Are Mag Pedals a bad idea?

PB Forum :: Freeride & Slopestyle
Are Mag Pedals a bad idea?
Previous Page |
Author Message
Posted: May 10, 2010 at 3:35 Quote
Time to replace my pedals so looking around online, I came across some deals on a few magnesium pedals like the DMR V12, Wellgo MG-1, and Azonic Fusion. The manufacturers say these are made for FR/DH use, but are mag pedals a bad idea for constant jumps/drops? From what I've heard in the past, mag sacrifices some strength/rigidity, when compared to aluminum, for weight savings. Is that true or is it BS?

Posted: May 10, 2010 at 4:10 Quote
Triple8Sol wrote:
Time to replace my pedals so looking around online, I came across some deals on a few magnesium pedals like the DMR V12, Wellgo MG-1, and Azonic Fusion. The manufacturers say these are made for FR/DH use, but are mag pedals a bad idea for constant jumps/drops? From what I've heard in the past, mag sacrifices some strength/rigidity, when compared to aluminum, for weight savings. Is that true or is it BS?

Magnesium is actually stiffer than aluminum,it is also used to make wheels for rally cars and specialized use it on their link on the demo 7/8 2 models.

Unsecure image, only https images allowed: http://www.nsmb.com/assets/images/A-events2009/ReadersRides1/Picture4MagLink.jpg

Posted: May 10, 2010 at 4:15 Quote
Magnesium cracks more easily, so if you're hitting your pedals on rocks all the time, I wouldn't advise them.

It corrodes more than aluminum as well.

Posted: May 10, 2010 at 4:44 Quote
its a magnesium alloy, anything that with be made with that should have some sort of warranty, ive never had any issues with them, id go mag

Posted: May 10, 2010 at 5:14 Quote
marquis wrote:
Magnesium is actually stiffer than aluminum,it is also used to make wheels for rally cars and specialized use it on their link on the demo 7/8 2 models.
True but magnesium is used in race wheels of all types because it bends rather than cracks, not stiffness. However I am using mag pedals for street/trail/jumps/park, prepare to loose large amounts of magnesium to concrete or slick rock. Still solid though after 4 months, and the amount i've lost only saves weight:P

Posted: May 10, 2010 at 5:16 Quote
R-trailking-S wrote:
marquis wrote:
Magnesium is actually stiffer than aluminum,it is also used to make wheels for rally cars and specialized use it on their link on the demo 7/8 2 models.
True but magnesium is used in race wheels of all types because it bends rather than cracks, not stiffness. However I am using mag pedals for street/trail/jumps/park, prepare to loose large amounts of magnesium to concrete or slick rock. Still solid though after 4 months, and the amount i've lost only saves weight:P

other way round mate, mag cracks not bends

Posted: May 10, 2010 at 5:21 Quote
connen31 wrote:
R-trailking-S wrote:
marquis wrote:
Magnesium is actually stiffer than aluminum,it is also used to make wheels for rally cars and specialized use it on their link on the demo 7/8 2 models.
True but magnesium is used in race wheels of all types because it bends rather than cracks, not stiffness. However I am using mag pedals for street/trail/jumps/park, prepare to loose large amounts of magnesium to concrete or slick rock. Still solid though after 4 months, and the amount i've lost only saves weight:P

other way round mate, mag cracks not bends

All in application. In solid chunks, like an engine block, yes because it has to be pressurized hot in casting like bmw engines. Layed out thin, it is brittle, but also an extremely malleable metal

Posted: May 11, 2010 at 4:47 Quote
marquis wrote:
Magnesium is actually stiffer than aluminum,it is also used to make wheels for rally cars and specialized use it on their link on the demo 7/8 2 models.

When it comes to car wheels, mag just is far lighter but not as strong as forged aluminum. That's what I knew about it coming into this, but just wasn't sure how it applied to pedal design. That example doesn't really apply anyways since pro rally/indy tend to rebuild/replace parts (like wheels) before there is even a chance of catastrophic failure.

Posted: May 11, 2010 at 4:50 Quote
JokerMachine wrote:
Magnesium cracks more easily, so if you're hitting your pedals on rocks all the time, I wouldn't advise them.

It corrodes more than aluminum as well.

I didn't even think about corrosion, but that actually would be a concern. Although I store my bike indoors, it can get pretty wet/muddy out here in the PNW sometimes.

Posted: May 11, 2010 at 6:51 Quote
Triple8Sol wrote:
marquis wrote:
Magnesium is actually stiffer than aluminum,it is also used to make wheels for rally cars and specialized use it on their link on the demo 7/8 2 models.

When it comes to car wheels, mag just is far lighter but not as strong as forged aluminum. That's what I knew about it coming into this, but just wasn't sure how it applied to pedal design. That example doesn't really apply anyways since pro rally/indy tend to rebuild/replace parts (like wheels) before there is even a chance of catastrophic failure.

I said stiffer not stronger,hence why it is widely used in suspension fork lowers,albeit in a mixed form.

Posted: May 11, 2010 at 7:10 Quote
marquis wrote:
I said stiffer not stronger,hence why it is widely used in suspension fork lowers,albeit in a mixed form.

I would think that the reason they use it over plain aluminum is because it's lighter. Suspension forks are heavy, they try to shave off as much as they can where they can.

Or maybe I'm talking out of my ass.

Posted: May 11, 2010 at 7:22 Quote
JokerMachine wrote:
marquis wrote:
I said stiffer not stronger,hence why it is widely used in suspension fork lowers,albeit in a mixed form.

I would think that the reason they use it over plain aluminum is because it's lighter. Suspension forks are heavy, they try to shave off as much as they can where they can.

Or maybe I'm talking out of my ass.

From what i read magnesium is stiffer and lighter than aluminum,so yes you are right.

Posted: May 11, 2010 at 7:29 Quote
The basic pro/con list for Mag Vs Alu is

1. Aluminum, versus magnesium is heavier and more corrosion resistant.
2. Magnesium, is a lightweight substitute for aluminum.
3. Magnesium, needs a protective coating to make it an anti corrosive material.
4. Aluminum, has a lower die casting cost when compared to magnesium.
5. Magnesium, is soft and flexible when compared to aluminum, which is stronger.

I believe the use in lowers is typically when a alu/mag alloy is used to save weight.

Posted: May 11, 2010 at 7:38 Quote
Well i will be buggered i was always led to believe that magnesium was stiffer,mag also absorbs vibration better so could also be a deciding factor as to why it's used for fork lowers,my apologies and i stand corrected.

Posted: May 11, 2010 at 10:33 Quote
marquis wrote:
Well i will be buggered i was always led to believe that magnesium was stiffer,mag also absorbs vibration better so could also be a deciding factor as to why it's used for fork lowers,my apologies and i stand corrected.

it is probably stiffer than cast aluminum which is not nearly as strong as machined aluminum.

Previous Page |

 
Copyright © 2000 - 2020. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.006167
Mobile Version of Website