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lusenator redbullbike's article
Nov 28, 2018 at 10:33
Nov 28, 2018
Must Watch: Brandon Semenuk's 'AIM'
backflips are cool and all that but hes doing this shit with vans on? those things are like floppy slippers
lusenator danielsapp's article
Jun 14, 2018 at 17:13
Jun 14, 2018
Mountain Biking's Troubled Roots & the Hope in Marin County
I grew up mountain biking in Marin and would like to put this in perspective. I see a lot of people speculating on things they're misinformed about or saying they came through and had a bad experience. I've ridden in 10-15 different countries the last 4 years and this has really opened up my own perspective on what a great riding location can be like. Marin is a place I absolutely love. The trouble is that the only real way you can enjoy trails in Marin is if you know where to go. A lot of riding locations I've spent time in are extremely established and labeled or even have a spiderweb of a network of great trails (ex: Rotorua or Bellingham). We are not well set up for being a destination because we don't have a good infrastructure for informing and welcoming traveling riders. We don't have shuttles, tight trail networks, or even a good resource for information. Our best trails are spread around, not in a tight cluster and the good stuff requires a decent climb to get to. Then the trails themselves either aren't originally built for bikes, or they were built so early in mountain biking's history (tamarancho) that they come across as very "XC" where you might have some fun downhills but then you're met with tight switchbacks and a trail that might not be using the terrain as more modern trails do. Generally speaking more modern trails are built to maintain speed, not require hard braking or to have pinch climbs. We have a flow trail, and some of our newer trails absolutely pick up those cues. But because it's crazy difficult to have new trails put in Marin, most of our trails that we ride were either built for other purposes (and just happen to be really fun for a bike) or in some cases were built by cyclists a long time ago before it was so illegal to do so. But again that was before the more modern way of building trails was so popular. Out of all the places I've been the last few years: New Zealand, Australia, Peru, Nepal, Iceland, Costa Rica, Dolomites & Finale Ligure, Scotland, France, Canada and most of the PNW, I can honestly say theres a couple of my favorite trails in Marin. I've shown friends that have traveled here and they loved it to. So the truth is we DO have great riding, bike shops older than mountain biking is and are still in business, great beer and food too. We have beautiful areas to ride so close to the coolest little welcoming town (Fairfax!). But if you don't know where to go you won't find that. And thats actually quite normal in other parts of the world, a lot of my early trips I've been on I spent so many extra days in some locations just trying to figure out where to ride by exploring and guessing. Trailforks has become a great tool to overcome that for travelers, but the only way to really be set is if you have a guide. There's no doubt Marin has it's large amount of issues but there's so much good to it as well. I'm extremely proud to be from here and would love to answer anyone's questions about it.
lusenator danielsapp's article
Jun 14, 2018 at 16:46
Jun 14, 2018
Mountain Biking's Troubled Roots & the Hope in Marin County
@Hill-Seeker: you have a point but I grew up in Marin and have traveled a lot the last few years as well, what he's saying is that theres actually a very close minded attitude in Marin specifically, but those extreme representative types simultaneously signify as open minded. My friends and I used to say "you're not open minded just because you're liberal". Its just kind of the culture in Marin, you're open minded until someone you don't agree with starts talking to you. It's a big irony but the truth is that no one likes to feel challenged or wrong.
lusenator sarahmoore's article
May 23, 2018 at 13:26
May 23, 2018
Ergon's Saddle Designer: "My Female Colleagues & I Couldn't Find a Saddle We Were Happy With" - Interview
Had an Ergon saddle (their "enduro" version) and it was super painful on long rides, which is ironic how not ergonomic that saddle was, thought maybe theres a wear in period but even a year later it was still painful, got a WTB volt and it was more comfortable on the first ride than the Ergon ever was. That was 2 years ago, 3 bikes ago, same WTB saddle is still working so well. Sorry Ergon :/
lusenator sarahmoore's article
May 1, 2018 at 10:20
May 1, 2018
lusenator mikelevy's article
Mar 29, 2018 at 15:32
Mar 29, 2018
Should the Derailleur Die? Zerode's Gearbox-Equipped Taniwha - Review
@taletotell: YO! looks like maybe they had that whole integrated project at some point https://www.electricbike.com/pinion/ its a little old but its there also on that link I showed you earlier, on their site, they do talk about the benefit of having the motor on the hub so there's not extra motorized stress on the gearbox so maybe thats why they're doing it that way now, kinda makes sense
lusenator mikelevy's article
Mar 29, 2018 at 15:17
Mar 29, 2018
Should the Derailleur Die? Zerode's Gearbox-Equipped Taniwha - Review
@taletotell: There's rumor they're making electric shifters too. Pinion sees the demand and they're working on it, it takes a long time for a company to get to the point where they can announce and show a new product. Especially considering that they're so much smaller than sram/shimano and they also dont have the years to have all these secret side projects going on all the time until they're ready to be shown. Were definitely in the "early adopter" phase of gearbox bikes but I have to say its definitely worth it! such a fun bike, and thats what really counts in the end!
lusenator mikelevy's article
Mar 29, 2018 at 15:15
Mar 29, 2018
Should the Derailleur Die? Zerode's Gearbox-Equipped Taniwha - Review
Good thing to bring up too: There's really low cost over time. You dont have to replace $500 cassettes, chains last way longer (mine just lasted a year of hard use), your der will never get smashed by anything or wear out. So your overtime cost is so low compared to a traditional drivetrain. If you're going to talk about the price being an issue, this is a really important thing to be aware of.
lusenator mikelevy's article
Mar 29, 2018 at 15:07
Mar 29, 2018
Should the Derailleur Die? Zerode's Gearbox-Equipped Taniwha - Review
Also I gotta say (I've owned a taniwha for a year, like i've said in previous comments) This bike actually does climb incredibly well, its just not a fast XC climber. I did trans NZ this year and was climbing long steep fireroad climbs that most riders walked, I've been riding for a while but I attribute most of that to the crazy low gear you can get into. Despite it being a 160mm enduro shredder, it absolutely gets you to the top if you're cruising. ALSO Sam Shaw has won XC races on his taniwha #justsayin
lusenator mikelevy's article
Mar 29, 2018 at 14:59
Mar 29, 2018
Should the Derailleur Die? Zerode's Gearbox-Equipped Taniwha - Review
@taletotell: They dont offer a motorized gearbox (would be surprised if they arent already working on this) but they do have a motorized rear hub that obviously works with a gearbox https://pinion.eu/en/e-bike/
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