Dörte Kompakttool - The Coolest Trail Tool at Eurobike 2022

Jul 15, 2022 at 12:20
by Travis Engel  
Sometimes the coolest stuff you’ll see at Eurobike comes from brands too small to have their own booth. You’ll be walking by, say, the Pinion booth, and you’ll see a beautiful custom-made steel hardtail that’s there to catch your eye so they can reel you in. At the booth belonging to iconic 14-speed gearbox hub manufacturer, Rolhoff, there was something a little more hidden.

Eurobike 2022

Strapped to a monstrous custom cargo bike (which technically happened to be a steel hardtail) was a collapsible trail tool that, to the right person, was definitely eye-catching. Turns out, it was made by a German brand called Dörte Tools. The design of this model, the Dörte Kompakttool, should be familiar to anyone who’s seen the tools made by Bellingham, Washington’s Trail Boss USA. The handle separates into three pieces, two of which are a glass-fiber-reinforced polymer, and one is aluminum to increase strength at the high-torque area nearest to the tool head.

Eurobike 2022
Eurobike 2022

The way those sections connect should also be familiar. Aluminum couplers are bonded to the handle, and there’s a high-tolerance spline on each end. A threaded lockring pulls them together, knurled to give you a firm grip with your hand, though there’s room to use a tool for a tighter fit.

Eurobike 2022

Both Dörte and Trail Boss have a truly boutique feel to them. When you see a brand new one, you almost can’t bring yourself to, ya’ know, spend four straight hours slamming it into dry dirt and sharp rocks. But that adds character, and like the Trail Boss tool I have at home, the Dörte Kompakttool I saw hiding in the Rolhoff booth definitely has character.

But it’s also got something the Trailboss doesn't have. A 160cm (63-inch) overall length. Out of the box, most Trail Boss tools are 122cm (48”). That’s closer to the size of a “normal” hand tool, but a 160cm tool is bound to keep your back from being any more sore than it has to be at the end of a hard day of pounding dry dirt and sharp rocks. And it looks like it’s built to hold up to the extra leverage that length brings. The diameter of both the handles and the couplers is larger than that of Trail Boss tools. Plus, the couplers themselves are taller, and the threaded sections are deeper. As a bonus, they’re tightened with a traditional spanner instead of a classic bottom-bracket-tool-style hook.

Eurobike 2022

Dörte doesn’t offer nearly as many head options as Trail boss, but they cover the basics. There’s a compact mattock / hoe-style head, a narrow 4-tined McLeod (pictured), a wider 6-tined McLeod, and a wide 10-tined rake with a pretty clever pair of small tines on one end for those hard-to-reach places.

Surprisingly, the Dörte Kompakttool is priced pretty reasonably. It’s definitely expensive, but at €330, it’s actually on par with a similar tool from Trail Boss. Also surprisingly, Dörte seems to be able to ship worldwide. You just need to send them an email first to see if it’s possible. But if you're at Eurobike the weekend of July 14th, I know where you can find one.

Author Info:
travisengel avatar

Member since Jun 23, 2010
21 articles

107 Comments
  • 121 6
 When will they release the ebike specific one? Asking for a friend.
  • 17 0
 Word on the street is right after the enduro-specific model is released.
  • 11 1
 It better have ABS too.
  • 12 0
 Totally. Plus, no water bottle mount, mullet, kashima, or super boost options. Pass.
  • 27 0
 The ebike model comes with a man servant to buff out any unwanted bumps. Maybe chop that root? Wouldn’t want his lordship to experience any discomfort.
  • 2 1
 They need to make the shafts all pack down to the same size/shape as the battery, so you can swap it out for trail day.
  • 1 0
 @dstroud70: don't forget lack of flip chip, too steep a seat tube angle, no dropper and no internal storage.
  • 1 0
 The ebike version is a market capped by the TV remote
  • 9 0
 You laugh but I really need one of these with an accelerometer on the head (which will need to charge from my high capacity battery of course) so that I can flex objective data on Strava comments about how much harder I swing my tool .
  • 22 0
 Ebikers don't do trail work
  • 2 0
 So....for that much money, how many Pabst Blue Ribbon 6 packs could you buy and bribe your buddies to do all that digging with you and an $60 Rogue Hoe?
  • 1 0
 @JulioValeinte:
If you want to brag about how hard you swing your tool around there are "special" websites for that. Go ahead, try a Google search.
  • 2 0
 @brass-munky:
From my observation; they just like to wreck em.
  • 2 0
 @blinglespeed: i thought mobility bikes were for the fat old men who can't get it up........ to the top of the hill any more...
  • 1 0
 @blinglespeed: I ride an ebike and find this comment damn funny
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: we only use them (trail boss tools) when we're a few miles out and want to ride in or bring several tools like hoe, saw, mcloed and flathead. The ability to carry a truckload of tools in your day lack is really nice. They're pretty sweet for Backcountry but 7" wide rogue hoes with the wooden axe style 48" handleweilded by pbr drinking pedal homies are the go to for front/ slack country! Can't beat a proper wood handle
  • 4 0
 "Can't help with trail work tomorrow. Still waiting on the firmware update for my McLeod"
  • 4 0
 @Mac1987: mcloading
  • 24 1
 How is this not a blatant rip-off of the Trail Boss one? I think Trail Boss gets credit here.
  • 3 0
 So blatant. Would’ve been nice if they tried to do something different with the hardware used to join the sections.
  • 10 0
 Our trail organization has tons of Trail Boss equipment and it has held up amazingly. I was a doubter until I used it. We started using it heavily once Covid started since we couldn't take larger groups out. In addition to the organizations equipment, most active trail workers now have their own set as well. They have been a game changer for some of us. They even have a collapsible rock bar that works great... It's still heavy as hell but easy to ride with. I even prefer a couple of the heads they make over full sized tools. It's expensive but worth it if you ride with tools. This article should compare the weight of these against Trail Boss.
  • 13 0
 stoked to see Travis Engel have some by-lines here.
  • 7 1
 Problem with tools like this is they weigh nothing, try digging through rocky root filled mineral soil with a tool that’s got absolutely no heft to it… tried a similar tool before and they’re trash, just use a mcleod, Heavy duty hoe and mattocks, cost you way less and do a better job.
  • 4 1
 agreed but being able to pack it up and pedal/ride with it is the whole point of this tool. I cant always pack a mcloed 3000' up a mountain. Its nice to be able to pack it in and out easily.
  • 1 0
 If you have a tool stash then yes, just use those but for remote access and maintenance the Trail Boss is amazing
  • 3 0
 I believe you can buy an extra piece of handle from Trail Boss to ease the pain on the back. I generally use mine when on backcountry rides when I'm not moving dirt all day, but even still the extra handle would be very nice...
  • 4 0
 The Travis Tool head is the best “one tool” solution for trailbuilding and maintenance IMO. It should come as a head for this system and the Trailboss system.
  • 1 0
 The fact that Trail Boss doesn't offer the Travis is the main reason I haven't pulled the trigger on buying a kit. I'm not gonna spend $300+ on a collapsible tool if I can't use the tool head I like best, especially when they offer other Rogue Hoe heads.
  • 5 0
 Have you suggested that to Trail Boss? It's a very small company and the owner is super in touch with the trail building community. I think he'd be receptive to a suggestion.
  • 5 0
 @Jakesmith32: It used to be available. I guess there are issues with the supplies right now
  • 2 0
 you can't buy one from Rogue right now, either, along with a lot of other stuff. it's been a huge problem, so much so that trailboss is now making their own heads: trailbossusa.com/blogs/news/we-back
  • 1 0
 @ACree: I actually just emailed them asking about it the other day, or if they would sell parts to modify my existing Travis head to use with the TB handles. But have yet to get a response.
  • 1 0
 @groghunter: I actually just ordered a Travis from prohoe the other day. It was in stock and I didn’t hear anything from them, hopefully it still comes.
  • 1 0
 Trail Boss is not sourcing from Rogue Hoe any longer. All heads are in house now.
  • 1 0
 @Jakesmith32: ? I've got one from Trail Boss... unless they stopped making them.
  • 2 0
 The travis is a jack of all, master of none. JH fire tool is a super great choice though not collapsible. Personally i've found these trail boss esc tools require a bunch of TLC is you are going to use them the same way you'll pound on a flat shoes or a pick.
  • 1 0
 A friend has bought the trail boss with travis tool head about two years ago. Thus, at least it was available via trail boss in the past. Might be possible that they will do a own design.
  • 2 0
 Travis is my favorite tool.
  • 1 0
 @ACree: Update, they did get back to me and they can sell the aluminum head adapter as part of a custom order. They did mention that they no longer offer the 70AR/Travis from Rogue Hoe, and do not intend on making a copy of that shape, but a multi-headed shape may be in the works. I'm still a bit conflicted on if I will actually buy one due to the cost and I'm a little worried that I can't beat on it and easily replace like a wood handle, but the collapsibility is a really attractive feature for the ability to ride my bike to a worksite with it in a pack rather than having a heavy tool clumsily strapped to my bike or hike in with it in my hand.
  • 2 0
 @groghunter: Update, my Travis is out for delivery. Prohoe makes them and has them in stock. www.prohoe.com/product-category/fire-trail-building-tools
  • 7 1
 330 for a stick… ahahahahaha
  • 9 2
 Kinda like these bikes I keep seeing on here, ThOuSaNdS of dollars for a simple bicycle.
Some people, eh?
  • 6 0
 I see the person who was naming Ikea products has a new gig.
  • 4 0
 I could get 15 folding spades from the army for that price and you call that reasonably priced?
  • 3 1
 Well, work a day with both of them and tell whats worth the money. I for once will never ever dig with a foldable spade. Waste of time and health.
  • 4 0
 Awesome but too nice for me to leave in the bush for 2 and a half years like my current one.
  • 1 0
 I hear you. I take tools in and leave them.
  • 1 0
 @dirtpedaler: Me too. Chainsaw is the only tool I pack in. I couldn’t imagine paying this much for a lightweight multi-piece tool that doesn’t work as well. If it ain’t broke..
  • 1 0
 @emptybe-er: I’m gonna do some work at Mt St Helens later in August. I’m gonna have to ride about 13 miles to the site.

There are no tools left out there ( or should there be)
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: Ok but it’s actually not that hard to ride in with a real mcleod and mattoc. I’d rather suffer on the ride in than use lightweight tools, personally.
  • 1 0
 @emptybe-er: I’d love to see a of pic of how you comfortably and safely carry a real mattoc and McLeod over loose and rocky terrain on your bike.
  • 1 0
 @pmhobson: I didn’t say it was gonna be comfy.. If you send me a pic of using a super expensive/lightweight mcleod in rocky terrain I’ll send you one of my tools strapped to my pack.
  • 3 0
 @emptybe-er: Transcadia uses a ton of trailbosses for their backcountry work. youtu.be/Q28FgLRQww4?t=53

I've used mine at Sandy Ridge a bunch, Mt St Helens, Gifford Pinchot trails....
  • 1 0
 Big shout out to making a longer tool. Nothing I’ve found locally outside of a simple spade has had a long enough handle for me to comfortably use much of the day. It’s a big part of why I bought a backhoe. I would prefer to cut skinnier trails but a day of digging with short tools will have me barely able to move for the following week.
  • 1 0
 Buy some fibreglass or carbon pole, cut into 3 pieces. Use epoxy resin to fix some stainless steel threaded rod connecting nuts in the ends. Use threaded rod to screw the poles together. Buy a piece of 4mm thick plate steel...cut into required shape, drill hole in plate. Use threaded rod to attach plate to end of rod with a bolt. There is one easy way amongst countless others to produce such a tool...not getting into ready made telescopic rods, already manufactured rake ends, various ways to attach the poles together via pre made components such as rod clamps etc..
  • 3 1
 BTR trail tool, it's the best, get one. It's 70 quid, so not cheap (except compared to this one, 330€?), but worth every penny.
  • 7 0
 yeh but this has a bottle opener
  • 6 0
 @mac1v3r:
Name checks out
  • 2 1
 shapeshiftertools.ca stuff is pretty nice. Not collapsible, but a fraction of the price and the "honey badger" lightweight line is impressive for strapping on a pack and hauling in.
  • 5 0
 So, an expensive McLeod.
  • 3 3
 I love how people think mountain bike trails are so special that they need specialized tools for it. Its not rocket science folks, just hard work. Stop the marketing BS here. Pinkbike should be ashamed for pushing such consumerism on its readers. If yout want to build trails you would be better off learning how to read the terrain and understanding erosion, drainage and water tables than throwing a rediculous amount of money at a tool that doesnt do anything better than the cheaper trail building staples.
  • 3 0
 Dude, leave it to the actual trail workers to have strong opinions about the tools they use. My crew (usfs) use trail boss tools almost every day. Hiking in 2-4 miles with a rogue hoe, saw, rake, shovel isn't really feasible without something like this. It's ok that you don't understand how trail maintenance on legacy trails works, but maybe get down off of the soapbox until you have enough life experience to speak from knowledge. Clearly, this tool isn't for you
  • 2 0
 You're both 100% correct.
  • 1 0
 @brass-munky:Pro tip, leave your tools stashed in the bushes close to where you are working.
Or, perhaps you should buy a designer bag to carry your tools since you have so much life experience (money to waste).
  • 1 0
 @colebmx: it's best stash your tools if you work on one trail or spot. Rogue hoes are $90, and on backorder. we try not to leave them out in the elements My crew has over 40 miles of trail to work on, and we are full time. Work buys our tools, so we use the best one for the job, not just the one left out there. We do have caches of specific tools in some places but not everywhere. Some places it doesn't make sense to leave a chache. Trail boss come with their own bag, which fits great in a Thule rail 12, or our evoc trail builder packs, if you ever decide to try them out. I'm sure you could argue that a person could carry a chainsaw without a saw pack too if they don't do it for work every day. I don't have a lot of money, but I do have some experience carrying, stashing and swinging trail tools
  • 3 1
 Grammar police: High tolerance should have read Fine tolerance. ......takes off engineers hat leaves room
  • 5 0
 If I had a higher tolerance for alcohol, I might have caught that error myself.
  • 1 0
 I thought it meant it was high tolerance in the same way an ak47 is high tolerance. If it is indeed fine tolerance, I'm less interested, I want crude, pig iron that will outlast me, not something that takes a knock and doesn't line up right anymore.
  • 1 0
 I use trail boss tools all the time..the couplers donuse too fine a thread. The shaft also flexes. Trail boss tools come with a real rogue hoe head which is nice
  • 3 5
 If you're just shaving and sculpting loam, a fancy tool with precision threaded fittings might be nice. If you live where there are rocks everywhere, this is a colossal waste of money. I can practically feel this tool breaking in my hands. nobody, and I mean NOBODY makes trail tools to hold up to trailbuilding in rocky terrain.
  • 4 1
 Look up rogue hoes, and just get a metal McLeod. That being said I have lost a few picks on the hard ass basaltic shit we have. So I do feel your pain a little bit. Worst thing about the Rockies is sometimes you have to spend a few days digging around something as the only option.
  • 8 0
 We've been using trailbosses in Tucson for half a decade now. as long as you buy the aluminum bottom section, they're fine.
  • 7 0
 Trail Bosses have held up in my area really well and our trails are basically rocks on rocks, with a little dirt occasionally sprinkled in salt-bae style if you’re lucky.
  • 2 0
 @Thoromian: Is this NSWF?
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: good to hear the feedback. It's granite and limestone here-the graveyard of tools.
  • 1 0
 330€ for a telescopic Hoe with a bottle opener! Yeah definitely priced reasonably...
  • 2 0
 The bottle opener is always a give away that you are being ripped off.
  • 2 0
 330 Euro They are taking the piss yeah...
  • 2 0
 longer and more girth than my trail boss? story of my life...
  • 2 1
 Weak spot is the coupling, will develop play and then fail. Inevitable. Just like the joints on my folding bikes.
  • 2 4
 Yea...think you are overthinking it a bit mate...tolerances at the head? It's a rake....sharpness of the tool? Lawn mower blades how do you sharpen those? It's a simple tool that an be solved with a simple solution...no point trying to build it up to be more than it is for the sake of attempting to win a conversation....
  • 1 0
 So the whole point of these tools is to be light-weight but no weights given?
  • 1 0
 Lightweight tools.. bad idea
  • 1 0
 Let me get a firefighter tool, make it flashy, re name it and sell it for 37297491833 times its value
  • 2 0
 Trail boss is better. Buy local.
  • 1 0
 Haven’t BTR also been making a similar tool in the UK for years?
  • 1 0
 Yellowstone branding iron to show you are super legit
  • 1 2
 Could have been 6" longer for meme sales.
Below threshold threads are hidden







Copyright © 2000 - 2024. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.035627
Mobile Version of Website