheel flop, which acts to pull the steering away from centre. We've all experienced this on a slack bike at low speeds, where the handlebars feel like they're steering on their own accord away from straight ahead, leading to wandering steering. The system is also claimed to make the steering less twitchy, more weighted and more predictable.


How does it work?

One thing to make clear is that this is not a steering damper. Those have been tried before and seem to be mostly not appropriate for MTBs, where speeds are slow and rapid changes in direction are required. This is a steering spring, which exerts a torque on the steering assembly (the front wheel, fork and cockpit) which depends on the steering angle - the angle of the front wheel from the straight-ahead position. The further the steering assembly is turned away from straight ahead, the higher the spring force (torque) is acting to pull it back towards the centre.

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It does this with a pair of small springs anchored in the top tube, which connect to the fork steerer via a pair of kevlar bands connected to a cam wheel clamped to the steerer tube. As the bars are turned to one side, the springs are stretched, creating a force in the opposite direction. The geometry of the kevlar bands and the cam are designed to give the torque curve below, where the restoring torque increases quickly as the steering angle moves away from straight ahead towards about 15 degrees, then increases more gradually to make it easier to negotiate tight turns without feeling restricted.


This torque is designed to counteract the force created by a phenomenon called wheel flop. If you stand your bike upright with the steering off-centre, the handlebars will naturally turn away from straight ahead, towards a steering angle of 90 degrees. This is because, as the steering angle increases, the bike frame (and with it the rider) drops towards the ground - by over 10 mm in the case of a slack bike.

To picture this, imagine a bike with a 0-degree head angle (a horizontal fork). Now as you turn the handlebars away from straight ahead towards 90 degrees, the head tube would drop towards the ground by the radius of the wheel. With a vertical head angle, the head tube wouldn't drop at all. So the slacker the bike's head angle, the more the head tube will dip as the bike steers.

This drop in head tube height creates a force which acts to pull the steering away from straight ahead. This is a destabilising force because (within the range of normal steering angles) the further the steering moves away from straight ahead the more force acts to pull it even further away.

KIS designer, Jo Klieber, with a graph of head tube height against steering angle for a few different bike geometries. The slacker the head angle, the more steeply the height drops off with increasing steering angle and so the higher the torque on the steering.

The KIS system is designed to compensate for this, making the steering assembly more stable and less prone to pulling to one side.

At the risk of complicating things too much, we also have to talk about trail. This is the distance by which the tire's contact patch sits (or "trails") behind the steering axis (the line about which the steering assembly rotates as you steer).

Just like a trailer being towed behind a car, the contact patch is effectively towed behind the steering axis, which causes it to naturally fall into line behind it. This creates a self-centring force which counteracts the wheel flop force, and overcomes it at higher speeds. This is why the seeing on slack bikes feels stable at high speeds but unstable "wandering" at low speeds. The effect of the KIS system is to provide an additional centring force which operates at all speeds, making the steering less unstable at low speeds and even more stable at high speeds.
Offset

The wheel flop force is dependent on the amount of weight on the front wheel, so the system offers an adjustment mechanism to tailor the amount of counter-force it provides to suit rider weight and personal preference. This is done with a slider which changes the preload on the springs.

The slider on the top tube adjusts the torque the system provides.

In terms of practicalities, Canyon's system weighs a claimed 110 g, and Liteville's a little less. It requires no maintenance and uses a regular fork which can be removed or replaced by undoing the bolt on the cam, which in Canyon's case is accessed via a port on the left side of the frame. At the front of the head tube is a stop screw which prevents the cam ring from turning past 90 degrees. If the handlebars are forced beyond this angle (in a crash, for example) the cam ring will slip on the steerer. When this happens the system needs to be re-set (like straightening a stem) or else the mechanism will pull the steering towards one side.


For now, Canyon are launching just one model with the KIS system, the Spectral CF 8. Canyon say they chose this model because it's their best-selling bike, and they wanted it to be available to the largest number of buyers. The system has been tested on downhill bikes, and even saw action at the Fort William World Cup under Mark Wallace, though only in practice. Canyon say they plan to "roll out K.I.S. across many other models in the future." Liteville have one ebike with KIS integrated: the 301 CE EMTB.

Pricing for the standard Spectral CF 8 is £4599 (4599 EUR) and the K.I.S. equipped bike is £4999 (4999 EUR). It's due to land in the USA in Spring 2023. You can't retrofit KIS to another bike but the system can be removed and blanking plates will be available next year.




Ride Impressions

I was able to try out the system with a day of uplift-assisted riding on the Canyon Spectral, followed by a ride on the Liteville 301 eMTB the following day.

The first thing I did was carve some turns in the parking lot. Though it feels odd at first, it's very easy to adapt to the system in this case. But riding with no hands on the bars is very difficult. Normally when you lean to the left without touching the bar, the steering assembly turns to the left due to a combination of its own weight, wheel flop and gyroscopic forces, and this steering causes the wheels to move back under the rider's centre of gravity, correcting the lean and keeping you upright. But with KIS, the steering stays closer to straight ahead, so the bike is prone to falling over (known as capsizing). So while the steering may be more stable in terms of self-centring, this doesn't necessarily make the bike more stable in the sense of remaining upright.

But what about on the trail?


Again, it's easy to adapt to the system on the whole, but there were times when something felt a little odd. I found myself running wide in turns at times, especially with the system's tension turned to the max. It's not that I couldn't turn the steering to the angle I needed to make the turn (the force is quite modest), but the subtle counter-steering needed to initiate a turn required some recalibration. In order to turn left, you first have to steer to the right (counter-steer) so the bike becomes unbalanced and leans to the left; only then can you steer the bike to the left without falling over. I think with KIS engaged (especially on the max setting), I wasn't counter-steering enough and so not leaning enough, so I had to brake in the turn or adjust my steering mid-turn to get around.

Of course, this is something you get used to the more you ride it, but when I switched back and forth between the system's maximum, middle and minimum torque settings on the Spectral, I consistently preferred the minimum setting. I found it easier to make tight corners and stay balanced. Even on high-speed rocky straights, where I expected the bike to feel more surefooted and easier to handle with KIS, I sometimes found my weight in the wrong place and felt slightly less balanced with the maximum preload. I think the constant micro-corrections needed to maintain balance were muted, making it slightly harder to feel poised on top of the balance point.


Similarly, on the LIteville eMTB, I rode some awkward turns and narrow bench-cut trails and felt less able to correct and stay perfectly balanced with the system on when compared to off (the Liteville demonstrator could be switched completely off). When I came to some exposed switchbacks towards the end of the ride I kept the system switched off because that felt safer to me.


Don't get me wrong, the downsides are subtle and easy to overcome with practice. There are some upsides too in that the steering feels more weighted and settled, especially on low-speed uphill switchbacks where there is less wheel flop, but I noticed the downsides more than the upsides. Jo said it takes a long time to fully get used to the system and I'm sure with more time on it I'd adapt to the different forces required at the handlebar to ride smoothly. But the dilemma with testing any new technology is that once you get used to it, you've become unfamiliar with riding anything else. For example, I once cycle-toured for a week on a road bike with heavy panniers; when I took them off, I remember the bike feeling horribly twitchy for the first minute or so. That doesn't mean the handling with paniers was better, just that I preferred what I had become used to.

And while the system reduces the rider input required in some situations, like tight, slow switchbacks, it takes more effort to stay balanced at speed or throw the bike into tight turns. I'm sure that if I'd ridden with KIS for a long time (months or years), a bike without it would feel weird. But it's not clear to me that the system is making the bike easier to handle, as opposed to just different.

Fabien Barel described the system tying the front and rear of the bike together, making it easier to correct front-wheel drifts. He might have a point, and it will be interesting to see if any Canyon athletes use it for racing next season. But from my (brief) time on the KIS system, the benefit is hard to discern.






Tech Week 2023 is a chance to get up to speed on the latest mountain bike components, apparel, and accessories. Click here to view all of the related content.




503 Comments

  • 1060 13
 Solution to a problem no one had.
  • 224 75
 That is not true, we are selling a considerable number of E-Enduros to people who ride them around like an SUV. They are distracted by the slack HT angles and would love more stability in low-speed use with a bike made for high speeds. So there is a market for this, its just not for real mountainbikers.
  • 171 2
 Still waiting for the ebike which rides around alone and uploads to Strava itsself (or more likely Komoot for euro noobs) afterwards.
  • 17 3
 Actually it‘s something I „dislike“ on my 62,5 degree HA ship, I mean the wheel flop. But yes you‘re getting used to it and the downsides of this feature are obvious like no hands on the bar while eating ice cream.
  • 248 0
 Have you never come back from a ride, full of disappointment caused by all the Wheel Flops you've had in those flowy uphill switchback sections? So bad, no downhill could ever make up for it?

Me neither, but I guess I find the term Wheel Flop funny and am hoping to hear some rich dude on a Megatower say it soon.
  • 57 1
 extendable handlebars, now self centring handlebars, I never knew I had it so bad!
  • 226 7
 Wheel flop? f*ckINGNWHEELFLOP!?!?!!!! Is this an early April Fools joke? I feel like the dumbing down here is on another level!
The parallel 'logic' here would be putting a handle on a skateboard for people who can't take the time to learn how to do the activity without having their hand held or actually investing their energy to learn a skill intuitively, sans instant gratification.
f*ck off already, cunce.
  • 106 0
 I think it pairs nicely with ABS MTB brakes : for the people who buy 10k+ E-Bikes but don't know how to ride it. Probably the same kind of persons that drive Q7 SUVs to ski resorts without snow tires.
  • 86 0
 #SUCKMYWHEELFLOP
  • 8 0
 @Chridel: well then they should buy an e-trail xc bike like a focus thron instead of an e-enduro bike.
  • 7 0
 My bike has a 63deg HA and I don't experience this wheelflop as they call it. Maybe I'm not climbing steep enough, or riding too fast? I can imagine it may occur if people put too little weight on the front wheel. If they remain seated on a steep climb, their (high) center of mass puts more weight over the rear tire contact patch and less on the front tire one. Just putting your weight in the right place again should sort that. So, just stand up and move your body forwards and you'll be good.
  • 38 0
 @Chridel: working in a bike shop in Switzerland I can confirm... The expensive E fully is the new everyday bike.. like a SUV. Stupid and comfortable
  • 4 0
 And this is cheating for whip.
  • 76 15
 Your very wrong. This technology would be able to help disabled people like myself ride with more confidence. I have Asperger's and Dyspraxia and find balancing and coordination hard. When I learnt to ride in the late 80's it was a very long and painful experience but my dad came up with a very crude version of this tech using string and a pulley. If this tech was integrated into certain kids/adults bikes then it would drastically improve the lives of many disabled people that have balance and coordination issues.
  • 1 1
 I think you are right!! =)))
  • 5 0
 @Chridel: I call them balance bikers, after watching them shred those berms, sat down on their arse !
  • 14 0
 @captainclunkz: you have an awesome old man
  • 9 1
 @CRAFTY-P: This is the most Aussie reply to a pinkbike comment I think I have ever seen
  • 9 3
 KIS?

More like K.I.S.S, am I right?
  • 9 0
 @Chridel: Sounds like you're selling people the wrong bike for their needs.
  • 9 1
 Suddenly headset routed cables seems not so bad! Seriously, this has to be a ploy to move the Overton window to sell more headset routed cables. This idea is so dumb that its the only explanation. Not only is this completely unnecessary, it actually makes the bike more dangerous for beginning riders. Rake, trail, and offset have been honed by decades of bicycle design so that bikes are self-righting. Removing this critical design will make a beginner less stable at low speed and high speed.
  • 3 1
 @JohSch: just select "Van Der Poel" mode with the SRAM blip.
  • 1 1
 @vinay: your bike is a hardtail with no dropper and 26" front wheel and your terrain is flat, otherwise you'd have more sympathy for this terrible problem afflicting tens of thousands of other intellectual passenger riders
  • 3 0
 @ceecee: Well, I'd feel no sympathy whatsoever. I'm pretty heartless like that. Mind you though that altitude is measured with respect to sea level. Now that the sea level is rising, people thinking they were living at high altitude suddenly don't live quite that high anymore. Which also implies our dykes are getting higher and higher. By no means flat.
  • 4 1
 This is essential utility bike technology. Which is why most utility bikes already have simpler, lighter versions of them.
  • 9 2
 I’m gonna break the Pink Bike and with hold judgement until I try it. One of my most picky things about bike handling is the “lean in”, how tight the bike naturally turns for a specific lean angle. If this leaves that alone but improves the tech climbing then we’re OK. If it messes with the lean in then we’re most definitely not OK.
  • 7 0
 @Muscovir: if they were following KISS then this article wouldn’t exist . I’m just mad there aren’t any electronics or hydraulics somehow working with this.
  • 3 0
 @Apfelsauce: Utility bikes have this for when you park the bike so the kickstand works appropriately, esp. when you have a basket with stuff in it. This system on a commuter bike makes the bike more dangerous.
  • 3 1
 @PsBmx: Definitely! But that's what they want! But after telling the first 50 guys that a hardtail with mudguards and a rack would be the better fit, without any kind of awareness, you stop telling them. It's not that they hurt themselves, just our eyes.
  • 4 0
 @captainclunkz: I agree with you but you have a special riding style because a special condition, it fits and will will works for you perfectly 100% with you. But when the other people that doesn't need something like this (because a lack of knowledge, skills and drive to learn), you see that the other peoples are just trying to find a gadget to solve a problem that they already doesn't have or never will be because doing loops in a fire road doesn't show any danger. I would congratulate you for riding a bike and enjoying it since many years even when learning it was a little more difficult than many people, proud of you dude. Also to your father because even in that time, like 40 years ago he had the vision and engineering to understand a problem in the bike and bring a solution for you to make it more enjoyable, he must be a wizard at some point!... keep riding buddy !!!!
  • 26 0
 @CRAFTY-P:

"putting a handle on a skateboard for people who can't take the time to learn how to do the activity"

Congrats you just invented the razor scooter.
  • 4 0
 Best selling model soon to be worst?
  • 3 0
 @vinay: I have noticed it on my Dreadnought if I put the stack too high. I run a half spacer with an i9 a35 stem set at -5 and it's completely fine, but if I raise it up to ride park/downhill I find it wonders big time when climbing. I attribute this more to a sizing aspect of the bike, that ultimately has to do with rider position, rather than slack.
  • 4 0
 @captainclunkz: That is actually a really cool application of this.
  • 1 0
 @Matturalistic: But if you stand up and shift your weight forwards, does the wandering persist or does it stabilize? I think that mountainbikes are supposed to work on such a wide variety of slopes, it can't all work equally well with the rider on the saddle. But just like one might want to shift the hips rearwards when riding a steep downslope (and especially when trying to decelerate there), one might also want to shift the hips forwards on a steep upslope (and especially when trying to accelerate).
  • 4 0
 @CRAFTY-P: having not yet had much coffee today, I was also momentarily excited thinking it was April 1st and spring ng was already here.

Basically just puts these brands on my "do not buy" list.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: good in theory, but I can only stand for so long.
  • 2 0
 @CRAFTY-P: you’ve heard of scooters right?

Just poking for fun
  • 1 0
 @ICKYBOD: Fair enough. As @ceecee already mentioned, my country is flat and my rides are short. Usually well below two hours and I may only stand for half an hour between breaks. I prefer to push hard and short and take short breaks in between than go steady for longer sections. I can imagine marathon riders will want to sit down on their long Transalp climbs and then indeed for them a super long front center (in part because of a slack head angle) won't work unless the rear center is super long too. But then I can imagine this spring system will be a hassle too. What if they system shifts and you constantly have to correct only to go straight ahead for the next few hours?
  • 6 0
 Might save my whips I can't being back
  • 2 1
 @Chridel: may it is not how this system works, but I think having a bike able to correct itself after maybe you land a jump a bit wrong can be good
  • 2 2
 @vinay: you’ve experienced it, it’s not exactly something you “tune out” with body position, etc. In theory, weighting the front would make it more prevalent, or more noticeable.
We all ride relatively slack bikes up hills, and around switchbacks, you experience everytime, you’re just not recognizing it.
Can be helpful, I sometimes use that wheel flop to “climb” way way around a tight switchback by cranking on the bars while pedaling
  • 8 0
 @captainclunkz: sweet, thanks for providing an alternative view point. I think we all get caught up in our own little worlds that we forget about the adaptability for others.
  • 8 0
 What everyone seems to be missing is that this device removes a bikes ability to self-right, which is a feature built into bicycles to make them safer. This device will make any bicycle less safe and harder to ride for beginners, adaptive riders, and even seasoned bikers.
  • 3 0
 @Chridel: That is exactly what i thought when i read the press release. Sports equipment gets fitted with features for childrens bicyles or granny bikes to make it usable for people who have no interest in the sport but think it looks cool.
  • 3 0
 @Ttimer: Childrens bike and granny bikes do not have this. If they did they would be harder to ride and less safe for kids and grannies.
  • 1 0
 @Muscovir: my thoughts exactly
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: I mean @captainclunkz there did state that as an adaptive rider, this would have been a be eg]fit to him.
Long and short, it’s a feature available on a bike, not mandatory for you, myself or anyone else to purchase. Doesn’t seem like a feature I need or want, but I’m not making the choices for everyone.

Speed adaptive steering damper, that might be interesting. Loved the steering damper on my dirt bike, not on my mtb
  • 4 0
 I’m curious the cost of R&D for this. Home many engineers does it take to solve an imaginary problem haha.

My father is a Stanford Grad with a masters in Engineering. He’s academically brilliant, but I have seen him try assemble a small pre made doll house for my daughter, it’s no different than asking my dog do try and do it.
  • 20 1
 Actually.....I don't think that anyone has responded with something very important.

TOM CRUISE OF ALL PEOPLE KNOWS THAT THIS SYSTEM IS NOT NEEDED AT ALL....

And why? Because of Top Gun (well...the F16). Modern fighter jet are MADE to be unstable; they literally cannot fly in a stable mode without deliberate input from computer systems. The idea is simple. An unstable plane is a manoeuvrable plane. You can flick it to the right and it just goes...WHAM...because it is ready to fall in any direction and the pilot's and computer's input just exploits that 'flop' and over it goes, immediately. I have always considered wheel flop to be exactly this.The bikes now - with a 63 static angle like the COTIC BfE Max - just instantly turn to the left or right with a relaxation of control and an input to the side you wish to turn to. They are like an F16. And this explains the review experience above. You don't have to fight the tendency of the bike to go straight, since it inherently wants to turn. When turning, you are more giving an input to stop the inherent turn than force the bike to turn. Wheel flop is therefore an ASSET for a responsive, manouverable and ultimately safer bike.

Some here have said that this is a solution to a problem which does not exist. I would go further. It actually takes out a considerable advantage of current low, low and slack bikes. It is REGRESSIVE.

After all, Brandon S and Brett R have hardly wandered around saying '...I feel my bikes oversteer all the time, I mean they are really holding us back....' far from it, the performance envelope has just expanded in a mind-blowing way as bike geometry has developed in the last 10 years.
  • 5 0
 I think a steering damper would be more useful--we can all go back to steeper head angles and reduce one of the contributors to wheel flop in the first place.
  • 14 0
 Actually, low speed stabilizers have been used for years, they are called "training wheels."
  • 2 1
 @onawalk: I would bet money that @captainclunkz would have a harder time riding a "floppy" bike at low speeds with this device than without.
  • 4 1
 @Apfelsauce: yeah I had a 70 pound cargo ebike with a spring up there...its main benefit was while I was stopped, straddling the bike while spun around and trying to hand some thing to the two kids on the back. There was definitely a battle going on between the front wheel flopping and all the weight out over (and behind) the rear axle: there was pretty much no weight over the front wheel, and depending on the angle of the ground, the wind, time constraints, and how much the kids were wiggling, a flop could cause a fakie G-turn type thing where we'd death pirouette into the dirt if I wasn't careful.
That bike had these springs on it. I dunno. It also had some of the least comfortable cornering characteristics (that it shared with another heavy ass cargo ebike a friend had) --it would understeer at speed, like you could feel the front tire pushing away from you. Sounds like the Canyon in this article on trail...not into it, don't want it.
Maybe if I didn't already have decades of (shittily) turning bikes in my past, maybe this'd be for me. But man, I know wheel flop: it happens when I'm pedaling a DH bike over to Crank it Up and them. It means I'm going too slow. Gimme all the flop you got there, it's well worth the tradeoff for being able to ram into rocks like a dipshit later on. When your bike is choppered out you can go faster.
I can totally see it on the cargo ebike, but why are these weirdos putting it on a ripping trail bike? What're these Canyoneers even doing? What's next? You gonna let MoiMoi go oh wait

I'm imagining those springs banging around in the top tube all day too...reminds me of those butterfly exercise things we had in the basement--five springs lined up like guitar strings? Nobody ever used them, but everyone got pinched in the springs. They had that sound. That sound lives inside these bikes.

But yeah put them on the cargo bike sure that's fine, that bike rode so weird already, it's not gonna hurt...

love you MoiMoi
  • 7 0
 @Chridel: There is only a market for this because people are buying the wrong tool because the industry isnt making what the riders actually need, and riders are buying "cool"

Riese and Muller Delite/Homage are full suspension E-SUV's with steep head angles that handle great as city/trekking bikes...because that's what they are... need more of those bikes and less of this trash on actual mountainbikes
  • 7 0
 Does no one remember this:
www.bikemag.com/blog/hopey_steering_damper_review

AM I that old???

And why are we bringing Tom Cruise into this?
  • 1 0
 @stepf: comment gold medal!
  • 1 0
 @CRAFTY-P: Henry has a new account?
  • 1 0
 @JohSch: and to be able to program it so your personal best times weren't too suspicious to your friends
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: Yeah, maybe I am not good at recognizing it. I can imagine if you'd lean back to much (or sit in the saddle) on a steep climb, the front may loose traction and wanders off towards a less steep direction. Is that what it is or am I way off?
  • 3 1
 K.I.S. my a$$
  • 1 0
 @CRAFTY-P "A handle on a skateboard" your imagination has been rewarded, it's been done.
  • 3 0
 @vercorin1: I agree. When I bought my current bike I tried it in both 29er and mullet configurations. It was better in mullet because the bike 'fell' into the turns better - wheel flop meant that the bike didn't want to remain upright as much.
I can see that it may suit some riders for adaptability purposes, but not one for me.
  • 5 13
flag two2pedal (Oct 25, 2022 at 12:12) (Below Threshold)
 Not true. The problem was created by these MTB engineers successfully convincing the masses that slack, low, and long is king. We learned fifty years ago that fork extensions on StingRays sucked in reality just like todays "progressive" geometry does. Just like all progressive thinking, everything they touch, they royally screw up.
  • 5 0
 @Chridel: already devices out there for this
www.hopey.org/product-info.php
  • 7 0
 @two2pedal: It's more the marketing than the engineers tho- let's be real Slack, Low and Long IS king ....on very steep rocky trails

but yeah it's totally terrible on grampa's full suspension comfort cruiser that occasionally *might* go down a fireroad which he bought mostly to keep the potholes from hurting his back on neighborhood streets.

I swear if another XC rider tells me an Orbea's 66degrees is not "slack enough" for their XC stuff because they read a review testing on steep things they'll never ride, I'll scream
  • 2 0
 @CRAFTY-P: handlebars on skateboard is a scooter!
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez, @XC-Only: I've been using a Vicsoset for the past couple years. Took a ride to get used to it, now bikes without a steering damping feel very "busy".

@ReformedRoadie, @ArcticBeast: Nice to have people around here who remember things like the Hopey damper! Would be interested to try one.
  • 2 0
 @dontcoast: there are tons of Riese und Müller riding around here. But a lot of the people want a Brand which stands for racing and mountainbiking, even if they never ride a trail..
  • 1 0
 @JohSch: A self-steering and driving eBike! This is a great engineering problem that only complicates the bike. How about a self-centering external steering damper?
  • 2 2
 @hamncheez: not saying you’re right, or wrong here, and I’m going to assume you didn’t read @captainclunkz comment, but your audacity to completely discount his personal opinion and experiences is pretty wild. Applause to you sir for being the definition of self righteous.
  • 1 0
 @Chridel: yes indeed it's true and sad lol - hence why my comment included "they're buying cool" and blaming the marketing departement.
  • 2 0
 @vercorin1: haybro maverick flew the f18

i haven't seen the new one yet though

your slopestyle bike reference also seems clunky. those bikes are the least changed in the cycling universe over the last decade.

but I dig the typing styles!
  • 2 0
 @onawalk: what he describes and what this is are not congruent
  • 1 0
 @R-M-R: Ya, steering damping and a preloaded steering aren't going to feel the same haha
  • 2 0
 @captainclunkz: that is a good point although Seb thought it actually made it harder to balance.
  • 2 1
 @hamncheez: you have absolutely no idea, as his description of what he had was incredibly vague at best. You made an assumption, and possibly you’re correct, but it doesn’t change the fact that you completely discounted his opinion and experiences to suit your preconceived notions, about a product you’ve never tried.
  • 3 0
 @two2pedal: You're insane!
  • 1 0
 @mr-moose: my thoughts would be to use it on specific bike's for autistic/disabled individual's. These types of bike's aren't usually long, low and slack and use contemporary geometry. The only way to find out is to either buy one or make my own.
  • 3 0
 @CRAFTY-P: This deserves a up vote just for the use of the word cunce. Very well done.
  • 1 0
 @two2pedal: I think you are forgetting about the grim donut.
  • 1 0
 @Ranger92: yep. And look where that got us, man...
  • 1 0
 @kingbike2: I see you have eyes and perceptiveness, my friend. Ha ha
  • 1 0
 @fingles: it's all about the loopholes, bruv
  • 4 0
 I am saving my money for the autopilot mountain bike, I want to be able to read pinkbike comments on my phone while my bike bikes.
  • 2 0
 @captainclunkz: Hear, Hear! I have friends that would greatly benefit from this as their arms (and resulting strength) were formed asymmetrically at birth. This modification would make their riding more stable and confidence inspiring. Increased access and opportunity is a good thing.
  • 6 0
 And you thought bikes were gonna get lighter. Surprise suckers. We're gonna put weight and mechanical stuff in your head tube.

And you're gonna pay extra for it so you won't be the only dude with a 35lb trail bike with tubeless tires, tons of sealant, tire inserts, 4 piston brakes with 200mm rotors and 5 different adjustments at the brake lever and 2 more at the caliper & we're gonna stuff everything from cables to gears to a flashlight inside your bike.

Oh...and then we're gonna tell you the only way to be happy sf to shove batteries inside a Bosch drill powered moped that looks like your bike swallowed a linebacker from the University of Georgia's schlong.
  • 1 0
 @vercorin1: And riding MC on a closed road course is why these things work. Another example of taking good tech to wrong party.
  • 1 0
 BuTT Cream is best
  • 3 0
 @blowmyfuse: I consider this to be great writing.
  • 2 1
 You can build this yourself with a couple of bungees and a zip tie for a grand total of $2.87 from Home Depot.
  • 1 0
 @Chridel: just sell those people the bike they really need.
Problem solved.
  • 1 0
 @Rollminister: Mate that is true here!
  • 1 0
 @Chridel: then these customers clearly bought the wrong bike and should get a city e-bike...
  • 2 0
 @Charlotroy: Tell that the majority of german emtb customers...
  • 2 1
 @hamncheez: this does nothing to legitimize any of your arguments.
This isn’t new, how do you think we have been riding sport bikes for decades
  • 1 1
 Fat out of shape Broped riders have this problem....
  • 4 2
 @captainclunkz: who the f#@k is downvoting this. You just gave a specific market that would benefit from an innovation that would make biking more accessible to more riders.
Jesus people, i don't think i want or need this either but that doesn't mean its bad if someone else does.
  • 1 1
 you shit with that ass
  • 1 0
 @owl-X: ummm…. Maverick flew an F-14 Tomcat
  • 2 0
 @Chridel: what happens when one spring wears out faster than the other and then your steering is pulling in one direction?
  • 3 0
 @poundsand: order a new matched set for a few hundred plus install
  • 2 0
 @Chridel: If you can't ride a bike straight on a MTB trail, you can't ride a mt bike.
  • 1 0
 @Rageingdh: no way! when he did that upside down flip off move??? (spoiler alert) I'm sorry, great Xenu, I have let you down
  • 1 1
 @gossman: super cool,
I can only assume you ride a single speed, fully rigid bike, with canti brakes, and repacking your your hubs weekly……don’t $hit on others simply cause it doesn’t fit your version of what mountain biking is. There’s room for everyone, and all their wacky innovations.
For the record, doesn’t seem to make sense for me, but I’ve never tried it, and maybe it’s as good as modern geo on bikes
  • 1 0
 It's not about solving a "problem." If it makes the bike ride better then it's good. Whether or not it does that though is the question
  • 2 0
 @onawalk: There is a difference between innovation and senseless cash grab that makes bikes less stable
  • 2 0
 @Chridel: so basically they bought the wrong bike then? And now they should buy a new wrong bike with a device that solves their wrong decision? LoL
  • 1 0
 a 400 usd "solution", hahaha!
  • 1 0
 @KennyWatson: this is just keeping me from buying canyons now.
  • 1 0
 @camcoz69: But once you go back to a normal bike your screwed when you have a bad whip, its like learning to bunny hop with clipless pedals, just dosent help, you gotta learn without them.
  • 1 0
 @ReformedRoadie: Idk, i guess he has something to do with bikes that correct the steering themselves.
  • 1 1
 @CRAFTY-P: Imagine after people hate on it so much then try it, and realize it was actually super helpful and then all the bikes of all brands start adding them. that would be hilarious.
  • 1 0
 @CRAFTY-P: best hashtag ever
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: That's what I ride lift service, but my other trail bike is different...
  • 166 1
 Dude this is amazing! April fools early and some next level shit
  • 23 1
 Those were my exact thoughts as well. This product seems like a bad joke.
  • 3 0
 Feels like in spring already the winter was a blur this year...
  • 9 0
 Even if this isn't a joke, think of the opportunities that this product presents for pranking your poor riding buddy who decides to try it. Remember the weighted telephone from The Office?
  • 3 0
 I actually had to check the date as I read this…
  • 1 0
 My local trail system has a 3 mile fire road climb to start. Sometimes I fidget with something and want to ride no-handed for a couple secs to fix something and the combo of riding slow, uphill, and no-handed just doesn't work because of wheel flop.
Does this really need to be fixed? Not on my bike.
  • 3 4
 The sad thing is, there is a real use case for this - motorcycles have steering stabilizers that are essentially hydraulic dampers. Very popular for track racing, where you want a quick turning bike but want to avoid tank slappers, and also supermoto bikes, where the conversion from dirt bike wheels to 17 inch street rims reduces the geometric trail and makes the steering twitchy. I can see something like this being used on steeper head angle trail/xc bikes to stabilize the front over chatter

But of course, with bike industry being where all the bottom barrel engineers go to work, these guys made it all wrong with springs instead of dampers.
  • 20 1
 @8a71b4: my man this isn't a steering damper. It's a flopperstopper. Hit the showers and get some sleep.
  • 5 0
 @owl-X: "Flopperstopper". The rest of this comment section can go home now.
  • 103 0
 If it ain't coming with headset routed cables, I ain't buying.
  • 5 0
 Also my first thought: But can I route my cables through it?
  • 100 1
 Create a problem, sell a solution. Big Grin
  • 19 0
 Just cinch down your stem bolt. ta-da - no wheel flop!
  • 9 6
 Welcome to the world of business! Where your wheels are too small, your head angle is too steep while your seat is not steep enough and your handlebars not self-centering is now abominable we've decided. What's that - you're still riding a bike with a 760mm wide bars? What are you, some kind of psychopath? Think of the children for goodness sake.
  • 61 0
 How come nobody noticed the biggest benefit yet?
This system looks like it prohibits cable routing through stem and headset. Winner!
  • 29 0
 Don't worry, they will find a way
  • 9 0
 No-one has mentioned one of the biggest drawbacks yet: you can't ride no-handed! How am I supposed to adjust my helmet and zip up/unzip my jacket whilst riding?
  • 3 0
 How could it be positive for overall balance on the bike if riding without your hands is impossible with this system on? Sounds like a hack to me
  • 38 0
 Perfect for my daily influencer post while I ride the new IMBA #uphillflow climb trail. I love the outdours, i just wish my chinese stocks weren’t doing that bad now
  • 1 0
 Dude you joke but the idiot trailbuilders near me are plowing my local singletrack and doing just this. Turning everything into a flow trail minus the rhythm sections and berms...
  • 37 1
 Now you can preload your bar spins.

A spring to pull the handlebar straight is fairly common on commuter bikes where you have a crate on the front rack or a kid on a steerer mounted child seat. This helps to keep the bars from rotating when the bike is on a kickstand. One common system is to have a lock on the headset, the other is to have a spring between fork and downtube. That's a single spring though. Maybe this one is more advanced in a way though it also seems more vulnerable too if one spring becomes stiffer than the other one (through overstretching in a crash or an accidental bar spin).
  • 48 0
 wait for the electronic version. As soon as you let go of the bars mid-air, a small electric motor spins the bars up to 8,000 rpm, allowing far more barspins than normal and a small amount of helicopter-like lift so you get more air. Emil johansson is rumored to be testing it for joyride. At least 6 metres of brake cable length is needed
  • 2 0
 It mentions in the article that it if your bars turn more than 90deg the cam will (by design) slip on the steerer to avoid damaging anything.

The downside to that is you then have to reset it, so I can imagine nobody will be racing this setup. Quite a few EWS guys mention having crashes in a stage, trying to straighten up their stem again and having to deal with it being off for the rest of the stage, so having that PLUS the KIS effectively pulling your steering at the same time would be balls.
  • 2 0
 @mattg95: Can you imagine programmable electronic bar motors that would do the barspin then stop it in exactly the right place? People might actually buy that...
  • 10 0
 @mattg95: Nyquist did it! (minus the RPM required for lift) www.youtube.com/watch?v=nh-QyvRXlVg
  • 3 0
 @mtbracken: ^ worth watching Nyquist's video Smile
  • 2 0
 @CleanZine: surprised there isn’t a knock block type thing going on to prevent that
  • 1 0
 @CleanZine: good point. I think.
  • 2 0
 @mtbracken: thank you for this!
  • 2 0
 @somebody-else: Just checked enduro-mtb.com/en. According to them, the system blocks the steerer at 90deg.
  • 22 0
 Why?
It seems to me that if you need to spend significant time on the system to get used to it, perhaps you would be better spending the same amount of time getting used to dealing with a slight tendancy to wheel flop at low speeds.

Other than the comment from Barel, it feels like this is aimed at less experienced riders to help them ride slack bikes at low speeds more comfortably. Perhaps it would be better to offer bikes with less agressive geometry to these riders instead? But I suppose that means greater tooling costs for two sets of frame geometry, when this can just be added at little cost and increase the profit margins.

Anyway, no thanks.
  • 5 0
 you could invest the time to get used to it in core-muscle training whick REALLY supports your riding
  • 4 0
 Non EWS Geometry is not cool, furthermore riders would have to admit that they are way slower than Jack Moir -not gonna happen.
  • 9 1
 @vhdh666: Wait wait wait. You want people who ride eBikes to...just get stronger?
  • 1 0
 "Other than the comment from Barel"

Most front wheel washouts are from oversteering a front wheel drift so I can see that but what of the downsides

I can go from the 65 degree HTA on my AM bike to my 70 degree cross bike with no problem but to add something like this to the fleet would be inviting a crash.
  • 4 0
 @RobinLaidlaw " if you need to spend significant time on the system to get used to it, perhaps you would be better spending the same amount of time getting used to dealing with a slight tendancy to wheel flop at low speeds."

Absolutely. I have a manual transmission car with a hill-holder. It is a bug for me, not a feature. So many years of cars acting one way suddenly boom stop why are you helping please go away! Spent a couple months stalling or chirping the tires like I was 15 all over again. This thing has the same vibe. Let me feel the flop. I'll deal with it. I know it's coming. Flop it.
  • 3 8
flag owl-X (Oct 25, 2022 at 16:06) (Below Threshold)
 @JSTootell: eMTBs have made me way stronger!
  • 27 0
 K.I.S.S.
  • 3 0
 This is the way.
  • 18 1
 Keep It Straight Sucka
  • 2 0
 Great advice. Hurts my feelings every time.
  • 21 0
 Can imagine the marketeers discussing this one.
"What "standard" shall we invent next?"
"Wider hubs?"
"No, done that a few times - let's leave that one for a year or two"
"Bigger tyres?"
"Done it too but the public realise it was crap"
"2wd ebikes?"
"Too soon. Too soon. We're still trying to deal with the schmucks who don't think they want an ebike at all. Win them over to the idea of 70lb lumps of motor driven lead and we can try the 2wd thing"
"What else then?
"Let's invent something we can flog. An idea. You know everyone moans about the steering on slack bikes?"
"No?"
"Yeah whatever. Everyone moans about slack bikes so let's attach a spring to the steerer, tell the public it's to fix 'wheelflop' and get a few manufacturers to jump in with the idea"
"Sounds crap. Will anyone actually believe this garbage"
"It's either this or superdoopaboost hubs"
"OK, wheelflop it is....."
  • 1 0
 Brilliant!
  • 24 0
 where does the toast pop out?
  • 2 0
 from the ttop of thte ttoaster
  • 1 0
 yes!!! I hear it!!!!
  • 21 0
 Please good lord above DO NOT let the engineers at Scott get hold of anything at all to do with this.

There is already enough s#%&E going through the headset.
  • 17 0
 It doesn't add another lever to the handlebars so Scott isn't interested.
  • 3 0
 @ndefeo96: Dude, on-the-fly adjustable centering force!
  • 19 2
 I’ve been waiting for this for years, now i no longer need to exercise my arms to be able to straighten the bars to a neutral position, the springs will do that for me. Another step closer to the full dream of no longer having to pedal, steer, or shift gears, and stress my body. Ideally another step closer to a floating pod like in Wall-E, I can sit in while floating down forest trails.
  • 2 1
 Yes! Every time I see an E-bike I think of the fat people on the hover pods in Wall-E.
  • 1 0
 If you want to stress your body to the max then ride without suspension. There's nothing wrong with technology that makes riding more enjoyable
  • 1 0
 @Tustinite: I've actually considered switching to flying drones with a VR headset as my primary source of entertainment to eliminate any chance of needing to move my lower body at all
  • 22 1
 I'm done
  • 19 0
 Jesus, more '94 Mountain Bike Action type crap. How many idiots will fall for this shit.
  • 21 1
 Hahahahahahahahaha
  • 21 1
 Is it April 1st already?
  • 18 0
 This is very helpful when you have fully loaded shopping basket mounted on the handlebar of your DH-bike.
  • 5 0
 ngl, Living somewhere where the bike park is a DH pedal away with the grocery store inbetween sounds like a dream. I want to have this problem.
  • 17 1
 The most self centred bikes have to be e-bikes.
  • 12 2
 Someone need to have an intervention with the engineers at canyon. It’s one half baked design after the next, and now it’s become apparent that their engineers literally think you only steer a mountain bike by turning the bars with your hands. The reviewer couldn’t get on with the steering because, and this should be obvious, a lot of bike steering is done by shifting your body weight - and the self centering steering will majorly mess this up. This is a bad, irredeemable idea. How anyone can have faith in canyons engineering after everything and now this, is beyond me.
  • 3 4
 The target audience is not true mountainbikers. They could have spared us with this press release, because noone on pinkbike is interested in this. Here in Germany, most Canyon spectral, Strive and torque bikes have never seen a trail. They are used as commuters, touring bikes, status symbols at the beer garden. Nobody is hitting a trail on their Factory Level Canyon MTB.
  • 11 3
 Proper geometry should stabilize a bike at its intended speed and corner radius. If wheel flop is an issue, perhaps revisit overly slack head angles and short offset forks in bikes not ridden at high speeds by experienced riders. I do see a use for such springs in family bikes with child seats in the front as it may help the wheel from flopping when parking the bike. But this is (I think?) not the market segment these bikes are aimed at.
  • 11 3
 Thats because the market segment canyon is targeting with most of their mountainbikes is age 50+ folks touring to the local ice cream shop in full fox kit and factory suspension.
  • 1 0
 Actually with a child seat, you're fine without such a system as the weight of the child is behind the steerer (so pulling it it down and actually straightening it). I've used this for years on a bike without spring or headset lock and it worked perfectly fine. On my next bike (and my girlfriends bikes) we had a rack up front of which the weigh is actually destabilizing the steerer, so that's where it helps.
  • 3 0
 Indeed steering centering springs for city/touring bikes have been employed for decades (maybe a century even?). Bikes with front racks have a tendency to flop over the front wheel wildly, so a centering spring makes the bike easier to handle when you are off the bike. This same effect on steering was probably evident there as well.
Anyway, you are correct- the problem is the geometry of the bike doesn't match the use case.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Yeah indeed. I was referring to the situation when you have the bike on the dual kickstand with the front wheel lifted off the ground. Our family bike had one of these springs but then it broke. Never bothered to fix it and I didn't really notice a difference riding the bike. But when trying to load a kid into the front seat, it is quite nice that the wheel remains somewhat centered.
  • 1 0
 It is kind of funny that Canyon wants to sort wheel flop problems, while they are producing one of the steepest head angles on the trail bike market. This system would be great to the Grim Donut though.
  • 9 1
 So, y'all have done the "build the lightest bike / heaviest bike" before, can you do build the most unecessarily complex bike?

In-stem cable routing
In-body cable routing
Wireless everything
This thing
Magnetic pedals

Am I missing anything else? A battery? Smile
  • 7 1
 In terms of complexity, SPD pedals are more complex than magnetic pedals....so you missed that one
  • 3 0
 @handynzl: But... clipless* pedals are not 'unecessarily' complex ;-)
  • 2 0
 As many pivot points as possible and a 3 speed up front for good measure.
  • 2 0
 - electronic suspension - knock block - tyre pressure monitors
  • 1 0
 Adjustable handlebars + revgrips
  • 2 0
 Pressfit BB?
  • 1 0
 Thise wheels that can automatically adjust tyre pressure.
  • 8 0
 This is what I take of the whole article: "this doesn't necessarily make the bike more stable in the sense of remaining upright."
If there is one thing I Try while on my bike is remaining upright, call me old fashion.
  • 6 0
 Nice, another thing really easy to access in the frame and maintain in case of a failure... Are the "pros" really better than the "cons" for this solution ? Let me doubt about it for mountain biking....

We find the same kind of solution (simplified) for low-entry city bikes from a big manufacturer in Europe : www.decathlon.fr/p/velo-de-ville-elops-520-cadre-bas-mint/_/R-p-145734?mc=8378612&c=BLEU . In that case, people riding those bikes are beginners and not everyday bikers, and having a thing who help to maintain a straight line in traffic is probably a life-saving option in some cases.
  • 18 0
 This will end up on E-bikes SUVs which are delivered with Fox 36 or 38, Magic Mary 2.6, 160mm of travel but are solely used for commuting or to go to the beergarden on sunday. Fits in nicely with the dropper post which is soooo helpful at red traffic lights and with the new ABS braking helpers. KIS allows you to text on your phone without problems.
  • 14 1
 No, that is not what it is for. It is so that when the bike is on the kickstand and you load the basket up with groceries, the front wheel stays straight. It is a common solution on bikes with a front rack. Either that or you get a lock on the headset (that slips and disengages when you accidentally ride away with it).
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Yep, you're right i forgot that better stability with a front rack
  • 1 0
 @Voxran: Yeah, the bike in question still seems like a horrible idea though. The headlight integrated into the frame does keep it protected, yet at the same time when you steer, the headlight doesn't steer along. Also, the bottle dynamo has been setup wrong on the bike in question. Which should be an easy fix, unless they mounted tyres that aren't compatible with a bottle dynamo... The kickstand is in a horrible place if you're going to put anything in that basket. It will tip right over. Especially as this basket has been mounted pretty high. I wouldn't use that kind of kickstand anyway if you're going to load up the bike with a decent amount of groceries. Just use a two legged Ursus kickstand so that the bike is upright and stable. They could have done it properly, but they haven't.
  • 5 0
 By removing the trail effect that helps a bike self-right (ghost ride) this makes a bicycle more dangerous for beginner riders. Its actively evil.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: Fun fact, the bikes of the city of Lille in France (where there is the biggest Decathlon shop) are produced by them, and they fixed the problems you've noted : integrated dynamo, centered two legged kickstand, smallest and lowest basket.. and integrated headlight in the basket that steer along. With, of course, the same external "self-centering steering technology" aka a coil spring, accessible from outside the frame.

But in my example it was the low-priced bike... Wink
  • 1 2
 @vinay: You sure you're not a professor of POS commuter bikes..?
  • 5 1
 @SixxerBikes: When is a commuter bike considered "POS"? If you need it to ride to work and you need it to carry 50kg of groceries and a kid, you want something reliable.
  • 1 7
flag SixxerBikes (Oct 25, 2022 at 8:23) (Below Threshold)
 god damm those bikes infuriate me. what next...a trailer? those shitty long tail 'kid hauler' bikes with electric motors......I don’t know who you are. I don’t know what you want. If you are looking for ransom I can tell you I don’t have money, but what I do have are a very particular set of skills. Skills I have acquired over a very long career. Skills that make me a nightmare for people like you. If you let my daughter go now that’ll be the end of it. I will not look for you, I will not pursue you, but if you don’t, I will look for you, I will find you and I will kill you.
  • 4 1
 @SixxerBikes: Not sure what you're trying to communicate so yeah, just have your best shot and try to kill me. If you're aiming for the one who has an electric motor and your daughter, it probably won't be me anyway who you'll end up killing. If you do eventually have some money, of course you're still free to send it to me.
  • 5 0
 @SixxerBikes: Dude, living in Seattle I knew a lot of folks with those bikes--ferried kids to school and activities, went grocery shopping, rode to the lake in summer. Way better than more cars on the road.
  • 5 0
 Holy shit, @hamncheez nailed it. It's why balance bikes (striders, etc) are better than training wheels: because the feedback from the interaction of flop and trail is what makes riding a bike "just like riding a bike". This thing is actively bad for improving riding skills.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: Having feet on the ground might help a bit, maybe? Balance bikes are much better for transition to control a bicycle because they don’t have to unlearn useless training wheel skill.
  • 2 1
 @emptybe-er: ability put feet on the ground quickly helps confidence, but it doesn't help actually learning to balance a bike. Learning to use steering inputs to keep the bike upright, as opposed to relying on the training wheels, is what helps.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: My point was without feet on the ground a balance bike wouldn’t be a balance bike. So I’d argue it’s crucial, not just confidence inspiring.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: But yes, you are correct. Balance bikes let the bike and rider lean and turn like a real bike. I thought this was common knowledge
  • 3 0
 thanks, but THIS is the REAL stuff
de.aliexpress.com/item/33001865310.html
  • 2 0
 @delarscuevas: What part of "One thing to make clear is that this is not a steering damper. Those have been tried before and seem to be mostly not appropriate for MTBs" did you not understand?
  • 3 0
 @mi-bike: I was just joking, I am aware of the fact that the spring on the mommy bike is used for an entirely different reason. : -)
  • 9 0
 If you can't ride straight ahead just drink one beer less. It's cheaper, trust me.
  • 3 0
 You're not my mom, you cant tell me what to do. Personally I like to ride drinking Snapps.
  • 7 1
 So while the steering may be more stable in terms of self-centring, this doesn't necessarily make the bike more stable in the sense of remaining upright."

So why are we f*cking with the human body's intrinsic ability to properly ride a bike?

This is what happens when the marketing department's headcount is larger than engineering's.

Next: "Why do all wheels have to be round?"
  • 4 0
 A square wheel can actually span entire rocks if you just have enough speed and time it so the flat part goes over the rock.
  • 2 0
 @ryan77777: which 80s haircut should we call the next line of bikes that will have a square rear wheel and a trapezoid front?
  • 10 2
 April fools come early? You can't fool us pinkbike. This isn't real.
  • 7 1
 sweet, now your bike too can have the same features as a £300 ladie's town bike lololol
www.decathlon.co.uk/p/city-bike-elops-520-low-frame/_/R-p-145734
  • 8 1
 I like how MTB companies are solving problems that don't exist to stay relevant. Wait. No I don't.
  • 6 0
 File this in the same place as through the headset routing. Anyone riding a sub 65 degree HTA should have the ability to properly handle "wheel flop"
  • 4 0
 Have we truly come so far that bike designers have now forgotten the natural tendency for bicycles to "auto-correct" is what makes it possible to ride them in the first place?

This idea isn't just stupid, its actually the polar-opposite of smart. Some sort of new word needs to be invented to describe it.
  • 3 0
 Smrt?
  • 2 0
 @SimbaandHiggins: Need a new age mountain bike brand? Just get RID of your VOWELS!!
  • 4 0
 I would suspect EWS racers would not want this on their bikes. Partly because when they crash, the idea of having to fight the system to keep the fork straight would far outweigh any incremental benefit they might get in low speed stability. Especially since they are rarely moving at low speeds.
  • 4 0
 This is excellent technology. For age 75+ people and others with balance issues on city bikes. The only reason to put it on high end mountain bikes is marketing. "No, this is not for people with poor balance. Downhill racers use it too! "
I really wonder if at some point geometries with steep head angles but long trail and wheelbase will break through. In theory those solve the wheel flop problem without losing the stability of current geometry. It will take a different design of the fork/steering assembly that will initially not be esthetic. Also, I have no idea to what extent that geometry will be better in practice.
  • 4 0
 Innovation 10/10, but another case of over engineering. In reality it's just adding another part subject to fail. That's going to be fun times getting that replaced at your local bike shop. Canyon please follow the KISS principle - not the Keep It Stupid version.
  • 4 0
 I just imagined how it would look like to buy a bike in 2023...after selling a kidney and taking half the season to recover, I need to dial in my, by this time not-so-new, new bike. I put it on the workstand an Start drilling holes to re-route the cables and remove them from the headset, I then continue and remove the electronics in my fork and damper to install a coilspring and change the brakes to get rid of the build in Abs System. Then I might have to use some gentle violence and saw-of the knock-block. Good thing is, the bike is about 2Kg lighter now...
  • 3 0
 It was only a matter of time...just waiting for the e version now..you know what is better still..4 wheels instead of 2, 4wd, a more powerful e bike motor and completely autonomous so you don't have to do anything at all. Sure Android auto isn't too far off for bicycles too. Can't wait to rip all of that on the dh lines at Whistler.
  • 3 0
 when I can't ride the current bike in straight line, I will buy this one...OK.
In 2025 there will be a lot of smart non-electric/e-bikes with stupid riders, same as it is with phones…
In 2026 the high end bikes will no longer need rider to ride it…
  • 5 0
 So on top of not having my stem not properly strait I could also preload my bar to always steer a little bit too much to one side?
  • 3 0
 I had a bolt on version of this on a front loading cargo bike at one time, it was pretty sweet for loading it up, parking/maneuvering with a lot of weight on the fork mounted rack.

velo-orange.com/products/vo-wheel-stabilizer

This, on the other hand, is another ebike centric abortion.
  • 1 0
 Yep, I have that product on my touring bike. Combined with a twin leg kickstand, it means I can load and unload cargo without the bike falling over so much. I did however replace the stock spring with a heavier one I found in a trashed recliner couch.
  • 5 0
 Canyon is the Mercedes of MTB. First to adopt new gizmos/features nobody asked for to grab some headlines, then quietly abandon them.
  • 2 0
 More like Trek (knock block). Canyon's proprietary tech is the shapeshifter and they haven't abandoned that (yet).
  • 6 0
 Hopey steering dampers.
I had one on my 2003 balfa bb7
www.hopey.org/downhill.php
  • 1 0
 I remember seeing one in 1995 at Kirchzarten world champs.
  • 8 2
 You know what work best for stability ? Training wheels !
  • 7 1
 actually it does not. Kids learn cycling way faster without them.
  • 5 2
 Conspiracy theory: these only exist because bike manufacturers want people to get used to the ebike displays in the top tube, so all front triangle molds have the cutouts ready.
  • 6 0
 Floyd Rose tremolo meets mtb.
  • 2 0
 LOL! more like Kayler Flyer if thats how its spelled .... you are 100% right
  • 1 0
 Haha, nice one! As a matter of fact, I had a Jackson guitar with a Floyd Rose once, but ended up locking it into place with a piece of wood. Lol
  • 1 0
 @sorrymissjackson: Once I realized that even hi-end tremolos suffer from detuning, poor intonation and dampened string vibration, I stuck with hardtails guitars and never looked back.
Oh wait, the same happened with mountain bikes...
  • 2 0
 @Tasso75: guitar with a tremolo was also a one time experience for me.
I own a hardtail too, but I guess on a mountainbike it's okay two have two springs in place. But certainly no more than that!
  • 5 1
 While they were coming up with this KIS crap, they forgot the biggest ethos in design and engineering KISS - Keep It Simple Stupid.
  • 1 0
 Funny how an engineer could do this thing without questioning himself and the projekt. But maybe it had a different development name like "project mayham" or sth. Wild
  • 4 0
 They wanted it to be more efficient so they removed an S and ended up with Keep It Stupid.
  • 1 0
 Isn't it just two springs and a strap? Seems pretty simple
  • 3 1
 Imagine how many more bikes we can sell if we make it so you don’t actually have to know how to ride a bike. This seems like an idea born at the height of the covid boom that will look even more silly when it hits stores in the middle of a recession.
  • 2 0
 Just do your darn pushups! Jokes aside, I guess I could see some advantages, but very situation specific. Maybe in a rough off camber dh section..very unsure if it justifies mass production! On the other hand fabien barel might have more insight than me..we'll see!
  • 2 0
 I like the innovation, and I have noticed the "wheel flop" thing before. Never considered it a problem - especially not a big enough one to get a different frame over - but I'd be curious to see how it feels. It'd be nice on mellow rides and those climbs where my bike tends to wander a bit I guess?

Idk, hard to see this as a problem worth solving. Kudos for trying something new though, we'll see how it pans out.
  • 3 0
 far simpler and cheaper option:

just leave the POS Acros headset your bike came with in there for a few extra months, let it get good and indexed, and VIOLA! self centering steering!!!
  • 5 0
 I might as well soak my headset bearings in water for a couple days to achieve the same resistance
  • 2 0
 This is one step closer to autonomous biking. I think the next step is to add in a virtual TV screen, more comfy seat and even more slack reclining back support. Then biking would be like sitting at home enjoying movies for 2 hours at a time! Heck, this is happening in cars now where people can sleep and drive. This needs to happen to bikes now before I turn 65!
  • 4 1
 Here's an engineering problem I'd like someone smart to solve: make regular water bottle cages easily mount without having to figure out how the 3 or 4mm hex wrench can easily navigate the cage and top tube above it.
  • 1 0
 YAAAAAS!
  • 3 0
 wingnuts you're welcome
  • 2 0
 @gabriel-mission9: I Luv this place
  • 2 0
 What exactly is the amount of torque on the handlebars caused by wheel flop? When I'm climbing steep stuff, the last thing on my mind is a couple foot-pounds on the handlebar. Rather, I appreciate it, it's great feedback for how the ground is pushing on the front wheel. With this silly thing neutralizing that feedback, trying to rail off-camber corners with varying traction is going to _suck_.
  • 6 1
 lol at Syntace, Liteville and Canyon
  • 3 0
 tho, this could.. be good for disabled riders
  • 1 0
 @naptime: Yup. Really not required for most normal able-bodied riders, but this could be great for someone with a disability that can't steer with both hands / arms.
  • 6 1
 …and now we know why shark attack Jack is leaving Canyon…
  • 5 0
 One way to eliminate winter is to just fast forward to April.
  • 4 0
 I'm giving KIS 3 seasons of shelf life. After that nobody is going to remember...
  • 4 0
 What an unbelievable waste of R&D money. Almost as bad as Flight Attendant. Almost.
  • 2 1
 Well, its only natural progression... Bikes that do the pedaling for the rider have already taken over, why not let them steer automatically already?

Now, if they can only go to the hospital to get stitched instead of us, and make excuses to my wife why I missed lunch again,...
  • 3 0
 "The system has been tested on downhill bikes, and even saw action at the Fort William World Cup under Mark Wallace, though only in practice. "

LOL.
  • 1 0
 Guys, keep calm. Let’s make this thing happen and let’s make Canyon sell all the bike with this system.

Then we wait some time…

Finally we will have Friday Fails with riders down and their bikes will simply continue their journey…
  • 2 0
 Mtb reduce the stem length to have a playful drive, and now we need a stabilizer dumper?. Don't would be better to reduce reach and increase the stem length like earlier times?
  • 2 0
 I thought this was an April fools thing too. I was wondering how long I'd been in a coma for. But wheel flop is horrific. I hate slack. But then again, I have a BMX background.
  • 1 0
 Correction about the physics of wheel flop: It's not only because the head tube gets closer to the ground when the handlebars are turned.

Prove it to yourself this way: Clamp a bike in a work stand at an angle that's level to the ground and wheel pointed straight ahead. The wheel will still flop if you give it a slight nudge (if it doesn't, your headset is too tight; this is actually one way to test a headseat's preload). This is because both the fork offset and the stem length give the handlebar-to-fork-to-wheel assembly a higher center of mass when straight ahead than when turned.
  • 3 0
 Ummmm....back in the day they had this tech. Had a bud that was full moto guy pulled over to MTB DH and had the Hopey. www.hopey.org/product-info.php
  • 3 2
 A tremendous invention stolen from strong American patriots. A great way to help riders make strong rights, McConnell rights and weak lefts, AOC lefts. I knew eventually the baguette party animals would come up with something that many many people had been asking for, what many proud Americans wanted: A way to stay straight when all the radicals kept steering things in the wrong direction. Bien fait!
  • 1 0
 I have no idea if this is satire or not...
  • 1 0
 Pinkbike's definitely not the place to say this but I can see some potential benefits for some people. Watching canyon's tech video on it, the althetes seem to like it (well I mean of course they do - they're sponsored by canyon after all!). I just can't help wondering why they would make pro athletes run this kit if there wasn't at least some advantage.
  • 2 0
 It's fun how this system should help riding straight ahead. while doing so it worsens the ability to corner properly. It's not like most people are good at going straight ahead in the fall line and suck at cornering...
  • 1 0
 So it's supposed to reduce the torque (force) from flop, by adding a feeing of weight to it... and it's supposed to make the steering less twitchy? But slack bikes that have higher flop already have not-twitchy, sluggish it's even been called, steering. So is this going to make the steering even feel even heavier and slower? And what about those times when you need to counter-steer beyond centered in order to regain stability after, say, getting pinged off a rock garden? With this, it's going to want to pull you directly to centered, so you'll have to fight it in order to easily counter-steer according to feedback through the bars. This actually hurts stability when the trail is non-smooth.
  • 1 0
 How about instead of basically forcing the bars to stay straight so that the wheel doesn’t flop over, you make the steering easier to control the flop, and flop less erratically? I’m going to introduce a concept I call “hand lead” and “frame lead”. Your hand lead is the horizontal distance that your hands are from the contact patch of the tire along the steering plane. You can think of it as basically the trail measurement but for your hands. Your frame lead is the same as your trail measurement. Wheel flop is proportional to how long your trail is, how slack your headtube angle is, and how much weight is on the front wheel. It increases with all of these. In much the same way, a long hand lead such as with a long forward offset stem, combined a slack headtube angle, and weight on your hands increases wheel flop. I’ve been testing stems with a Reversed offset for about 2 and a half years now, and the reduction in wheel flop is quite substantial. It really helps to have a hand lead that is shorter than your frame lead aka trail measurement because when it is longer, the feeling of wheel flop is exaggerated from what your frame would naturally have if your hands were off the bars.

Check out Instagram.com/BeMoreBikes for more about stems that reduce the torque that wheel flop has on your hands.
  • 1 0
 When you sell E-Bikes, you have to tell the customers that the rear shock is an active element of the suspension, not just a fancy tube on the frame. Put at least 7psi in the rear shock, fix the head angle, done! The bike industry created a bunch of morons and is now selling them panacea.
  • 1 0
 So first they made head angles too slack, then they took away 51 offset forks. Now with the poor handling this creates they are trying to fix the problem with a gimmicky device. How about just run the correct amount of trail in the first place?
  • 2 0
 Canyon, you couldn't find better use of R&D money on your bikes than this. I have been riding bikes for 35 yrs. and I never heard "one" person complain about "wheel flop".
  • 2 0
 Sadly the write up doesn’t really sell it. The review over on NSMB is worth a read for some balance
  • 2 0
 Holy shit, something new came out that none of you came up with, quick, get behind your keyboard and talk shit!!! What size tampons do you guys wear when you ride? XL Heavy Flow? Geezus!
  • 2 0
 No way I'm reading all of this just to find out that I'm being trolled. Please someone reassure me that this indeed is a joke.
  • 2 0
 This will be really nice when combined with internal headset routing of all other cables for my frequently shipped, friendly skies, bunghole-country bike.
  • 4 0
 What about power steering?
  • 5 1
 Saw this on another site, came straight to pinkbike for the comments
  • 4 0
 I really don't need this. I'm self centered. My bike still has a chance!
  • 5 0
 Made for and by Jerry
  • 1 1
 Broped Jerry
  • 3 0
 I'm sure canyon will be great to work with on warranty claims on this little bit of kit.
  • 4 0
 www.hopey.org wants their idea back.
  • 2 0
 Already a historical lowlight to look back on...impressive actually. European folks are the American equivalent of "rednecks", but with all things bike.
  • 2 0
 At what point do we just wear VR goggles? Might work best for manufacturing shortages. You won't even need the actual bike anymore!
  • 4 0
 [ ] Keep it simple stupid
[ x ] Keep it stupid
  • 2 0
 -huh, maybe frames have got too slack.. -no no, we just need springs and other mechanisms in the frame to counteract the affect of excessively slack front ends lol
  • 1 1
 I have a 69 degree head angle. Is that slack enough to benefit from one of these thingy bobs?

In all seriousness cool I guess but not a problem I experience so I cannot understand the benefit. I guess it's one of those you have to try it things.
  • 1 0
 F....

When I though Canyon would be an excelent choise for my next bike, I have to pay for this???

If people have problems, and are glad to have this gizmo, I have a better solution:

TRY SOMETHING ELSE.
  • 2 0
 Let's HOPEY this doesn't catch on. Maybe if bikes didn't come with 880mm bars these days this would never have been developed
  • 1 0
 Steering dampers have their place in the moto world. On a bicycle, this could be of use for one of Charlie Sheen's droopy eyed armless children..SMH Way to create a market for something that is not needed.
  • 2 0
 I am a sucker for gadgets but this seems like the best idea to throw off all your timings.
  • 3 0
 "I noticed the downsides more than the upsides" lol
  • 3 0
 I'll do my own capsizing, thank you very much.
  • 2 0
 Engineer: "Good geo's should center themselves. What's the point?"
Marketing: "Compensate bad Geo's!"
  • 4 0
 400 dollerydoos.... wtf
  • 2 0
 Ah actually, now that I think about it... no i've never had wheel flop issues
  • 2 0
 I have but it was because I was tired and not properly weighting the biking. Or I had a full loaded basket on the front of my town bike.
  • 1 0
 If this keeps companies from riding cables through the head tube, I guess I'm for it? You could always just not tighten the steertube clamp thus disabling the system.
  • 3 0
 The Viagra for Wheel Flop...
  • 2 0
 Michael Hannah will come back and ride for Canyon. So he can land his suicide no handers with no hands.
  • 3 0
 SIK MIK, KIS
  • 1 0
 @mi-bike: That's a great band name.
  • 3 0
 Next week Tesla self driving ebikes
  • 3 0
 I have yet to "capsize" a bike, but when I do I'll post a video
  • 4 0
 remember to scuttle your bike, so the gerrys don't get their hands on it.
  • 2 0
 Waiting for the Sam Hill review, "riding this is soo trerrible, it's actually the best thing ever"
  • 3 0
 But does it auto-blip on downshifts?
  • 2 0
 They should have presented it as a dwarf living in your frame pulling on your handlebars to prevent you from cornering.
  • 2 1
 no maintenance ... until a spring breaks or something, what a pain to fix, and the worst part of it, I bet you can't ghost ride this bike lol
  • 1 0
 As this is obviously bollocks, they will drop it in a year or so meaning you can't buy spares
  • 2 1
 @SebStott: Please link to any articles here on Pinkbike where you (or others) have done long-term testing and in-depth reviews of steering dampers. Thanks.
  • 1 0
 Have you ever experienced a tank slapper on a pushbike?
If so, you *might* benefit from a steering damper.
If your arms are particularly noodly
And your pushbike has a 1000cc engine.
  • 1 1
 @gabriel-mission9: battery slapper on my ebike
  • 3 0
 You gotta be fucking kiding me
  • 1 0
 The picture of Jo Klieber reminds me of someone on Shark Tank still trying to pitch their idea well after all the sharks have said they're out.
  • 2 0
 They put it on their best selling bike because they wanted to make it their worst selling bike????
  • 3 0
 New trick around the corner: x-up no hands auto return!
  • 2 0
 I didn’t think mountain bikers could become any more self-centred. Apparently I was wrong!
  • 3 0
 HAve they considered f*cking right off?
  • 2 0
 A Spectral CF 8 with regular headset and spacers is what most owners want tbh.
  • 2 0
 I always struggle with wheel flop while doing no hands wheelies, thanks Canyon this solves all my problems.
  • 1 0
 What a crock of sh*t, which chubby middle age bloke is getting a speed wobble ANY where to justify this - I certainly ain’t ….
  • 1 0
 Happy I got my Spectral before they put this odd contraption on them! A great bike already that that does not need this gizmo.
  • 1 0
 I like gadgets, and I want to like this one, but I am really struggling to find a situation where I have or will ever need this.
  • 1 0
 NGL even if it helped marginally, I'm not giving up my ability to ride hands free down the tarmac. That's like pissing on your childhood.
  • 1 0
 It's pretty amazing how triggered people in this comments section get by a product like this. It's like they're being forced to buy it
  • 1 0
 I've got a life hack and a money- making scheme.

Who wants to buy my notched headset bearings? The bearing was £30 but because I've enhanced it, it's yours for £100.
  • 3 0
 Wack
  • 2 0
 i wonder how barspins and tailwhips feel with that
  • 2 0
 The Pinkbike comments sections really crack me up sometimes
  • 3 0
 Keep It Simple stupid…
  • 2 0
 They forgot the first S and decided to just use the second S - Keep It Stupid... Knockblock ain't looking so bad now, eh!
  • 3 0
 Terrible
  • 3 0
 What a BS
  • 1 0
 I, in all honesty, feel like I don't need this in my life. This is a "solution" to a problem I never had.
  • 3 1
 That Liteville eBike is evil looking. I'll have one without KISS please...
  • 5 0
 But evil you mean f*ck ugly right?
  • 1 0
 I'm surprised I had to scroll down this far to see this!
  • 1 0
 @93EXCivic: "But evil you mean f*ck ugly right?"

Yeah, that's his Wreckoning....
  • 1 0
 I am not even sure what a Wheel Flop is.. but that probably just means, it is nothing that ever bothered me...
  • 2 0
 The Spectral was their best selling model.
  • 1 0
 *was* Big Grin
  • 2 0
 Reading this with a straight face. Skip
  • 2 0
 Kokua already invented this on the kids-bike!
  • 2 0
 O would steer clear of that if I were you.
  • 1 0
 Great. Now I am gonna have to worry about my headtube routed cable to be entangled in my steering springs.
  • 3 1
 Handlebars decreasing in width, in 3, 2, 1...
  • 2 0
 I want a transparent frame.
  • 1 0
 Easier to route housing...
  • 2 0
 They're missing the market - the no hander rider and the wheelie crowd.
  • 2 0
 Next year:
Whole frame filled with PU foam to reduce resonating frame.
  • 3 0
 2023 Spank Vibrocore 150
  • 2 0
 Not buying it yet, waiting for the E version!
  • 1 0
 Hands-free like Teslas?
  • 2 0
 Can I use this device as an excuse for not doing barspins?
  • 4 6
 Having road raced ( read racetrack ) motorcycles for years, these devices do have a useful scope of application. In motorcycle racing they are adjustable, from almost nothing to needing your mom to step in ( my god her beautiful forearms, I digress.) You can read this as several hundred pounds ( sry Canada ) weaving through turns, it slows down the steering, keeping an otherwise steep agile head angle from getting overly twitchy. Nothing is free, it's more effort to steer on top of overcoming the moment of inertia. We used these on wide open asphalt race tracks ( with turns that go both ways, sry NASCAR .) There is no useful scope of application for this device on a mtn bike in my estimation, except possibly racing down a gravel ski access road at a resort at 50mph+ ( sry Canada .) Also, not sorry.
  • 5 0
 Do, this isn't a steering damper though (I also come from that world). This is a steering centering device.

A damper just slows the movement, this device doesn't slow the movement, just pushes it back to the center. Which, it also says in the article that this is NOT a damper like used on motorcycles.
  • 3 0
 This would be a tank slapper enhancer if anything.
  • 1 0
 @rodeoJ your mom gave a steep yet agile headache. It was all twitchy at first but was more effort to steer on top of overcoming the moment of her inertia
  • 1 0
 *headangle
  • 1 0
 The "no more flop" and "capsizing" issue kind of makes me think about that youtu.be/9cNmUNHSBac
  • 2 0
 Steering stabilizers aren't new....
  • 1 0
 Gotta prevent those tank slappers we have all the time!
  • 2 0
 Because the UCI doesn't have enough things to regulate already?
  • 1 0
 Nah, I am good. I do not need yet another thing that makes the already needlessly expensive bike more needlessly expensive.
  • 1 0
 No one is forcing you to buy it lol
  • 5 2
 KIS my grits!
  • 1 0
 kis my as
  • 2 0
 This seriously feels like an April 1 sort of article.
  • 2 0
 So more weight for something totally unnecessary.
  • 1 0
 Needless technology invented by Michael Douglas? Shut up and take my money!
  • 2 0
 Hopey dampers for the win
  • 2 0
 Can I get the external version? Going for a steampunk bike theme this year
  • 1 0
 Remarkably I keep my 63* HA spire wheel tracking straight on mellow trails. Must just be built different.
  • 2 0
 Reading this article just gave me diarrhea.
  • 1 0
 Another "already been done years ago" idea rehashed by the bike industry. Nobody cared back then either.
  • 2 0
 a revolution in bike photography
  • 2 0
 I’ll just stick to using my arms for “wheel flop”
  • 3 0
 Please NO A mechanic
  • 2 0
 My word that Liteville is so ugly...
  • 1 0
 Interesting, I would give it a try. My 63.5 degree HTA enduro bike is pretty sloppy up front on uphill technical sections.
  • 1 0
 I wonder if those working hours could be spent in something let's say ....NOT bull$hit.....
  • 3 0
 KISs my ass
  • 1 0
 When is Canyon going to revolutionize cycling with their new invention: a needle bearing headset
  • 1 0
 Don't need add ons for slow speeds. Give me the steering damper for battery slap on my ebike
  • 1 0
 I'm waiting for the built in gyroscope so I can lean the hell out of my bike without crashing.
  • 1 0
 Yay more moving parts that are easy to break and hard to replace!!! This definitely won't get tweaked in a crash!
  • 2 0
 April 1st is still over 6 months away.
  • 2 0
 People should learn how to ride a mountain bike first.
  • 1 1
 Pretty sure this is designed so the unskilled and unfit but affluent Broped buyers can turn their heavy rig at low speeds. yay
  • 1 0
 april called it wants its fools back.. this seems over the top and unnecessary.
  • 1 0
 Selling my Canyon to avoid association. Sort of like why I don’t own red hats
  • 1 0
 With all this new tech on the bikes, the bikes will not need a rider soon .
  • 1 0
 Oh man I can't wait for the warranty on those canyon frames that is going to be the biggest pain!
  • 1 0
 Likely really useful for climbing on an ebike. Less so on legacy pedal bikes as the riders of them tend to push uphill.
  • 1 0
 2024: Titanium spring upgrade.
2026: Coils are so old-fashioned, air spring version is out.
  • 1 0
 Aftermarket progressive springs.
  • 1 0
 This is perfect for all these ebike Joeys having difficulty controlling their whiskey throttle on the climbs.
  • 1 0
 Just Look at the German engineer and his explaining eyes and you know everything, lol!
  • 2 0
 Liteville is still around? How?
  • 2 0
 Next up, the revolutionary “Three Wheel Balance Assist System”
  • 1 0
 Next:
a spring that return your cranks horizontal.

Nice feature for perfect bike photos.
  • 1 0
 In motorbikes you need this just if you ride Dakar race.

"We need to set the price up... 15k is not enough.."

Yes
  • 2 0
 Will this make eating a hotdog and drinking a beer while climbing easier?
  • 2 0
 still struggling to find a positive comment (even from Germans LOL).......
  • 2 0
 Seems like marriage made in heaven for the Grim Donut
  • 1 0
 A solution to this problem. Do some workouts occasionally. Weight training goes a long way with application to riding.
  • 1 1
 More weight, more parts to go bad and when you put the bike in your pickup bed the front wheel wants to point straight? I'll stay with old fashion, thank you.
  • 1 1
 ...of course it was made by liteville. nothing says german mountainbiking more than overengineering the hell out of everything
  • 2 0
 Insert "But why?" meme.
  • 3 1
 Why?
  • 1 0
 Jepp,MIGHT bei a Luxus,but No Need. I want No Autopilot but Ride myself
  • 1 0
 another way to make sui's way more easy
  • 1 0
 I'm thinking half barspin to half barspin back with no hands. This could enable all kinds of new tricks!
  • 2 0
 Sui compatible
  • 1 0
 Imagine spring seized up while riding high speed,Instant rampage level
  • 1 0
 so...no bar spins or tailwhips on those frames.
  • 2 0
 very desperate
  • 2 2
 Sweet. "Unassisted steering ain't dead" from the stuck in the past 26" crowd.
  • 2 0
 Is it April already?!
  • 1 0
 Barspin to no-handed lander. Can't wait!
  • 1 0
 Every barspin becomes a bar-to-bar back! Increase the tech of your tricks with no effort!
  • 1 0
 Front wheel flop ain't dead!
  • 1 0
 I always thought my mtb would ride better if it had power steering.
  • 3 1
 October Fool !
  • 1 0
 I need self righting system for when I crash
  • 2 1
 K.I.S

Keep it simple.

Canyon: “Hold my IPA”
  • 3 0
 Double IPA
  • 2 0
 This about sums it up lol
  • 1 0
 Won’t that get in the way of the headset routed cables?
  • 3 2
 Why? Is it April fools already?
  • 1 0
 Better solution to the problem, ride faster...
  • 1 0
 Ever since I quit drinking, I don't have any problems with WHEEL FLOP.
  • 1 0
 The term wheel flop is equivalent to pussyonthechainwax
  • 2 0
 Hahaha
  • 3 1
 Pointless!
  • 1 0
 Now that this is sorted, can I get heated grips?
  • 2 0
 Technoloy
  • 2 0
 But bar spins
  • 1 0
 This would be perfect for the grim dony
  • 1 0
 This will pair perfectly with my trust fork!
  • 1 0
 Great for practicing suis bad for bar spins
  • 1 0
 Mads Mikkelsen also a cycling engineer, talented fellow Smile
  • 1 0
 Syntace should go broke. They were about to go broke, now this shit??
  • 1 0
 I am old enough to remember when bikes were simple and beautiful
  • 3 2
 Everyday we strive further away from God
  • 2 0
 Wheelflop? Try Hims.
  • 1 0
 How to combine this with head set cable routing?
Now that is a problem
  • 1 0
 Needs batteries, a motor, kashima, and remote computer controlled lockout.
  • 2 0
 Power steering please Smile
  • 1 0
 So this is what Seb posted a video of to his account on the 20th
  • 1 0
 This is mtb informercial territory.
  • 1 0
 so I´m guessing tomorrow is #wheelflopwednesday
  • 1 0
 Hmmm...wait what...this should be a moto application
  • 2 1
 I hate the name but I actually would love it if my Yeti had this feature.
  • 3 1
 Just F”*k off please
  • 1 0
 Waiting for the bike that stands upright on its own.
  • 1 0
 I never could ride without my hands on the bars...
  • 2 0
 Soooooooooo much LOL!
  • 2 0
 HAHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAH
  • 1 0
 Missed opportunity to name this Handlebar Helper
  • 1 0
 So much time and resources waisted!
  • 2 1
 Sounds like a 29’er problem
  • 1 0
 I want thins with a LAL super drive and anti lock brakes please.
  • 2 0
 I like it
  • 1 0
 I think it’s pretty cool. Don’t put it on
my bike tho
  • 1 0
 lol. Can you even barspin bro?
  • 1 0
 Barspin, x-up? What? Please stop(((
  • 2 1
 just fuck off with this crap.
  • 1 0
 Damn I’m gonna finally nail sui no-handers
  • 1 0
 Every floppy wheel needs a KIS and a couple Viagra.
  • 1 0
 Should've called it K.Y.S, because Canyon should kill itself.
  • 1 0
 Are these gonna be on all there Mountain bikes?
  • 1 0
 Saw this on old people's bikes in Berlin 5 years ago.
  • 2 1
 This is fuckin stupid.
  • 2 2
 This is excellent...if you have let's say, one arm, a cargo bike, an urban bike, a kids bike, an ecargo bike, a electric urban bike hell even an E kids bikes. the idea that mountain bikers could benefit from this at all is going to send this company bankrupt. oh wait maybe it already did...
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