Block user

Supported Regions

Hornby Island via HIMBA

Recent

Rode in Mount Fromme. view ridelog
May 23, 2019 at 17:17
21 hours
quotes Afternoon Ride
6.5 km - 00:54
Rode in Mount Fromme. view ridelog
May 20, 2019 at 11:17
May 20, 2019
quotes Morning Ride
11.5 km - 02:09
Rode in Mount Fromme. view ridelog
May 16, 2019 at 17:15
May 16, 2019
quotes Afternoon Ride
6.3 km - 00:57 - 1 achievements
Rode in Mount Fromme. view ridelog
May 15, 2019 at 17:45
May 15, 2019
quotes Afternoon Ride
7.6 km - 01:05 - 1 achievements
Rode in Mount Seymour. view ridelog
May 14, 2019 at 1:08
May 14, 2019
quotes Morning Ride
8.2 km - 01:26 - 2 achievements - 1 badges
Rode in Alice Lake & Highlands. view ridelog
May 12, 2019 at 0:49
May 12, 2019
quotes Afternoon Ride
16.6 km - 02:22 - 6 achievements
Rode in Mount Seymour. view ridelog
May 9, 2019 at 17:38
May 9, 2019
quotes Afternoon Ride
9.6 km - 01:31
Xorrox mikekazimer's article
May 7, 2019 at 18:52
May 7, 2019
Video: Are 29/27.5" Mullet Bikes Faster Than 29ers?
@rmjowett: I believe you are correct. I don’t have the spread sheet I did all the calculations on any more but the very roughly 1/3 of 30mm bb rise (~10mm) sounds about right.
Xorrox mikekazimer's article
May 6, 2019 at 20:59
May 6, 2019
Video: Are 29/27.5" Mullet Bikes Faster Than 29ers?
Here are my experiences with self made "mullet / frankenbikes" which I've been running for around 3 years / 2 different bikes: Pros: - Much better resistance to going over the bars in steep downhill terrain. This in turn is a huge confidence booster and allows me to take a more centered 'attack' position on the bike in these conditions instead of hanging off the back. - Better front wheel 'rollover' ability (common to all 29" wheeled bikes), both climbing and descending. Also more high speed stability in the front over rough stuff, a trait all 29ers tend to share due to the gyroscopic effect of the larger wheels. - More front end 'pop' when hitting obstacles and sharp lips. The front wheel tends to deflect upwards more rather than getting hung up or plowing straight through. This can be good (makes launching off roots and rocks easier) or it can be bad (you can't steer when your front wheel is in the air). However, this encourages you to weight the front wheel more than before, actually improving grip and cornering. - Related to the point above, jumping just feels more natural and controlled to me. The greater front wheel 'pop' encourages launching off practically everything while the landings feel more controlled as the larger front wheel gives a greater margin for error when landing front heavy. - A higher front end (assuming you don't reduce the amount of front fork travel that much) means a higher BB which means fewer pedal strikes. (But this is also a negative). Cons: - Unless you reduce your fork travel by around 30 mm when you switch to a 29er front fork and wheel, the whole front end of the bike will be significantly higher. However, the higher stack height was fine for me as I was already using a bunch of spacers under my stem and a riser bar so I just got rid of those for a similar bar height. - The higher front end also means your stand over height will increase which may be annoying if the bike already has a fairly high stand over height. - This will also raise your bottom bracket by around 15 to 20 mm (which is also common in long travel full 29er bikes) which might be less than ideal because of the higher center of gravity. I never noticed this as an issue and, in fact liked the fewer pedal strikes as a result. - It will also slacken the head angle by around 1.5 degrees which to me is a net benefit but does lead to a longer wheelbase and more wheel flop on tight uphill corners. A reduced offset fork may help with this a little or you can install a negative angle set if you don't like this. - Finally and most importantly, it will also slacken your effective seat angle by around 1.5 degrees. You can somewhat compensate for this by slamming your seat all the way forward on the rails but to me this is the biggest downside on most bikes. For this reason, the bikes that are most ideal for this swap are ones with the steepest initial seat angle. As a result, I do find myself riding the nose of my seat on steep climbs more than I would like to. - The larger front wheel and slacker head angle means you need to take the wide, outside line going into tight slow corners. This is typical of all slack 29ers though I believe. The one thing that may not be similar to a full 29er (I'm not sure on this) is that the 27.5" rear tire takes a significantly different line through the corner than the front. This makes riding North Shore 'skinnies' a lot more challenging than a full 27.5" wheeled bike as there often is not enough room to keep both wheels on the skinny when there is a turn unless you 'hop' the back wheel ( which I suck at). - Another 'con' that will discourage many people from trying this is that it will almost certainly void your frame warranty. Over-forking and over-wheeling the front of 27.5" bike by this much puts a lot more stress on the head tube area of the frame so you wouldn't want to try this on a bike that is known to be weak in this area. That said, I'm a really heavy guy (riding weight with pack around 230lbs) and I've never had issues with this on either of my bikes in spite of the fact I rode hard enough to crack my shock link and break the damper shaft in my DB Inline shock (at different times) . A guide to selecting a good bike to make into a 'mixer / frankenbike / mullet bike": - Steep seat angle - Not too slack a head angle or the ability to install a negative head angle set if you don't like super (DH like) slack head angles on bikes. (I really don't mind the current 63.5 head angle on my Patrol with the 29er fork but many might not like it). - A low BB and stand over height in stock configuration - A strong head tube area; carbon bikes may be the winner here as I would be more concerned about welds breaking after some time on an aluminum bike due to the extra stress over time. - A bike designed around a 170mm or even 180mm 27.5" fork would also be ideal for the strength and geometry reasons already listed above. I think the new 2018 SBG Transition Patrol and probably 27.5" YT Capra would be ideal bikes for this type of conversion, although the Transition Patrol at least would probably require a reverse angle set or you would end up with a 63 or even 62.5 degree head angle. The bottom line for me is that a 29 front, 27.5 inch rear bike is best for the Pacific Northwest steep and technical up and down trails and bike park riding. Obviously this will not be for everyone, and probably would not be great for cross country but for me its perfect.
Rode in Galbraith. view ridelog
May 6, 2019 at 18:03
May 6, 2019
quotes Galby
16.5 km - 02:02 - 3 achievements - 1 badges
Load more...
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.045615
Mobile Version of Website