Video: Katy Winton Shares Her Dyslexia Journey

Jan 31, 2024 at 8:04
by SHIMANO  

Words: Shimano

In Episode 3 of Evolution Stories, Andy meets Katy Winton. Katy’s been a presence within the topflight of enduro racing for a decade – but in this film, it’s not her awesome bike riding skills that are explored. Katy has dyslexia; her brain is wired ‘differently.’ Watch to find out what dyslexia means to her.

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Mountain biking connects people. It brings us closer to places, experiences, feelings and emotions that count. Hitting the trails with friends and hearing their outlooks helps rider Andy McKenna put the uncertainties of multiple sclerosis into perspective and provides him with new tools to take on his incurable challenge.

In Episode 3 of the ‘Evolution Stories’ series - ‘When Fish Climb Trees’ - Andy meets Katy Winton. Katy’s been a presence within the topflight of enduro racing for a decade - but in this film, it’s not her awesome bike riding skills and athletic abilities that are explored. Katy is neurodiverse: she has dyslexia - her brain is wired ‘differently’: watch to find out what dyslexia means to her.

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Being dyslexic isn’t always straightforward. Katy’s trademark candor and openness about the ups and downs of her racing career are as remarkable as her abilities to process the testing tracks of the Enduro World Series. She’s a capable athlete and a great communicator so it can be difficult at times for the world to ‘see’ her unique challenges. Hidden behind her infectious optimism and drive, Katy’s only now becoming more comfortable in her dyslexic skin.

Despite moments of despair and isolation growing up, Katy’s not alone: 10-15% of the U.K. population have brains that think in ways that are different from the majority. How each individual with dyslexia sees and interacts with the world is as unique as a fingerprint, and in this emotional rollercoaster story Katy reflects on her realities growing up as a dyslexic person and the way it has influenced her approach to life.

Andy and Katy take a moment to reflect not just on Katy’s personal dyslexia journey but on the pervasive societal norms that can lead to a crisis of identity. In the past, dyslexic thinkers have been judged more on what they couldn’t do, rather than what they could. Thankfully, the world is evolving, and hopefully, Katy’s dyslexia story can play a small part in that evolution, too.


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Author Info:
shimano avatar

Member since Apr 7, 2000
87 articles

33 Comments
  • 75 1
 *accidentally rides fakie down the entire trail* "Whoops! Darn slysdexia.. " (I'm dyslexic btw, don't kill me)
  • 47 3
 Thanks for sharing your story Waty Kinton.
  • 13 0
 Just watched this with my 7 year old daughter who is having similar struggles at school thank you for sharing your story and giving her someone to look up to.
  • 19 4
 My dad always says he has lysdexia
  • 39 1
 Same as mine. Does he also calibrate his stud-finder on himself?
  • 5 1
 @jubs17: If he doesn't better check the Mail/Milk Man. Self-calibrating stud-finder is a Dad-must.
  • 10 3
 @wburnes: mine does too, and he’s an agnostic insomniac.

He sits up all night wondering if there really is a dog…
  • 1 1
 @gaberoc: ABSOLUTELY IS!
  • 2 5
 Mine says he’s KO now
  • 7 1
 Thanks for being so open and for sharing this with the world. With the dyslectic who may have felt misunderstood and isolated and those who now may be able to see the dyslectic around them from a different perspective. In turn, I will share this one with my girlfriend who studied the social implications for people with dyslexia for her graduation. I hereby also apologize for my longer comments in the comment section.
  • 8 1
 Rather enjoyed that. Well done all around. Surprised to learn that approximately 1 in 5 people have dyslexia. Always thought it was just me haha
  • 9 0
 I have dyscalculia. Its the numbers version of dyslexia. It sucks.
  • 2 0
 Aye, I know what you mean. My partner has that too.
  • 4 0
 Keep going forward is the way I like to think. As one who also is dyslexic. I feel your pain. But it also makes us stronger to adapt and problem solve like a champ.
Nothing Ventured
Nothing Gained

Let’s ride bikes
  • 3 0
 I didnt find out I was dyslexic until my first year of college when I was failing a class. Looking back it explains why I was always bad at math and learning Spanish. Still hampers me with every day tasks, but I learned tricks how to manage.
  • 2 0
 Same. Diagnosed in college as well. Explained a lot. Challenged with Spanish, Math, pretty much everything took longer and was confusing. Affects my writing as well. Tend to write letters backward and sometimes over the top of each other.
  • 3 0
 My daughter appears in the newpaper article and was over the moon to see herself on Pinkbike! I was diagnosed many years ago with dysgraphia and was lucky to be at a school where there was support. My daughter has dyslexia and we had to fight hard for a diagnosis, although now thats in place her school life has been transformed.
  • 5 0
 No dylsexic should read these jokes
  • 45 4
 Because they'll take them the wrong way?
  • 4 0
 Friggin cool story. Had no idea (and how would I). Awesome watching her mtb tale unfold over the years.
  • 6 2
 Pretty easy fix - just swap your brake levers around.
  • 4 0
 Why is Dyslexia such a hard word to spell!?
  • 1 0
 Really interesting interview. I appreciate how she articulated her experiences, she's a great communicator. Love your attitude Katy!
  • 2 0
 Thanks for sharing. You are one of my favorite warriors in MTB
  • 2 1
 Warriors?
  • 3 5
 Dyslexia is a problem to decode written words in the way it is usually taught in schools. You make it sound here as it is a social and life changing disability- dyslexia does non wire your brain in the wrong way!!? It does affect kids of course, as Kathy describes, if schools can't adapt it will become very frustrating. There is some very helpful programs to learn decoding and get better (while not perfect). And PLEASE this is not funny but very difficult for people who have to go with it.
  • 4 0
 Absolutely no idea what you’re talking about
  • 1 4
 What a beautiful person. I’d like to invite her to join me for dinner and a movie, respectfully walk her back home, and call a day or two later, hoping to spend more time together. Should I be so fortunate, after months of courtship, I would ask her father for her hand in marriage and then spend the rest of my life dedicated to adoring and caring for her.
  • 1 0
 Big incel energy here.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for sharing! Spot on! Love Bikes Love Life Love People
  • 2 0
 Dude deleted his post and left me hanging lol
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