Unwobbler Announces Canadian-Made Wooden Truing Stand

Jun 1, 2022 at 22:35
by unwobbler  

Press Release: Unwobbler MTB Wheel Stand

Are you constantly casing jumps?
Do you put your wheels through a state of constant abuse?
Do your wheels no longer identify as being straight?

If you’ve answered yes to any of those questions, the Unwobbler Wheel Stand is here to assist your wheel building/truing needs. Now more than ever with parts shortages.

The Unwobbler Wheel Stand was designed to allow you to true or build your wheel with ease, without the hefty price-tag.

Sure, it may look a little DIY-ish, but unlike those on Pinterest, the Unwobbler was designed to abolish the use of a dishing tool so you can true or build a wheel with ease and efficiency, at a fraction of the cost of wheel stands with similar potential.

It is a more affordable alternative to constant wheel flipping on a conventional $250+ stand, dishing tools that take up too much time for what they’re worth, and $500+ stands with questionable calibration.

1. Set your hub width | 2. Set your rim position | 3. True / build your wheel

Let’s have a closer look:

Solid, sturdy construction (CNC routered ¾" Baltic Birch Ply)
Pre-etched hub widths

Steel knurled knobs

Made in BC, Canada
CNC routered in Vancouver, assembled and shipped from Whistler.

Price: $205 CAD
Buy it here (limited on-hand stock): www.unwobbler.com
Contact: unwobbler@gmail.com
Instagram: @unwobbler

Please do not contact us with questions about wheel building, it would be best to consult this guy or a professional.


116 Comments

  • 85 4
 I was going to make a snarky comment about this product….then saw the price.

Killer deal for what looks like a well made truing stand, just keep it dry.
  • 17 2
 Yah I’m buying one now. This is cool as hell. No reason a home mechanic should need to pay $500 for a true stand for the house. I’ve been waiting for a fully adjustable stand that’s not dummy expensive.
  • 5 0
 @pakleni: Not a bad one either. I do like the dual sided dish indicators on this wood one. Helps with getting everything lined up.
  • 5 0
 @cougar797: It was just to point out how it's quite easy to find a truing stand for 100 - 150 moneys even here in Ch. It should be even easier for you in USA. I agree with you, there's really no need for a fully optional Park Tool stand.
  • 8 1
 Hmm, for me seem rather expensive for what it is. At least in Europe, for around 100eur (watch out for sales) you can get the generic-branch truing stand. It requires some initial calibration (can use an already true and centre wheel for reference), but after that, it's up to the races.
Super solid build and for a home mechanic for tightening and building on occasion a wheelset seems to do the trick.
  • 3 0
 @pakleni:
english version (since changing language choice on their site reloads a new page, took me 5 minutes to find it again)

www.alltricks.com/F-11929-outillage/P-79417-unior_wheel_centering_stand
  • 8 0
 "Made by trainee beavers who are not paid for that"; that's what the article doesn't mention.
  • 1 0
 @preston67: Thanks I never found it...
  • 17 0
 @pakleni: The main gripe I have with these ones is the inability to centre (dish) the rim without the use of a dishing tool... and that's how the Unwobbler was born!
  • 2 20
flag KK11 (Jun 2, 2022 at 15:14) (Below Threshold)
 Looks like a balsa wood project. Pass.
  • 2 0
 @unwobbler: There's no hate towards your product. I think it's cool.

I was just reacting to the statement how it's hard to find cheap stand for home mechanics
  • 8 0
 @KK11: You should check in to what baltic birch is all about. It's really, really good material.
  • 3 0
 @cougar797: www.bike-discount.de/en/radon-professional-wheel-truing-stand-for-qr/thru-axles

I have this one and its really good, basically the same functionality as the park tools one just a bit more basic.
But it has the dual sided indicator and can be calibrated easily

Edit: It also works for 29" with tires perfectly even though the description says you have to remove the tires
  • 1 1
 why was your first reaction to make a snarky comment?
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: 205 cdn is 150 euros, so no problem. Looks like a sweet set up!
  • 3 0
 @KK11: @KK11: baltic birch ply is a great material, super stable and flat. It won't come off the rack looking like a taco like the shite standard ply these days. Tons of furniture in europe is made with it. I use it in my wood shop for making jigs and fixtures, as well as for cabinets. Super bomber.

Incidentally, a lot of it has come from Ukraine and Russia, so will be interesting to see what happens to the price!
  • 1 0
 @bakenbikin: It's slightly over 100 eur here in Ch
  • 1 0
 @bakenbikin: I paid 65 euros 2 years ago for a hard duty Red Cycling truer that I've already used hundreds of times in my personal (pro) workshop without any issue. One of the best bargains I did when launching my little firm. I just doesn't accept 150 and 157mm axles. I never had any till now... but I can easily build adapters if it occurs Wink
  • 72 2
 This in my roommate who makes these—by hand. High quality, very dialled.
  • 58 1
 Sorry for the mess Construction
  • 40 2
 THE WORLD CHAMP COMMENTED!!!!
  • 31 1
 I can’t think of any good wood puns I think I better branch off into another topic.
  • 10 0
 Probably better to splinter off now with heads boughed, before people twig and bark out more.
  • 1 0
 Please don't leaf.
  • 1 0
 Yes, but wood you use it?
  • 1 0
 youve got me stumped... i perhaps wood feel oaklined to but if i tripped and rooted it i would cedar price of a replacement and fall.
  • 16 2
 Came in fully expecting something called "The unwobbler" to be a wooden kickstand that attaches to Levy's leg while he walks out of a pub. Or perhaps to stabilize Quinney the next time some rando give him shrooms.

Come to think of it, I could use one myself.
  • 17 1
 Simple and well thought-out product.
  • 8 0
 Thanks guys!
  • 6 1
 I thought to myself….. I’ll scroll down and see if Privateer Wheels chimes in.

Sold.
  • 6 0
 @tkrug: Aww shucks!
  • 9 0
 I have been using a Roger Musson designed wooden truing stand for years now.... never had a problem with it....
admin.isambards.co.uk/download/B20191123T000000386.jpg
  • 5 0
 I also made this last year, cost me around $50 in plywood and hardware. The plywood was actually scrap I had laying around. Built my first set of wheels with this design, works a treat.
  • 7 1
 @MinTheMerciless: “$50 in plywood”

I assume you took out a loan for the rest?

I kid, but those lumber prices for reeeal.
  • 10 0
 I drew inspo from these! Unfortunately it doesn't allow you to centre (dish) the rim if you are building something from scratch, or prevent you from pulling the rim too far to one side. I do love the simplicity though!
  • 1 0
 @unwobbler: yea it does. you just place something against one side of the rim as a reference, secure it there. then flip the wheel around. if there's a gap between the other side of the rim and the reference, you know you need to bring the rim in half that distance. you don't need a dishing tool. i used this method and my wheels were bang on centred. i saw it in a youtube video.
  • 7 0
 Much nicer to look at than a rigid fork in a vice with popsicle sticks taped on for checking up ,down and side movement. Then I flip the wheel in the fork stand to ensure it's perfect . Awesome this is made locally.
  • 10 0
 'This Guy' is the best.
  • 25 2
 "This guy" will just tell you to talk to this guy: www.sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html
  • 3 0
 @jonbath: I'd hoped the link would go to Mr Brown when I clicked to see.
  • 2 0
 @Quinn-39: the Legend.
  • 3 0
 Seems like a reasonable deal, I guess you’re using your thru axle for the axle. That may be a bit of a problem for some axle standards that have smaller dia threads or are too short, but I imagine that’s a small percentage.

I managed to get a Park pro stand years ago on Craigslist, and it’ll likely last the rest of my life, but it doesn’t play well with large volume tires and 29ers. Plus you can’t easily dish with it, I like that this stand addresses that. I just dish off of my workbench but this would be much easier.

If I was in the market and couldn’t find a used Park, this would be my next choice.
  • 1 0
 Park sells the newer version of their stand's calipers that allow big wheels. They also sell tower extenders. And problem solvers has pretty slick stepped axle adapters that slip into hubs to make it a 9mm for the stand to grab easier. As long as you don't own a true fat bike, those three things will make an old park stand do plus 29 down to 12" just fine.
  • 5 0
 This looks like a great solution, kudos to the people who designed and built this. You could do a great home stain and oiling of this, and make it look spectacular
  • 5 1
 Dee's makes a really nice stain. Have you heard of them?
  • 2 0
 @KeithShred: I prefer tipidis brand, but dee's works great too
  • 6 0
 The link to Google as the "consult this guy". Well played @unWobbler, well played.
  • 2 0
 @unwobbler : Suggestion re the increments on the gauges for 'rim position'. Perhaps the increments could be set in terms of the outer rim width. For example, if my outer rim width is 34 mm, then I slide both sides to '34' or, say, start at '50' and work my way towards the '34' setting as I get my rim straighter and straighter. This way I don't have to do maths on working out where my gauge should be from the centreline of the rim.

This may help with dishing - I kinda have a goal. With this method one could also use only one guage in the right position to get the major adjustments done, and then bring the second guage for fine tuning. This way I don't have my rim banging both sides.

If you like that, you could keep the current distance gauge on one side and the 'rim width' version on the other.
  • 2 0
 I did consider this, however with the hub widths being variable it's not entirely possible to have specific measurements on the side indicators too. At the moment it's just a matter of ensuring they're the same on each side... (eg. -3.5 on the left & on the 3.5 right)
* Also note that some wheels require an offset
  • 4 0
 Was already most of the way through express checkout when I realized shipping to the US is not an option.
  • 5 0
 Technical difficulties - should be fixed now but feel free to shoot me an email too! unwobbler@gmail.com
  • 2 0
 @unwobbler: Ordered one. Thanks!
  • 1 0
 So happy I bought a Park Tools TS2.2 truing stand back in the day when it was around $150US. I can't believe the inflation these days. You'd be lucky to find a bomb-proof metal truing stand for less than $400! Wood or plastic warp/disintegrate over time. If you really want to build good wheels, go for the industrial truing stand. If not, just use your frame or fork as the stand.
  • 1 0
 Does it support Superboost (158mm) plus some axle adaptor? I had problems to find a truing stand advertising support for Superboost hubs.

I thought about going the DIY truing stand way.
  • 2 0
 157 you mean, and yes, it's written on the base
  • 2 0
 The BITUL (Polish brand) one need more props : very sturdy and inexpensive :
bitul.pl/en_GB/p/TRUING-STAND-BASIC-TS001/110
  • 5 2
 If you read this, you case jumps.
  • 1 0
 Awesome product idea, I ordered one to try out, anyone have any lefty hub adapter ideas (or is there only the one company that makes them)?
  • 4 0
 Bought!
  • 2 1
 @unwobbler I have a question, won't this be inaccurate when there are fluctuations in humidity and temperature? Otherwise, it is an excellent idea.
  • 9 0
 All plywood runs the risk of warping, and the most common type of warp in plywood is bowing. Baltic birch is not immune, it’s still a wood product. However, Baltic birch has the odds stacked in its favor much better than other plywood, especially in 3/4″ thickness and the fact that it's cut down to smaller sizes. 3/4″ Baltic birch in particular won’t change much in width or length, that’s why it’s great for jigs and fixtures that need to maintain accuracy over the years.
  • 1 1
 @unwobbler: Okay, that makes sense. I have experience working with maple veneers when making skateboards and the veneers can change their length 2-3mm depending on humidity and temperature. I was just wondering if birch has the same problem.

Would you ever sell plans to people so that they can if they have a CNC router machine and CNC laser engraver make their own?
  • 3 0
 you had me at knurled knobs....
  • 3 0
 Dang I can't dish my old 130mm road wheels.
  • 4 0
 Agreed! Constructive criticism : an updated version could include 130 mm and 197 mm marks for most common hub sizes covering road and fat biking.
  • 1 0
 @dolmen @takeiteasyridehard : shoot me an email and I'll make a custom one for you Smile
For other hub widths that are not pre-etched, there's a ruler at the bottom so you can set it yourself.
  • 1 0
 @unwobbler: That is a very generous offer. I didn't see the ruler on the other half of the bottom board, and I was being a bit facetious. You have a very well thought out product and seem like a great person. Best of luck to you! If I needed a trying stand I would buy yours.
  • 2 0
 can we talk about how many gems are in this article? so good!
  • 1 0
 I think the design and function of this looks great. If I didn’t already have a stand I’d buy one.
  • 2 0
 Sell the one you have and buy this and then pocket the profits
  • 2 0
 Won't the wooden feeler gauges wear out from the rim rubbing on them?
  • 1 0
 With the humidity in Oz this will give you a nicely dished off-centre wheel after a couple of weeks of warping
  • 2 1
 Seems like it should be made out of maple...
  • 1 0
 The maple/birch etc. is just the veneer topsheets. It really doesn't matter much.
  • 1 0
 @VTwintips: i was a pro woodworker for 20 plus years. baltic birch ply is different from other veneer plys in that the top sheets are of higher quality than the core sheets, but the same species. meaning the core sheets are not junk. it's odd stuff to work with and handle because it comes in 5' x 5' sheets instead of 4' x 8' sheets as is standard with other types of ply. it is extremely stable compared to other wood products. i have had jigs and fixtures in my shop last decades without any loss of accuracy.
  • 3 0
 @VTwintips: because it's Canadian
  • 1 0
 @sparcula: OHHHHHHHHH. I get it.
  • 2 0
 @flipoffthemonkeys: I didn't realize baltic birch is was different than regular birch. You can get birch plies at home depot and they're really different. Now I understand why and why the "baltic" part actually matters. I see why my bosses plywood cost so much more for his personal projects now too, lol. I always noticed that the plies in his wood were different. Flatter and more consistent rather than being boudinage looking (geology term). Thanks for that.
  • 3 0
 @VTwintips: I made a proto using birch ply from home depot... I can email you a picture of the difference... it's awful!
  • 1 0
 @unwobbler: dm'd you my email.
  • 1 0
 @sparcula: Maybe you could use maple syrup as a stain instead.
  • 3 2
 Hell yeah! That's like 75 bucks in freedom units!
  • 2 1
 200 USD? I see lamber is still sky-high prices
  • 1 0
 Baaaaahhhhh!
  • 1 0
 It looks nice and all but my truing stand is metal and cost 40 euros.
  • 1 0
 Looks like it's straight out of the IKEA catalogue!
  • 1 0
 That's like $14USD! IN!!!!
  • 2 0
 This is fantastic!
  • 1 1
 What brand CNC router is being used?
  • 1 0
 Don't have that handy, I'm sorry Julian.
  • 3 0
 I've got access to a Shopbot. I'm no *real* machinist but it gets the job done!
  • 1 0
 @unwobbler: Nice. I run a Biesse Roverplast J and a ShopSabre IS408.
  • 2 4
 Really wish it was finished, I'd be weary of moisture or shop grease ruining it. Make this design out of steel or aluminum and they'll print cash.
  • 4 1
 An alloy pro version, fully anodized and laser etched would be very nice. I would buy one. But I imagine it would cost a heck of a lot more.
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels: for sure, but I feel it would be worth it because the premium options available are slim unless you like a certain blue brand that rhymes with darkpool
  • 2 1
 @Bro-LanDog: There are a few more! Unior, and Birzman (quite nice) are kind of in the same league as the "pro" blue stands. Aivee came out with a beautiful looking stand as well a short while ago that looks lovely, but I suspect costs a good deal more. DT Swiss has their own which is quite pricey. And then there is the P&K Lie which is more expensive again.

There are some good looking Asian made truing stands as well, that you can find on eBay or alibaba.

But still, same as you, I think this design has lots to offer and a more premium alloy offering might just do well.
  • 1 0
 You can always stain it
  • 2 1
 @Mitchemous: For shop/pro use where you see multiple wheels a day in a stand, I am not sure a simple stain will cut it. And for shop/pro use, I think the buyer will be willing to pony up the cost for alloy/metal.
  • 10 3
 Shop grease will be fine on it, it’ll help keep moisture from penetrating.
Jesus, get some linseed oil and oil it, stop whinging, it’s made of wood, oil it yourself
  • 3 3
 Are you incapable of taking 10 minutes to brush some poly on it?
  • 3 0
 @onawalk: a product designed to fit together without a coating may not fit together well with a coating.
  • 1 1
 @fullendurbro: am I capable? Of course. Willing to the spend money? Meh.
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels: thanks for the brands, I'll check em out!
  • 3 0
 @Bro-LanDog: oil is not a coating, it soaks into the wood to preserve/seal it.
Pretty basic woodworking stuffm
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: does it not expand the wood?
  • 2 0
 @Bro-LanDog: I asked “that guy” and found this

ibuildit.ca/tips/oil-swell-wood

Presumably - stain it, oil it, drop oil on it, oil it annually, drop more oil on it, spill beer and be glad you oiled and spilled oil on it first

Unless that guy is lying, but oiling wood as a preservative is a pretty time tested technique
  • 1 0
 @tkrug: right on, thanks. Looks legit then.
  • 1 0
 Very nice.
Below threshold threads are hidden





You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2022. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.016271
Mobile Version of Website