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thekaiser YTIndustries's article
Jul 23, 2024 at 13:50
7 hours
YT Industries Releases Dirtlove AL Dirt Jumper
It looks a little different from older DJ bikes to me, although I guess it depends on if you are comparing it to a specific 2008 model, or a general average from the era. DJ bikes back then tended to have a steeper HT angle than this, hanging on to a 71 degree angle long after trail and DH bikes started getting slacker. At a 69 HT angle, this bike is very steep by modern trail bike standards, but slack by older DJ standards. This bike still has the high BB that is traditional for DJ bikes though. Regarding your question about 4x, with the slightly relaxed HT angle mentioned above, this bike is more like some of the 4x focused hardtails of 2008. I would imagine a modern 4x bike geometry would depend on the roughness of the courses they were building.
thekaiser dariodigiulio's article
Jul 19, 2024 at 13:20
Jul 19, 2024
Review: Forge+Bond Shift EM - A US-Made Carbon Wheelset for $1250
That is a really good point about the knock on effects of using a single loop spring on pawls vs. individually sprung pawls. I had never considered that before. Thanks for doing the math on what is the likely actual pawl engagement configuration. There is a big difference between "6 pawl engagement", and "3 phased sets of 2 pawl engagement". Since you are so well versed in this stuff, I am curious what you think about the increasingly common setup with pawls that have multiple engagement points on the tips, so they are engaging 2 or 3 teeth rather than the older style with just 1 point per pawl. On the one hand, spreading the load out on the parts that are, as you point out, prone to bending or chipping, seems like a good thing. But, on the other hand, it seems like if you have multiple points per pawl, any misalignment or partial engagement of that pawl will affect all of the points equally, so perhaps no benefit, and there is increased risk of grease or grit preventing one of the points from sinking into the notch fully. Hopefully that makes sense.
thekaiser dariodigiulio's article
Jul 19, 2024 at 13:05
Jul 19, 2024
Review: Forge+Bond Shift EM - A US-Made Carbon Wheelset for $1250
@justinfoil: Even in the scenario you cite though, it is the flex characteristics that are making the wheel comfortable, not the weight itself. The article seems to suggest that the weight itself is providing some ride quality benefit, almost as of the writer was confusing sprung and unsprung weight.
thekaiser dariodigiulio's article
Jul 19, 2024 at 13:02
Jul 19, 2024
Review: Forge+Bond Shift EM - A US-Made Carbon Wheelset for $1250
@William42: I agree with you in most regards, but are you really saying that people are realistically swapping a hub out in a built wheel in only 30min? I'd like to see a video of that.
thekaiser seb-stott's article
Jul 13, 2024 at 0:46
Jul 13, 2024
How To Pick A Safer Helmet - According To Science
I agree. I was eager to see how their products did on the VT tests, because Kali was one of the few companies that really seemed to be pushing testing and safety focused helmet tech forward prior to VT hitting the scene. I am still undecided as to if the Kali internal testing was more for their own "marketing story" purposes than truly making their helmets safer, or if their own testing focused on substantially different standards than VT, which lead to a mismatch on their helmets characteristics vs. the VT test protocol. To put it another way, it would be interesting to test Kali's helmets and the top VT performers, against Kali's own internal test protocol, to see if Kali simply built their helmets to excel on somewhat different set of tests, or if the to VT helmets are truly better performers in all conditions. The double edged sword of testing protocols is that companies can start trying to game the test, to the detriment of real world performance. Not saying that is happening here, and I applaud the VT testing as it is a long overdue 3rd party validation of what has been purely sales driven marketing BS for so long. I'm just saying we need to be aware of the risks too.
thekaiser seb-stott's article
Jul 13, 2024 at 0:30
Jul 13, 2024
How To Pick A Safer Helmet - According To Science
That is a very interesting question. To put it another way, we all know the risk of brain injuries from crashing and striking the head on a stationary object, but is it possible that we're all giving ourselves brain damage even when doing MTB 100% correctly, with no crashes? Your front wheel lift comparison to headbanging is an interesting one. Regarding the hucks, I can tell you I have heard anecdotes of people getting concussions when jumping from some height and landing on their feet. I have also heard of jet ski racers who are hitting wave jumps and, for the most part, landing flat (albeit on water), so it seems reasonable to think there could be some risks there. Regarding the rock gardens, I wonder if there is some occupational hazard which is similar, such as operating a jackhammer. I have seen the comparison drawn between the two when it comes to overuse injuries to the hands and arms, and studies on the risks of chronic occupational vibration exposure, but I have never seen anything linking it to CTE. From research on soccer players, we do know that chronic sub-concussive impacts can have a cumulative effect.
thekaiser seb-stott's article
Jul 12, 2024 at 23:00
Jul 12, 2024
How To Pick A Safer Helmet - According To Science
@stormracing: Where did you see the independent ratings of Fox’s fluid vs MIPS?
thekaiser seb-stott's article
Jul 12, 2024 at 22:56
Jul 12, 2024
How To Pick A Safer Helmet - According To Science
The MIPS headform is rubberized, so it definitely uses a substrate less slippery than hair (or a stocking)! The NOCSAE headforms that Virginia Tech uses are surfaced with vinyl nitrile, which is supposed to provide a texture and level of grip similar to human skin, so again, less slippery than hair, and also less slippery than sweat layered skin a bald person would likely have in most riding situations. As a result, I am of the opinion that MIPS benefits are likely to be overstated, but, having said that, I do use a MIPS equipped Tactic 4, specifically due to its great score in the Virginia Tech ratings, figuring that it's likely better than nothing.
thekaiser seb-stott's article
Jul 12, 2024 at 22:43
Jul 12, 2024
How To Pick A Safer Helmet - According To Science
@kiwikiter: That is an excellent point in terms of the real world implications of helmet fit, as high point loads on the skull could be a real problem, but I'm not sure that it matters for this type of helmet testing. The reason I say that is that I don't think they use multiple pressure sensors dispersed across the head form which receives the impact. Instead, I think they are just measuring an aggregate linear, and an aggregate rotational acceleration for the head form as a whole. But someone please correct me if I am wrong.
thekaiser jessiemaymorgan's article
Jul 9, 2024 at 21:38
Jul 9, 2024
New Protection from Smith, Leatt, Evoc and Alpina - Eurobike 2024
Standalone shin guards to add to your current knee pads: https://cambriabike.com/products/661-comp-am-shin-guards-black Full length knee/shin guards: https://cambriabike.com/products/7-idp-transition-knee-shin-pad-black https://ixs.com/us/mtb/mtb-equipment/protection/3024/cleaver-knee-shin-guards-black There are more options if you don't like the above. You're welcome.
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