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tomcat jamessmurthwaite's article
Feb 3, 2019 at 11:16
Feb 3, 2019
Bike Check: Joe Nation's Pole Stamina
@Ttimer: I partially agree. The upper body orientation and positioning is a big part of the equation here is well, the relative hand position to saddle and pedals (i.e. reach, stack). The hand position is much more consistent on other bikes so the same basic rules tend to work (and the relationship is static where it is dynamic on a suspension bike). Knee over pedal makes sense in some instances, but the rule ignores a lot of complexity in a mountain bike situation.
tomcat davidarthur's article
Feb 3, 2019 at 11:05
Feb 3, 2019
First Ride: YT's New Long-Travel 29er, the Jeffsy 29 CF Pro Race
@jclnv: Svinyard is right. I think you are missing what a shock (damper) actually does. The fundamental physics of damper is the conversion of kinetic energy to heat through a fluid medium (i.e oil). Yes that 'tiny volume' of oil is creating almost all the heat. No heat = no suspension. The seal friction is pretty minimal. The fundamental mistake you are making is assuming the temperature of a shock is directly related to how much heat is being generated. The main difference between different types of shocks is their ability to dissipate heat. The issue isn't how much heat is generated it's how it is how effective a shock is at transferring that heat to the surrounding air. The weak point of air shocks (especially inline) is that the air sleeve surrounds the damping circuit as the shock compresses and insulates it. The oil is heating up the air sleeve as this is the only path to disapate heat. In a coil shocks the damping circuit is inside the threaded shock body and there is a much more direct path to transfer heat outside the shock, thus cooler temps. Piggybacks are great for any type of shock as they provide a much greater surface area for heat transfer, but they make a bigger difference for air shocks.
tomcat mikelevy's article
Dec 7, 2017 at 6:01
Dec 7, 2017
Rocky Mountain Instinct Carbon 90 BC Edition - Review
@Zaff: The non bc (140mm travel) uses a 210 x 55 shock. For the BC edition they are using a 216x63 (8.5 x 2.5). Apparantly the BC edition fixed mount on the rocker link is just the middle ride 9 position, so it would be easy to BCify a regular instinct.
tomcat mikelevy's article
Dec 4, 2017 at 16:41
Dec 4, 2017
The Insolent DH Bike Uses a Fox 40 Stanchion Tube as a Shock
Don't think heat will be an issue. It looks like about 90-100 mm stroke and if the damper layout is done right there should be lots of surface area on the slider to disapate heat (and lots of oil which helps too). Epoxy can be an issue at high heat, but I doubt this will be a problem at the kind of temps coming off a shock (brake mount temps are more of a concern).
tomcat mikelevy's article
Dec 4, 2017 at 12:23
Dec 4, 2017
The Insolent DH Bike Uses a Fox 40 Stanchion Tube as a Shock
@jclnv: It's an interesting challenge. It's cool leverage curves and other info are getting into the public eye but none of the nomeclature or presentation has been created in a way that focuses on simplifying and clarifying things for a non-tecnical audience. Have you checked out andrextr's youtube channel and info on vitalmtb? He's done the best job at presenting info on how progressive suspension is in a simple way and putting useful numbers to it. I like how he just puts out numbers on each bike for what percentage of progression there is and the bottom out force (based on holding sag % the same on different bikes).
tomcat mikelevy's article
Dec 4, 2017 at 11:14
Dec 4, 2017
The Insolent DH Bike Uses a Fox 40 Stanchion Tube as a Shock
@jclnv: Do you realize that by getting the terms backwards and using them incorrectly you are confusing the issue? I agree that it confuses people that those terms are based on wheel rate, but we generally look at graphs of leverage ratio and so people (like you) get it mixed up. But you don't get to pretend standard terminology is backwards just because you don't know it. I laugh when you try to dismiss what Steve puts out when it's the standard terminology that you just don't have a clear understanding of. He's the one person doing more than anyone to educate people on here about suspension and cut through the BS. The terms rising rate and falling rate have been around forever and have always had a consistant meanings.
tomcat mikelevy's article
Dec 4, 2017 at 9:50
Dec 4, 2017
The Insolent DH Bike Uses a Fox 40 Stanchion Tube as a Shock
@jclnv: No it wouldn't, but what are describing is a classic falling rate. We're actually agreeing (you are mixing up leverage ratio and wheel rate. They are inversely related - so rising ratio means a falling rate). When someone says ralling rate they are actually talking about the wheel rate (or motion ratio). Take a look at the labels on the chart Steve at vorspring put together for their Tuesday Tune on leverage ratios. https://www.pinkbike.com/news/the-tuesday-tune-ep-12-leverage-rates.html
tomcat mikelevy's article
Dec 4, 2017 at 9:00
Dec 4, 2017
The Insolent DH Bike Uses a Fox 40 Stanchion Tube as a Shock
@jclnv: I can confidently say you are wrong. Falling rate is regressive, easier to blow through the end of the travel.
tomcat mikelevy's article
Dec 1, 2017 at 20:51
Dec 1, 2017
tomcat mikelevy's article
Oct 24, 2017 at 14:16
Oct 24, 2017
Rocky Mountain Instinct Carbon 90 BC Edition - Review
http://www.bikeaction.de/fileadmin/techgarage/techmanual/Slayer_2017_Tech_Manual.pdf There's a good rendering in the tech manual (pg 11) the threads are bonded into the seatstay. Everyone I've talked to on slayers has had no problems. As long as the threaded piece has a fairly large bonded area it should be solid.
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