Pinkbike Product Picks

Mar 23, 2012
by Mike Levy  
MEC The Don gloves

MEC has a massive glove lineup that spans the range from minimalist to more protective options, including The Don gloves that we've been using for the last while. The Don's utilize an interesting mix of materials for their construction, with Clarino synthetic palms that feature leather overlays in high stress areas - between the thumb and pointer finger, and along the top edge and sides of the palm, and at the tips of the fingers - along with a stretchy neoprene section over the top of the hand/knuckle joints. You'll also find a portion of polyester waffle mesh covering the top of the hand in an effort to maintain an air of breathability. Both the middle and braking fingers also each sport a silicone print to their tips that MEC says gives them better purchase on the brake levers, but doesn't make them touch screen friendly for use with phones. The inside three fingers on each glove also sport nearly hidden sections of foam padding (we didn't know they were there until we read the header card) to help ease the blow from branches, although it's lacking on the pinky finger that lives dangerously at the outside edge of the handlebar. The Don's are only available in the color shown here, but come in sizes from small to double extra large. MSRP $29.00 CAD. www.mec.ca


MEC The Don gloves
MEC's The Don gloves might not rate high on mountain biking's 'cool scale', but they proved to be both comfortable and durable.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesForget for a moment that The Dons don't sport a popular logo or trendy styling and you'll find them to be a rather well thought out pair of gloves that can hold their own against the more popular options out there. Finger length feels spot on with our paws in them, and the gloves' cut seems just right to allow for maximum flexibility without surplus material that would only bunch up when holding the grips. The fabric around the cuffs is soft enough to make them invisible, and the short Clarino extension at the base makes it easy to pull them on. The leather palm overlays look like they might be annoying during use, but they were actually invisible when the gloves were on, and we especially appreciated the small leather section that is positioned over the outside edge - exactly where our palms often make contact with the outer collars of lock-on grips. The only quirky point with the gloves is the strange twist at the tip of each pointer finger, enough that the silicone gripper ends up in a jonty position. Aside from that, we'd say that the MEC's The Don gloves are a smart buy at $29.00 CAD. - Mike Levy



Alpinestars Manual short

The Manual is constructed from a mix of cotton, polyamide, and polyester to create a short that falls in between featherweight XC and heavy duty DH-only options. The leg length puts their cuffs just over the top of the knee, and you'll find a stretch panel at the rear to aid their fit. Speaking of fit, Alpinestars outfits the Manual's waist with both adjustable Velcro tabs and belt loops, the latter of which we don't see many riders using while riding. Velcro is also used for the fly, along with a button up top. Perforated material is employed across both thighs in an effort to keep the wearer cool in hot weather, and a mesh polyester liner can be found inside for the same reason. There are pockets galore on the Manual, including two standard side pockets (not zippered or Velcro'd), along with multiple cargo pockets at the bottom of each leg. You can choose from black, grey, brown, and green color options. MSRP $79.95 USD. www.alpinestars.com


Alpinestars Manual short
A great fitting short that seems to be built from just the right fabric, but it's a shame about their Velcro fly.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe Manual has been our go-to short for much of the wet and muddy Winter riding season due to their great cut and fabric that strikes a middle ground between being too heavy or too light. The length, which is just slightly over the knee, is long enough to keep us from showing too much of our pasty white thighs while pedalling, but still short enough that they never came close to getting caught on the top of dual crown forks or be bothersome during pedal intensive trail rides. The stretch panel at the rear of the short seemed to be invisible to us, but then that may be it's just doing its job, and the waist adjustment tabs make fine tuning the fit easy. We liked the Manual short, but there are a few things that we'd like Alpinestars to do differently. If we were to nitpick we'd like to see the hand pockets deeper - they don't feel deep enough to trust them with anything that you'd like to keep with you - and the short's cargo pockets are useless when riding unless you want whatever you put in there to be constantly flailing around as you pedal. If the pockets are a small issue, the Velcro fly is much more annoying. It was prone to opening up and exposing parts that don't need exposing, especially when covered in mud. A zippered, or even a button fly, makes so much more sense to us. Overall, the Manual short offers a first-class fit, but they lose points thanks to the less than steller Velcro fly. - Mike Levy



100% Racecraft goggle

100% has their roots buried deep in motocross, but that doesn't mean that their goggles won't work just fine for downhilling, especially given their recent involvement with both the ODI Trek development team and Team CRC/Nukeproof. The Racecraft goggle that we test below are their premium offering, making use of a single lens that has been given an anti-fog treatment to keep the goggle free from fog at slow speeds. The Racecraft's frame features large outriggers where the silicone coated strap is attached on either side, that in theory, allow the frame to better conform to your face. Small vents are present at the leading edge of each side of the nose piece, as well as completely around the upper, lower, and side edges of the frame, and the protective nose guard is removable - a nice touch considering that mountain bikers don't require roost protection. The lexan lens is home to tear-off posts, of which there are twenty included with the Racecraft goggle. You'll also find a spare clear lens in the box, as well as a goggle bag to keep them looking great. There are a total of nine different color and lens combinations available. MSRP $75.00 USD.www.ride100percent.com


100 Racecraft goggle
The Racecraft offers great styling and a comfortable fit, but the fog-prone single lens is less than ideal.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThere are three factors that determine if a goggle is a winner in our minds: fit (both on your face and in your helmet), resistance to fogging, and if the lens can stand up to some wear and tear in the real world. Our white and red Racecraft goggle seemed to mate nicely with all of the full face helmets that we tried them with, including both DOT approved moto lids and trimmer mountain bike helmets. There was no interference between the frame and helmet shell, and the goggle's triple layer foam was quite comfortable against the skin. The single lens setup used on the Racecraft is never going to be as fog-resistant as a dual lens layout, even with the anti-fog treatment that 100% employs, and they did tend to fog fairly quickly when stopped on the side of the trail. They would clear again once we got moving, allowing air to flow through the goggle's vents, but clear vision wasn't restored any sooner than we've experienced with other goggles. While the lens may not have seemed especially fog proof, it has managed to shrug off any of the abuse that we've put it through, remaining nearly scratch free during our time with them. The 100% Racecraft goggle is an interesting alternative if you are looking for something different than the usual Oakley or Smith offerings, but we'd like to see a dual lens model that would limit fogging when stopped. This is an especially important trait for downhilling, where the runs are not only much shorter and the speeds slower than a moto race, but racers can often be found stopping to practice short sections of the trail repeatedly. Having said that, there is an aftermarket dual lens upgrade ($17.00 USD) that can be popped in, greatly improving the goggle in this regard. - Mike Levy






45 Comments

  • 32 2
 Surprised there wasn't a dropper post on here haha Wink
  • 17 1
 I've been using the Manual shorts for a while now and agree totally. The pockets are just that little bit too small but the velcro fly is just stupid. I take kids out riding and can't wear them just in case I get arrested for exposing myself! I love the feel of them (the shorts that is, not the kids you sickos) so am going to get a zip put in.
  • 1 0
 HAHAHA Smile
  • 17 4
 No offence but it all looks like stuff from a sports shop as opposed to a bike store, not keen on any of it.
  • 2 2
 Totally agree...
  • 2 2
 Agreed, all low quality looking stuff and those gloves are down right fugly
  • 8 0
 I recommend the Mechanix Original gloves.
  • 2 0
 Totally agree on mechanix although I use the impacts
  • 5 0
 the gloves are ugly as sin.. but i like 'em
  • 2 0
 I won a pair of the MEC Don gloves and will be using them tomorrow. Will give a review here of how they are! But you already know they are awesome when they're free... from PB none the less!
  • 1 0
 The Alpinestars Manual shorts are some of the best I ever worn. it's true to size and the inner liner is decent. Way better than Fox, Royal or any comparable brands. Two thumbs up in my book.
  • 1 0
 I tried to pick up a pair of the Manuals, but never could find my size. I do have a pair of the AStars Gravity shorts though, and I love em. No liner though.
  • 2 0
 On those Racecraft goggles, can anyone explain why there are tear-off posts on both the lens and the outriggers? There's no info available on 100%'s website.
  • 2 0
 My guess would be for the tear-off posts on the outriggers are for their roll of system and, the posts on the lenses are for the regular tear offs. Not 100% sure but that would be my guess.
  • 2 0
 Actually you 100% correct one is for a roll off system and 1 for tear offs I run the same goggles woth dual lens and they are awsome
  • 2 0
 every goggle company (good ones) do this multi-post system. the two on the lens are for the basic tear-off retention, the one post on the outrigger is to keep them organized when using more than one tear-off.
www.motorcycle-superstore.com/4/19/261/4565/ITEM/Blur-Optics-B-1-Goggle-Tear-Offs.aspx
in this picture you can clearly see the random hole on the tear-off mid way from the mount hole and the tether. This hole is to mount to that outrigger and keeps the tear-offs organized. good looking goggles! 1+
  • 1 0
 I like the look of those goggles, proper sleek and beastly shape, BUT the 100% logo/brand name is/looks stupid!
  • 1 0
 I love my 100% goggles and they fit over glasses well. way sicker than most goggles. check out mine www.pinkbike.com/photo/7764928 and the racecraft come with 10 tear offs when you buy them Smile
  • 3 1
 100% goggles are amazing and they actually have a dual lens that you can buy separately if desired!!
  • 1 0
 100% true! Review is updated to include this info.
  • 1 1
 And for $75, its a really good buy. Props!
  • 1 0
 im glad that they have the scond lens option becouse all of my single lens goggles anti fogg or not will always fog up in a really exhausting climb
  • 1 0
 100% also has the Accuri Enduro which comes with the dual-lens at $60. One cool thing with the 100% is that all lenses work on both the Accuri and the Racecraft

www.cyclesport.com/mountain-bike/100-ACCURI-ENDURO-GOGGLES
  • 1 1
 I'm sorry but at 75$ i don't think they are a good buy if you have to upgrade to duel lens. the ryders eyewear shore goggle is $45, looks good, comes with dual lens and i have never had it fog on me. my two cents
  • 1 0
 the accuri are very nice goggles and they are 60 with extra lens and dual layer try them out u wont be disapointed
  • 2 1
 i was eyeing some MEC gloves they were affordable and i could purchase them locally. now im not hesitating any more and i know what model to look for. thanks for the review!
  • 5 1
 also it's kinda nice they don't have a huge logo on them
  • 1 0
 Mike when is the male model career going to surpass the bike tech wizzardry? i think PB should invest in a manequin! ahahaha sweet review regardless
  • 1 0
 Definitely been curious about the goggles from seeing various race teams using them, might have to try them out Wink
  • 2 4
 i simply loose respect to those who buy bike stuff at MEC. they undermine and rune the bike industry in canada. remember what hapened to raceface... MEC should stop selling bike stuff they don't know anything about and focus on selling granola bars...
  • 1 0
 do u know if all the 100% Accuri models are dual lense?
  • 2 1
 i bet those gloves burn your hands during the summer
  • 2 0
 are they on fire?
  • 1 1
 I rock a belt 100% of the time, I must be weird. I'd like to try these shorts out but I hate adjustable waist tabs.
  • 1 0
 I too use a belt and I am well known for being wierd. They are great shorts especially in the summer as the venting works very well indeedy
  • 1 0
 do u know if all the 100% Accuri models are dual lense?
  • 1 1
 Sick!
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.025517
Mobile Version of Website