Dh tires weight

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Dh tires weight
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Posted: Dec 13, 2009 at 20:21 Quote
Im running michelin dh 32 at in front and dh 24at rear on my glory. there something like 1450g in front and 1300g rear. looking to cut some weight, and this seems like a good place. Are these considered heavy tires? what are some lighter alternatives for a good all around tire? thanks
-Matt

Posted: Dec 13, 2009 at 20:35 Quote
im running maxxis minions but i would say maxxis highrollers.

Posted: Dec 14, 2009 at 3:32 Quote
most of the dual ply tires in 2.35-2.5" width range are around 1200-1400 gm each

a good compromise is Specialized's new Clutch SX tire which is a 1.5 ply, and just under 1000 gm - dual compound sticky rubber, tough carcass, very good grip and often cheaper than Maxxis or Michelin

you can also get the Clutch DH which is dual ply and heavier (about 1200 gm)

Posted: Dec 14, 2009 at 21:44 Quote
hampsteadbandit wrote:
most of the dual ply tires in 2.35-2.5" width range are around 1200-1400 gm each

a good compromise is Specialized's new Clutch SX tire which is a 1.5 ply, and just under 1000 gm - dual compound sticky rubber, tough carcass, very good grip and often cheaper than Maxxis or Michelin

you can also get the Clutch DH which is dual ply and heavier (about 1200 gm)

Yea I have the SX casing Clutch and Chunder on my sxt and I am actually looking to get a bit lighter of a tire because I'm pretty light on the bike and very rarely get flats as long as I stay out of the thorn bushes. I was thinking some folding bead Kenda nevegals or some small block 8's, but idk how either of these work in standard dry dusty socal conditions. Any other recommendations for 600ish to 800ish gm. tires?

Posted: Dec 15, 2009 at 3:24 Quote
if you want something grippy in that weight range, look at Specialized's Control (2-bliss tubeless casing, kevlar bead, dual compound) Eskar All-Mountain tire

about 650gm and its very large for 2.3" (as big as a Maxxis 2.5")

the only problem for DH use is that its got thin sidewalls (but this will be an issue for any tire in that weight range - they are light because of the thinner construction)

as a comparison, Maxxis single ply High Rollers in 2.3" are surprisingly heavy, almost 1000gm


I run Specialized tires with Stan's No-Tubes (tubeless conversion) around 30psi and have used their Eskar and Captain tires for DH with no issues

if running with inner tubes, you would be pinch flatting such thin tires, unless you are very light or somewhat lucky!

Posted: Dec 15, 2009 at 8:54 Quote
Continental Der Kaiser's, 1000g each and they are downhill tires in a 2.5. I used to run Minions but these hook up wicked.

Posted: Dec 15, 2009 at 17:02 Quote
hampsteadbandit wrote:
if you want something grippy in that weight range, look at Specialized's Control (2-bliss tubeless casing, kevlar bead, dual compound) Eskar All-Mountain tire

about 650gm and its very large for 2.3" (as big as a Maxxis 2.5")

the only problem for DH use is that its got thin sidewalls (but this will be an issue for any tire in that weight range - they are light because of the thinner construction)

as a comparison, Maxxis single ply High Rollers in 2.3" are surprisingly heavy, almost 1000gm


I run Specialized tires with Stan's No-Tubes (tubeless conversion) around 30psi and have used their Eskar and Captain tires for DH with no issues

if running with inner tubes, you would be pinch flatting such thin tires, unless you are very light or somewhat lucky!

I was thinking about tubeless, but I don't know if I feel like dealing with it if it doesn't work well. And btw I am a very light rider at around 130 pounds with gear, so I figure that If I run light tires with tubes at a bit of a higher pressure than usual, I might have better results. But I'm not so sure, all I know is I want to shave some rotating weight and tires are the first thing I want to change. How difficult is it to do the tubeless conversion with standard rims?

Posted: Dec 15, 2009 at 17:18 Quote
hey does anyone know the weight of wtb dna tires 2.5 and 2.3 sizes? sorry to thread jack, im looknig to save some weight too

Posted: Dec 15, 2009 at 19:01 Quote
anderson4000 wrote:
Continental Der Kaiser's, 1000g each and they are downhill tires in a 2.5. I used to run Minions but these hook up wicked.
Are they worth it? I ordered a pair but im considering canceling the order because the shop said it might take as much as 2 months to get them in. I run minions now and want to shave some weight. Btw Do you have any problems with flats on them?

Posted: Dec 16, 2009 at 8:35 Quote
Broark wrote:
anderson4000 wrote:
Continental Der Kaiser's, 1000g each and they are downhill tires in a 2.5. I used to run Minions but these hook up wicked.
Are they worth it? I ordered a pair but im considering canceling the order because the shop said it might take as much as 2 months to get them in. I run minions now and want to shave some weight. Btw Do you have any problems with flats on them?

I would wait for them, i used to swear by Minions but i threw some Kaisers on just before riding whistler, I have never had so much grip on wet rocks and roots. They wear good aswell, had mine now for 2 months and i have about 80% left. I have had one flat but thats because i dented my rim and was running em tubeless.

Posted: Dec 16, 2009 at 14:31 Quote
anderson4000 wrote:
Broark wrote:
anderson4000 wrote:
Continental Der Kaiser's, 1000g each and they are downhill tires in a 2.5. I used to run Minions but these hook up wicked.
Are they worth it? I ordered a pair but im considering canceling the order because the shop said it might take as much as 2 months to get them in. I run minions now and want to shave some weight. Btw Do you have any problems with flats on them?

I would wait for them, i used to swear by Minions but i threw some Kaisers on just before riding whistler, I have never had so much grip on wet rocks and roots. They wear good aswell, had mine now for 2 months and i have about 80% left. I have had one flat but thats because i dented my rim and was running em tubeless.
Ok sick. Im just going to wait for them then. That backs up what ive heared about them. But do they really grip better tham minions?

Posted: Dec 17, 2009 at 11:48 Quote
I reckon they do and so did the Athertons last season!

Posted: Dec 17, 2009 at 12:04 Quote
I reckon they do and so did the Athertons last season!

the funny thing is, you see the Athertons in the bike magazines posing in the Conti adverts

and then you see close-up shots of their bikes at races, with the Maxxis logo blacked out as they are supposed to be riding Conti tires???



btw - Stans works great with regular rims and tires if you choose the right rim strip to suit your rim, and set it up properly with soap and Stan's tubeless solution

Posted: Dec 17, 2009 at 12:09 Quote
hampsteadbandit wrote:
if running with inner tubes, you would be pinch flatting such thin tires, unless you are very light or somewhat lucky!

Ignorance is bliss, eh?

I am one to very, very rarely puncture, let alone pinch. I've gone from needing dual ply UST Maxxis tires setup tubeless with 3 cups of Stans No Tubes. To Folding tires with superlight tubes. My lightest setup to date was 540g per tire with 130g Michelin Aircomp Latex tubes. However that was a little too far. My 'regular' summer setup is 580g folding tires with the same latex tubes.

The reason I can do this is not just because I'm a 140 lbs rider, but because I am not a hack. I may ride a sub 30 pound AM bike (170mm x 160mm), but I use it for DH & FR mostly, and feel no need for a burlier or longer travel bike.

I often pondered why I can run the tires I do yet others who ride mellower tracks need tires nearly 3 times as heavy and scooter tubes. Until I watched a bit of footage of the NPS series...

Fair enough, the super fast racers will want the heavy setup because they can't afford to lose due to a flat. But for the average rider up to the fast elites. I think a lighter setup is fine, with a little alteration of your riding style.

Now, try bending your damn legs people! The bike isn't supposed to do 100% of the work, it's not there to spoon feed you, let alone breast feed you like some expect it to. Try getting a little closer to the bars, put a bend in your arms and your legs and start letting that bike move! Take in some of the hits, lighten the bikes load over rockgardens (this'll also make you clear it faster, the bike won't get hooked up so much if your ass doesn't have to be dragged over the rocks), absorb the impact when landing drops. etc.etc.etc. It's not that hard, just try it.

Maybe I'll see you on the trails and you can see why my super light summer setup works fine for me.

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