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phops XFusionShox's article
May 2, 2019 at 9:37
May 2, 2019
X-Fusion Shox Announces H3C Shock & Coil Spring System
@spankthewan: >I understand there's still force required to compress the regressive 2" of travel, but it's less force than was required to move the wheel the previous 2" of travel. I think you are conflicting rate with the net amount of force. Just because you have a decreasing RATE doesn't mean you have a decreasing FORCE. 2 things are very separate. For example, you can have a decreasing population RATE, but still have an increasing population in the sense of total number of additional people per year. For every shock and suspension out there, no matter what the RATE is, the FORCE still goes up with deflection. The only way for the FORCE to start decreasing is if the RATE goes below zero, which will never happen. >Big hits are usually the result of acceleration due to gravity, which is much different than just pushing down on a bike. Thats why I mentioned tuning the spring rate/preload for that big hit number. It will take a higher spring rate due to the regressive nature of suspension as opposed to if it was progressive, but it can still be done. > I think it would be nearly impossible to achieve the recommended 25-30% of sag while running a coil shock that's stiff enough to avoid harsh bottom outs. It is easily possible. Take a spring, set the sag to 30% with the preload collar, fiddle with your compression to your liking, and go ride. If you bottom out, go up a higher spring rate, back out the preload collar to achieve the designed sag, go ride. Repeat until you no longer bottom out. The regressive linkage does not vary that much to put the suspension outside the range of available springs.
phops foxfactory's article
May 2, 2019 at 9:24
May 2, 2019
Video: Go Behind the Scenes with Fox Suspension in 'Dialed'- Maribor World Cup DH 2019
Not really. Most of the suspension oils are petroleum based.
phops foxfactory's article
May 2, 2019 at 9:18
May 2, 2019
Video: Go Behind the Scenes with Fox Suspension in 'Dialed'- Maribor World Cup DH 2019
>10 problems/scenarious and have to answer how you would change the shock/fork to fix it. Suspension tuning is more up to the rider preference rather than terrain.
phops XFusionShox's article
Apr 30, 2019 at 12:35
Apr 30, 2019
X-Fusion Shox Announces H3C Shock & Coil Spring System
@spankthewan: (continued from my previous cut off comment) what you can run on what, you can definitely run coil shocks on regressive ratio bikes safely as long as match the spring rate and preload to the bike.
phops XFusionShox's article
Apr 30, 2019 at 12:32
Apr 30, 2019
X-Fusion Shox Announces H3C Shock & Coil Spring System
@mgolder suspension linkages are perhaps the number 1 topic of discussion in terms of the amount of bullshit being spread on the internet.
phops XFusionShox's article
Apr 30, 2019 at 12:29
Apr 30, 2019
X-Fusion Shox Announces H3C Shock & Coil Spring System
@spankthewan: The spring rate is defined as additional force required to compress a shock an extra distance. Say you have a spring rate of 500 lbs/inch, which is about 20 lb/mm. If your leverage ratio is a constant 3, the force on the wheel to compress the shock an extra mm is 20/3 which is 6.6 lbs. To compress it by 2 mm is 40/3, 13.2 lbs. Say your leverage ratio goes from 3 to 3.2 in the first mm of travel, which is completely unrealistic btw, 40/3.2 = 12.5 lbs at the rear wheel. 12.5 lbs is still greater than 6.6 lbs. So even with a regressive ratio, the suspension behaves just like a regular spring where the force goes up as you compress it. The only thing that regressive ratio does is just effectively decrease the spring rate, but remember that spring rate =/= force. The net force still goes up. So for your bike, what you would do is simply pick a stiffer coil than you would run if you had a progressive leverage ratio, to match the bottom out force of your current setup. Whether or not that is optimal or suits your riding, especially if you are at a high level, is a different discussion, and all depends on how you ride and whether you like firmness for pumping and boosting jumps or terrain compliance. But as far as
phops XFusionShox's article
Apr 30, 2019 at 9:23
Apr 30, 2019
X-Fusion Shox Announces H3C Shock & Coil Spring System
Its not that they are unsuitable, its that air shocks tend to work better from a tuning perspective, but you can fit a coil shock to any bike (provided there is one in the right size) While the leverage ratio is regressive, there isn't a single bike out there where the regression of the leverage ratio is so high that completely negates the rise of the force from the shock as you compress it. This means that even on regressive leverage ratio bikes with a coil shock, as you push the suspension down more, its going to push back harder and harder like what you are used to, because the force goes up as you compress the shock. Then its just a matter of picking the spring rate and the preload setting for 2 points: the correct force to support your weight statically at 20-30% compression for preload, and the maximum force at max travel which corresponds to how hard you land after a big drop. You do the same for the air shock as well, the difference is the shape of the line that connects the two points, which affects how the bike feels. With a regressive ratio and coil shock, you will be riding at a higher spring rate up top, because you don't get the ramp up of the air shock, but on the flip side, the bike will feel more plush on big hits. None of this is wrong or bad, just depends on what you like.
phops mikelevy's article
Apr 30, 2019 at 9:11
Apr 30, 2019
First Look: Ibis' Longest, Slackest, and Burliest Ripley
I may be the minority here, but I think that slack headangle and long wheelbase is pointless without the longer travel to go along with it.
phops jamessmurthwaite's article
Apr 23, 2019 at 12:04
Apr 23, 2019
Confirmed: Cannondale's New Downhill Bike Has 2 Shocks
Somewhat, but that is usually accounted for. The system records IMU data (i.e accelerations, i.e forces) along with suspension data, so they can basically get a range of input force vs suspension response. When riding, there is no difference to suspension when it sees a mass of 1.1x coming down at velocity 1v or mass of 1x coming down at velocity 1.1v.
phops mikekazimer's article
Apr 17, 2019 at 12:15
Apr 17, 2019
First Look: Push Unveils HC97 RockShox Charger Damper Upgrade
The funny part of all of this is that there are people that legitimately think that having more knobs on your suspension is going to make you magically faster than all your friends on your recreational trail rides.
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