Maxxis

One of the world’s most trusted tire brands, Maxxis delivers high-quality tire products to customers in 170 countries and employs more than 25,000 people. Of course, we didn’t become one of the world’s top tire companies overnight. Through the years since its founding in 1967, Maxxis has become known for its commitment to excellent products and customer service. That commitment to offer the best has led us to create new technologies to develop our tires. Maxxis products are then tested both at our own facilities and at the world’s leading tire test centers. Input from our roster of championship-winning riders also ensures that our products measure up to the toughest real-world standards. Every Maxxis tire is manufactured using the most advanced equipment, by personnel who display a dedication to quality at every level, from management to the factory floor. For winning races or enjoying a safe daily commute, Maxxis is the tire company riders and drivers trust.

Block user

Recent

Maxxis trek's article
Oct 9, 2018 at 6:04
Oct 9, 2018
Winner Announced: R-Dog's Bontrager Tire Giveaway
@celstark: thanks for the comment. Getting into rolling resistance is opening up a whole other can of worms. There are so many things that can affect rolling resistance, it's really more about picking the right compound for your needs. As for the rolling efficiency (NOT resistance) graphic we use in the catalog, those are based off the tread design itself and not the compound. Obviously, XC-oriented tread patterns with smaller knobs - like the Ikon - will get higher marks for rolling efficiency than the beefy-knobbed Minion DHF. It's an admittedly arbitrary system and it is best to use it to compare Maxxis tires within the same category (e.g. Ikon vs. Crossmark vs. Ardent Race; Minion DHR vs. DHR II vs. HR II, etc.). As for compounds, GENERALLY speaking, single compound tires (apart from Super Tacky) will have the longest tread wear and roll faster. Dual compound tires are in the middle and then you have our 3C tires either MaxxSpeed, Terra, or Grip. As you move from Speed to Grip, the rubber gets softer, traction increases, but tread wear decreases. Again, what rolls fastest on a drum in a lab isn't necessarily what will be fastest out on the trail. Hope that helps!
Maxxis mikekazimer's article
Sep 25, 2018 at 11:28
Sep 25, 2018
Maxxis Unveils Tubeless Ready DH Tires, More 2.6” Options
Yes! There's no difference in the casing construction other than the bead material.
Maxxis trek's article
Sep 25, 2018 at 11:26
Sep 25, 2018
Winner Announced: R-Dog's Bontrager Tire Giveaway
@wiscobiker: 30 PSI according to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QyTyjQbvylg
Maxxis trek's article
Sep 6, 2018 at 5:19
Sep 6, 2018
Winner Announced: R-Dog's Bontrager Tire Giveaway
@islandforlife: XC for sure, there are one or two random trail specs that get MaxxSpeed, but those are the exceptions. The overwhelming majority of MaxxSpeed tires are for XC racing/riding. That description was updated in our 2019 catalog and will be updated on the site as well.
Maxxis trek's article
Sep 6, 2018 at 5:17
Sep 6, 2018
Winner Announced: R-Dog's Bontrager Tire Giveaway
@islandforlife: now you see our dilemma. No matter what specs we come out with, there will be other possible permutations that we don't have available. We don't currently offer the exact tires you're asking for in this instance, for example. And yes, our website is a little scrambled at the moment. We actually tried to simplify things by reducing the number of tire categories under bicycle, but the way it combined mountain and downhill is not ideal. Just know that we hear you (and many others) and we'll be working this winter to simplify the presentation of our products.
Maxxis trek's article
Sep 5, 2018 at 12:52
Sep 5, 2018
Winner Announced: R-Dog's Bontrager Tire Giveaway
@islandforlife: thanks for the feedback (and from all the others on here). We realize we have a ton of tires and then each of those tires has a ton of options. There are lots of reasons for this, but largely it comes down to our customers and athletes asking for them. Sometimes those customers are bike manufacturer that are trying to meet very specific needs and other times it's you, the end users. We've trimmed down our catalog by removing older tread patterns, but it can still be overwhelming. As for your specific question about Double Down, it is different from our DH casing in that it uses a higher TPI (thread count) fabric to start with: 120 TPI in DD vs 60 TPI in DH. They both get a butyl rubber insert in the sidewall which protects your rim from damage and lessens the chance of a pinch flat. The 120 TPI casing makes the DD tires lighter than our DH tires and also a bit more supple. The DD casing was developed with feedback from our EWS racers. They wanted something burlier than our standard trail tires but lighter than our DH offerings. We're committed to being the best tire company in the industry and that means offering things other companies don't or can't. tl;dr - buy yourself a set of Minions and don't worry about the rest.
Maxxis SteelCityMedia's article
Sep 5, 2018 at 5:01
Sep 5, 2018
Video: The Finer Points of Luca Shaw's Bike Setup in 'Between Two Puzzlers'
@Archimonde: yup! Danny rides dual DHR II quite a bit. When the tracks/trails are drier and you want more rolling speed, the DHR II's flatter knobs have the advantage over the DHF. DHF is a bit more versatile when it comes to changing conditions.
Added 1 photo to Talking-Shop
Aug 30, 2018 at 13:08
Aug 30, 2018
1 comment – Add comment
Maxxis mattwragg's article
Jul 23, 2018 at 7:03
Jul 23, 2018
Maxxis mattwragg's article
Jul 23, 2018 at 7:03
Jul 23, 2018
Comparison Test: Are Wider Rims Better? We Try 4 Different Widths
@makripper: the DHR II being a more recent tread pattern was actually designed around wider rims to begin with. Basically, it predates the Wide Trail distinction. Same with the 29x2.5 Minion DHF. You'll see some that have the older hot patch that don't denote WT, but they are in fact WT. All of our newer treads in 2.4-2.6 widths are designed with wider rims in mind.
Load more...
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2018. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.055633
Mobile Version of Website