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cueTIP vernonfelton's article
Oct 10, 2017 at 13:10
Oct 10, 2017
Have Your Say on the Ever-Changing Bike Standards
@ntmjeep: I have to respectfully disagree with you on automotive standards. There are many different bolt patterns, different hub center diameters (hence the reason you need centering rings on aftermarket wheels), and tire sizes are a joke if you consider them standardized. Not only are there wheel diameters currenly on the market in 1" intervals from 15 to 22 inches. Each of these diameters have between 3 and 100 different tire sizes. Yes, some are interchangeable but not most of them. Furthermore, there are dozens of wheel offsets that can't be readily interchanged. Just because some people don't WANT this kind of change to happen doesn't mean it doesn't make economic sense. If the bike manufacturers stop putting out incremental changes they will stop putting out anything new altogether. And of course they play up the benefits. I can't think of a single person that would go buy a new bike if the marketing material said "now, 0.25% better than last model."
cueTIP vernonfelton's article
Oct 6, 2017 at 4:36
Oct 6, 2017
Have Your Say on the Ever-Changing Bike Standards
I'm of a different opinion of a lot of Pinkbike it seems. My father was a senior chassis engineer at an automotive company before he started his own business consulting with aftermarket companies like Tuff Country, Rancho and Pro Comp to build aftermarket suspension systems. When I talk to him about the evolving standards in the bike industry he simply laughs. In his experience and opinion, trying to standardize anything is not only pointless, but also a major limiting factor in performance. In a world where bikes are already perform quite well, there are fewer ways to improve performance within a standardized framework for interchangeable parts. If you are stuck to a certain dimension, there is only so much you can do with materials science, manufacturing processes and design to make your part perform in any way significantly different from those of your competitors. Yes, large companies are setting the pace for the industry. Tough shit, that happens in EVERY industry. Do you think that Ford gives a shit about the needs of the aftermarket? Do you honestly think that Yamaha, BMW, KTM or Honda care that Husky and GasGas have a hard time keeping up with the progression in motorcycles? Many smaller car manufacturers died out through lack of ability to finance rapid product development cycles. My point is, we are reaching the point in bicycle performance where standardization is going to end. Players like SRAM, Shimano and Fox are going to go the route of OEM suppliers to larger bike companies with parts designed to fit specific bikes. I wouldn't be surprised to see large companies like Trek, Giant or Specialized buy up smaller suspension manufacturers like Xfusion or MRP to design and build in-house suspension for base model bikes and have aftermarket companies like SRAM, Ohlins and Fox provide parts for the premium model bikes. I'm sorry to say, but tooling for something like a custom hub spacing is pretty damn easy to do. My dad has a full HAAS machining center in his shop that could make both boost and 135mm hub bodies at the same time using the same tools, it isn't hard. For things like fork lowers and uppers, a permanent metal casting mold is only $10-20,000 on the high end for something like a fork crown, lowers might be closer to $25,000 if the mold needs to split in more than 2 directions to accommodate intricate voids. Still, not crazy.
cueTIP mattwragg's article
Oct 6, 2017 at 3:54
Oct 6, 2017
Opinion: Save the DH Bike?
Same could be said for my $70,000 truck. After 2 years I'd be lucky to get $40,000 for it. Same goes for dirt bikes, street bikes, skis, snowboards...pretty much everything. Why are you so frustrated with changes in technology. I've been riding and building bikes for 17 years (started when I was 14) and I can count on 2 fingers how many times I've actually wanted to upgrade an old frame with a new fork. Having worked in a shop between 2002 and 2008 which many would consider the golden age of bike standards actually being standards, I can tell you that most people are the same way. For every 1 fork we sold, probably 200 complete bikes went out the door, and 90% of the time those were upgrades at time of sale. I sincerely HOPE that bikes continue to evolve at a high rate. I'd hate to buy a bike only to have the same shit on the market when it was time to upgrade. The fact that there are fewer long-standing fitment standards is indicative of any maturing industry. You typically can't share forks between two different model years of the same moto bike, much less take a fork off a KTM and slap it on a Yamaha.
cueTIP mattwragg's article
Oct 5, 2017 at 20:24
Oct 5, 2017
Opinion: Save the DH Bike?
This is kind of a pointless article. I don't know many people in Saskatchewan that own downhill skis, but lots of them own cross country skis. I live in Calgary, and while COP is a mediocre hill, I have a lift accessed park 5 minutes from my house with an awesome shuttle hill about 30 minutes from me. People who live in Fernie have incredible lift and shuttle areas that they can walk to in 5 minutes as do a lot of people in the Alps, New Zealand, BC, etc. Standing by your opinion that you won't buy a DH bike, and telling the world about it, is akin to me standing by my reasoning not to buy a sea kayak because I live 12 hours from the ocean and me feeling the need to tell the world about it.
cueTIP pinkbikeaudience's article
Sep 29, 2017 at 12:42
Sep 29, 2017
GoPro Release Hero6 and Fusion, 360-Degree Spherical Camera
@brunse: Sometimes, but not exclusively. ;)
cueTIP pinkbikeaudience's article
Sep 29, 2017 at 5:03
Sep 29, 2017
GoPro Release Hero6 and Fusion, 360-Degree Spherical Camera
@tricklin: Well, I do for a couple of reasons: A: I get to look at footage I took of my wife, and footage she took of me to figure out what we need to focus on for technical skills. B: We like to relive memories of bike trips and rides we've gone on. Just because nobody wants to see our footage on Pinkbike or YouTube doesn't mean it has no value to us. No need to be judgmental because you don't think the average rider is good enough to need a GoPro.
cueTIP pinkbikeaudience's article
Sep 29, 2017 at 4:58
Sep 29, 2017
GoPro Release Hero6 and Fusion, 360-Degree Spherical Camera
Lots of people do. 360 photos are excellent for people who create virtual walkthroughs for real estate sales. I use 360 video from a roof mounted camera to record lease road conditions in the oil and gas industry. And some of us have VR gear that allows for an easy way to watch 360 videos or stills to virtually revisit places we've been. Honestly, I was skeptical about VR. But with the low cost of the PSVR I dove in to try it and have not been disappointed.
cueTIP mikelevy's article
Sep 24, 2017 at 10:27
Sep 24, 2017
Thule's Tailgate Solution and New MTB Backpacks - Interbike 2017
In western Canada there are tons of these. In fact, of the 10 friends I have that ride. Only 1 of us doesn't have a pickup with a pad.
cueTIP mikelevy's article
Aug 17, 2017 at 7:16
Aug 17, 2017
Is This Linkage Fork the Future of Suspension? - Crankworx Whistler 2017
@sq225917: I'm not saying it will be any better than current designs. I'm just saying that there is a chance this might be a good idea. Some people are forward thinkers, others are sheep. Forward thinkers are often wrong, but at least they try something. If everyone was like you, we'd still be waiting for random lightning strikes to start our fires for us.
cueTIP mikelevy's article
Aug 16, 2017 at 13:35
Aug 16, 2017
Is This Linkage Fork the Future of Suspension? - Crankworx Whistler 2017
@sq225917: Ever stop to think that the reason there are no linkage forks in MX is because the linkage needs to be similar to this one to work effectively? If we're going to look at absurd comparisons to MX bikes let's go a little further. Why do we bother with more complex rear suspension designs when all motocross bikes are either linkage driven single pivots or direct-mount single pivots? Why do we not see water bottle mounts inside the frames of dirtbikes? Why don't mountain bikes have ultra wide rear tires when compared to front tires? Why do we bother with handlebar shifters when clearly foot shifters are more effective in MX? What I'm getting at is that you clearly aren't thinking things through to their logical conclusion. Yes, dirt bikes are the motorized cousin to mountain bikes. But there is enough different about them that direct comparison is silly. Also, one linkage is not equivalent to another and to suggest that "any old linkage" should be considered shows an obvious lack of understanding in basic engineering principles.
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