Trail Tool Review: Silky Gomboy vs Corona RazorTooth Folding Handsaw

Nov 30, 2022 at 10:12
by Travis Engel  

Nothing gets me more stoked than finding cheap products that work just as well as the expensive stuff. But I guess it's all relative. When we're talking about saving, like, twenty bucks, I say splurge. If you can feel, or even just perceive a difference, surely you can justify shelling out one extra Andrew Jackson over the lifetime of your new jacket or seatpost or helmet. Oddly enough, though, I don’t really apply that logic to anything else I buy. My cookware is basic, my power drill doesn’t have a hammer function, and my wiper blades will be just fine until my next oil change, thank you very much. Maybe that’s why I do most of my light-duty trail cutting with a cheap hardware-store folding saw instead of something fancy from—who else—Silky Saws.

One reason is that I just don’t do much light-duty trail cutting. I’m usually wielding my Makita Sawzall at the very least. But for quick strike missions, or just as a sidearm on dirt-work days, a folding saw is nice to have. I’ll also usually keep a small one in my pack during the winter, when there's always new deadfall to be found. It’s a nice way to make a problem area passable until the chainsaws arrive. I use a regular handsaw just rarely enough that I’m fine buying the $38 10-inch Corona RazorTOOTH (yep, that's how they write it) from down the street at Baller Hardware. But then, I started to get jealous of the Japanese-made, high-class cachet of the $60 to $80 Silky saws that some of my crewmates use. Seemed like the sort of thing I ought to write about.


Silky isn’t a gardening equipment company or a tool company. It’s a saw company. Aside from a few hatchets and machetes, all they make are saws. Which means, they make a lot of them. From the five-inch Pocketboy to the 40-goddamned-inch Katanaboy Professional. That variety alone is probably enough to justify the price. Throughout the seven different lengths they offer, there’s usually a straight or curved option. Within that, there may even be a fine- or extra-fine-tooth option. And that’s just their folding saws. There’s almost as much variety in Silky’s fixed-saw lineup. If you have specific needs, they may be the only brand with the specific solution.

My needs are pretty basic, though. I’m cutting 1- to 6-inch branches, often overhead or deep in a thick bush. So, I decided to try the 10-inch-(ish) Gomboy Curve 240, which retails for $61. The first thing I noticed was the lack of injection-molded plastic. The structure around the hinge is nothing but steel, including the release trigger. The only visible part of this saw that isn’t metal is the rubber handle.


That does mean that there’s a slight audible rattle instead of the quiet turgor that I feel in my plastic mass-market Corona saw, but Silky’s system seems to be more robust. The hinge hardware is more like a frame-pivot bushing than some oversized pocket knife. But it does rely on friction to stay closed when not in use, instead of an extra notch for that release trigger like on the Corona RazorTOOTH. I had to snug it up after a week and add some thread locker, but it’s been good ever since. Or, I could have put it back in its plastic case every time I needed it safely stowed while walking from one job to the next. But no.


As for actually using the Gomboy, the differences were a little more subtle, especially when comparing it to another brand-new saw. Even a cheap brand-new saw. Channeling my inner bushcraft YouTuber, I compared the time it took to complete various cuts on each of the saws. When cutting through soft, green wood, the Silky saw was less than 10 percent faster than my Corona saw.

Both saws put the action on the pull stroke, and when gravity was on my side, neither required any significant downforce to keep the teeth biting. But the thicker and harder the wood, the better the Gomboy would perform. The blade’s a little thinner than on my Corona, so it’s not displacing as much wood. And as someone who’s seen first-hand how seriously Japan takes its metalwork, I can tell you that Silky’s saws are as refined as an XTR cassette. 


But what really impressed me was how the Gomboy performed on dry, dead wood. It wasn’t the hot-knife-through-butter feeling I got when cutting green wood, but it took more than 20-percent less time to get through a thick, dead branch with this saw than it did with my Corona RazorTOOTH. And those are the cuts that are usually the most tiring, so that let-the-blade-do-the-work thing was a real perk. I could see one of those Katanaboys being a huge asset for anyone without easy access to a chainsaw. Using one of Silky’s saws, you’re constantly reminded of just how nice they are. But that’s the problem.


As with most of my product reviews, I use these saws in a very southern-California setting. We're surrounded by low-lying chaparral that’s taking over the tread and needs to be removed entirely. Most of what needs cutting, needs cutting close to ground level, sometimes below it. I appreciated the fine edge on the Gomboy so much that I couldn’t bear to attack roots with reckless abandon like I do with my Corona saw. It’s like trying to parallel park in someone else’s Cadillac instead of my own beat-up Tacoma. It’s a little nerve-racking. I’m often shoulder-deep in brush, groping for the base and cutting until it’s free, sometimes sawing through as much rocky earth as soft wood. After just a few full days of that, my cheap saw starts to feel like a cheap saw. But it’s ok. It’s cheap.

And really, I wouldn’t have called it “cheap” if I didn’t know about high-end saws like the Gomboy. Corona’s fit and finish is clean and robust, and the rubberized handle is easy to grip in the middle for power cutting or just on the end for those hard-to-reach spots. This one is only three months old, same with the Gomboy, but I have a smaller one that’s been in rotation for two years and nothing in its handle has failed or delaminated. And again, when it’s brand new, the Corona saw does nearly as good a job as the Gomboy at the sort of living wood I cut most often. But I don’t feel like I have to baby it, which in my environment, means that the work can go more quickly. 


And that means I’m replacing the blade more quickly. That's right, both Silky and Corona offer replacement blades for their saws, which is probably the most important thing to know when comparing the cost of ownership between these two saws. There’s also the idea of sharpening the blades, but the Gomboy uses Silky’s hardened teeth, which are not designed to be sharpened. Thankfully, when the Gomboy’s blade eventually loses its edge, I can get a replacement for $43 instead of paying the full $61 for a whole new saw. That's a huge chunk of the overall cost, but because most of Silky's craftsmanship is in the blade itself, that seems fair.

The thing is, though, a new blade for the Corona saw is just $15. Maybe it's a bad habit to buy the cheaper thing just because you can afford to keep throwing it away when it wears out, but in my reality, that’s exactly why I like using the Corona saw over the Gomboy. In the same way that southern California’s dirt is harder on tires than that of the Pacific Northwest, the trail-cutting here is harder on saws. So, I don’t fight it. I just hold my nose and let my cheap saw hit the dirt once in a while.

This is not to say that nice saws like Silky’s aren't useful in these environments. Those Gomboy-weilding crewmates of mine still get a lot done while also keeping their fancy saws out of harm's way. It's a lot easier to hack out a mountain whitethorn root ball if all those pesky white thorns are gone. Unfortunately, though, I've come to the conclusion that nice saws are just too nice for me. But if you tend to take care of your stuff, maybe you'll find them to be worth it. I mean, it's just an extra $20.





166 Comments

  • 110 0
 Silky BigBoy gets my vote. It's hands down the best folding saw I've used, and I can squeeze it into a regular-sized pack.
  • 4 1
 Agreed on the BigBoy, but at that size of tree/branch diameter, the cutting is usually faster with a chainsaw blade that has been cut and welded to hooks for webbing hand straps on either end. I keep the free chainsaw blade in my fanny pack, since it fits in a ziplock sandwich bag and can take out bigger obstacles.
  • 2 0
 @cycling-trivialities: photos of this chainsaw blade apparatus, please?
  • 4 0
 Yes, I use my Silky Bigboy when away from dirt, and for cutting near / in dirt I have a cheapo folding saw.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: that's cool
  • 6 0
 Seriously. A BigBoy with coarse teeth spacing absolutely rips through fairly big trees. I use this especially dirtbiking and take one of my other Silkys out on the mtb, but always take the BigBoy if I'm trailbuilding/clearing specfically. Now to get the Silky Gomtaro root saw for roots and I'm set (I absolutely don't use my regular Silkys for roots...).
  • 12 4
 Japanese make the best steel. They've been making it since before it was discovered. They made it, then someone else discovered it.
  • 16 13
 @DizzyNinja: Japanese do not make the best steel. Their natural steel resources are actually fairly poor from what I recall, and they had to invent extremely interesting methods to strengthen their steel. IIRC high carbon steel came from the Norse prior to the Japanese, as they were mixing animal bones into steel to bless it in a way. German steel has been exceptionally high quality for a very long time, historically. 10k folded nippon steel is a bit of a meme at this point.

Not to nerd out here, the Japanese now have access to vastly higher quality materials, but that is a biiiiiiiiiiiiig claim to make my friendo.

Source; dude who use to own a genuine folded katana.
  • 33 11
 @sherbet: I'm guessing people like talking to you at parties and around water coolers and things?
  • 4 0
 @cycling-trivialities: I find those take forever to make a cut and you almost need two people so you can really yank on it. You wind up having to remove so much material due to the chain thickness compared to a saw. I like the idea, but sadly after using mine a couple times it's been retired.
  • 1 0
 @agmin: agreed. I find the only time the hand chainsaw is good is for a 12-16" tree that is unweighted on the bottom to avoid binding. And even that I have a big boy to get the top cut. I retired mine pretty much as well.
  • 2 0
 The gomboy is a waste of money unless you are pruning bushes and cutting small limbs off trees around your yard. If you're going to carry a saw go with something larger that can still fit in a pack. I'm a big fan of the Silky Zubat Pro 300.
  • 2 1
 BigBoy fits (and usually) in a jersey pocket, for those who still wear road kit...
  • 10 9
 @DizzyNinja: As opposed to the dude with Ninja in his name buffing Japanese steel? I'm sure your neck could use a shave mate.

That said, my bad for dropping a topical note. I keep forgetting it's socially unacceptable to get into a conversation unless you agree.
  • 4 0
 @sherbet: i dunno. 30 year woodworker here. japanese chisels and planes are some of the best. love my lie-nielsen and veritas stuff. but the white steel japanese stuff is such a pleasure to use, lap and hone i can't live without it. but that's just me i guess...
  • 5 5
 Who really wears a pack these days?
  • 11 3
 @sherbet: dude the fact is no one gives a hoot about your katana
  • 2 1
 @sherbet: Take it easy on him, he is dizzy
  • 6 0
 I can vouch for the quality of Silky saws. I lost a Gomboy 300 four years ago trailbuilding. Found it by chance this year when I was clearing brush from the trail. 4 years in all the PNW weathers and the hinge, lock and blade all still work like new. There's some rust spots on the blade, that's the only defect I've noticed. Also the pocketboy 130 folded can easily fit into my tiny bontrager fanny pack so it's always with me. With large teeth I can clear surprisingly large deadfall with a 130mm blade.
  • 6 2
 Fiskars works just fine
  • 6 2
 @likeittacky: those of us doing trail work
  • 5 0
 @ghostcat: you've clearly never tried a Silky.
  • 3 5
 @somebody-else: pat yourself on the back
  • 2 1
 In my opinion silky is overrated. All guys in the bike community use it, all professionals doing tree care over here, use ARS saws. I own a ARS - PM-24 for the Backback and one non folding one for my fruit trees and its by far the sharpest saws I ever used. Its very often I think twice if its worth to get the husky out of the shed.
  • 3 1
 more of an e saw kind of guy than these acoustic versions
  • 1 0
 Gomboy -barely- fits into an Evoc Pro 3L fanny pack. I've cut some big-ass deadfall with mine.
  • 1 0
 @moroj82: yeah I’m sure it’s a great saw but fiskars I can buy at Home Depot for cheap and I don’t worry about leaving them out in the trails or losing them. They work great for your average trail building or maintaining
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer but does it fit within in-frame storage?
  • 2 0
 @likeittacky: at least 4 people who downvoted you Big Grin
  • 4 0
 @sherbet: While you were out riding, this man studied the blade.
  • 2 0
 @ghostcat: can't lie. I bought one at Home Depot. Kind of wish I had bought that IMBA style one that forms a triangular hack saw. the "Sven Folding Saw"

I'm rarely motivated to cut tiny stuff, but get aggro on stuff I can't just stomp or yank out of trail.

www.rei.com/product/404013/sven-folding-saw-21
  • 1 0
 Yup. I have two of them and have gone through a blade on each. These saws are hands down the best.
  • 2 0
 @likeittacky: nah I just hate the gym. Instead of doing deadlifts for imaginary gym bro cred I’m out riding my bike and lifting deadfall instead. It’s a win-win. I get nicer trails and I don’t have to go to the gym.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: agreed, these work very well.
  • 1 0
 @somebody-else: Don't be foolish, do the workouts occasionally it'll save you from your heroic hernia.
  • 3 0
 @Chridel: funnily enough all the uk arborists use silkys, which is to say the ones I’ve met at industry events and in the wild. They are really very highly regarded.
  • 1 0
 @Peskycoots: Maybe its like Skilsaw in the US and Festool over here...
  • 1 0
 @likeittacky: that’s why you bring the saw
  • 1 0
 Truth! You can strap to butt bag or put in a back pack and can still cut a tree that’s too big to lift by yourself. Bring a plastic wedge too for those so you don’t get pinched.
  • 2 0
 @Chridel: ah now Festool is an international byword for quality and good engineering, I’ve never seen better power tools! I’d put them up there with British steel hardtails and Belgian beers
  • 2 0
 @tabbid: what the hell is a but bag? And why are you strapping a saw to it?
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: It's actually the more correct term for what is colloquially referred to as a fanny pack. A fanny is a vagina, and us cyclists wear 'fanny packs' above our butts.
  • 101 1
 Why do you guys carry tools? Whenever I see trees down I just ride around until they eventually disappear. Works every time.
  • 11 2
 I ride around them until a new trail appears around them. What forest are you riding in with disappearing trees?
  • 7 1
 @DizzyNinja: the one with the gnomes.
  • 25 3
 #NoDigJustRide
  • 12 2
 @jaydawg69: gotta keep these hands ready to fill cavities on Monday baby. That Allied ain’t going to afford itself.
  • 3 2
 How lazy can you get??? If you can't take the time to write down where the tree is, along with all your other trail complaints, on a piece of paper and drop it in the suggestion box, you don't deserve to ride.
  • 39 1
 If Silky Gomboy isn't the name of a club in thailand...it should be.
  • 9 0
 It the name of my weekend alter ego!
  • 33 1
 The regurgitation of old Beta content continues! Travis is onto the Radivist now for anyone interested.
  • 2 1
 Considering the recent brakes article, that computes.
  • 7 0
 Mike Ferrentino is at NSMB now too. Lots of people moving around. I wouldn't be surprised to see James Huang come to pinkbike from Cyclingtips given the implosion happening over there.
  • 7 0
 @ratedgg13: Ferrentino's articles are so good.
  • 5 0
 @ratedgg13: Pinkbike (Outside) owns CyclingTips. so he'd just be moving from the fire into the frying pan. If James moves around, I'm fairly sure it will be far away from the PB/Outside shit-show.
  • 26 2
 Is it ok to use gorilla tape on these?
  • 24 0
 i'll show YOU corroded nipples
  • 8 0
 > when the Gomboy’s blade eventually loses its edge, I can get a replacement for $43

Silky make a shaped file for resharpening the teeth. Part number ‎950-02-64. Is around £20 in the UK.

With some time and care you can resharpen the teeth many times before needing to buy a new blade.
  • 3 0
 I like this. I'm cheap *ahem*, green.
  • 9 0
 I'm an arborist and I ONLY use Silky for hand saws and pole saw blades. Sharpest, keeps their edge the longest and yes, expensiveist.
  • 4 0
 arborist here as well, and would agree. I'd only use a corona or something cheaper if I intend on cutting roots/into dirt. Zubat, Tsurugi, and Big Boy.
  • 2 2
 Im not an arborists but problem manager. I love my Silky. It saw through human tight bone like through butter
  • 3 0
 They are the expensiveist, but they aren't really expensive. One of those rare occasions when you can afford to have the finest tool without having to be toooo precious or guilt-ridden.
  • 2 0
 arborist here as well and I can assure you that nearly every arborist in my area is loyal to silky.But for trail work, I say the cheap one from ace hardware because it will get abused and absolutely replaced because I either ruined it or forgot where it is..
  • 6 0
 The Silkys are by far the best saw, but be aware the little black pivot bolt wiggles out. I found that mine was fallen out when I was about to put on for a 5 day kayaking trip. I bought 4 of them, and now I keep an extra in my kit.
  • 2 0
 The bane of virtually every folding saw
  • 1 0
 yep lost mine as well, thankfully theyre easily replaced. Silky bigboy ftw.
  • 9 0
 Can we get a McLeod field test next?
  • 10 0
 Include the Rogue hoe in the mix too
  • 7 0
 Spoiler Alert: Travis Tool wins
  • 2 0
 The Rogue Hoe Pro 6" is the best bang for buck, I have about 6 years of use on mine and zero issues other than the occasional sharping.
  • 2 0
 @lowejw: I have the 6" ProHoe and thought it was the best. Now I also have a Travis Tool and it is the best. Same ability to dig as the 6" ProHoe, but also a huge flat scraper side (great for moving a lot of dirt and smoothing tread), a rake side, and a pick side (great for stubborn dirt and picking rocks out and cutting roots). Try it. It's also a little heavier which seems to make it more effective at digging and slicing roots.
  • 2 0
 The Rogue Hoe 'Travis' is the best trail building tool out there. Prove me wrong
  • 1 0
 @gnarnaimo: I prefer the heft of the Rogue 70HR, but now I am Travis curious.
  • 2 0
 @BenLow2019: rogue hoe sounds like someone you don't want to run into at the club
  • 2 0
 @gnarnaimo: agreed with you and @rickybobby18. I'd say the Travis tool is a jack of all trades, master at none. For the weight to functionality ratio it can't be beat. If you want to do maintenance work and only want 1 tool, thats that one for me.

The travis tool has 4 tools on one head, but each is 2/3 good as the one it is imitating, since overall its lighter and smaller for each except the rogue hoe side. But it does all maintenance jobs pretty decently and a great 1 tool for drainage, de berming, armoring. I carry this 98% of the time as my only head for my trailboss. Its a bummer they no longer offer it.

If I have a lot of work to do and can leave tools on the trail, I'd personally choose a pick mattock and mcleod (or hard rake) together. The pick mattock digs and cuts easier and the mcleod makes it look better once your done.
  • 1 0
 I get a guy in Williams Lake to fabricate whatever tool I can think up for me. He rips and his tools are bombproof. Chris Masters.
  • 1 0
 Pro Hoe 85h is my go to when in digging shape. 8.5” wide head moves dirt quicker around here. The added weight allows for powerful swings when needed too.
  • 5 0
 "I could see one of those Katanaboys being a huge asset for anyone without easy access to a chainsaw". I would only recommend one for wilderness cutting where chainsaws are not allowed. Otherwise carry a chainsaw in or use the big boy. The katanaboys flex too much on the blade and bound up on larger trees easier than a big boy. If you have that many trees and can use a chainsaw, do it.

I only used one 1 time 5 miles out on a backcountry trail for a 18" tree. After 10 minutes we just switched to using a big boy and it was more efficient.

Saving you all that $, put it into something better like an electric chainsaw or more silky big boys for your friends.
  • 2 0
 gotta re-emphasize this. i bought a katanaboy, because who wouldn't rather carry that than a 4-6' crosscut. it's an immensely disappointing tool. I can get through almost anything with a 14" corona faster than that thing. Soured me on the whole brand. I kinda feel like the katanaboys are more "saw nerd can have a wall decoration" than a real tool. especially at the $999 price of the 1000.
  • 1 0
 Katanaboy is large enough you’ll want to carry blocks and a hatchet with ya. I agree they can be somewhat easy to bind but it’s significantly faster than a big boi for medium and large trees where a chainsaw would be more ideal. Often I’d just rather spend an hr sawing and an hr riding than 15 minutes sawing and hr and half of walking in and out. I’ve only used the 500 and am somewhat skeptical for the larger models having value however.
  • 1 0
 @bulletbassman: the first thing i added to the bag the katana boy came in is wedges, well aware of how to take care of saw binding. this wasn't that. it just... didn't cut nearly as fast as a corona ( i use the non-folding coronas which work better, but still.) between the experience @jasbushey had, and the fact that every other saw they make has multiple tooth counts available for different kinds of wood, but somehow this one is supposed to be fine for all wood types with one tooth size... I just don't think it's as good a saw as their more mainstream products.

It's still nicer to carry than a misery whip... but if i can doublecut a log with a 14" corona faster than a single cut with the katanaboy, or maybe even faster with a something like a zubat? it's just not a saw i would recommend people buy.
  • 1 0
 @groghunter: I’ve used carona Fiskars and most the department store brands and would strongly disagree. Especially with hardwood (and anything can cut softwoods reasonably)
  • 10 2
 Living in logging town... We only use Stihl, round these there parts..... Otherwise, you get kicked outta town....
  • 3 1
 I live in a logging town and that is the sentiment here too. I own two husky’s and they always get used because the Stihls are broken! Ha ha
  • 3 0
 Mine is from Fiskars. Similar idea, but it doesn't fold (but slides instead). What's nice is that it has a carabiner-like hook near the end so I can attach it to the outside of my backpack and then just keep it from swinging just under a single strap. I don't have room for something long inside the pack because mine is split in half with the water bladder low and a bag high (with running the back protector along the full length). I wouldn't want to carry something like this on my back without some protection though, could be nasty in case of a crash.

I used a Nordic Pocketsaw (manual chainsaw) in the past but went back to the Fiskars. It may be bigger, but it is quicker to pack and clean.
  • 3 0
 I have a Corona and Silky and the Silky is light years better, I am cutting mostly Rhodo, Laurel and such, the Silky can even make quick work of Locust which makes the Corona cry. Maybe if I was cutting brush down in the ground the Corona would be the better choice but I usually use my Estwing axe.
  • 1 0
 Best thing for a rhodo is gasoline and a match. My oh my I dislike those bushes...
  • 3 0
 I own both a Silky and a Corona and have used the hell out of them. I'm normally a huge sucker for expensive tools. But I agree with Travis, in this situation I've realized that I prefer the cheaper, plenty-good-enough tool. Bonus pro tip: folding saws aren't just for cutting limbs, they also do amazing work with a swinging motion for sightline clearing, like a wicked toothy foldable machete.
  • 6 0
 I didn't saw this coming..
  • 2 0
 Based on my Corona RazorTooth pole-saw vs my Silky F180 hand-saw, you'll also be throwing away your arm and bunch of time before you actually save money on buying Corona replacement blades. The Silky cuts _SO_ much faster and easier, and I don't even know if that F180 has the fanciest blade like the *Boys. Shit, I skipped the offer of my uncle's bowsaw when Xmas tree fetching this year, the Silky is so bomb.
  • 1 0
 Chipped the end of the blade on my Gomboy after a few months use. Factoring in replacement blades are $50+ and that blades are wear items, I don't think they're worth it. Had better luck with a $30 fixed blade saw from Canadian Tire.
  • 2 0
 I've had a big boy blade last me almost every years now of regular use and still looks like new, is nice and sharp and going strong. If you chipped your blade it was user error.
  • 1 0
 @gnarnaimo: yup. I crashed my Lambo so now I stick to Kia.
  • 1 1
 @Jvisscher: Kia is more reliable
  • 2 0
 @berrpa: Normally I would agree (almost every brand is more reliable than Lamborghini), but not in this case. Kia's are complete crap. Price does not reflect quality in the automotive industry, where in the saw world it does. So no good comparisons possible there..
  • 2 0
 At the moment the 10" Corona saw (handle and blade) is $20.99 on Amazon. The replacement blade costs $23.98. It is cheaper to buy the complete saw + blade then throw it every time the blade gets dull.
  • 1 0
 The Fujiwara doesn't cut as nice as a Silky but it's only $14 and comes with an extra blade. The blade won't break as easily as a Silky will, the handle is way more comfortable than any Silky handle, and I'm not afraid to use it around dirt. I've used it alot in 2 years and am still on the original blade.
www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B07ST86HFC?psc=1&ref=ppx_pop_mob_b_asin_title
  • 1 0
 I've got a Silky Goboy 360 which fits in my backpack, light enough to be carried around in winter time when I encounter lots of fallen branches.
For bigger work on tree I then come back with my Katana boy 500 which is a beast of a saw.
Heavier but you can do a lot of work with your muscles, quietly (stealth?), and I find it a nice alternative to be in the woods on crappy winter days when I can't ride...
  • 1 0
 I’ve had and used both Silky saws and Coronas for years as well as other brands. I do too much trail work and have been at it for over twenty five years. This choice is a no brained…. Corona. Not only is the Corona much less expensive and easy to find, it works better.
  • 1 0
 Bit late to the party, but like electricity we only get internet a few times a week here in South Africa. I have a Silky Gomboy and an Agri-Cut cheap saw. I hardly ever use the Silky and only carry it when riding when I'm carrying a back pack. The cheap saw is shorter and lighter, so it fits in my bum-bag, my running garter belt and in the spez swat bibs. So the cheap saw gets used 95% of the time. In my case portability trumps usefulness.
  • 4 0
 not if you're reaching into the middle of a bush to cut, like the author is mentioning. For cuts without a bunch of bramble/twigs/etc. around it, sure.
  • 2 0
 If you're cutting something more than a few inches thick, the frame starts to limit how much you can move the saw.
  • 1 0
 @evasive: That Boreal makes a 21" version and so does Sven. The Sven is half the price of the Boreal & grip isn't as sexy & doesn't have the hacksaw 4th angle to get in the way.
  • 5 0
 Silky always....
  • 1 0
 These are great but I also like the option of mounting a hand saw to a pole to easily cut big bushes at the base. A 1970’s era 14” Sears Craftsman pruning saw is my workhorse.
  • 1 0
 I posted the same elsewhere before checking to see if others mentioned the Sven.

FYI...if you ever want to post the direct link instead of the "when this link opens up it brags on Google for helping you find it":
www.rei.com/product/404013/sven-folding-saw-21
Beer
  • 1 0
 Big boy where there isn't dirt, corona where there is. We also use a silky katana on our crew. The silkies do a great job but we consider them more of a finite resource where we'll cut roots with a corona
  • 1 0
 I usually use BigBoy but in some cases it is too long. So I recently bought a Silky PocketBoy. I am very satisfied with the same sharpness. To be honest, it is much easier to use than the BigBoy.
  • 1 0
 Interesting reading. I use the Fiskars handsaw that I keep in my backpack. I use it to remove small trees that fall on the trail or the branches that grow and obstruct the passage.
  • 3 0
 Which one fits in my internal frame storage?
  • 10 0
 I think the unfortunately-named Silky Pocketboy 130mm should fit into most frame storage. It's small but works well too!
  • 11 0
 @brianpark: you need to do a 3D printed bottle cage mount for a PocketBoy! I'd bite.
  • 2 0
 @philshep: me too - awesome idea. PocketBoy is great.
Come on BP you can do that!
  • 2 0
 just something to raise it off the frame to prevent contact... and a ski strap can hold it on!
  • 1 0
 @philshep: Dude, I'd seriously buy this immediately if it were available
  • 3 0
 @philshep: hah I told Dylan Stucki I would design one of these a while back and then immediately got distracted by other projects. Maybe I'll get back onto that project.
  • 2 0
 @philshep: or maybe like a holster along the trailing edge of the fork leg
  • 1 0
 Ever since I bought that 3D printed frame mount for my handgun, I usually just shoot branches until they're no longer threatening me. Way faster than a saw.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: A 3D mount for the Sven folding saw would be super easy.
  • 1 0
 Lucked out in buying a Corona with a Lowe’s gift card because it was the only option there, only to read later that is is actually pretty good. Felt super #blessed
  • 1 0
 Silky Bigboy 2000 with its 14" blade will fit completely within even the smallest pack, like an Osprey Katari, and cuts so much faster than a 10"
  • 1 0
 My saws usually die by bendage or breakage. Could you tell whether the Gomboy was more resistant to bending/breaking?
  • 3 0
 It is not. Thinner blade overheats more quickly, starts to flex and then you either stop and give it a minute to cool off or you muscle through and snap it. Anything thicker than 4-5” is going to require stopping at least once or twice, several more times if it’s proper dead dry hardwood.
  • 1 0
 fwiw, i have a bigboy and out of half a dozen blades i've only broken 1. I'm often sawing branches from weird angles leading to accidentally flexing the blade pretty severely, and all but the one have held up to my ham fisted abuse.
  • 3 2
 @somebody-else: curious why you specify hardwood? You know what that means right? (Angiosperm). Take cedar for example (being a softwood (gymnosperm) is harder than a lot of hardwoods.

Or did you just hard wood coz you meant a "hard" wood. Not the same.
  • 5 0
 @YukonMog: there's gotta be at least five TWSS opportunities in what you just wrote, based on the number of times you said "hard", "wood", and "sperm"
  • 1 0
 @YukonMog: I live in the land of oak trees.
  • 1 0
 I used a Silky Sugoi as an arborist and it was really hard to bend. The blade is ground with a taper along the spine so it flexes evenly, like a fishing rod. The handle is also flexible rubber, so that helps eliminate the common stress riser and breakage point. The Sugoi is one of the non-impulse hardened models that can be sharpened with a handfile.
  • 2 0
 I've had both and prefer the Corona. Can't say the same for their beer.
  • 2 1
 If you don't go to "Baller", but amazn they have the Corona for $21 which is less than a new blade for some dumb reason.
  • 5 2
 I miss Beta
  • 2 0
 I miss Bike
  • 1 0
 I have hooman wood/bone saw. It’s incredible at both. 2 blades, slick sheath and it folds up tidy.
  • 2 0
 Silky sugio 330 is the best handsaw I’ve ever used.
  • 1 0
 That's a piece of work - $130 too! O.O

Worthwhile though - good quality saws are a joy to use.
  • 2 0
 Can they saw through bones? Asking for a friend.
  • 2 0
 Yes, but it clogged with flesh pretty bad. That’s what my friend told me to tell your friend…
  • 1 0
 Ive snapped 3 silkys, but Ive also cracked my dogs head open with a Mcleod when he ran through at the wrong time.
  • 1 0
 I've broken some silky blades, everytime was my own fault however
  • 2 0
 Imma get the wood one
  • 1 0
 It’s short but at least it’s thin
  • 1 0
 Hammer, the only tool required.
  • 1 0
 We have e-Bikes. Time for e-Saws! Esaw Wood, come on down! Big Grin
  • 1 0
 i feel like i've read a similar saw review somewhere else?
  • 1 0
 remember to get the course blade with the silky i think its the black one
  • 3 3
 Screw these old fashioned analogue saws. Get me an esaw.
  • 1 0
 Amish saws for The win
  • 1 1
 I prefer a battery chain saw
  • 1 0
 Love my Stihl MSA 220 saw, but it's pretty hard to fit into my fanny pack like the silky pocketboy does. Their both great and they both serve a purpose. It can be challenging to get a chainsaw out for every job, where the folding saw can come along on rides and do work when it comes up.
  • 1 1
 Never, ever had the need for one of these. ‍♂️
  • 1 0
 More of this please!
  • 1 1
 Who named these?..
  • 1 2
 Felco or nothing.
  • 2 0
 Tell us you call brushing pruning without telling us you call brushing pruning
  • 2 5
 Milwaukee sawzall is the way
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