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cueTIP pinkbikeaudience's article
Jan 11, 2018 at 17:44
Jan 11, 2018
No Fly Zone: GoPro Leaving the Drone Business
@JarrodB: Yeah, I agree with you. I was pointing out that just because a company's revenue seems high to the layperson, that it does not necessarily mean they are profitable. And if the company is turning unprofitable (or even not profitable enough for shareholders) then big cuts are the first thing to happen. It's easier to cut 1/3rd of a workforce than it is to suddenly release a new product or service that turns everything around immediately.
cueTIP pinkbikeaudience's article
Jan 10, 2018 at 14:46
Jan 10, 2018
No Fly Zone: GoPro Leaving the Drone Business
300 million in revenue is really not that much and literally means nothing when it comes to profit. My business does $7 million in revenue every year and we only employ 12 people total. Our PROFIT is still less than $1 million after we factor in all of our expenses. If I were to scale up to $300 million in revenue our staff load would be around 720 people total while GoPro has approximately 1200 after these 250 get let go.
cueTIP pinkbikeaudience's article
Jan 10, 2018 at 14:39
Jan 10, 2018
No Fly Zone: GoPro Leaving the Drone Business
Do you also shoot at low flying aircraft? Because those are likely taking high ground resolution imagery. Also, you should probably start taking potshots at GeoEye, WorldView 1, 2, 3 and 4, Pleiades-1A and B, KOMPSAT 3 and even RapidEye imaging satellites because they all take imagery with GSDs that are sufficient to make out a person sunbathing in their back yard.
cueTIP pinkbikeaudience's article
Jan 10, 2018 at 14:28
Jan 10, 2018
No Fly Zone: GoPro Leaving the Drone Business
I fly commercial UAVs up here in Canada for pipeline inspection and crop assessment and I agree with you. I (and all my staff) have gone through commercial training, carry proper insurance, have ERPs in place, carry aviation radios to notify low flying aircraft in the area of our operations and maintain a rigorous inspection and safety program. We carry a blanket SFOC for western Canada and have jumped through all the appropriate hoops. It wasn't that tough, just time consuming and, at times, expensive. Almost every one of my clients has at some point gone with some cheaper alternative only to come back to me after they get complaints from land owners and local law enforcement that the UAVs are flying too close to homes, across major roadways, or crashing into power lines etc. I even had one instance where a competitor (now bankrupt due to flying without an appropriate SFOC and being assessed a $50,000 fine) would fly 18 km linear missions where the UAV was not only out of visual contact but also outside of telemetry contact for upwards of 10 minutes while crossing populated areas. This industry begs for more enforcement and regulation and I for one am all for it.
cueTIP pinkbikeaudience's article
Jan 10, 2018 at 14:20
Jan 10, 2018
No Fly Zone: GoPro Leaving the Drone Business
Couldn't agree more. I love my Hero 4 Silver. But in all honesty, my SJCAM4000 that I bought for $70 Canadian gets as much or more use because it takes almost as good video (Never shoot in higher than 1080p anyway, all I use it for is vacation videos) and I'm not worried about wrecking or losing it.
cueTIP paulhaysom's article
Jan 4, 2018 at 14:10
Jan 4, 2018
A Walmart Bike vs Whistler Bike Park
@manchvegas: I think you vastly overestimate the amount of revenue generated by YouTube views. That 15k views probably generated somewhere in the range of $1.00 in ad revenue.
cueTIP vernonfelton's article
Oct 10, 2017 at 13:10
Oct 10, 2017
Have Your Say on the Ever-Changing Bike Standards
@ntmjeep: I have to respectfully disagree with you on automotive standards. There are many different bolt patterns, different hub center diameters (hence the reason you need centering rings on aftermarket wheels), and tire sizes are a joke if you consider them standardized. Not only are there wheel diameters currenly on the market in 1" intervals from 15 to 22 inches. Each of these diameters have between 3 and 100 different tire sizes. Yes, some are interchangeable but not most of them. Furthermore, there are dozens of wheel offsets that can't be readily interchanged. Just because some people don't WANT this kind of change to happen doesn't mean it doesn't make economic sense. If the bike manufacturers stop putting out incremental changes they will stop putting out anything new altogether. And of course they play up the benefits. I can't think of a single person that would go buy a new bike if the marketing material said "now, 0.25% better than last model."
cueTIP vernonfelton's article
Oct 6, 2017 at 4:36
Oct 6, 2017
Have Your Say on the Ever-Changing Bike Standards
I'm of a different opinion of a lot of Pinkbike it seems. My father was a senior chassis engineer at an automotive company before he started his own business consulting with aftermarket companies like Tuff Country, Rancho and Pro Comp to build aftermarket suspension systems. When I talk to him about the evolving standards in the bike industry he simply laughs. In his experience and opinion, trying to standardize anything is not only pointless, but also a major limiting factor in performance. In a world where bikes are already perform quite well, there are fewer ways to improve performance within a standardized framework for interchangeable parts. If you are stuck to a certain dimension, there is only so much you can do with materials science, manufacturing processes and design to make your part perform in any way significantly different from those of your competitors. Yes, large companies are setting the pace for the industry. Tough shit, that happens in EVERY industry. Do you think that Ford gives a shit about the needs of the aftermarket? Do you honestly think that Yamaha, BMW, KTM or Honda care that Husky and GasGas have a hard time keeping up with the progression in motorcycles? Many smaller car manufacturers died out through lack of ability to finance rapid product development cycles. My point is, we are reaching the point in bicycle performance where standardization is going to end. Players like SRAM, Shimano and Fox are going to go the route of OEM suppliers to larger bike companies with parts designed to fit specific bikes. I wouldn't be surprised to see large companies like Trek, Giant or Specialized buy up smaller suspension manufacturers like Xfusion or MRP to design and build in-house suspension for base model bikes and have aftermarket companies like SRAM, Ohlins and Fox provide parts for the premium model bikes. I'm sorry to say, but tooling for something like a custom hub spacing is pretty damn easy to do. My dad has a full HAAS machining center in his shop that could make both boost and 135mm hub bodies at the same time using the same tools, it isn't hard. For things like fork lowers and uppers, a permanent metal casting mold is only $10-20,000 on the high end for something like a fork crown, lowers might be closer to $25,000 if the mold needs to split in more than 2 directions to accommodate intricate voids. Still, not crazy.
cueTIP mattwragg's article
Oct 6, 2017 at 3:54
Oct 6, 2017
Opinion: Save the DH Bike?
Same could be said for my $70,000 truck. After 2 years I'd be lucky to get $40,000 for it. Same goes for dirt bikes, street bikes, skis, snowboards...pretty much everything. Why are you so frustrated with changes in technology. I've been riding and building bikes for 17 years (started when I was 14) and I can count on 2 fingers how many times I've actually wanted to upgrade an old frame with a new fork. Having worked in a shop between 2002 and 2008 which many would consider the golden age of bike standards actually being standards, I can tell you that most people are the same way. For every 1 fork we sold, probably 200 complete bikes went out the door, and 90% of the time those were upgrades at time of sale. I sincerely HOPE that bikes continue to evolve at a high rate. I'd hate to buy a bike only to have the same shit on the market when it was time to upgrade. The fact that there are fewer long-standing fitment standards is indicative of any maturing industry. You typically can't share forks between two different model years of the same moto bike, much less take a fork off a KTM and slap it on a Yamaha.
cueTIP mattwragg's article
Oct 5, 2017 at 20:24
Oct 5, 2017
Opinion: Save the DH Bike?
This is kind of a pointless article. I don't know many people in Saskatchewan that own downhill skis, but lots of them own cross country skis. I live in Calgary, and while COP is a mediocre hill, I have a lift accessed park 5 minutes from my house with an awesome shuttle hill about 30 minutes from me. People who live in Fernie have incredible lift and shuttle areas that they can walk to in 5 minutes as do a lot of people in the Alps, New Zealand, BC, etc. Standing by your opinion that you won't buy a DH bike, and telling the world about it, is akin to me standing by my reasoning not to buy a sea kayak because I live 12 hours from the ocean and me feeling the need to tell the world about it.
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