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the303kid vernonfelton's article
Mar 28, 2016 at 11:43
Mar 28, 2016
Banned in the USA: Part 2
http://www.singletracks.com/blog/trail-advocacy/mountain-biking-has-an-identity-crisis-and-it-affects-us-all/ Another link posted below threshold that gets a lot further into the comments I made above.
the303kid vernonfelton's article
Mar 28, 2016 at 11:17
Mar 28, 2016
Banned in the USA: Part 2
The Flow Trails comment was in reference to what this comment was replying to originally which is now below threshold because too many users of this website do not approve of any suggestion that bikes leave an impact on the land just like any other form of outdoor recreation. The user who I was replying to was suggesting that allowing for bicycles in Wilderness Areas would lead to trail widening (sanitization) that is taking place at many riding areas. If you read my comment what I was saying is that the style and designation of a trail should influence what the trail looks like on the ground, for example "backcountry trails" would not wind up turning into widened bermed flow trails if the powers at be plan recreation appropriately.
the303kid vernonfelton's article
Mar 28, 2016 at 10:50
Mar 28, 2016
Banned in the USA: Part 2
I'm reposting this because it's below threshold because of who I replied to, and despite being less popular to the average pinkbike user I think it is hugely important. We need to have a dialog about trail access and not just a gimmie gimmie approach. Mountain Bikers should not feel entitled to any form of access because just a few short years ago we had none. I'm not suggesting that the work the STC is wrong, I actually think bikes should be allowed in sections of Wilderness Areas however too many riders are ill informed on issues of outdoor recreation planning and the complexities involved in making decisions that impact federal or state public lands. The issue far more complex then building flow trails in Wilderness Areas, and I also do not believe this is what the STC is advocating for. I have to say I agree bikes do not belong in all outdoor settings, we as a group (mountain bikers) need to understand that there is a reason why we don't have trails on every patch of open land available. However with proper zoning and planning, tails that support bicycle and other forms of manual powered travel can fit into the vision of what "Wilderness" in the United States is. Backcountry trails should be just that, backcountry, this should inform the style of trail regardless of what the particular context of the outdoor space is designated. Different mountain biking experiences can exists as a apart and a part from one another, if we do not provide this variety of trail experience we risk alienating ourselves from one another.
the303kid vernonfelton's article
Mar 28, 2016 at 10:40
Mar 28, 2016
Banned in the USA: Part 2
The issue far more complex then building flow trails in Wilderness Areas, and I also do not believe this is what the STC is advocating for. I have to say I agree bikes do not belong in all outdoor settings, we as a group (mountain bikers) need to understand that there is a reason why we don't have trails on every patch of open land available. However with proper zoning and planning, tails that support bicycle and other forms of manual powered travel can fit into the vision of what "Wilderness" in the United States is. Backcountry trails should be just that, backcountry, this should inform the style of trail regardless of what the particular context of the outdoor space is designated. Different mountain biking experiences can exists as a apart and a part from one another, if we do not provide this variety of trail experience we risk alienating ourselves from one another.
the303kid mikekazimer's article
Mar 24, 2016 at 8:31
Mar 24, 2016
First Ride: SRAM's 12-Speed Eagle Drivetrain
If you have one bike for the bike park and your local trails and run 1X11 you know spinning out, I've spun the 34t out riding Plattekill, Thunder, Attitash and many other east coast bike parks. Think about the benefit racers will have not needing a different chainring for training and racing on, seems like that will likely be the target market for these groups with the more XC specific and Enduro versions.
Selling
Mar 3, 2016 at 11:54
Mar 3, 2016

One Owner Yeti SB-66 Large

$2700 USD
Great value! This bike is still super up to date in terms of it's geometry with a 66 degree headtube angle and a 25" Top Tube Length. The bike includes everything pictured, SB-66 Aluminum L, Rock Shox Pike RCT3 fork, Rock Shox Monarch Plus rear shock, Rock Shox Reverb 150mm drop, full Sram XX1 drive train, Sram Guide RSC breaks, Hope hubs laced up to WTB i25 rims and more. Overall an incredibly solid build considering the price. I can also include my stock of 26in tires to keep you rolling well into the future worry free. While there are other SB-66's out there for sale, this bike has more complete, higher-end build than many others that are priced just a few hundred dollars less. These other bikes lack dropper posts, proper 1X drive trains and are slapped together from internet close out deals. This build was selected carefully and updated meaningfully over time to keep up with newer comparable models that have come out in the past two years.

Added 8 photos
Mar 3, 2016 at 11:41
Mar 3, 2016
the303kid mikekazimer's article
Feb 26, 2016 at 17:40
Feb 26, 2016
Pinkbike Poll: Water Bottles, Yea or Nay?
Traditional seatbags are static at the post so friction isn't the issue. The bigger issue is the loss of the last few mm of travel on your dropper, I personally wouldn't run that style on a bike with a dropper either however the slim rail mounted rolls do make a great substitute.
the303kid mikekazimer's article
Feb 26, 2016 at 17:36
Feb 26, 2016
Pinkbike Poll: Water Bottles, Yea or Nay?
@MasterSlater, there are plenty of great seatbag options or should I say tool rolls that mount up just to the rails of your seat so no contact with the dropper what so ever, and they are pretty thin so no need to worry about catching it on a tire during a harsh bottom out.
the303kid mikekazimer's article
Feb 26, 2016 at 17:03
Feb 26, 2016
Pinkbike Poll: Water Bottles, Yea or Nay?
What happened to seat bags... I ride with a pack for any ride over an hour and a half, but for my late afternoon quick loops the thought of carrying a pack seems like overkill. Can you be prepared for anything sans pack? Probably not, but are you really venturing so far away from the trailhead, your car, home, ect, in an hours time that you couldn't push your bike back if necessary. For me having the necessities mounted on my bike is just a much better riding experience and yes I can carry a multi tool, bottle, spare tube, co2, and maybe some zip ties either in my pockets or on the bike. Packs mean having to reset your suspension for the additional weight not to mention how much it can throw your balance.
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